Communication Is Crucial When You’re Working on Top of the Village Hall

Lincolnshire Village Hall houses city offices and a police station. The structure’s roof and gutter systems were recently replaced by All American Exterior Solutions. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The Lincolnshire Village Hall, located in Lincolnshire, Illinois, houses city departments and the offices of elected officials, as well as the Lincolnshire Police Station. When its natural cedar shake roof and inlaid gutter system began to fail, city officials looked for a solution that would provide the desired aesthetics but last longer and require less maintenance.

Dale Pole of All American Exterior Solutions, a full-service union roofing contractor headquartered in Lake Zurich, Illinois, thought he had the answer. Pole, a 32-year industry veteran who is now the company’s vice president of operations, dropped off samples of a synthetic shake roofing tile manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes and asked if city officials wanted to give it a try.

All American was awarded the job in 2016. The scope of work consisted of a complete re-roof of the complex, including the steep-slope roof system on the hall and tower. The project also included five sections of flat roofing and replacement of the copper gutter system. The job was complex, but All American was up to the challenge. The company worked in conjunction with Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, located in McHenry, Illinois.

The Steep-Slope System

The building’s signature feature is the observatory tower over the main entrance, which extends approximately 45 feet in the air. The main roof features a pitch change at the rear of the building, where the roof goes from 4:12 to 12:12. All

The complex is located right next to a large pond and bordered by mature trees, so the jobsite limited access to sections of the roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

American installed approximately 23,000 square feet of the DaVinci product, Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, a blend of four colors. The company also fabricated the new gutter system out of 20-ounce lead-coated copper with soldered seams. Approximately 600 feet of new gutters were installed.

Work began in late spring, and the 23-year-old existing roof was torn off in sections. GAF Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield was applied as a leak barrier, followed by Proof Synthetic Underlayment from ABC Supply. “We couldn’t install the tiles until the inlaid gutter was in place, so we used a synthetic underlayment to keep everything watertight during the tear-off process,” says Pole.

Gutters were installed in an 8-inch-by-8-inch trough. “There was a course or two of the DaVinci, and then the inlaid gutters were set into the roof, and the roof starts again,” notes Pole. “The trough area was also layered with ice and water shield before the copper gutters were put in.”

Transitions and flashings were also made of copper. “Everything on this job was 20-ounce lead-coated copper,” notes Pole. “All of the valleys, transition flashing, and the gutters were all lead-coated copper.”

The DaVinci synthetic shake tiles were easy to install, according to Pole. “They are nailed in place,” he says. “You can use stainless steel nails or hot-dip galvanized nails. In this case, we used 1-1/2-inch stainless steel ring shank nails.”

Low-Slope Areas

The low-slope roofs were covered with a GAF two-ply modified bitumen system. Michael McCory, project manager, headed up the crews on the five low-slope sections, which totaled approximately 2,700 square feet.

The observatory tower over the main entrance features a walk-out area with a modified bitumen roof system. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The low-slope sections had different substrates. Two balconies had concrete decks, while two canopies and an area over the garage had wooden decks. Some of the flat roofs had paver systems, which had to be removed and replaced after the new system was installed.

Half-inch DensDeck Prime cover board from Georgia-Pacific was installed over the wood and concrete decks. The GAF mod bit system consisted of a Ruberoid 20 base sheet and Ruberoid Granular FR cap sheet in white. “It was applied in a cold-process adhesive,” says McCory. “No torches were used. A manufacturer’s inspection was part of the process for a 20-year warranty.”

The upper level of the tower features a small walk-out balcony. “That was probably the most difficult area,” notes McCory. “It was covered with pavers and difficult to reach. We had to remove the pavers and store them in the stairwell during the installation.”

A Challenging Jobsite

Logistics at the jobsite posed a few problems. “The hardest part was the observatory tower by the front entry,” Pole recalls, noting an 80-foot man lift was used to remove the existing cedar and install the synthetic shake. “On the tower, it was all lift work. For other parts of the project, workers on both the steep-slope and the low-slope portions of the roof were tied off at all times.”

Crews installed 23,000 square feet of Bellaforte Shake by DaVinci Roofscapes on the building’s main roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The building is bordered by mature trees and a large pond, limiting roof access. “On the west side of the structure, the pond comes right up against the building,” Pole says. “We had to use a lift that could stretch over that pond to get that end of the roof.”

An Equipter mechanized debris hauler was used to get around narrow grassy areas near the building. “We used an Equipter, which is like a gas-powered, mobile dumpster, to drive around the building and enter the courtyard for our debris,” Pole says. “We have two of those pieces of equipment, which we use on a lot of our jobs to get the shingles out. They don’t damage lawns and help protect the landscaping.”

The building was occupied during the installation, so care had to be taken to ensure business was not disrupted and passers-by would be safe. “The village offices were open for business while we were working, and the police station was open as well,” notes McCory. “The tower and front entryway had to be completed on the weekend, as that was the only walkway for the public to get in.”

The police station had several doors, so crews had to coordinate with officers while replacing the roof on that section and let them know where they were setting up the crane. The courtyard area was also restricted at times.

“We obviously had to keep everything neat and organized and make sure we cleaned up every day to make sure nothing would bother the people working in the building and the residents who came in to the village hall to get permits or whatever the case may be,” McCory says. “You don’t want police cars getting flat tires.”

Communication is the key to meeting customers’ needs, especially with an occupied building. “Whoever the building owner is, I give him my cell number and make sure I have his,” Pole notes. “I try to stay in contact with them and let them know if anything is changing. I ask them if they have any questions or issues, or if their schedule is changing. On this project, they said it was like we were never even there, and that’s what we like to hear.”

Feedback from the city has been positive, according to Pole. “They are very happy with it,” he says. “The system has the look they wanted. It looks like shake, they had a lot of colors to choose from, and they won’t have the maintenance issues that they did with the cedar. And it will last a lot longer. They will save a whole roof replacement phase in the life of the DaVinci product.”

Pole believes his company’s diverse portfolio gives it an edge. “We’re one of very few union companies that have their own shinglers, flat roofing crews, and sheet metal workers in house. We also do waterproofing, metal wall panels and insulation,” he says.

“This project shows our strength — we can do it all.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com
Roof Consultant: Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, McHenry, Illinois, www.irca.com

MATERIALS

Steep-Slope Roof System
Synthetic Shake: Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.DaVinciRoofscapes.com
Underlayment: Proof Synthetic Underlayment, ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.ABCsupply.com
Leak Barrier: Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield, GAF, www.GAF.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Base Sheet: Ruberoid 20, GAF
Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet: Ruberoid Granular FR, GAF
Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.DensDeck.com

Working From Home

After more than three decades working in an office setting, I recently joined the ranks of the people working from home. The situation has its obvious advantages — my commute time has been cut down to less than a minute — but I must admit I’m still getting used to it.

There are a few problems I’ve encountered in my home office that I didn’t have to cope with before. The other day our cat, Boo, ran across my keyboard and renamed a file “;;;;////.” Luckily it jumped to the top of the folder I was working in, or I’d probably still be looking for it. I’ve gotten better at timing the delivery of a Kong toy stuffed with peanut butter to keep our dog, Josie, from barking during phone interviews, but it still sometimes happens, especially when packages are delivered on our block.

Working from home and working in an office have their challenges, but I realize how lucky I am. Every week I talk to people who work at the top of buildings large and small, making the roof of a commercial building or a home their temporary office. I’ve learned each jobsite has its own obstacles and its own set of risks. Each project also has its own rewards.

This issue puts the spotlight on hospitality and entertainment projects, and as a sports fan it was a thrill to cover stories about new construction projects including the PVC roof installation atop U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, and MB Arena in Chicago, the practice home of the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks, which sports a TPO roof and two garden roof systems.

This issue also explores the roof renovation that took place at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, known as “The Q.” The project was completed during the Cavaliers’ historic NBA World Championship run and while the Cleveland Indians were hosting the World Series right next door at Progressive Field.

Working from home has its small hurdles, but making sure the jobsite looks pristine when viewed from a blimp is not one of them.

That was the case in Cleveland, where crew members worked on their hands and knees to restore the roof under the giant LED sign at The Q before the World Series. It was also the case in Chicago, where Willie Hedrick of All American Exterior Solutions in Lake Zurich, Illinois, was proud to see his work on display during aerial views televised during the Stanley Cup playoffs. “When the Blackhawks went to the Stanley Cup championship and the blimp was hovering over the arena, I could see a couple of my projects on TV,” he noted. “It reminded me of all the time, effort, attention to detail, and collaborative hard work that it took to produce the final product.”

Remind me never to complain about my cat ever again.

New NHL Practice Facility and Community Center Sports Vegetative Roof

The American Hydrotech Extensive Garden Roof Assembly was installed on two sections of the roof. The system was topped with pre-grown mats featuring mature sedum plants. Photo: American Hydrotech Inc.

The Chicago Blackhawks have captured the hearts of the city of Chicago along with three Stanley Cups in the last decade. The Blackhawks routinely lead the league in attendance at the United Center, and fans were excited when the team announced it would build a new 125,000-square-foot training facility and community center in downtown Chicago.

Completed earlier this year, the MB Arena features two NHL-sized ice rinks and other amenities including a fitness center, dining options, and spaces that can be rented for outings and events. The facility is the practice site for the Blackhawks and also hosts youth hockey, adult hockey leagues and public skating.

When plans for the project were unveiled, architects and planners mandated the facility meet or exceed all green and sustainable standards for the city. Chicago has been a leader in promoting vegetative roofs to help control storm water runoff, and this new construction project was no exception. The arena includes the construction of 24,000 square feet of green roof systems to complement the structure’s 68,000-square-foot main roof. A 60-mil TPO system manufactured by Carlilse SynTec was specified for the upper roof assembly, and plans called for an American Hydrotech Extensive Garden Roof Assembly to be placed on two lower sections of the roof.

The Garden Roof Assembly

Architect HOK worked with American Hydrotech during the design stage to select roofing components and plants that were optimized for the climate conditions and the building’s structural limitations.

According to Dennis Yanez, national marketing manager, American Hydrotech, and Kevin Serena, garden roofing technical sales coordinator for the central region, the structure’s metal deck necessitated a lightweight system.

The 125,000-square-foot facility 24,000 square feet of green roof systems that complement the structure’s 68,000-square-foot main roof. Photo: Chicago Blackhawks.

“Our 4-inch extensive garden roof system was ideal for this project,” says Yanez. “Since part of this project had a metal deck, there are more structural capacity concerns than with a concrete deck, so we were able to put together a lightweight, built-in-place system.”

The assembly consists of a hot-applied rubberized asphalt membrane, MM6125, which is applied to the roofing substrate to form a monolithic coating. It is topped with a root barrier and Dow Styrofoam insulation. The system also incorporates Hydrotech’s Gardendrain GR15, a molded polyethylene panel designed to retain water, filter fabric, lightweight growing media, and mature plants.

The plants are installed in the form of the InstaGreen Sedum Carpet, a pre-grown mat that comes in 25-square-foot rolls. It contains between nine and 15 different types of sedum and provides instant coverage when it is installed.

Key benefits of the system include reducing the urban heat island effect, purifying the air, and limiting storm water runoff, notes Yanez. “The Extensive Garden Roof Assembly is able to capture more than 1.5 inches of water on the roof, which plays a major role in storm water management,” he says.

The system also protects the membrane from ultraviolet (UV) degradation and damage from wind-blown debris. “Most importantly, for us, a garden roof is just another version of a PMR, or protected membrane roofing,” says Yanez. “Because the membrane is always in a PMR application, with Dow insulation over it, whatever ballast — whether it’s gravel ballast, or architectural pavers, or the garden roof assembly — is in place makes it literally impossible for the membrane to get damaged. It also mitigates the climate swings, keeping the membrane at a more constant temperature year-round.”

This system has a proven track record, according to Yanez. “We’ve been doing this going back 50 years on parking decks under regular topsoil, where weight wasn’t a concern,” he points out. “This is just a more modern version of that, but we’re putting it on the 4th, or the 14th, or the 99th floor.”

The Roofing Installation

All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, is an approved applicator for both key manufacturers. The union contractor installed the Carlisle TPO system on the building’s main roof and the Hydrotech green roofs on the two lower roof levels.

Willie Hedrick, division manager at All American Exterior Solutions, notes that the TPO roof was installed first. “The deck was acoustic, so first we had to lay strips insulation in the flutes over the entire main roof,” he says.

The lightweight growth media was lifted to the roof in 2-yard totes. Photo: Christy Webber Landscapes.

Areas that housed mechanical equipment were reinforced with two layers of 5/8-inch DensDeck from Georgia-Pacific. Two layers of 2.6-inch insulation were then installed, followed by the 60-mil TPO, which was mechanically attached using the RhinoBond system from OMG Roofing Products. The attachment system uses induction welding technology to attach the membrane to the fasteners and plates that secure the insulation — without penetrating the membrane.

The main roof was originally designed as fully adhered system, but work began in January, and the temperature constraints ruled out some adhesives. “Once we made the switch to RhinoBond, we were able to install the membrane even though we did it during the winter,” Hedrick says.

Most of the TPO roof was surrounded by high parapet walls, and in other areas the safety perimeters were marked with flags. “At a few points at the highest points of the main roof we had to put up some the flags, and if you were outside of the flags you had to be tied off,” notes Hedrick. “The mid-roofs had short parapet walls, and on those roofs, we set up flags and had 100 percent fall protection outside the safety perimeter. For the lower green roof, we put guardrails up on the parapet to eliminate the fall hazard.”

The Garden Roofs

After the TPO sections were installed, work began on the extensive garden roof assemblies. The mid-roof had a metal deck, so the first step was to screw down 5/8-inch USG Securock cover board and strip in the seams. “At that point, we installed the liquid-applied membrane and the protection board,” Hedrick says.

The second green roof was installed over a concrete deck, so the application was a bit different. The membrane was applied directly to the concrete. A late change was made in the configuration of the lower green roof to take advantage of the space. “The owner decided to add a terrace to the lower green roof so people could walk out and see the roof and views of the city,” Hedrick recalls.

Before the growing media and plants were added, electronic field vector mapping (EFVM) was conducted by International Leak Detection to determine if there were any voids in the membrane. “You’ve got to confirm everything is 100 percent watertight before we start setting the components down,” Hedrick says. “We usually do the test and start putting the components down the next day to minimize exposure. The subcontractor we worked with to do the landscaping, Christy Webber, performed well. Since some of the components are loose laid, we worked with them to put down enough soil to hold everything in place. We worked hand-in-hand getting the all of the components and soil in.”

The Landscape Work

Jim Waldschmidt, project manager for Christy Webber Landscapes, Chicago, oversaw the installation of the lightweight growing media and sedum mats on the roof. Christy Webber is a full-service union landscaping company, and Waldschmidt notes that roofing work is a small but growing share of the company’s business. “We work with a few different commercial roofers,” he says. “This year we’ve done maybe 10 commercial projects.”

After the growing media was evenly spread out, the sedum mats were laid into place by crews from Christy Webber Landscapes. Photo: Christy Webber Landscapes.

Logistics at the site made for an easy delivery and setup — an unusual situation in downtown Chicago. “We were able to deliver the soil almost a week before we were scheduled to go out there, so we had everything on site and knew we wouldn’t have to worry about waiting,” Waldschmidt notes. “We just had to bring in a crane and lift up the soil bags. We had a pretty easy installation compared to other green roofs we’ve done.”

Growing media was lifted to the roof in 2-yard tote bags, which were cut open to disperse the contents. Three days after the growing media was in place, Christy Webber crews returned to install the sedum mats. “The sedum mats are delivered on pallets almost like the way a roll of sod would be delivered,” says Waldschmidt. “We just had to set the pallets on the roof, pull off the sedum mats and unroll them.”

A temporary irrigation system was set up to help the plants get established in the hot July temperatures. “Everything looks great now,” Waldschmidt says. “All of the sedum up there is thriving.”

Growth Sector

In this high-profile project, with a high-profile owner, making sure the system was error-free was critical, notes Serena. “Chicago is definitely the leader in vegetative roofs, and has been for more than 10 years,” he says. “This is another prime example. There was never a question whether this building would have a green roof on it. It’s a credit to Chicago, and it is a credit to the Chicago Blackhawks.”

Hedrick is proud to be part of the green roof movement. “I like the challenge, and I like the diversity,” he says. “When the Blackhawks went to the Stanley Cup championship and the blimp was hovering over the arena, I could see a couple of my projects on TV. It reminded me of all the time, effort, attention to detail, and collaborative hard work that it took to produce the final product. We’re turning typically unusable roof areas into useful space for amenities.”

The key driver of green roofs is storm water management, notes Yanez, but turning rooftops into useful space is another key benefit. “We’re seeing more and more city incentives for storm water management,” he says. “In urban areas, people are also taking advantage of existing space with green roofs. It’s a growing industry — pun intended.”

TEAM

Architect: HOK, Chicago, www.HOK.com
General Contractor: James McHugh Construction, Chicago, www.McHughConstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.AAEXS.com
Landscape Contractor: Christy Webber Landscapes, Chicago, www.ChristyWebber.com

MATERIALS

Garden Roof System:
Cover Board: Securock Gypsum-Fiber Roof Board, USG, www.USG.com
Membrane: MM6125 hot rubberized asphalt membrane, American Hydrotech Inc., www.HydrotechUSA.com
Protection Sheet: Hydroflex 30, American Hydrotech Inc.
Root Barrier: Root Stop, American Hydrotech Inc.
Insulation: DOW Styrofoam, DOW Chemical, www.Dow.com
Drain Board: Gardendrain GR15, American Hydrotech Inc.
Filter Fabric: System Filter fabric, American Hydrotech Inc.
Growing Media: LiteTop Engineered Growing Media, American Hydrotech Inc.
Plants: InstaGreen Sedum Carpet, American Hydrotech Inc.

TPO Roof System:
Membrane: 60-mil TPO, Carlisle SynTec, www.CarlisleSyntec.com
Cover Board: DenDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.BuildGP.com
Attachment System: RhinoBond, OMG Roofing Products, www.OMGroofing.com

Roof Restoration Project Brings Back Luster to Quicken Loans Arena

The 170,000-square-foot roof of Quicken Loans Arena was completely restored using a liquid-applied system from Tremco Roofing. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

Re-roofing sports and entertainment venues presents its own set of challenges. Sports arenas usually host concerts and other events, so scheduling and logistics can be difficult. Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland — also known as “The Q” — is home to the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA, and it hosts some 200 other diverse events every year, including concerts and conventions. In 2015, realizing the roof was reaching the end of its useful life, the owners looked for advice on their next move. A team of roofing professionals recommended a roof restoration system that would provide the protection and recreate the aesthetics of the original roof — and keep disruption to the facility at a minimum.

Ohio companies stepping up to help the home team included architect Osborn Engineering, headquartered in Cleveland; roof consultant Adam Bradley Enterprises of Chagrin Falls; roofing manufacturer Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance, headquartered in Beachwood; and roofing contractor Warren Roofing & Insulating Co., located in Walton Hills. After comprehensive testing revealed that more than 90 percent of the roof could be restored, they developed a plan to clean, repair and completely restore the 170,000-square-foot main roof of Quicken Loans Arena using a liquid-applied system from Tremco Roofing.

John Vetrovsky of Warren Roofing and Joe Slattery of Tremco Roofing shared their insights on the project with Roofing magazine. Both men were brought in during the planning stages of the project and saw it through to completion. “We were helping to budget the project with Adam Bradley and Osborn Engineering,” notes Vetrovsky. “They were asking about a few different systems, and the Tremco system was the best fit for the project.”

Warren Roofing has served the greater Cleveland and Akron area since 1922, and Tremco’s roots in northeast Ohio go back to 1928. Warren Roofing served as the general contractor and roofing contractor on the project. The scope of work included updates to the lightning protection system, the safety cable system, and the heat trace system used to melt snow in the gutters.

Repairing the Existing Roof

The existing system was the structure’s original roof. It was 24 years old, and consisted of a mechanically attached hypalon membrane over two layers of polyisocyanurate insulation totaling 3 inches. The roof membrane was showing some wear, and sections had sustained damage from an interesting source: fireworks from nearby Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians, launched after the Indians hit home runs. After the damage was detected, the team changed the direction the fireworks were launched, and the problem ended.

Crews from Tremco Roofing cleaned the roof using the company’s RoofTec system, which recaptures the water and returns it to a truck to be filtered. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

Despite the damage, visual analysis and a nuclear roof moisture test using a Troxler meter confirmed the roof was an excellent candidate for restoration. “There was some wet insulation and warped insulation, and we marked off those areas that had to be replaced,” notes Slattery. “It was a small fraction of the total job.”

Crews from Warren Roofing removed and replaced the damaged insulation, cutting through the membrane all the way down to the existing 6-mil vapor barrier on the deck. “All of that insulation had to be stair-stepped back so we could properly lap in the new material,” Vetrovsky says. “We got rid of all of the damaged insulation, and we repaired the vapor barrier. Then we staggered the two new layers of insulation, matching the existing thickness.”

Where possible, the existing membrane was pulled back and glued into place. In sections where new membrane was needed, crews adhered pieces of EPDM.

The plan specified adding the fasteners in the existing roof and any repaired sections before the coating system was applied. Tremco Roofing conducted uplift testing through Trinity ERD to ensure the results met or exceeded the specified design. “There was a significant upgrade to the fastening,” Vetrovsky says. “Because of the shape of the building, the perimeter enhancement was probably the greatest I’ve ever seen.”

Screws and 3-inch plates were used. In the field, the minimum was 4 feet on center, 12 inches apart. In the perimeter, fasteners were installed 2 feet on center, 8 inches apart. “It worked out nicely because the fastening ended up in the middle of the sheet, and now the sheet has fasteners that are original at the seam, and a foot or two over, there is a row of new fasteners,” notes Vetrovsky.

Cleaning Up

Prior to the fasteners being installed, the membrane was cleaned by crews from Tremco Roofing using the company’s RoofTec system. “We cleaned the membrane no more than 30 days ahead of what Warren Roofing was doing,” notes Slattery. “We had to mobilize at least three times to clean the roof so the time elapsed would never be more than 30 days.”

The three-step restoration process consists of a primer, a base coat with a fiberglass mat embedded in it, and a topcoat. Here, crews embed the fiberglass mat in the base coat. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

The cleaning solution is applied using a custom-designed tool that looks like a floor polisher. It has a 2-foot diameter head that spins to clean the surface and a vacuum that recaptures the water, which is returned via hoses to a truck so contaminated waste water, environmental pollutants and high-pH cleaning solvents can be filtered out. “All of that water goes back into the sanitary system after it’s filtered,” Slattery explains. “It does not go into the sewer system.”

“It’s very fast, it’s very effective, and it’s very efficient because you can easily see the areas that have been cleaned,” notes Vetrovsky. “With power washing, you don’t have any way to filter the water.”

The biggest challenge on the cleaning portion of the project was the arena’s sheer size. Approximately 500 feet of hoses were needed to supply water and return it to the truck for filtering.

Cleaning of the substrate is a crucial step, according to Vetrovsky. “The system really does a nice job cleaning the membrane, and that is the key to any restoration project,” he says. “You’re only as good as the surface you’re applying it to.”

Applying the New Roof System

After the sections were cleaned, crews installed the liquid-applied AlphaGuard MT system. The three-step process consists of a primer, a base coat with a fiberglass mat embedded in it, and a topcoat. In this case, the primer was applied with rollers. “The area that we primed each morning was the section we would apply the first coat of AlphaGuard MT with the fiberglass mat that afternoon,” Vetrovsky says. “We did not prime ahead. We didn’t want to take the chance of dust adhering to the primer.”

The top coat was applied with both rollers and spray equipment. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

Care had to be taken with the schedule to complete the work efficiently. “Once the base coat is on, you have 72 hours to apply the top coat,” Vetrovsky explains. “We would install the base coat and the fiberglass mat for two to three days to get a big enough area. The topcoat would go on faster because you’re not embedding any mesh into it. You really had to always keep an eye on the future weather to make sure you could get the topcoat on within the 72 hours.”

The topcoat was applied with both rollers and spray equipment. After the topcoat was applied, crews installed a second coat with sand embedded in it as a wear surface. Because of the roof’s curved surface, walk pads were not feasible, so the sand was used to provide additional traction for any workers conducting ongoing maintenance.

The sand was broadcast by hand and back-rolled into the coating to maintain a uniform appearance. “Part of this project was to make sure the sand looks uniform when it is visible from a blimp overhead,” notes Vetrovsky. “That was a difficult task, but the guys did a great job.”

The roof features three different finish colors, which were custom designed to match the roof’s original color scheme. The main roof is light gray, with black under the large LED sign. The sections over the wings are white, as are the 2-foot-wide stripes.

“They wanted black under the new LED sign so it would really show the letters nice and clear, even during the day,” says Vetrovsky. “We also put the white stripes back to match the roof’s original appearance. That was a challenge, to keep everything straight. It’s hard to chalk lines on a curve, but it came out nice. Everything matches what the original roof looks like.”

Penetrations for the sign included round posts that held the rails about 2-1/2 feet above the roof level. The liquid-applied membrane made coping with details easy, according to Vetrovsky. “The liquid membrane makes the flashing details all one piece with the roof system,” he says. “We removed the existing boot flashings so that we could seal directly to the conduit or steel posts.”

Gutters, Lightning Protection and Safety Systems

The large commercial gutters also needed to be refurbished. The gutters were 4 feet deep and 4 feet wide, and were outfitted with a cable snowmelt system, which had to be removed. “The gutters had a lot of damaged insulation, so material in the gutter sections was 100 percent torn off,” notes Vetrovsky.

After the roof surface was cleaned, the restoration system was applied. The three step process consists of a primer, a base coat with a fiberglass mat embedded in it, and a topcoat. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

In the gutters, tapered insulation was installed, and a cover board — DensDeck from Georgia-Pacific — was added for increased durability. New EPDM membrane was installed and cleaned prior to the three-step coating application. New heat trace cable was also installed.

The lightning protection system also required repair, and close coordination with the subcontractors was critical. “The existing lightning protection had to be removed to apply the new roof system, but we couldn’t remove it 100 percent, because we still had to have an active lightning protection system for the building,” says Vetrovsky. “We rearranged the lightning system and installed new stanchions to try to eliminate as many horizontal lines as we could.”

During construction, key to the safety plan was a perimeter barrier system, which was installed by workers who were 100 percent tied off. After the system was in place, workers inside the barricades did not need to wear personal fall arrest systems. “The entire perimeter had a barricade system put on before any material was even loaded,” Vetrovsky says. The company makes its own barricade sections, which are anchored to the parapet walls and gravel stop edges and feature a downward leg for added support.

As part of the project, crews also installed permanent safety equipment. “There was an existing tie-off system out there, but it was not a certified system and we couldn’t use it,” Vetrovsky says. “We brought that to the owner’s attention and replaced it with a new certified tie-off system manufactured by Guardian Safety.”

Challenging Schedule

Progressive Field and the Quicken Loans Arena are right next to each other, and logistics and scheduling around the stadiums was difficult. Work began in 2016 and finished in 2017, and the demanding schedule was made even more difficult when both the Indians and the Cavaliers made deep runs into the playoffs. In 2016, the Cavs became NBA Champions. But it was the Indians making it to the 2016 World Series that posed bigger logistical problems for the re-roofing project.

The restored roof recreates the original color scheme, which features three different custom colors. The main roof is light gray, with black under the large LED sign, while the sections over the wings stripes are white. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

“The first part of the schedule was the most difficult, as we had the get the black coating on the roof under the sign prior to the playoffs,” Vetrovsky says. The sign covered approximately 30,000 square feet of roof area, and it was difficult to access the roof surface beneath it. “Crews had to work on their hands and knees to apply the coating beneath the steel framing. That was towards the fall, when the weather started changing, and one of the biggest hurdles was just getting the roof dry in the morning. It got colder and colder as we got down to the wire, but we made our deadline for the work under the sign.”

The staging area was also limited, and the crane could only lift material to one section of the roof. Some material had to be moved by hand some 2,000 feet. “It was an awfully long walk from one end of that roof to the other,” Vetrovsky recalls.

Concerts and other events held during the construction cycle made the schedule even more challenging. “The most notable event was probably the Republican National Convention, which totally shut the site down for more than a week because of security,” notes Slattery.

Concerts usually necessitated loading in the early morning and clearing the staging area by 8 a.m., but usually work could continue during the day. “We had to do a lot of coordination to make sure we had what we needed to work the entire day and also not go against our commitment to the owner that we would not work past certain hours,” Vetrovsky says. “Many of the special events started after 7 p.m., so we would be long gone by then.”

Championship Caliber

The project was wrapped up earlier this year. Vetrovsky and Slattery agree that the system chosen was a great fit for this project for several reasons. With restoration, there is less noise, less disruption, and less equipment than with a re-roofing project, and the roof has a warranty for the next 20 years. The process also limits negative impact on the environment by preventing removal and disposal of the old roof system.

“The weight was also a factor,” notes Vetrovsky. “With the existing structure, there wasn’t a lot of room for a different type of roof system with heavy cover boards. This roof system was perfect because it doesn’t add a lot of weight.”

The coating also minimized installation time, notes Slattery. “The disruption of a roof replacement in a hospitality setting like that, where they need 250 days of revenue stream, restoration becomes a real attractive option,” he says. “I can’t think of one day where we really disrupted anything.”

Vetrovsky points to his talented crews as the key to meeting tough schedules with top-quality production “What we can offer is skilled labor,” he says. “We’re a union contractor and our guys are well trained. The harder, the better for us. We can handle projects that most other contractors won’t even put a number to — this project being one of those.”

He credits Adam Livingston, a third-generation foreman for Warren Roofing, for his work on the project.  “With his experience and attention to detail, we were able to complete this project on time, meet the expectations of the client and Tremco, and match the unique aesthetic requirements of the roof,” says Vetrovsky. “We have a lot of great employees who take pride in their work. Take all of that together, that’s why we can be successful on projects like the Quicken Loans Arena.”

The Cavaliers taking the NBA Championship during the project only added to the excitement. “It’s a great feather in our cap,” notes Slattery. “Restoration is a growing segment of the market. Instead of letting the clock run out on these roofs, if you catch them at the right time, it can be a phenomenal way to keep costs down and it’s good for the environment because it’s not adding waste to landfills.” 

TEAM

Architect: Osborn Engineering, Cleveland, Ohio, www.osborn-eng.com
Roof Consultant: Adam Bradley Enterprises, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, www.adambradleyinc.com
General Contractor: Warren Roofing & Insulating Co., Walton Hills, Ohio, www.warrenroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Cleaning System: RoofTec, Tremco Roofing, www.tremcoroofing.com
Roof Restoration System: AlphaGuard MT, Tremco Roofing

Tecta America Adds to Leadership Team

Tecta America announced that Rylee Miller has been named the President of JB Roofing, A Tecta America Company, LLC, with locations in Tiffin and Columbus, Ohio. Miller has been in the construction industry since 2002, and joined JB Roofing in 2012. According to the company, he has a strong background in project management with a degree in construction management from the University of Cincinnati.

“Rylee and his terrific team have already proven themselves since they have been at Tecta and we look forward to continued success under Rylee’s leadership,” said Mark Santacrose, President and CEO of Tecta America Corporation.

For more information, visit http://www.tectaamerica.com.

 

Metal Roof and Wall Panels Capture the Spirit of Shakespearean Theater

The Otto M. Budig Theater is the home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. The new theater was designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp

For many new arenas and theaters, the sheer size and scope of the project can pose the biggest hurdles. At the new Otto M. Budig Theater, home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the problem was the reverse. The intimate theater was shoehorned into an existing space up against an adjacent building, so logistics were tight. But that didn’t mean the roof system couldn’t be striking. Designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati, the building’s exterior features daring angles and multi-colored metal roof and wall panels that combine to help capture the spirit of the Shakespearean theater.

Matt Gennett, senior project manager and vice president of Tecta America Zero Company in Cincinnati, oversaw the roofing portion of the new construction project in the Over the Rhine section of Cincinnati on the corner of Elm Street and 12th Street. “This building was plugged in downtown, and they fit everything in real tight,” he says.

Approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch, 24-gauge Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. were installed on the metal roofs and walls. Tecta America Zero Company installed the metal roof systems, as well as a TPO roof manufactured by Carlisle SynTec over the main structure and mechanical well. Work began in January of 2017 and the roofing portion of the project was wrapped up in late August.

The Metal Roof System

The building features two different metal roof systems. The roof on the Elm Street side is comprised of three intersecting triangle-shaped sections in two colors, Champagne Metallic and Custom Metallic Bronze. “There were several unique angles on the roof,” Gennett explains. “On the top, there was a second metal roof, a shed roof that went down to the 12th Street side.”

The theater’s roof and walls feature approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. in two colors. The wall panels are perforated. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The metal roof systems were installed over a 2-inch layer of polyisocyanurate insulation and a 2-1/2-inch nail base from Hunter Panels, H-Shield NB. The nail base is a composite panel with a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam core, a fiber-reinforced facer on one side and, in this case, 7⁄16-inch oriented strand board (OSB) on the other. The nail base was topped with Carlisle WIP 300 HT waterproofing underlayment to dry in the roof.

Crews also installed two rows of snow guards on the metal roof using the S-5! CorruBracket. “The snow guard was a little different,” Gennett says. “It was specifically designed for a corrugated roof.”

The TPO Roof System

The main roof and mechanical well were covered with the TPO roof system, which totaled approximately 8,300 square feet. After Carlisle VapAir Seal725 TR self-adhering air and vapor barrier was applied to the metal deck, crews installed two layers of 2-inch iso. Tapered insulation was applied over the top to ensure proper drainage. The insulation was covered with a 1/2-inch sheetrock and the 60-mil TPO was fully adhered.

Two large smoke hatches manufactured by Bilco were installed over the stage area. The ACDSH smoke hatches measured 66 inches by 144 inches, and are designed for theaters, concert halls and other interior applications that require limiting noise intrusion.

The Installation

The initial focus was to get the roof dried in so work could progress inside the building. The jobsite conditions posed a few challenges. The structure abutted an existing building, and the space was tight. The schedule necessitated multiple trips to the site, which can be a budget-buster on a small project. “We had a lot of trips in and out to accommodate the schedule and get everything dried in so they could meet the interior schedule,” notes Gennett. “We were sort of on call. We made three or four trips out to roof this small project, so it took a lot of coordination because it was completed in pieces.”

Crews tackled the TPO roof sections first. The mechanical well section provided several challenges. Changes in the mechanical well layout necessitated moving some curbs and making adjustments to the tapered insulation. “They were trying to get lot of equipment into a small space,” Gennett explains. “We had to make sure we could get the water to the low spots and route it around all of that equipment. That was probably the biggest challenge on the project.”

Staging material was also problematic, as traffic was heavy and parking space was at a premium. Material was loaded by a crane, which had to be set up in the street. “It’s a postage stamp of a site,” says Gennett. “This is a main thoroughfare, and there is a school right across the street. We had to work around school hours, and we couldn’t be working when the busses were coming in. We usually came in after school started, around 8 a.m., to load materials.”

When it came time to load the metal panels, the cramped jobsite actually paid off. “It was very convenient,” Gennett recalls. “We were able to load the panels onto the adjacent roof and just hand them over. We had a nice staging area for cutting, so all in all it wasn’t bad.”

The corrugated panels were installed with matching edge metal. “It’s not a complicated panel to install, and they look really nice,” Gennett notes. “On the Elm Street side, to the right of the valley was one color, and to the left was another, so we had to match the color with our coping. There were some interesting transitions with our metal. We also had to really pay attention to how the siding was being installed so we could match the metal to the siding and follow the transitions from color to color.”

The perforated wall panels were installed by ProCLAD Inc. of Noblesville, Indiana. “Once the walls were done, we came in and did the transition metal,” Gennett says. “We just had to make sure everything lined up perfectly.”

Planning Ahead

Ensuring a safe jobsite was the top priority for Tecta America Zero and Messer Construction, the general contractor on the project. “Both Messer Construction and Tecta America take safety very seriously. That’s why we’re good partners,” Gennett says. “We had PPE, high-visibility clothing, hard hats, safety glasses for the whole project. All of the guys were required to have their OSHA 10. Anyone outside of the safety barriers had to be tied off 100 percent of the time.”

Planning ahead was the key to establishing the safety plan and meeting the schedule while ensuring a top-quality installation. “This job had a lot of in and out, which is tough in the roofing business,” Gennett says. “But we planned ahead, we made sure everything was ready for us when we mobilized, and we did a good job of coordinating with the other trades. It took a lot of meetings and discussions — just good project management.”

Gennett credits the successful installation to a great team effort between everyone involved, including the general contractor, the subcontractors, and the manufacturers. “We pride ourselves on our great, skilled crews and our great field project management,” he says. “Our superintendents are there every day checking the work and making sure the guys have everything they need. Messer Construction is great to work with, and obviously having the manufacturer involved the project and doing their inspections as well helps ensure the quality meets everyone’s standards and holds the warranty.”

The theater is now another exciting venue in the Over the Rhine neighborhood. “It is really cool spot,” Gennett says. “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood that’s grown in leaps and bounds in the last seven years. There is a ton going on in Cincinnati. It’s just another part of the city that makes it really fun to go downtown.”

TEAM

Architect: GBBN Architects, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.gbbn.com
General Contractor: Messer Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.messer.com
Roofing Contractor: Tecta America Zero Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.tectaamerica.com
Wall Panel Installer: ProCLAD Inc., Noblesville, Indiana, www.procladinc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof:
Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp., www.pac-clad.com
Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Nail Base: H-Shield NB, Hunter Panels, www.HunterPanels.com
Snow Guards: CorruBracket, S-5!, www.S-5.com
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec, www.CarlisleSyntec.com

TPO Roof:
Membrane: 60-mil grey TPO, Carlisle SynTec
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec
Smoke Hatches: ACDSH Acoustical Smoke Hatch, The Bilco Co., www.Bilco.com

Preserve, Protect and Defend

Our thoughts about government get intertwined with our images of the buildings that house its institutions. Architects know this, and in their designs, they often strive to evoke the key principles governments aspire to—permanence, stolidity, common-sense functionality, even grandeur. These buildings can touch our emotions. They can inspire us.

But no building lasts forever. When the time comes, talented individuals and enterprising companies have to step up and secure the integrity of these landmarks so they can survive to serve and inspire future generations.

The twin themes of this issue are government projects and historic renovation. Many of the projects you’ll see detailed on these pages would qualify in both categories, including three buildings that recently had iconic structures at their peaks meticulously restored. They include the copper pyramids on the North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina; the Saskatchewan Legislative Dome in Regina, Saskatchewan; and the Bradford County Courthouse Dome in Towanda, Pennsylvania.

The contractors involved in these projects conveyed the sense of responsibility that comes with keeping these one-of-a-kind structures functioning. But as they talked about the challenges they faced on these projects, it was the love of their jobs that kept coming through.

“We’re using natural, traditional building materials of stone, wood, copper and other noble metals,” said Philip Hoad of Empire Restoration Inc. in Scarborough, Ontario, as we talked about the Saskatchewan Dome project. “That’s what drives me to love the industry and my job—because it’s permanent, sustainable and it’s for future generations.”

Mike Tenoever of Century Slate in Durham, North Carolina, echoed that message when he talked about his company’s work on the North Carolina Legislative Building. “Our guys do this every single day, day in and day out,” he said. “It’s repetition, practice and love of restoration. Taking something so amazing and restoring it to the beauty it originally had—we all get a kick out of that.”

“You put in a hard day’s work and you’re proud to go home and know that what you’ve done is going to last not only your lifetime, but probably your kids’ lifetime, and maybe even your grandkids’ lifetime,” said Bill Burge of Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc. in Elmira, New York, as he detailed his company’s work on the Bradford County Courthouse.

Each of the roofing professionals I spoke with about these projects had the conscious goal of making sure the systems they installed might last another century. “We try to think of these slate and metal projects in terms of 100 years—that’s why we named our company Century Slate,” said Tenoever.

“This is the one thing that makes Charles F. Evans Company special to me: the fact that what we do from an architectural sheet metal standpoint, from a slate, copper, tile roof standpoint—these roofs will last 100, 150 years, and it is artwork,” Burge said.

“At the end of the day, why do we go to cities?” Hoad asked me. “We go to cities to look at their beautiful old buildings. We don’t generally go to look at their skyscrapers. It’s the old building that gets our minds and hearts working. When you go to a city and look at these old buildings intermingled with new buildings—that’s what gives a city life.”

Expert Crew Is Called in for Copper Roof Restoration Project

The dome on the Bradford County Courthouse was restored with copper panels during the first phase of a $3 million renovation project. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

The octagonal dome atop the Bradford County Courthouse has been a fixture on the Towanda, Pennsylvania, skyline for more than 120 years. It now shines brightly after being restored with copper panels as part of a $3 million renovation project.

Built in the Classical and Renaissance revival styles in 1898, the four-story courthouse was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1987. The dome’s original roof tiles were recently replaced as part of the project, which also included the complete restoration of the structure’s main roof.

The Charles F. Evans Company Inc., the union division of Evans Roofing Company Inc., headquartered in Elmira, New York, has a long history of successfully tackling projects with historical significance. C&D Waterproofing Corp., the general contractor on the project, reached out to the firm for support assessing the roofing portion of the project. The two companies teamed up on the project, with C&D Waterproofing handling the masonry restoration work and Charles F. Evans Company installing the roof systems.

The roofing work consisted of two phases. Phase One, which began in April of 2016, involved replacing the deteriorated terracotta tiles on the dome with soldered flat seam copper panels. Phase Two, which began in April of 2017, involved installing batten seam copper roofing on main structure and new copper flashings, gutters and downspouts.

Safety First

Construction Manager Bill Burge of Charles F. Evans Company was thrilled to be part of this historic project. Before

Originally completed in 1898, the courthouse was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1987. The building’s main roof was removed and replaced with a copper batten seam roof after work on the dome was completed. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

concentrating on the installation details, he knew the company would focus on the top priority. “Safety is number one,” says Burge. “Safety comes before profits. Safety comes before everything. We always want to make sure we have the right safety plan going into the job, and throughout the job, we are maintaining that plan and working that plan. We want our guys to go home to their families at the end of the day, so that’s key for us.”

Burge worked as a union carpenter for 10 years before joining the company more than seven years ago. He found he had an affinity for sheet metal work. “The craftsmanship and quality goes hand in hand with carpentry,” Burge says. “Everything starts with the carpentry. You have to have your base perfect; otherwise, everything from there on out doesn’t work. Sheet metal is a finished product, typically, especially in our business, so things have to be done right. Things have to be done to the highest standard of quality, because that’s what people see.”

The dome was designed to be a showpiece, and Field Superintendent Brian Babcock and his crew of qualified union sheet metal mechanics knew they would be held to an exacting standard. “The key to this project and every project is our talented mechanics in the field,” Burge says. “Charles F. Evans Company is nothing without this talent—they deserve all of the credit.”

Around the Dome

Phase One began with the removal of the tiles on the dome. “The ceramic tile was laid over open steel purlins,” Burge notes.

Charles F. Evans Roofing Company handled the roofing portion of the project, while C&D Waterproofing Corp. served as the general contractor and performed masonry restoration work. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

“There was open framing with quarter-inch steel angle for the purlins, and each piece if tile was wired on. The removal process was fairly simple. You could actually lift up the bottom of the tile and snap it off.”

The removal work had to be done in sections and dried in every night. “One of the hardest things about this process was we had to install two layers of half-inch plywood over the steel purlins and anchor those down,” says Burge.

The plywood was attached to vertical two-by-fours, which were screwed into the purlins. The plywood was covered with one layer of Warrior 30-pound felt paper, Meadows Red Rosin Paper, and Grace Ultra High Temp underlayment in gutter areas.

The built-in gutter at the base of the dome was torn out and re-framed. The new gutter was wider and deeper according to the recommendation of Levine & Company Inc., the architect on the project. “We did everything to specification as Levine & Company drew it,” says Burge.

Once the cladding was completed on the gutter, the copper panels of the dome were installed. The 20-inch panels were made of 20-ounce, cold rolled copper, supplied by Revere Copper Products. Both the panels and cladding were fabricated in Charles F. Evans Company’s fabrication shop. The copper panels clip to each other and have a hem on four sides that clips

Custom flashing pieces were fabricated and installed where the copper roof panels met the base of the dome. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

to the adjacent panel fastened to the deck. At the top of each panel, a hook clips off to the plywood, and the hook is covered by the panel directly above it.

Burge points out that the octagonal structure of the dome helped speed up the installation of the copper panels. “There are eight hips on the dome,” he notes. “Every section of the dome is like a piece of pie, basically, so we were able to start the panels in various locations. We didn’t have to start at one end and go around the dome. We could move around.”

Repairing the statue on the top of the dome was also part of the scope of work. “We soldered copper patches on any damage the statue had,” Burge says. “C&D Waterproofing completely cleaned and buffed the statue and applied a copper coating.”

Across the Roof

After the work on the dome was completed, work began on the main roof. The existing roof was removed down to the existing steel deck. The lower roof also had a built-in, copper-clad gutter that had to be removed and reconstructed. After

Scaffolding systems were constructed for both phases of the project. Shown here is part of the system installed around the lower roof, which featured planks and guardrails at the eave and rake edges. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

the gutter was completed, work on the main roof began. “After we completely cleaned the metal decking, we had to install a layer of Grace Ultra High Temp underlayment,” Burge recalls. “We then installed two-by-four wood sleepers, 2 feet on center.”

Crews installed 1.5 inches of polyiso insulation between the two-by-fours, followed by another 1.5-inch layer of polyiso. Pieces of 5/8-inch plywood were then screwed down to the sleepers. The plywood received 30-pound felt, and the battens were installed 20 inches on center. The seams were completed using a custom-designed mechanical seamer manufactured by Roll Former Corp.

Installation of the 12,000 square feet of copper panels went smoothly, but where panels met the dome, details were tricky. “Everything is pitched, and the dome has eight different sections sitting right in the center of the structure,” Burge explains. “A lot of time and energy went into fabricating and installing custom flashing pieces at the base of the dome.”

The Safety Plan

A scaffolding system was the key to the safety plan for both phases of the project. “For Phase One, we had to remove a portion of the roofing system and put down some plywood on top of the existing roofing in order to build a scaffold to access the dome,” Burge says.

This photo shows the main roof before restoration work began. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

Scaffolding was constructed to the eave edge of the copper dome, allowing the gutter to be removed. Ladders were used to access the dome and personal fall arrest systems were attached into HitchClips from Safety Anchor Fall Equipment, LLC, which served as individual anchor points. “We continued that process as we went up, using ladder jacks,” says Burge. “We continued with that plan, and never deviated.”

After Phase One was completed, the scaffolding was removed, and another scaffolding system was installed around the entire lower roof. Phase Two required planks and pre-engineered guardrails at the eave and rake edges. “Part of process of installing this roof included installing new safety anchors at various locations, and as we finished up, we were able to use those anchors as tie-off points,” Burge points out.

Phase Two is scheduled for completion in early November, and Burge has high praise for everyone involved with the project. “Levine & Co. Inc. is the architecture firm on the project,” he says. “We didn’t deter from any details developed. They drove this thing. We have worked with them on a great many projects in the past, and we have a great comfort level with them.”

Copper panels, cladding and details were fabricated in Charles F. Evans Company’s metal shop. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

The masonry and roofing work had to be well coordinated. “C&D Masonry & Waterproofing progressed ahead of us with items that we needed to be done, and then came back behind us to mortar all of the counter flashings back into the dome,” Burge says. “They were right there with us every step of the way.”

Finding the right combination of workers for this project was crucial, according to Burge. “We had one of our best crews on this project for a reason,” he says. “This project was led by Brian Babcock of Sheet Metal Local 112, and he was essential in putting this whole thing together. He’s been with Charles F. Evans Company for 20 years, and his leadership and focus is the reason this project is going to be successful.”

Ornate sheet metal work is rare these days, but the art is not lost at Charles F. Evans Company. “We’ve been doing this work for 60-plus years,” Burge says. “This knowledge and this workmanship has been handed down generation after generation. We wouldn’t have taken on this project if we didn’t have the confidence in our employees that we do.”

Historic restoration projects are becoming an increasingly bigger chunk of the company’s portfolio, notes Burge. “We do a lot of work with older universities and businesses that have these types of buildings,” he says. “A lot of buildings need this type of work, and it’s a trade not everyone else has. This is a craft that takes years to master. We harness that, we build from within, and we bring in young guys and teach them how to do it the right way. We have a great mix of people ages 23 up to 60, and it’s learned, it’s taught, and it’s preached.”

Burge is hopeful the new roof will last at least as long as its predecessor. “This is the one thing that makes Charles F. Evans Company special to me: the fact that what we do from an architectural sheet metal standpoint, from a slate, copper, tile roof standpoint—these roofs will last 100, 150 years, and it is artwork,” he says. “The fact that you’re a part of something that’s been around since the turn of the last century—to me it doesn’t get any better than that.”

TEAM

Architect: Levine & Company Inc., Ardmore, Pennsylvania, Levineco.net
Construction Manager: C&D Waterproofing Corp., Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, CDwaterproofingcorp.com
Roofing Contractor: Charles F. Evans Roofing Co. Inc., Elmira, New York, Evans-roofing.com

MATERIALS

Copper Supplier: Revere Copper Products, Reverecopper.com
Synthetic Underlayment: Grace Ultra High Temp, GCP Applied Technologies, GCPat.com
Mechanical Seamer: Roll Former Corp., Rollformercorp.com
Anchor Points: HitchClip, Safety Anchor Fall Equipment, LLC, Hitchclip.com

Restoring the Saskatchewan Legislative Dome Is a Labor of Love

The Saskatchewan Legislative Building in Regina was originally completed in 1912. The structure had undergone deterioration due to poor drainage around the dome, and a restoration project was initiated to repair the masonry and restore the copper dome. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

“At the end of the day, why do we go to cities?” asks Philip Hoad. “We go to cities to look at their beautiful old buildings. We don’t generally go to look at their skyscrapers. It’s the old building that gets our minds and hearts working. When you go to a city and look at these old buildings intermingled with new buildings—that’s what gives a city life.”

Hoad is with Empire Restoration Inc., headquartered in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. He’s been restoring historic buildings for some 30 years, and when he found out about the project to renovate the dome on the Saskatchewan Legislative Building, he knew it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “The architect put out a pre-qualification across Canada, and four firms were successful. We were one of them,” he remembers. “Then we ended up securing the tender bid. I’ll never forget it because I did the tender estimate just after a hernia operation in my dressing gown. It was really a project I won’t forget.”

The building was originally constructed in Regina, Saskatchewan, between 1908 and 1912, and it serves as the seat of government for the province and houses the legislative assembly. Designed by architects Edward and William Sutherland Maxwell of Montreal in a mix of English Renaissance and French Beaux-Arts styles, the building features ornate stone elements and unique decorative copper finishes that accent its iconic copper-clad dome. It is designated as a National Historic Site of Canada and a Provincial Heritage Property, and is subject to strict regulations regarding materials and methods of repair.

Work on the dome was carried out in a fully enclosed and heated temporary structure that allowed crews to continue throughout the winter months. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

The structure has undergone some restoration work over the past 100 years, but in 2013, planning began for a conservation project designed to repair and restore the tower. The reasons for the project were twofold, according to Hoad. “First of all, the copper panels were blowing off, and somebody had re-secured them with face screws back in the ’60s or ’70s. But more importantly, the water was coming off the dome and damaging the stone below it. The dome was originally never designed with gutters, and then they later put gutters on, and these failed. So those were the two things that drove the project in the first place.”

Hoad knew the project would be challenging, but it he was confident that his company had the experience and passion to handle it. “These projects come along, for most of us, once in a lifetime,” he notes. “It’s the scale and the detail and the level of commitment that you need to restore an old building that sets us apart from, say, new construction. It’s not cookie-cutter. Everything is different, and you never know what you’re getting into—although with our experience, we’ve done so many old buildings we sort of know what we’re going to run into. All of the people who work for us love to work on these old buildings. It’s very satisfying at the end of it.”

The goals of the project were perfectly aligned with Hoad’s business philosophy. “When I start with an old building, I don’t want to change it,” he says. “It might look a little newer, but I want it to be the same as when we found it. I don’t want it to stand out as a brand-new building. We just want it to last another 100 years and to know that we’ve helped preserve it for future generations.”

The ornamental copper elements were restored and reset over the new copper panels. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

Repairing the Substructure

Work on the dome was more complicated than initially thought. During the pre-construction condition survey and assessment, additional problems were discovered by the conservation architect, Spencer R. Higgins of Toronto. “Once the architect had done all his work and surveyed the building, they also realized the original woodwork was not quite up to snuff,” Hoad explains. “Basically, much of the original wood framing was made up of old pallets. It was quite remarkable. So structurally, we had to re-frame the hips, which we call the ribs. We completely removed the old pallet framing and re-framed it. We also tried to straighten the slight twist in dome, but it wasn’t easy to do since it was a poured concrete structure underneath.”

New ribs were constructed out of Douglas fir plywood using a CNC machine from 3-D architectural drawings to create templates. It was also necessary to remove and replace approximately 40 percent of deteriorated wood deck on the concrete dome, with both the interior and exterior surfaces of the concrete being repaired by the general contractor on the project, PCL Construction Management of Regina. “Re-framing the ribs was quite a challenge,” notes Hoad. “Once the concrete deck was repaired, we screwed new Douglas fir roof boards into the repaired concrete dome, added an air vapor barrier, Roxul insulation, wood nailers and an additional layer of Douglas fir roof boards, with housewrap and asphalt saturated roofing felt as the underlayment system for all the new copper roofing and cladding that would follow.”

Internally drained stainless-steel gutters were installed at the base of the dome. The gutters were lined with sheet lead. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

After the masonry restoration was completed by RJW-Gem Campbell Stonemasons of Ottawa, Empire Restoration installed new gutters at the base of the dome. According to the architect’s design, heavy stainless-steel plate gutters were formed and then lined with sheet lead. Projecting stone cornice ledges were also covered in sheet lead.

Restoring the Copper Dome

The existing 16-ounce copper panels were all removed, and they were replaced with new 20-ounce panels recreated to match the original sizes and profiles. More than 20,000 square feet of copper panels were custom fabricated and installed. Great care was taken to carefully remove and restore decorative elements, including the copper garlands.

Decorative elements that could be saved were installed on new brass armatures. The dome is topped by a cupola and lantern, which were carefully restored. “The mantel on the very top, we didn’t strip that off,” Hoad notes. “We just replaced and repaired selective components, so that’s why you have a mix of old and new.”

Logistics at the job site were well coordinated. “Access was quite remarkable because PCL had erected a steel frame onto which we erected scaffolding, so the dome was right there in front of us,” Hoad notes.

Cornice sections were restored, and extensive sheet lead flashings were installed over stone cornices and ledges. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

When working on the dome itself, crew members had to be tied off with personal fall arrest systems, as it was possible to slip through gaps between the scaffold decks and the dome roof surface. Weather was not an issue, as the steel frame structure was totally enclosed with a heavy-duty insulated tarp system. “We had our own ventilation system, we had a heating system, we had electricity up there, we had pneumatic power—we basically had everything up there. PCL had it well set up for the various trades. There was a large crane on site to hoist all our materials up.”

Hoad cites the sheer size of the project as one of his greatest concerns. “The biggest challenge was just the scale of the project, being able to produce the amount of work necessary and get the job done in the prescribed time,” he says. “It was a lot of the same thing, albeit with some very complicated detailing. We had multiple skill sets on the site dealing with multiple materials and details.”

The project has won numerous awards, including a 2017 North American Copper in Architecture Award from the Copper Development Association. Hoad is proud of his company’s role in the project but relieved it is completed. “During it, I was at times tearing my hair out,” he recalls. “It was a very high-pressure project that lasted a long time. It was three or four days a week of constant men, materials, equipment, meetings, details, changes, extras, credits. From start to finish, it was two years of my life.”

The cupola and lantern at the top of the dome were repaired in situ. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

Despite the pressure, Hoad found the work extremely satisfying. “What we are doing is permanent and built to last for future generations,” he says. “We’re using natural, traditional building materials of stone, wood, copper and other noble metals. That’s what drives me to love the industry and my job—because it’s permanent, sustainable and it’s for future generations.”

After all, it’s often the roof and flashings that play one of the most critical roles in fighting the elements of weather, notes Hoad. “Roofing and sheet metal deficiencies is where much of building damage and deterioration starts,” he says. “You can repair a masonry wall, but if you don’t stop it getting saturated, it’ll just deteriorate again in another few years. Regina was a good example of that. We’ve now provided great protection to these beautiful stone elements, allowing them to last another 100 years.”

TEAM

Conservation Architect: Spencer R. Higgins, Architect Incorporated, Toronto, Ontario, Higginsarchitect.com
General Contractor: PCL Construction Management, Regina, Saskatchewan, PCL.com
Sheet Metal Contractor: Empire Restoration Inc., Scarborough, Ontario, EmpireRestoration.com
Masonry Contractor: RJW-Gem Campbell Stonemasons Inc., Ottawa, Ontario, RJWgem.com

MATERIALS

Copper: 20-ounce copper sheet metal
Wood Framing: Douglas fir
Insulation: Rockwool Rigid Insulation, Roxul, Roxul.com

Orlando Airport Project Necessitates Custom Fabrication, Precise Installation

 

Work on the first phase of the Orlando International Airport expansion project includes the South Airport Intermodal Terminal Facility and APM Complex, which features a standing seam metal roof

Architectural Sheet Metal Inc. has been in servicing the Orlando area for more than 23 years, specializing in commercial metal roofs and wall systems, primarily new construction. When Matthew Leonard, the company’s vice president, found out that the Orlando International Airport was proposing a new terminal project with a metal roof, he jumped at the chance to submit a bid.

He wanted to land the job because it would be the largest project the company has ever tackled, and one of its most prominent. He also wanted it for another reason—he knew he’d see it every time he drove to the airport. “For many years now, we’ve specialized in standing seam metal roofs. It’s our bread and butter,” he says. “We’ve done lots of schools, government building, military bases. It’s just something we enjoy doing. When this project came around, right here in our backyard, we knew we wanted to take it on. It’s larger than anything we’ve ever done, but it’s our specialty.”

The South Airport Intermodal Terminal Facility and APM Complex is a new construction project that coordinates mass transit for the airport, including regional rail systems and the Automated People Mover (APM). It’s part of the first phase of an ambitious $2 billion plan to almost double the size of the airport.

Architectural Sheet Metal installed the Berridge standing seam metal roof system, as well as internal aluminum gutters and a custom-fabricated aluminum bullnose that runs along the perimeter of the roof

The building encompasses approximately 200,000 square feet, and the structure is primarily covered with a standing seam metal roof. The scope of work for Architectural Sheet Metal included installing the metal roof system and internal aluminum gutters. It also included custom fabrication and installation of an aluminum bullnose that runs along the perimeter of the roof. “Every roof is radiused, and some sections have compound double raiduses,” Leonard notes. “The trickiest part of the project is probably the bullnose because all of the gable ends of the roof are radiused, and the large bullnose has to be welded on in 30-foot sections.”

Another tricky thing about the project is that the work was divided into two different contracts with two different construction managers. On one side of the building, which houses the monorail and parking garage, the project is overseen by Hensel Phelps, and on the other side, which handles the train lines, the construction is overseen by a Turner-Kiewit joint venture. The dividing point is a building expansion joint that runs across the middle of the roof. “We’re one of very few subcontractors out here that has a contract with both of the construction managers,” Leonard says. “They both have their own agendas, their own timelines, and their own completion dates, and it was a delicate balancing act working with the two of them.”

Installing the Roof

The roof system was designed to unify the elements of the structure and tie the building together. Some sections of the roof cover the building, while others serve as canopies, so there are two types of metal deck on the building. “The area we call the spine has a 3-inch-thick acoustical deck,” Leonard explains. “That was interesting because before we could put our 6 inches of polyiso on, we had to install batten insulation in the flutes. The acoustical decking is perforated, so you can see through it. That’s a little different, when you’re so high up. It spooked the guys at first to be able to see right through it.”

Crews dried in the entire roof with a waterproofing underlayment from MFM Building Products specifically designed for high-temperature applications.

The other sections were comprised of standard type B metal deck. Sections covering the interior were insulated, while canopy sections were covered with 5/8-inch DensDeck from Georgia-Pacific.

Crews from Architectural Sheet Metal dried in the entire roof with a peel-and-stick waterproofing underlayment from MFM Building Products specifically designed for high-temperature applications, MFM Ultra-HT. “It’s easy to install,” notes Leonard. “That’s our go-to underlayment for metal projects.”

After the underlayment was applied, the welded aluminum gutters were installed. “The longest piece was 78 feet,” says Leonard. “We fabricated the sections, water-tested them and shipped them out. We used a crane to lift them to the roof.”

The roof system was supplied by Berridge Manufacturing, and the 24-gauge galvalume metal panels were roll formed at the site. “Berridge has a ZEE-Lock double-lock standing seam panel,” Leonard says. “We own one of their portable roll formers, and we have it on site here. We pick it up with a crane, and lift it up to the edge of the roof, and we actually roll form our largest panels straight out to the roof. The guys just catch the panels as they come out of the roll former.”

Metal roof panels were roll formed at the site. For most roof sections, the roll former was hoisted by a crane, to the edge of the roof, and crew members stacked the panels as they come out of the roll former.

Panels were stacked in piles of 10 for installation. There were 12 different roof surfaces, so as the roll forming crew moved along, other crews would start installing the panels. “Every stack was tied down with strapping to ensure that it wasn’t susceptible to wind,” Leonard points out. “With a hurricane in the forecast, we were very careful about that.”

The panels in the spine area had a tighter radius, so those panels were formed on the ground using separate curving machine. Lining up the panels perfectly was critical. “With a radiused roof, it’s sometimes harder to find things to measure off to ensure your panels are straight. This panel is a left-to-right system. It’s a male-female overlay with a continuous clip that Berridge manufactures. The panels are hand-crimped together, and then you do the first and second stage of the double-lock panels with an electric seamer. You just turn it on and it goes up and over.”

Details, Details

Fall protection posts were installed during the framing process, which helped with safety planning but posed problems when it came to detailing. “It’s nice to have permanent fall protection points to tie into, as everyone had to be 100 percent tied off, but there are close to 200 fall protection posts on the project that we had to cut around and flash,” Leonard says. “I’ve never seen so many posts on a roof like that.”

The aluminum bullnose was constructed after precise measurements were taken at the site. After they were custom painted to match the roof, the 30-foot sections were lifted into place and installed.

Because the posts were tied into the structural steel and couldn’t be moved, the company designed and manufactured a welded aluminum flashing detail to ensure they all looked the same no matter where they landed in the panel profile. “We set up a welded aluminum flashing that should last forever, and it’s welded, so it shouldn’t leak. We try to go above and beyond in our flashing details.”

Leonard points to his company’s fabrication experience as a key to its strength. “We try to be more than just a roofing company,” he says. “We try to be a custom metal fabrication company that fabricates the panels to precise specifications determined by the site. We custom fabricate metal and then, as roofers, we install it. We like to have that double whammy. Not many people have that ability to do both.”

The company’s expertise came in handy on the bullnose. “The bullnose was originally bid as 22-gauge metal,” he says. “We looked at it and we didn’t like it. It’s a large, 9-inch radius, and we felt the thin, light-gauge metal would shake in the wind. Every 10 feet would be a lap joint with caulk, which would be susceptible to wind damage. We came up with the idea of using a welded piece of .080 aluminum. Once it was approved, we purchased a 100-ton press brake with a custom die to fabricate this bullnose.”

The bullnose was constructed from precise measurements taken at the site. “We took the radius off of the building and created jigs in our warehouse,” Leonard explains. “We welded pieces together in 30-foot sections, and we shipped them to a local painter who coated them with baked-on Kynar to match the roof.”

The bullnose was designed to hook into the gutter strap and wrap around onto the fascia, where it is screwed into the framing. In areas where there is no gutter, sections of the bullnose are equipped with a larger flange with an S-hook built into it to attach it to the roof. Corner pieces tie it all together.

Watching Out for Irma

Dealing with two different GCs was challenging, in part due to changes in the schedule. “Originally, we were supposed to finish one side first and then start the other side, but both phases of the project ended up starting around the same time,” says Leonard. “This doubled the manpower we needed on the job.”

Photos: Aerial Innovations

For changes like the bullnose, Architectural Sheet Metal had to make sure RFIs were submitted and approved by both sides. “Sometimes it was hard to keep track of who we submitted it to, but it worked to our benefit at times. Once it was approved by one side, it was easily approved by the other.”

The schedule had the crews working in hurricane season, and precautions were taken to make sure the job site was prepared for high winds. “When Hurricane Irma was approaching, I checked every single weather update every day until it made landfall,” Leonard recalls. “It hit on a Monday, and a full week ahead of that we were cleaning the roofs and preparing the gutters. We removed all debris on the jobsite because any trash on the roof could clog the downspouts. We added more and more men to the process throughout the week, and we shut the jobsite down on Wednesday. We took all of the material we had, stacked it, bundled it together, and we were able to move it all inside the building. We were pretty well complete on the Hensel-Phelps side, and Turner Kiewit brought in 40-foot Conex boxes for us to put our material in and secure it. They tried really hard to make sure the jobsite was secure.”

As the storm progressed, it deviated from the projected path, and no one could be certain which direction the winds might be coming from. “We just had to start battening everything down,” Leonard recalls.

Photos: Architectural Sheet Metal Inc.

Stacks of panels on the roof that were not yet installed were strapped every 2 feet on center. The entire state was in emergency mode, making things difficult. “For four or five days before the storm even hit, we couldn’t find water, rope and extension cords. Grocery stores were running out of supplies. Gas stations were running out of gas.”

After the storm passed, Leonard breathed a sigh of relief. The roof wasn’t damaged. The panels that had already been installed were in great shape, and the uninstalled panels weren’t harmed.

Elements like the weather are beyond anyone’s control, and Leonard notes his company tries to control as many variables as it can. “We have full control over the actual fabrication of the material and the quality of it,” he says. “When I call something in, I talk to our guy who works with me. Our company oversees it. Every morning I stop by the shop and follow up on the process on the way to the job site. We install it. I can make sure everything is OK.”

The project is nearing completion, and Leonard can’t wait to finish a landmark project he’ll see every time he makes a trip to the airport. “You can’t miss it,” he says. “It’s huge.”

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Orlando, Florida, HKSinc.com
General Contractors: Hensel Phelps, Greeley, Colorado, HenselPhelps.com; and a joint venture between Turner Construction, Orlando, Florida, Turnerconstruction.com, and Kiewit, Sunrise, Florida, Kiewit.com
Metal Roofing Contractor: Architectural Sheet Metal Inc., Orlando, Florida, ASMfl.com

MATERIALS

Standing Seam Metal Roof: Berridge Zee-Lock Double-Lock, Zinc-Cote, Berridge Manufacturing, Berridge.com
Underlayment: MFM Ultra-HT Wind & Water Seal, MFM Building Products, MFMbp.com
Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, Buildgp.com