About James R. Kirby, AIA

James R. Kirby, AIA, is director of Codes and Regulatory Affairs for the Kellen Co. He is a licensed architect in Illinois and has a Master of Architecture—Structures Option and a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies from the University of Illinois. Kirby also has a Graduate Certification in Sustainable Building Design and Construction from Boston Architectural College. Kirby has expertise in roof system design and construction, weatherproofing and energy-efficiency of the building envelope, as well as rooftop PV systems. He also is an accredited Green Roofing Professional. Kirby has a strong combination of association experience, as well as roofing expertise, which help serve the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) and the Roof Coating Manufacturers Association (RCMA), among others.

Two Commercial Installations Are Honored with ARMA’s QARC Awards

Advanced Roofing Inc. installed two new roofs at a luxury retired-living community in Palm Beach Gardens. These projects were Silver Award winners in ARMA’s 2016 QARC Awards.

Advanced Roofing Inc. installed two new roofs at a luxury retired-living community in Palm Beach Gardens. These projects were Silver Award winners in ARMA’s 2016 QARC Awards.

Commercial roofs are the workhorses of a building system. They endure wind, rain, hail and foot traffic while serving as an important line of defense between the outside world and a building’s occupants. If inhabitants never consider the roof over their heads, it means the roof system is doing its job well.

The Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) showcases these hardworking but rarely celebrated systems in its annual Quality Asphalt Roofing Case- study (QARC) Awards program. Each year, the organization seeks the top asphalt roofing projects in North America that demonstrate durability and high performance, as well as beauty. The QARC awards honor a Gold, Silver and Bronze winning project that illustrates the benefits of asphalt roofing.

The Silver Winner of ARMA’s 2016 QARC Awards is a prime example of what a commercial roofing system must stand up to while remaining water-resistant and durable. Advanced Roofing Inc. (ARI), which has service areas throughout much of Florida, was hired to install two new roofs at a luxury retired-living community in Palm Beach Gardens. These reroofs were completed in 2015 and were submitted to ARMA’s awards program.

The two buildings in this community were originally built in the 1990s and were found to have numerous issues that demanded immediate attention when new management reviewed the property. The area’s hot climate requires many air-conditioning units on the roof that frequently have to be serviced. This aspect of a commercial roof can be overlooked by building owners but has a significant impact on its service life and performance. Because HVAC units and related equipment are heavy and may require frequent maintenance that brings extensive foot traffic, they can cause a roof system to deteriorate faster than normal. That was the case with the existing roofs in this living community.

Toward the end of the roofs’ service lives, temporary fixes, like patching and coatings, were made. These regular repairs only increased the operational budget while the core issues remained unresolved. According to Jessica Kornahrens, project manager at ARI, “The existing roofing system was at risk of a failure that could potentially close the building and leave its elderly residents without a home.”

ARI was hired by the new building owner and property manager to tear off the existing roofs of these two buildings and install an asphalt roofing system on each. Because of the significant durability required by the new roofs, the roofing contractor chose a high-performance three-ply modified bitumen asphalt roofing system.

The two buildings in the retirement facility were still occupied during the reroof project, creating an additional challenge during installation, but the work came in on schedule and within budget.

The two buildings in the retirement facility were still occupied during the reroof project, creating an additional challenge during installation, but the work came in on schedule and within budget.


“We knew that this type of redundant, multi-layered system would protect these buildings long-term despite the high foot traffic and heavy equipment they have to stand up to while also meeting the project budget,” Kornahrens says. “This particular system also has a Miami-Dade Notice of Acceptance with testing and approvals for Florida’s high-velocity hurricane zone.”

Between foot traffic and harsh weather, the contractors knew this asphalt roofing system was up to the task.

Challenging Installation

Before they could begin the project, ARI had to first stop the existing leaks in the first 45,900-square-foot building and the second 51,000-square-foot building, followed by a tear-off of the roof system down to the light- weight concrete. ARI fastened the modified anchor sheet with twin-lock fasteners directly into the lightweight insulated concrete deck and then torch applied an interply and fire-retardant granulated cap sheet.

Photos: Smith Aerial Photography

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Choosing the Right Roof Coatings for Substrates Can Extend Roof Service Lives, Cool Temperatures and Save Energy

Roof coatings are a fast-growing market segment in the roofing industry—and it makes good sense why that is the case. Application of a roof coating on a new or existing roof can provide
added durability, extend roof service life, save on energy costs, and avoid the hassle and expense of a full tear-off and replacement.

COATING TYPES

Roof coatings come in many formulations and are appropriate for installation over all roof system types. The first question many have is which coating is appropriate for which substrate?

A reflective coating has been applied to a hybrid asphaltic roof. PHOTO: GAF

A reflective coating has been applied to a hybrid asphaltic roof.
PHOTO: GAF

Coatings are most broadly divided into asphaltic- and polymer-based materials. Asphaltic-based coatings are solvent-based “cut backs” or water-based emulsions. They can be black or aluminized. They have the ability to be used in cold and inclement weather. Aluminized coatings are used when a reflective and ultraviolet-, or UV-, stable asphalt coating is needed.

The most common polymer-based coatings include acrylics, polyurethanes and silicone coatings. Acrylic water-based coatings are ideal for high UV environments where a reflective roof is desired. They can be colored but generally are sold in white, tan and gray. Many specialized versions are made to be compatible with specific substrates. Polyurethane coatings are typically solvent-based and come in two main types, aromatic and aliphatic. Urethanes have good mechanical properties and high abrasion resistance. They are suggested for use in hail-prone regions or where a roof is exposed to heavy foot traffic.

Silicone coatings, like acrylic coatings, perform well in high UV environments where a reflective roof is desired. Often silicone is used in locations where rain is a daily occurrence or if the roof is often wet and experiences excessive amounts of ponded water. In addition, butyl, fluoropolymer, PMMA, polyester, STPE, SEBS and styrene-acrylics can be used to formulate roof coatings.

Coating thickness (dry film thickness) has an effect on performance. In general, thicker coatings will have increased service life and will provide additional durability regardless of coating type. Also very important is the specification written for each project. Every project is different and every specification should be tailored to every project to ensure the correct coating and application is appropriate for the roof and coating type. Coating manufacturers’ specifications should be the basis for every coating project and be coordinated with project specifications.

SUBSTRATES

Asphaltic-based coatings are most commonly used on built-up roof (BUR) and modified bitumen (MB) membranes; they are rarely, if ever, used on single-ply roof membranes. All types of polymer-based coatings are used on BUR, MB, metal and single-ply roofs. There is information to assist with the evaluation and preparation of the substrate in the ASTM standard titled, “Standard Guide for Evaluation and Preparation of Roof Membranes for Coating Application”.

From a material-quality standpoint, it is important to use products that meet or exceed their ASTM material standards, which are listed in the International Building Code and International Residential Code. Meeting the building-code requirements provides the minimum safeguards for materials used for construction.

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Attic Ventilation in Accessory Structures

Construction Code Requirements for Proper Attic Ventilation Should Not Be Overlooked in Buildings That Don’t Contain Conditioned Space

The 2015 International Residential Code and International Building Code, published by the International Code Council, include requirements for attic ventilation to help manage temperature and moisture that could accumulate in attic spaces. Although the code requirements are understood to apply to habitable buildings, not everyone understands how the code addresses accessory structures, like workshops, storage buildings, detached garages and other buildings. What’s the answer? The code treats all attic spaces the same, whether the space below the attic is conditioned or not. (A conditioned space is a space that is heated and/or cooled.)

The 2015 International Residential Code and International Building Code include requirements for attic ventilation to help manage temperature and moisture that could accumulate in attic spaces. Although the code requirements are understood to apply to habitable buildings, not everyone understands the code also addresses accessory structures, like workshops, storage buildings, detached garages and other buildings.

The 2015 International Residential Code and International Building Code include requirements for attic ventilation to help manage temperature and moisture that could accumulate in attic spaces. Although the code requirements are understood to apply to habitable buildings, not everyone understands the code also addresses accessory structures, like workshops, storage buildings, detached garages and other buildings.


The administrative provisions of the IRC that set the scope for the code are found in Chapter 1. Section R101.2 and read:

    The provisions of the International Residential Code for One- and Two-family Dwellings shall apply to the construction, alteration, movement, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, removal and demolition of detached one- and two-family dwellings and townhouses not more than three stories above grade plane in height with a separate means of egress and their accessory structures not more than three stories above grade plane in height.

Let’s clear up any confusion about the code. The ventilated attic requirements in the 2015 IRC include the following language in Section R806.1:

    Enclosed attics and enclosed rafter spaces formed where ceilings are applied directly to the underside of roof rafters shall have cross ventilation for each separate space by ventilating openings protected against the entrance of rain or snow.

An accessory structure is actually defined in the IRC:

    ACCESSORY STRUCTURE. A structure that is accessory to and incidental to that of the dwelling(s) and that is located on the same lot.

The IBC also includes attic ventilation requirements that are essentially the same as the IRC. Section 101.2 of the 2015 IBC contains this text:

    The provisions of this code shall apply to the construction, alteration, relocation, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, maintenance, removal and demolition of every building or structure or any appurtenances connected or attached to such buildings or structures.

This requirement for ventilated at-tics in accessory structures in the IBC and IRC is mandatory unless the attic is part of the conditioned space and is sealed within the building envelope. Unvented, or sealed, attics allow any ducts located in the attic to be inside the conditioned space, which can have beneficial effects on energy efficiency. For accessory structures, which are typically unheated, that provision does not apply.

It’s important to note the codes do contain detailed requirements for the design and construction of sealed at-tics to reduce the chance of moisture accumulation in the attic. These requirements have been in the codes for a relatively short time and remain the subject of continued debate at ICC as advocates of sealed attics work to improve the code language in response to concerns about performance issues from the field.

Traditional construction methods for wood-framed buildings include ventilated attics (with insulation at the ceiling level) as a means of isolating the roof assembly from the heated and cooled space inside the building. Attic ventilation makes sense for a variety of reasons. Allowing outside air into the attic helps equalize the temperature of the attic with outdoor space. This equalization has several benefits, including lower roof deck and roof covering temperatures, which can extend the life of the deck and roof covering. However, it is not just temperature that can be equalized by a properly ventilated attic. Relative humidity differences can also be addressed by vented attics. Moisture from activity in dwelling units including single-family residences and other commercial occupancies can lead to humidity entering the attic space by diffusion or airflow. It is important to ensure moisture is removed or it can remain in the attic and lead to premature deterioration and decay of the structure and corrosion of metal components, including fasteners and connectors.

In northern climate zones, a ventilated attic can isolate heat flow escaping from the conditioned space and reduce the chance of uneven snow melt, ice dams, and icicle formation on the roof and eaves. Ice damming can lead to all kinds of moisture problems for roof assemblies; it is bad enough that roof assemblies have to deal with moisture coming from inside the attic, but ice damming can allow water to find its way into roof covering assemblies by interrupting the normal water-shedding process. For buildings with conditioned space, the attic can isolate the roof assembly from the heat source but only if there is sufficient ceiling insulation, properly installed over the top of the wall assemblies to form a continuous envelope. Failure to ensure continuity in the thermal envelope is a recipe for disaster in parts of the country where snow can accumulate on the roof.

Accessory buildings, like workshops, that occasionally may be heated with space heaters or other sources are less likely to have insulation to block heat flow to the roof, which can result in ice damming. Ventilating the attic can prevent this phenomenon.

Accessory buildings, like workshops, that occasionally may be heated with space heaters or other sources are less likely to have insulation to block heat flow to the roof, which can result in ice damming. Ventilating the attic can prevent this phenomenon.


For unheated buildings in the north, ice damming is less likely to occur, unless the structure is occasionally heated. Accessory buildings, like workshops, that might be heated from time to time with space heaters or other sources are less likely to have insulation to block heat flow to the roof. In these situations, a little heat can go a long way toward melting snow on the roof.

While the ice damming and related performance problems are a real concern even for accessory structures, it is the removal of humidity via convective airflow in the attic space that is the benefit of ventilated attics in accessory structures. We know that moisture will find its way into buildings. Providing a way for it to escape is a necessity, especially for enclosed areas like attics.

There are many types of accessory structures, and some will include conditioned space. Depending on the use of the structure, moisture accumulation within the building will vary. For residential dwelling units, building scientists understand the normal moisture drive arising from occupancy. Cooking, laundering and showering all contribute moisture to the interior environment.

The IRC and IBC include requirements for the net-free vent area of intake (lower) and exhaust (upper) vents and also require the vents be installed in accordance with the vent manufacturer’s installation instructions. The amount of required vent area is reduced when a balanced system is installed; most ventilation product manufacturers recommend a balance between intake and exhaust. The IRC recommends that balanced systems include intake vents with between 50 to 60 percent of the total vent area to reduce the chance of negative pressure in the attic system, which can draw conditioned air and moisture from conditioned space within the building. This is less of an issue for non-habitable spaces from an energy-efficiency perspective, but moisture accumulation is a concern in all structures.

PHOTOS: Lomanco Vents

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Asphalt Roofing Provides Comprehensive Weather Protection for a Luxury Condominium

Working with the unique variables of a region and its climate poses a significant challenge to roofing contractors. Installing a roof system that looks beautiful and can stand up to ice, snow and freezing temperatures takes an expertise that only comes with experience. This is the case in the snowy and picturesque mountains of Park City, Utah. The city is a winter haven for skiers who vacation there, but the extended snow and cold season can deliver a beating to a roof.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves.


The Grand Lodge at Deer Valley Resort, a luxury condominium development at one of North America’s top-ranked ski resorts, sits at an elevation of 9,000 feet in the mountainous area. Along with the breathtaking views comes an average annual snowfall of 350 inches. As a result, the 40,000-square-foot concrete tile roof of the lodge had begun to fail after only six years of intense weather and needed to be replaced immediately.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves. Dangerous icicles would form, and noisy chainsaws were frequently needed to cut through the ice on the 5-story building. In 2013, the owner of the condominium decided to completely redesign the roofing system. IronClad Exteriors Inc., a Sandy, Utah-based roofing company had successfully installed roofs for Deer Valley in the past and was contacted by Deer Valley Resort Management to consult on the new design.

“Due to insufficient insulation and poor ventilation on the existing roof, ice dams were forming, tiles were cracking and the roof was falling apart,” says Eric Kircher, owner of IronClad Exteriors. “There was an architect involved in redesigning the roof … . I was asked to take a look at the design, and I recommended an asphalt shingle roof instead.

Kircher advised that a full asphalt roofing system with proper insulation and moisture protection would be able to withstand the harsh weather of the ski resort.

“Asphalt was the ideal material for the reroof for reasons that involve aesthetics, safety, and the long-term health and viability of the roof,” he notes. “I recommended a shake style because it really fit the architecture and look of the roof while being able to protect the building and residents from the weather conditions.”

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow.

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow.

Installation

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow. FlintBoard ISO NB (Nail Base) Composite Polyisocyanurate/OSB Roof insulation was installed over the plywood deck, followed by a 3- by 10-inch fascia board. WinterGuard HT advanced waterproofing underlayment and DiamondDeck High Performance Synthetic Underlayment were then added to provide important moisture resistance. Finally, the Presidential Shake TL asphalt shingles provided a beautiful look that matched the lodge’s breathtaking surroundings. The project was completed in November 2014.

The Grand Lodge’s new asphalt roof also contains a unique feature that sets it apart in form and function. IronClad installed 11,000 copper snow guards that offer another layer of weather protection. Snow freezes around the copper pieces and keeps it from sliding down the roof to form dangerous ice dams at the eaves. Lodge residents no longer have to walk underneath potentially hazardous icicles or listen to the sounds of manlifts and chainsaws that are used to remove them.

“The roofing system we designed had the unique ability to withstand that type of cold environment,” Kircher notes. “There will be no heat loss contributing to ice and snow on the eaves, and the insulation protects the interior of the lodge. These are high-end condominiums with finished ceilings and no attic space at the top where you can put more insulation, so the insulation had to be installed on the existing roof deck to prevent ice dams.”

The installation process went smoothly despite the challenges brought on by Park City’s weather. Snow can begin to fall as early as September and lasts through the spring, providing little time for construction projects to take place. Fortunately, IronClad had extensive experience with the roofing systems needed in Park City.

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Asphalt-based Low-slope Roof Systems Provide Long-term Service Life

Asphalt-based roof systems have a long-standing track record of success in the roofing industry. In fact, asphalt-based roof systems have more than a century of use in the U.S. Building owners, roofing specifiers and contractors should not lose sight of this fact. It is important to understand why asphalt roofing has been successful for so long. Asphalt roofs demonstrate characteristics, such as durability and longevity of materials and components, redundancy of waterproofing, ease and understanding of installation, excellent tensile strength and impact resistance. Each of these characteristics helps ensure long-term performance.

Using a composite built-up/ modified bitumen roof system provides redundancy helping ensure durability and longevity. Surface reflectivity and a multilayer insulation layer provide excellent thermal resistance. Quality details and regular maintenance will provide long-term performance. PHOTO: Advanced Roofing

Using a composite built-up/
modified bitumen roof system provides redundancy helping ensure durability and longevity. Surface reflectivity and a multilayer insulation layer provide excellent thermal resistance. Quality details
and regular maintenance will provide long-term performance. PHOTO: Advanced Roofing

There are two types of asphalt-based low-slope roof systems: modified bitumen (MB) roof systems and builtup roof (BUR) systems. MB sheets are composed primarily of polymer-modified bitumen reinforced with one or more plies of fabric, such as polyester, glass fiber or a combination of both. Assembled in factories using optimal quality-control standards, modified bitumen sheets are manufactured to have uniform thickness and consistent physical properties throughout the sheet. Modified bitumen roof systems are further divided into atactic polypropylene (APP) and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS) modified systems. APP and SBS modifiers create a uniform matrix that enhances the physical properties of the asphalt. APP is a thermoplastic polymer that forms a uniform matrix within the bitumen. This matrix increases the bitumen’s resistance to ultraviolet light, its flexibility at high and low temperatures, and its ability to resist water penetration. SBS membranes resist water penetration while exhibiting excellent elongation and recovery properties over a wide range of temperature extremes. This high-performance benefit makes SBS membranes durable and particularly appropriate where there may be movement or deflection of the underlying deck.

BUR systems consist of multiple layers of bitumen alternated with ply sheets (felts) applied over the roof deck, vapor retarder, and most often insulation or coverboard. BUR systems are particularly advantageous for lowslope applications. The strength of the system comes from the membrane, which includes the layers of hot-applied bitumen and the reinforcing plies of roofing felt.

FACTORS FOR LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE AND SERVICE LIFE

It is important for building owners and roof system designers to recognize the principles of long-lasting, high-performance roof systems. Roof longevity and performance are determined by factors that include building and roof system design, job specifications, materials quality and suitability, application procedures and maintenance. The level of quality in the workmanship during the application process is critical.

Longevity and performance start with proper design of the asphalt-based roof system. Proper roof system design includes several components: the roof deck, a base layer supporting a vapor retarder or air barrier when necessary, multi-layer insulation and a coverboard, the asphaltic membrane, appropriate surfacing material or coating, and the attachment methods for all layers. Roof consultants, architects and roof manufacturers understand proper design. Roof design needs to follow applicable code requirements for wind, fire and impact resistance, as well as site-specific issues, such as enhanced wind resistance design, positive drainage and rooftop traffic protection. Roof designers can provide or assist with the development of written specifications and construction details that are specific to a roofing project for new construction or reroofing.

Low-slope asphalt-based roof systems are redundant; they are multi-layered systems. BUR systems include a base sheet, three or four reinforcing ply sheets and a surfacing, either aggregate (rock) or a cap sheet. MB sheets include one and sometimes two reinforcing layers and are commonly installed over a substantial asphaltic base sheet. Modified bitumen roofs can be granule surfaced, finished with reflective options or coated after installation. Aggregate, granules, films and coatings add UV protection, assist with fire resistance, provide durability to the roof system and can improve roof aesthetics.

An asphaltic cap sheet with a factory-applied reflective roof coating is installed over three glass-fiber ply sheets and a venting base sheet. The reflective coating reduces heat gain, and insulating concrete provides a stable substrate and high R-value. PHOTO: Aerial Photography Inc.

An asphaltic cap sheet with a factory-applied reflective roof coating is installed over three glass-fiber ply sheets and a venting base sheet. The reflective coating reduces heat gain, and insulating concrete provides a stable substrate and high R-value. PHOTO: Aerial Photography Inc.

Coverboards provide a durable layer immediately below the membrane, are resistant to foot traffic and separate the membrane from the thermal insulation layer. Protecting the thermal insulation helps maintain the insulation R-value as specified and installed.

Asphalt is a durable and long-lasting material for roof membranes and flashings. Asphalt is stable under significant temperature swings and can be highly impact resistant. Various reinforcements can be used to increase an asphaltic membrane’s durability. All asphaltic membranes are reinforced, during installation (BUR) or the manufacturing process (MB membranes). Polyester reinforcement has excellent elongation, tensile strength and recovery. It provides good puncture resistance and stands up well to foot traffic. Glass fiber reinforcement resists flame penetration and provides excellent tensile strength and dimensional stability.

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RRPs Help Achieve the RoofPoint Designation for Roofing Projects

Your roof is an asset—an asset that protects your building and everything and everyone in it. So it’s important to get a high quality, environmentally friendly roof system for the lowest annualized cost. There is a new environmentally focused certification for roofing professionals to help building owners make informed decisions about their roofs. The certification
is the RoofPoint Registered Professional (RRP) program.

BACKGROUND

The RRP program adds to the suite of information from the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing (Center) and complements the RoofPoint certification program and its RoofPoint Guideline for Environmentally Innovative Nonresidential Roofing. In addition to the RoofPoint Guideline and certification program, the suite of information
includes the RoofPoint 2012 Energy and Carbon Calculator, the Center/PIMA Roof and Wall Thermal Design Guide, the Center/Spray Foam Coalition Spray Polyurethane Design Guidance document, and guideline documents from the Center’s PV Taskforce about racking and attachment criteria for integration of PV on low- and steep-slope roof systems. The RRP’s focus is to be fluent in the RoofPoint Guideline, however. (More information about RoofPoint and the Center is available in the May/June issue of this magazine, page 34.)

The Meridian Vineyards roof restoration in Paso Robles, Calif., was submitted by D.C. Taylor Co. and achieved a 17 within RoofPoint, as well as a 2011 RoofPoint Excellence in Design Award for Excellence in Materials Management.

The Meridian Vineyards roof restoration in Paso Robles, Calif., was submitted by D.C. Taylor
Co. and achieved a 17 within RoofPoint, as well as a 2011 RoofPoint Excellence in Design
Award for Excellence in Materials Management.

RRP PROGRAM

The RRP program is intended to provide individual certification for roofing professionals who are designing, specifying, constructing or managing sustainable roof installations certified under the RoofPoint Guideline. The RoofPoint project certification program was started several years ago and has certified hundreds of the most sustainable and environmentally friendly roof installations across the U.S. and North America.

Because many of the sustainable concepts in RoofPoint are likely new to many building owners seeking guidance in the selection of sustainable roofs, the RRP program provides an important link between the ultimate roofing customer—the building owner—and the green-building community, similar to the relationship between the LEED rating system and the LEED AP professional designation.

“RoofPoint Registered Professionals represent a dedicated group of professionals in the roofing industry who make contributions every day to sustainable construction and whose work helps to showcase the critical role roofs play in mitigating the impact buildings have on our environment,” says Center President Craig Silvertooth.

As ambassadors for RoofPoint, RRPs provide services to building owners, facility managers and other building designers interested in achieving the RoofPoint designation for their projects.

CERTIFICATION AND AWARDS

As a building owner, requesting a “RoofPoint roof” in an RFP for a new roof system accelerates the process of ensuring the design and installation of a sustainable roof system. Working directly with RoofPoint Registered Professionals can guarantee the installation of a sustainable roof. RRPs, because they understand the RoofPoint program and process, are capable of self-certifying a new roof as a RoofPoint roof.

A key feature to the RoofPoint program is acknowledgement of the excellent work done by every member of the project team with certificates or awards for the building owner, facility manager, architect or roof consultant, the general contractor, subcontractors and suppliers. Certificates can be awarded to the team as part of a formal or informal presentation.

“I recently had the opportunity to attend a reception sponsored by a charter member of the RRP program in Denver,” notes Jim Hoff, vice president of Research for the Center. “At the reception, we were able to recognize every member of the building team involved in a number of RoofPoint projects for the General Services Administration in Denver. In addition to the GSA’s chief roofing manager, we were able to recognize the roofing contractor, roof system manufacturer, and a number of key service and support organizations that made these award-winning roofing systems possible. RoofPoint and the RRP program really helped to acknowledge everyone involved in these outstanding projects.”

Honda Headquarters, Clermont, Fla., scored a 22 within RoofPoint for Tecta America and was recognized with a 2011 RoofPoint Excellence in Design Award, Honorable Mention for Excellence in Water Management.

Honda Headquarters,
Clermont, Fla., scored a 22
within RoofPoint for Tecta
America and was recognized with a 2011 RoofPoint Excellence in Design Award, Honorable Mention for Excellence in Water Management.

Furthering the marketing opportunity, a RoofPoint-certified roof is eligible for the Excellence in Design Awards (EDAs). EDAs are given annually to the best RoofPoint projects. The EDA categories include energy, water, material and life-cycle/durability management; global, community, private sector and public sector leadership; excellence in reroofing; and advanced sustainable roofing.

RRP IMPORTANCE

An RRP understands the RoofPoint Guideline and can identify the many ways current roofing systems provide economic value and protect the environment. An RRP will wade through the myriad roof system choices to establish design, installation and maintenance criteria for the selection of sustainable roof systems. An RRP understands how to recognize and validate roof system
selection and reward environmental innovation in roofing. An RRP can help analyze the energy and carbon savings by using the RoofPoint Energy and Carbon Calculator, which helps promote life-cycle costs in lieu of the traditional initial-cost basis for roof system selection.

“For over 20 years, I have worked to promote the value of sustainable roof system design and construction with durable, time-tested materials and construction-detail design, delineated graphically for long-term service life, which is the essence of sustainability,” explains Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, principal of Hutchinson Design Group Ltd., Barrington, Ill.; a Roofing editorial advisor; and co-chair of CIB W083 Joint Committee on Roofing Materials and Systems, an international committee on sustainable low-slope roof systems. “The RoofPoint program and the RRP designation help me validate to my clients proven design standards and detailing, as well as help ensure my clients are getting the most durable and sustainable roof systems available.”

If you would like to learn more about RoofPoint and the RRP program, please visit the RoofPoint website, RoofPoint.org. It contains the following detailed materials:

    ▪▪ Information about the function, structure and content of the RoofPoint Guideline.
    ▪▪ A comprehensive database of all certified RoofPoint projects in North America.
    ▪▪ Detailed instructions how to become an RRP, including a free copy of the RRP Program Manual and application form.
    ▪▪ Free online training videos about RoofPoint, including “Introduction to RoofPoint”, “Scoring RoofPoint Projects” and “Submitting RoofPoint Projects”.

The Center encourages all building owners and facility managers to work with RRPs to obtain appropriate, environmentally friendly roof systems.

A Trade Association Brings Roofs to the Sustainability Discussion

Roofs, first and foremost, keep water and the elements out of a building. The roofing industry has done this quite well since the modernization of buildings began more than a century ago. Along the way, a number of trade associations—ARMA, ERA, MCA, NRCA, PIMA, SPFA, SPRI—have formed and evolved as materials and trends have changed. Each group provides excellent information relative to its mission and goals. Yet we know change keeps coming.

THE BYRON WHITE COURTHOUSE, DENVER, features a RoofPoint-certified high R-value (R-30) roof for energy savings. A dual-reinforced Derbigum modified bitumen membrane, 90-mil base sheet and a high-density coverboard were installed.

THE BYRON WHITE COURTHOUSE, DENVER, features a RoofPoint-certified high R-value (R-30) roof for energy savings. A dual-reinforced Derbigum modified bitumen membrane, 90-mil base sheet and a high-density coverboard were installed.

Since the turn of the century, the awareness and push for energy efficiency of buildings and the sustainability for materials and building design has grown substantially and has become an important topic in the public forum. Sustainability and environmentalism are universal topics.

Serving as a unified voice for issues involving roofing, energy and the environment, the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing was established in Washington, D.C., in 2008. The non-profit organization’s focus is to advocate and promote the use of environmentally friendly, high-performance roof systems, not just within the U.S., but in North America and globally. The center is a member-based association consisting of roofing manufacturers, roofing contractors, roofing consultants, raw-material suppliers and other trade groups within the roofing industry.

To promote the sustainability of roof systems, the center develops resources, products and educational information that can be used by the building industry to advance the longevity, durability and overall sustainability of roofs. Increased awareness of the importance of a building’s roof is critical to the center’s mission. The roof can be a large contributor to the energy efficiency of the building, a long-term asset and, increasingly, a location for energy production (solar, wind).

ROOFPOINT

The center’s premier program is RoofPoint, a guideline for environmentally innovative nonresidential roofing. RoofPoint is used to evaluate new and replacement roofs for commercial and institutional buildings based on their environmental performance during the life cycle of the building the roof covers. This provides a useful measure for what constitutes a sustainable roof during design, construction, operation and decommissioning.

RoofPoint is primarily a rating system, and when certain minimums are met, a roof can become a RoofPoint Certified roof. Certificates and plaques noting RoofPoint certification can be awarded and used to validate a commitment to sustainability and the environment.

RoofPoint is based on current state-of-the-art processes and methods, remaining technology neutral. It does not rank or prioritize materials or systems; however, RoofPoint emphasizes energy efficiency and long-term performance and durability as overarching key attributes of a sustainable roof. Material recycling and reuse, VOCs, water capture and reuse, hygro-thermal analysis, and operations and maintenance are a few of the categories within RoofPoint.

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Reroofing Is One of the Few Opportunities to Improve the Built Environment

All of us get misled by catch-phrases, like “Save the Planet” or “Global Warming” or “Climate Change”. Although phrases like these are well intended, they can be misleading; they really are off topic. Something like “Save the Humans” is more to the point and truly the root of the entire sustainability movement. Let’s face it: The efforts to be more green are inherently aimed at a healthier you and me, as well as our children’s and grandchildren’s desire for continued healthful lives and opportunities.

The existing PVC roof on the GM After Sales Warehouse, Lansing, Mich., was removed and recycled into new PVC roofing material, a portion of which was reinstalled on this project and helped it achieve RoofPoint certification.

The existing PVC roof on the GM After Sales Warehouse, Lansing, Mich., was removed and recycled into new PVC roofing material, a portion of which was reinstalled on this project and helped it achieve RoofPoint certification.

The discussion about green and sustainability needs some context to make it real and effectual. The question to ask is: How does green construction help humans live a healthier and happier life? The answer is: It is because of the co-benefits of building (and living) in a more environmentally appropriate way.

One key component of building environmentally appropriate buildings is that, collectively, we use less energy. Less energy use means no need to build another power plant that creates electricity while spewing pollution into the air. Less pollution in the air means people are healthier. It also means the water and soil are less polluted. We drink that water and eat what grows in the ground. We also eat “stuff” from the rivers, lakes and oceans. Healthier people means reduced costs for health care. Reduced sickness means fewer sick days at the office, and fewer sick days means more productivity by employees—and, dare I say, happier employees all because of the environmentally appropriate building, or a “human appropriate” building.

So what does all this have to do with roofs? Rooftops, because they are a significant percentage of the building envelope, should not be overlooked as an important and truly significant energy-efficiency measure. Building owners and facility managers should always include energy-efficiency components in their roof system designs. There are few opportunities to improve the building envelope; reroofing is one of those opportunities, and it shouldn’t be missed.

According to the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing and building envelope research firm Tegnos Inc., roof systems have the potential to save 700-plus trillion Btus in annual energy use. Too many roofs are not insulated to current code-required levels. If our rooftops were better insulated, these energy-saving estimates would become reality. Imagine the co-benefits of such a significant reduction in energy use!

The RoofPoint certified Bucks County Community College roof, in Perkasie, Pa., features a high-performance multi-layer insulation system that provides high levels of energy efficiency. Staggered joints break thermal discontinuities and a coverboard provides R-value and a durable surface.

The RoofPoint certified Bucks County Community College roof, in Perkasie, Pa., features a high-performance multi-layer insulation system that provides high levels of energy efficiency. Staggered joints break thermal discontinuities and a coverboard provides R-value and a durable surface.

But how do we know we’re doing the right thing? RoofPoint and the RoofPoint Carbon Calculator will help. The RoofPoint Carbon Calculator uses seven inputs to compare an energy-efficient roof with a baseline roof: insulation, thermal performance, air barrier, roof surface, rooftop PV, solar thermal and roof daylighting. The outputs from the Carbon Calculator are total roof energy use, energy savings due to the energy-efficient roof design, energy savings during peak demand, and CO2 offset for the energy-efficient roof design. This can be used to compare an existing roof (the baseline roof) to a new roof design (the energy efficient roof), and this will help verify the energy savings and reduction of carbon output. It’s an excellent tool for verifying how green a new roof can be.

And don’t just take my word on this co-benefits idea. The Economist published an article about the EPA and rulings on interstate pollution. The article cited a claim that by this year, 2014—if pollution rates were half of those in 2005—hundreds of thousands of asthma cases each year could be prevented and nearly 2 million work and school days lost to respiratory illness could be eliminated. And just think, improving your roof’s energy efficiency is key to the reduction of power-plant use and the pollution that comes from them. So, yes, roofs can help your kids and your grandkids be healthy and happy.

ASTM International and Sustainable Roofing

ASTM International is a well-known standard-writing organization for the construction industry and other industries. As the building design and construction industries have moved toward more sustainable methods and products, it follows that more standardization of sustainability is necessary. This is certainly true for the roofing and waterproofing industry. ASTM now has a group devoted to developing standards for sustainable roofing.

Organizationally, ASTM is divided into numerous committees, each having a specific focus. The ASTM D08 committee is responsible for roofing and waterproofing standards. Within the D08 committee, there are multiple subcommittees that focus on a segment of the roofing/waterproofing industry—from asphalt shingles to spray polyurethane foam to modified-bitumen membranes to single-ply membranes and more. D08.24 is the subcommittee that is developing standards specifically related to sustainable roofing.

Further division of each subcommittee into Task Groups allows narrowly focused groups to develop standards for very specific topics. There are currently four Task Groups within D08.24:

  • D08.24.01 Guidelines for Sustainable Design
  • D08.24.03 Recycling Practices and Reporting Methodology
  • D08.24.04 Durability
  • D08.24.05 Selection Criteria Vegetative Roof Membranes

Process

Standards are developed by Task Groups with active participation by attendees at the semi-annual meetings. Typically, a draft standard (called a work item until it is an approved standard) is initially sent out for ballot to the Task Group to obtain comments that will improve the draft standard. After balloting to the Task Group, the draft standard is balloted to the full D08 membership. At times, a standard is simultaneously balloted to the Task Group and the full membership. During the balloting process, comments and negative votes are reviewed and dealt with according to ASTM protocols. Standards development is a very linear process that works well to achieve a consensus in the D08 committee. Once a consensus is reached, the standard is published for use.

The background on the process is necessary to understand the activities of the D08.24 subcommittee. Because the subcommittee was only recently established, all standards are still in the development stage.

Task Group Specifics

The D08.24.01 Task Group is developing a new standard, work item WK26599, which is currently titled “New Guide for Design of Sustainable, Low-Slope Roofing Systems”. The current scope is:

  • This Standard provides guidance for designing sustainable low-sloped roofing systems, including exposed membrane roofs, membranes covered with vegetative (green) overburden systems, ballasted roofs and protected membrane roofing assemblies. A sustainable roofing system minimizes environmental impact, conserves energy, and has maximized service life.

The scope recognizes the roof’s primary function is to weatherproof the building’s top surface.

The document provides a sequential process for designing sustainable roof systems. The document does not provide a prescriptive approach, but “attempts to help the user define and consider roofing system demands and environmental life cycle impacts, and integrate these with features that contribute environmental, energy conservation, or other benefit in service” through a number of considerations, which include roofing demands, functional expectations, end-user requirements and site restraints. The document is big-picture, technology-neutral and process-based.

The D08.24.03 Task Group is developing a new standard, work item 24614, currently titled “New Guide for Recycling Practices & Reporting Methodology”. The intent of the document is to unify common practices and develop an industry-accepted reporting format for recycling common roofing materials, such as asphalt shingles. The document is in its infancy and has not been balloted to date.

The D08.24.04 task group is developing a new standard, work item 26595, currently titled “New Guide for Roof System Durability”. The task group is still evaluating the specific scope but will focus on PVC and EPDM membranes in two separate documents. The intent is to provide methodology to evaluate the variables that lead to increased durability of PVC and EPDM roof systems. Neither document has been balloted yet.

The D08.24.05 Task Group is developing a new standard, work item 29304, currently titled “New Guide for Selection of Roofing/Waterproofing Membrane Systems for Vegetative (Green) Roof Systems”. The document will provide technology-neutral considerations for selection of appropriate membranes for vegetative roofs. The Task Group is expected to begin the balloting process soon.

Liaisons

The ASTM D08.24 group works with other groups, like E60 on Sustainability and the Built Environment Advisory Committee, to ensure continuity of ideas with all ASTM committees. Specifically, E60.01 on Buildings and Construction and E60.80 on General Sustainability Standards are in the focus of the D08.24 liaison efforts.

The ASTM sustainability standards are intended to be used by the roofing, construction and design industries to formalize the efforts toward more sustainable roofs and roofing. It is hoped that other roofing groups, such as ARMA, CEIR, ERA, NRCA and SPRI, will reference ASTM’s sustainability standards in their documents.

I encourage everyone in the roofing industry to not only join ASTM, but to participate in the development of the standards our industry uses each and every day. ASTM D08.24 needs your input as the roofing industry moves further toward sustainable products and activities.

Reroofing Is One of the Few Opportunities to Improve the Built Environment

All of us get misled by catch-phrases, like “Save the Planet” or “Global Warming” or “Climate Change”. Although phrases like these are well intended, they can be misleading; they really are off topic. Something like “Save the Humans” is more to the point and truly the root of the entire sustainability movement. Let’s face it: The efforts to be more green are inherently aimed at a healthier you and me, as well as our children’s and grandchildren’s desire for continued healthful lives and opportunities.

The discussion about green and sustainability needs some context to make it real and effectual. The question to ask is: How does green construction help humans live a healthier and happier life? The answer is: It is because of the co-benefits of building (and living) in a more environmentally appropriate way.

One key component of building environmentally appropriate buildings is that, collectively, we use less energy. Less energy use means no need to build another power plant that creates electricity while spewing pollution into the air. Less pollution in the air means people are healthier. It also means the water and soil are less polluted. We drink that water and eat what grows in the ground. We also eat “stuff” from the rivers, lakes and oceans. Healthier people means reduced costs for health care. Reduced sickness means fewer sick days at the office, and fewer sick days means more productivity by employees. And, dare I say, happier employees are all because of the environmentally appropriate building, or a “human appropriate” building.

So what does all this have to do with roofs? Rooftops, because they are a significant percentage of the building envelope, should not be overlooked as an important and truly significant energy-efficiency measure. Building owners and facility managers should always include energy- efficiency components in their roof system designs. There are few opportunities to improve the building envelope; reroofing is one of those opportunities, and it shouldn’t be missed.

According to the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing, Washington, D.C., and building envelope research firm Tegnos Inc., Carmel, Ind., roof systems have the potential to save 700-plus trillion Btus in annual energy use. Too many roofs are not insulated to current code-required levels. If our rooftops were better insulated, these energy-saving estimates would become reality. Imagine the co-benefits of such a significant reduction in energy use!

But how do we know we’re doing the right thing? RoofPoint and the RoofPoint Carbon Calculator will help. The RoofPoint Carbon Calculator uses seven inputs to compare an energy-efficient roof with a baseline roof: insulation, thermal performance, air barrier, roof surface, rooftop PV, solar thermal and roof daylighting. The outputs from the RoofPoint Carbon Calculator are total roof energy use, energy savings due to the energy- efficient roof design, energy savings during peak demand, and CO2 offset for the energy-efficient roof design. This can be used to compare an existing roof (the baseline roof) to a new roof design (the energy-efficient roof), and this will help verify the energy savings and reduction of carbon output. It’s an excellent tool for verifying how green a new roof can be.

Don’t just take my word on this co-benefits idea. The Economist recently published a blog about the EPA and rulings on interstate pollution. The article cited a claim that by 2014—if pollution rates were half of those in 2005—hundreds of thousands of asthma cases each year could be prevented and nearly 2 million work and school days lost to respiratory illness could be eliminated. And just think, improving your roof’s energy efficiency is key to the reduction of power-plant use and the pollution that comes from them. So, yes, a roof can help your kids and your grandkids be healthy and happy.