Architectural Shingle Roofing System on New Field House Helps St. David’s Prepare for the Future

St. David’s Episcopal School’s new field house features an architectural shingle roof designed to provide long life and protection from algae growth. Photo: Atlas Roofing.

St. David’s Episcopal School’s new field house features an architectural shingle roof designed to provide long life and protection from algae growth. Photo: Atlas Roofing.

Originally founded in 1972 as a high school, St. David’s Episcopal School now serves students in pre-K programs all the way through graduation. Located on a wooded campus in suburban Raleigh, N.C., the school now attracts students from Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Wake Forest and Cary. And as the student body grows, so does the campus of St. David’s.

The school’s facilities are being built with the future in mind, and when the decision was made to add a new athletic field house, durability and longevity were key factors in the decision-making process.

For the roof on the new complex, the school turned to Baker Roofing and Executive Vice President John Matthews, a parent of two St. David’s students who has worked with the school for the past decade. To ensure that the campus itself was built for longevity, Matthews selected 60 squares of Atlas Pinnacle Pristine shingles in Pristine Desert. Other products installed on the project include ProCut Hip & Ridge Shingles, ProCut Starter Shingles, and Summit 180 Synthetic Underlayment.

The architectural shingles feature Scotchgard Protector, which will help the field house maintain its appearance by resisting ugly black streaks caused by algae. In fact, more than 80 percent of the roofs in the U.S. are prone to algae invasion, so protection is the key to a long-lasting roof. “Having the Pinnacle Pristine shingles means the school will have the best protection and appearance,” Matthews says.

His personal relationship with St. David’s and his commitment to the donors who made the new construction possible meant that this project was especially important to Matthews. “The quality education provided by St. David’s is critical to shaping young lives,” he says. “With that in mind, it was essential I feel confident in the products we installed. Knowing that Atlas stands by its products made me sure of the roof the school would be receiving. The extended premium protection period on the Signature Select Roofing System gave everyone a lot of confidence in the decision to go with Atlas.”

When St. David’s Episcopal School in suburban Raleigh, N.C., decided to add a new athletic field house, durability and longevity were key factors in the decision-making process. Photo: Atlas Roofing.

When St. David’s Episcopal School in suburban Raleigh, N.C., decided to add a new athletic field house, durability and longevity were key factors in the decision-making process. Photo: Atlas Roofing.


On a campus where everything they do is geared toward the future, building a facility with longevity in mind is key. “Knowing my own children attend St. David’s and our family is a part of this community made it extremely important that the work we do and the materials we chose be of superior quality,” Matthews notes. “The Atlas system is a product that will ensure the building offers lasting protection and a beautiful appearance for years to come.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Baker Roofing Company, Raleigh, N.C., Bakerroofing.com
Roof System Manufacturer: Atlas Roofing, Atlasroofing.com

MFM Building Products Names New Vice President and General Manager

MFM Building Products, a manufacturer of a full envelope of waterproofing and weather barrier products for the building industry, announced that the firm has promoted Tony Reis to the position of vice president and general manager. The announcement was made by Robert S. Simpson, president of MFAM Building Products.

According to the company, Reis started his relationship with MFM as an independent sales representative in 1999, covering the New England area. He was then promoted to the position of sales and marketing director in 2008. In this position, Reis oversaw all sales and marketing activities for the company. Since his hire, MFM has experienced tremendous growth each and every year, noted Simpson.

As vice president and general manager, Reis will retain his current sales and marketing responsibilities, and take on the added duties of overseeing the company’s day-to-day operations. Reis will work closely with all MFM departments to synchronize the efforts of each.

“Tony is a tireless worker who gives 110 percent effort for the company,” Simpson said. “The growth MFM has experienced has been truly remarkable. I can attribute much of the credit to the leadership Tony has shown over the years. We look forward to having him in this newly formed position.”

Elastomeric Coating Line Offers High Reflectivity

Duro-Last introduces its line of Duro-Shield Coatings and MaterialsDuro-Last introduces its line of Duro-Shield Coatings and Materials, available in Duro-Shield 20, Duro-Shield 10 and Duro-Shield 5. Duro-Shield Roof Coatings are 100 percent elastomeric acrylic with a white finish that reflects the sun’s rays, which can lower heat buildup and reduce utility costs. Duro-Shield 20 offers 35 mils of coverage when dry and a 20-year limited warranty. Duro-Shield 10 features 24 mils of coverage when dry and a 10-year limited warranty. Duro-Shield 5 offers 20 mils of coverage when dry and a five-year limited warranty. Additional products in the Duro-Shield line include Duro-Shield Primer, Duro-Shield Brush Grade Mastic and Polyester Reinforcement Fabric.

School Board’s Kite-Shaped Building Reflects Location’s History

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The new home for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office in Alabama is a 14,500-square-foot modern structure that marks the first phase of a long-term development plan on a 24-acre site in Homewood, Ala., a suburb of Birmingham.

The contemporary structure was designed by Williams Blackstock Architects in Birmingham. “The roof design was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill,” says architect Kyle Kirkwood. “It’s a spot where kids and parents come to fly kites. The roof, which slopes in two different directions and is kite-like in its appearance, is representative of the popular site.”

The building was conceived as a “garden pavilion” integrated within the site, intended to mediate between public and private property, and man-made and natural materials. The structure is nestled into a line of pine trees with a cantilevered roof extending just beyond the pines.

The design incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. The main roof includes 16,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad panels up to 60 feet long. The design also incorporates an interior application of the Flush panels by integrating them into the lobby area. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. The panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Acworth, Ga., plant.

The roof design was complex, Kirkwood notes. “Since the roof slopes in two directions, we had an interesting valley situation where we had to coordinate the orientation of the seams,” Kirkwood said.

Challenging Installation

The roof also features two rectangular low-slope sections that were covered with a TPO system manufactured by Firestone Building Products. The roof systems were installed by Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing in Birmingham, which specializes in commercial roofing, primarily architectural metal and single-ply projects.

The building is nestled into a line of pine tree

The building is nestled into a line of pine trees near the edge of the site, adjacent to a residential area. The cantilevered roof was designed to help the structure blend in with the location and mediate between public and private property. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Eddie Still, Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing’s vice president, helped prepare the budget for Brasfield and Gorrie, the construction manager on the project, so Still was prepared to go when his bid was accepted. “It was a job that consisted of a large portion of metal and a smaller portion of TPO,” he says. “Since we do both things, we were a good fit.”

The installation was made event tougher by the logistics of the site, according to Still. “The design of the metal roof was unusual, to say the least,” he says. “It had a valley that cut through it, and the panels were sloped in two directions. That’s not normally the case.”

The biggest obstacle was posed by the building’s location on a hill near the edge of the property line, immediately adjacent to a residential neighborhood. “The Snap-Clad panels were approximately 60 feet long, which isn’t a problem if you have the equipment to handle them,” Still notes. “It does pose a problem logistically when it comes to getting them into a tight area, and we definitely had that.”

Panels were trailered in and hoisted to the roof by a crane. “Once the panels were up there, the installation was fairly easy,” Still says. “The roof didn’t have a lot of changes in elevation or different plateaus built into it. The only quirky thing was that valley, and once you had that squared away, you were good to go.”

Coordinating penetrations with members of plumbing and HVAC trades is critical, according to Still. “On the metal roofs, we always stress that you’re trying to present an aesthetic picture for the building, so you want to minimize the penetrations so it looks cleaner,” he says. “You have to coordinate on site so if you have a plumbing exhaust stack, it comes up in the center of the pan and not on the seam.”

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

A small section of metal roof near the entryway was made up of mechanically seamed panels. “The reason we used Tite-Loc panels on that portion of the roof was because of the low slope,” Still says. “We used the same width panel, so it looks identical, but the seams are different. They are designed to work on systems with slopes as low as ½:12.”

Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing also installed the Firestone self-adhered TPO roof system on two low-slope sections of the roof, totaling approximately 3,000 square feet.

Still looks back on the completed project with pride. “Our niche would be a building like this one, which has TPO or some other membrane roofing and metal,” he says. “We’ve been in business 33 years. We have a well-deserved reputation for the type of work we do. In the bid market things are price driven, so more often than not, price is the determining factor. But in larger projects and work that’s negotiated, the G.C. is going to opt to choose people to solicit pricing from who have a history of doing successful projects with them.”

TEAM

Architect: Williams Blackstock Architects, Birmingham, Ala., Wba-architects.com
Construction Manager: Brasfield and Gorrie, Birmingham, Brasfieldgorrie.com
General Contractor: WAR Construction Inc., Tuscaloosa, Ala., Warconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing Inc., Birmingham, Qualityarch.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Pac-Clad.com
Low-Slope Roof Manufacturer: Firestone Building Products, FirestoneBPCO.com

New Shingles Speed Up Installation Process in First Test in the Field

This residence in the Atlanta area

This residence in the Atlanta area is the first house in the country to have Atlas shingles with HP42” technology installed on its roof. Photos: Atlas Roofing

Atlas shingles with HP42” technology, a new format introduced in July, were recently installed on a home in the Atlanta area. It is the first roof in the country to be installed with the new shingles, and the homeowner, contractor and manufacturer are all pleased with the results.

Larger than any shingle currently made in the United States, the HP42” shingle format results in a faster installation, as well as significant savings in labor and materials for contractors, according to the manufacturer. HP42” format shingles are the new standard for the Atlas StormMaster Shake, Pinnacle Pristine and ProLam shingle lines.

“These new high-performance HP42” format shingles are larger and better engineered, which makes them easier and faster to install,” says Paul Casseri, product manager of Atlas Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division. “As a result, contractors and crew can expect a drastically improved installation experience.”

Faster on The Roof

Contractor Dirk Gowder of Ryno Roof in Atlanta says the HP42” shingle format made the project a breeze. “The larger shingle sped up installation time by about 10 percent because there’s less waste, more courses per run, and there’s less cutting of the shingles,” Gowder explains.

With the benefit of using fewer shingles and experiencing less waste, this particular job was easily completed in one day, giving Gowder’s guys plenty of time to do the finishing touches and clean up around the home.

The Ryno Roof crew also installed Summit 60 Synthetic Underlayment, Atlas Pro-Cut 10X Starter Shingles and Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector, which helps a home maintain its appearance by resisting ugly black streaks caused by algae. The project used Atlas Pinnacle Pristine shingles in Pristine Hearthstone, seamlessly mixing both HP and HP42” format shingles on the roof.

Mix and Match

“The install process, even with the mixed shingles, couldn’t have been simpler,” Gowder says. “It was an easy transition from the standard-sized shingles to the 42-inch shingles. The new HP42” format shingle fits the pallet perfectly, so all of the shingles were nice and straight and flat when we opened every single bundle. My guys moved through the install just like they would have if this were a standard roof job with only one type of shingle. The Atlas quick start guide had clear, easy-to-follow instructions that made the job go smoothly.”

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high, with a 6-inch exposure. It features an enhanced 1½-inch nailing area. Photos: Atlas Roofing

The old format of the Atlas HP shingles and new HP42” format shingles both have the same 6-inch exposure, which allows them to be mixed on a roof—as long as the products come from the same plant. Shingles made in different plant locations may contain a different granule blend and can vary in color.

For any roof installation, contractors should follow the manufacturer’s printed installation instructions, which include keeping the shingle seams outside 5 inches of each other in relation to the shingles in the previous and proceeding course when mixing the shingle sizes.

“After using HP42” format shingles on the test house, I’m going to start using them on all of my jobs because they make installation easier and faster and save me money because I don’t have to order as many bundles since they produce less waste,” Gowder states.

The roof qualifies for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System warranty, which comes with a built-in extended protection period.

“The quality Atlas products, backed up by the Signature Select coverage, will protect this home for a long time,” Gowder says.

Specialty Coating Creates Weathered Metal Appearance

Fabral has added the Weathered Metal Series to its line of Specialty Coatings. Fabral has added the Weathered Metal Series to its line of Specialty Coatings. Users have a choice of two stages of aged steel—moderately weathered Raw and more heavily weathered Robust. According to the manufacturer, each pattern is crafted and engineered to give any roofing or cladding project the authentic look of timelessness. The Weathered Metal Series is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology applied over GALVALUME-coated steel sheets.

Logistics Create Challenges on Metal Roof Installation for Kentucky High School

When the design for Logan High School in Russellville, Ky.

When the design for Logan High School in Russellville, Ky., called for metal panels measuring 161 feet, 2 inches in length, the decision was made to roll form them on the job site. Photos: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company

The design for the metal roof on Logan High School called for panels on one side of the roof to measure more than 160 feet. That posed logistical problems, to be sure, but the project proved there’s more than one way to deliver roof panels.

Morin, a Kingspan Group Company, recently introduced an onsite roll-forming process that runs panels to the eaves, where they are gathered and stacked for installation. Logan High School in Russellville, Ky., was the first project that put the method to the test. Panels on one side of the roof were 46 feet long, while panels on the other side measured 161 feet, 2 inches in length.

According to the company, the on-site process offers the benefit of producing panels of almost any length without lapping them. This is especially useful when restrictions on the length of delivery trucks and their loads do not allow for panels to be delivered via truck.

On this project, 89,000 square feet of SymmeTry Roof Series panels in Regal White were installed. “For the longer panels, we had 11 men on the roof,” says Basil Slagle, production manager and roll former operator for Morin. “We also had three separate scissor lifts between the roll former and the eave, with men on them to guide the panels to the roof because that’s as close as we could get with the roll former.”

The SymmeTry Roof Series is a mechanically seamed structural roof system that is both symmetrical and hydrostatic by design. Slagle produced 18-inch wide panels with 2 1/2-inch legs from the 22-gauge, pre-painted Galvalume.

The start of the project was delayed by heavy rains, notes Slagle. “And that Kentucky red clay, if you’d walk on it wet, you’d sink into the clay up to your shin. They had trucks with four-foot tires getting stuck in the wet clay.”

Tough Field Conditions

When the rain stopped, Slagle got to the jobsite on a Monday and realized he would not be able to drive his 10-ton vehicle into place. “They had to build us a 300-foot gravel road so we could pull the machine into place, get it where we needed it to be,” he says. “We finally got set up that Thursday morning.”

Eastern Corp. installed the roof system

Eastern Corp. installed the roof system, using crews ranging from 12-17 workers at a given time. Panels for the shorter side of the roof had to be transported over the ridge and stacked by hand. Photos: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company

Once the roll former was in place—about 100 feet from the roof eaves—the three scissor lifts were rolled into place in line between the roll former and the roof edge. Slagle then ran a “sacrifice panel” to use as a bridge, of sorts, from the roll former to the roof. Panels going on to the roof would slide across the sacrificial panel to the roof, where crew members would carry them to a staging spot on the roof. The sacrificial panel, almost 100 feet long, was eventually recycled.

Slagle ran the shorter panels first so crew members could haul them across the ridge to the opposite side of the building. Then the longer panels were produced and set up on the near side of the building. The Regal White panels were all covered with plastic film to protect them from the red clay on the boots of the installers, who had to walk on the panels to install the batten over the seams. After the battens were installed and seamed, the plastic film was removed. (Failure to remove the plastic film in a timely fashion will eventually lead to damage on the panels when the film is removed.)

“The installation went great,” says Nancy Mullins, senior project manager for Eastern Corp., of Norcross, Ga. “We had anywhere from 12-17 crew members at the site at a given time. The challenges were the logistical hurdles like getting the scissor lifts in place and getting the panels to the roof and stacking them.

On this project, 89,000 square feet of SymmeTry Roof

On this project, 89,000 square feet of SymmeTry Roof Series panels by Morin were installed. Photos: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company

“We install all the panels and then come back to install the seam cap and do the seaming. We always wait to make sure everything is where it needs to be, in regard to any penetrations. We really had no issues.”

After the panels were in place, the battens were installed and seamed around the 2 1/2-inch legs of each pan. The battens were cut to 46 feet to match the panel length for the shorter roof. To batten and seam the 161-plus foot panels, the battens were cut to 81 feet and lapped near the center. Slagle ran panels for four buildings at the school, one attached to the main school building and three outbuildings still under construction.

Eastern also installed 1,100 linear feet of a snow retention system, the iBeam from Sno Gem. The iBeam is installed near the eaves on both sides of the roof, with the longer panels hosting a second row nearer the center of the roof.

TEAM

Architect: JKS Architecture, Hopkinsville, Ky., JKSae.com
General Contractor: A&K Construction Inc., Paducah, Ky., AKconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Eastern Corp., Norcross, Ga., Easterncorpus.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company, Morincorp.com

Preserving History at Indiana State University

The State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project

The State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project that restored Normal Hall to its former glory. This photo shows the exterior after the renovation was completed. Photo: Indiana State University

Completed in 1909, Normal Hall is the second oldest surviving building on the Indiana State University campus in Terre Haute, Ind. Since then, Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations, including an addition added in 1957. But by 2010, the grand neo-classical building was largely unoccupied and falling into disrepair. The hall maintained its perch at the center of campus, but years of service to its tens of thousands of students had taken their toll.

“We try to preserve the history of ISU here on campus,” says Seth Porter of ISU facility management. “But between roof leaks and other issues, it was becoming an eyesore.” So, the State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project and partnered with architectural firm arcDESIGN to bring the building back to life.

“This renovation will return Normal Hall to its rightful place in the center of campus life,” says ISU President Dan Bradley. “The project will provide a valuable new resource to students while preserving and re-energizing a significant historic structure in the heart of campus.”

Aside from the stately Indiana limestone, the building had to be redone from the foundation to the roof. And the history that makes Normal Hall special also made for unique challenges in the design and renovation process.

They Don’t Build Them Like They Used To

“People will say, ‘They don’t build them like they used to,’” says Greg Miller, project manager from arcDESIGN. And in many cases, “It’s a good thing they don’t!”

Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations

Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations since it was completed in 1909, but by 2010, the neo-classical building was largely unoccupied and in need of major structural repairs. Photo: Indiana State University Archive

Normal Hall was originally designed for and used as the university’s central library. At that time in history, after the Civil War and before the 1920s, libraries were built in a certain way. Due to open flames of gas lighting and unreliable supply of electricity, indoor lighting at the time could have been dangerous to a library’s collection. So, libraries were designed to maximize natural light, with plenty of windows, skylights, and even glass floors. Instead of structural walls, Normal Hall’s six levels of bookshelves—or “stacks”—were designed to be structurally self-supporting, independent of the rest of the building.

Miller led the design team through the challenging process of removing the six-level stacks and replacing them with four new floors for offices and building systems. A portion of the stacks system was salvaged and reconstructed, providing the same view patrons would have had more than 100 years ago.

The Biggest Challenge

During construction, crews discovered unstable structural conditions on the north side of the building adjacent to the original six-story stacks system. The entire exterior wall had to be removed and replaced, all while supporting the existing attic and roof nearly 60-feet above the ground floor.

To do this, crews constructed a mammoth 60-foot-high temporary structural system in and through the six-story iron stacks system still in place to support the original attic and roof deck. The north wall was completely removed and reconstructed. Structural steel columns supporting roof trusses were replaced while ends of deteriorated roof trusses were reconstructed in place.

“It was a monumental feat,” Miller says. “It was a great example of teamwork by Indiana State University, design consultants and the contractor.”

The Roof System

For the roof replacement portion of the project, arcDESIGN collaborated with The Garland Company Inc., a leader of high-performance roof and building envelope solutions. Garland worked with local roofing contractor Associated Roofing Professionals (ARP) to install a new modified bitumen roof system with a high albedo coating.

All existing roofing was removed to structure and Garland’s StressPly EUV fiberglass-polyester reinforced, SBS and SIS modified bitumen membrane was installed to provide long-term waterproofing protection.

Associated Roofing Professionals installed a new modified bitumen roof system

Associated Roofing Professionals installed a new modified bitumen roof system manufactured by The Garland Company. After the modified bitumen membrane was installed, the roof was then coated with Garland’s Pyramic white, nontoxic, reflective acrylic coating. Photo: The Garland Company Inc.

The roof was then coated with Garland’s Pyramic white, nontoxic, acrylic coating, which helps preserve asphaltic or modified bitumen surfaces and significantly reduces under-roof temperatures to create a more energy-efficient environment.

“ISU has a strong commitment to the environment, and we were able to help them achieve their performance goals while also contributing to LEED credits with our environmentally-conscious products,” explains Rick Ryherd, area manager for Garland.

The largest—and brightest—rehabilitation involved the stained-glass dome atop Normal Hall. The original dome had deteriorated so extensively that, by the middle of the 20th century, the remaining glass panels were completely removed and the dome was completely hidden. A suspended plaster ceiling sealed off the once grand rotunda. “Imagine just a skeleton, an empty dome with only the ribs visible,” said Miller.

The dome restoration began with historic photos, documents and forensic analysis. The glass art featured distinguished educators and philosophers. Some of the original stained-glass panels were recovered from the building, whiles others had to be recreated. Conrad Schmitt Studios, in Wisconsin, restored the stained glass to its former glory. With the stained glass restored, rehab on the rotunda continued. Inside Normal Hall, the rotunda mural was restored and more than 140 light bulb sockets were re-wired to light the dome. Above the dome, a new 40-foot octagonal skylight was installed, along with supplemental lighting. Below the rotunda, 20 original columns that stretch through the open hall were restored with scagliola and paint finishes.

The crew worked to save original hardware and finishes that hadn’t already been lost to time. They were able to restore and replicate plaster moldings and cornices, save original wood doors and casings, and restore the grand marble and bronze staircase. “The general contractor did a great job preserving the historic detail with the extra time they put into restoring this building,” notes Porter.

The Future of Normal Hall

With all the time and effort put into preserving the history, the team did not forget to focus on the future of Normal Hall. The team, starting with arcDESIGN, incorporated the old and the new seamlessly.

The north exterior wall had to be removed

The north exterior wall had to be removed and replaced, so crews constructed a 60-foot-high temporary structure to support the existing attic and roof. Photo: Greg Miller, arcDESIGN.

For starters, Miller said the design was intended to respect but not imitate the building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Rather, he said, “the design clearly communicates original versus new construction to patrons.” Miller consulted experts from the team, from historians to a representative from the roofing manufacturer to gather the full scope of the project.

Today, the original stately limestone structure is accentuated by the addition, comprised predominantly of glass and Indiana limestone. The addition houses functional requirements such as stairs, elevators, restrooms and mechanical services, maximizing use of the historic interior spaces.

The renovation was planned and constructed to achieve LEED Certification by the USGBC. Renovation included new HVAC systems utilizing the university’s existing central steam heating plant that runs on natural gas. LED lighting throughout is an energy efficient replacement for the building, originally built with combination gas and electric light fixtures.

100 Years in the Making

Re-dedicated in October 2015, Normal Hall is back in action at the center of campus as home to the university’s Center for Student Success and numerous tutors, counselors and mentors. Below the rotunda, more than 100 years after the building opened its doors, students gather in the university Reading Room and Gallery modeled after the original hall when it opened to students in 1909.

TEAM

Architect: arcDESIGN, Indianapolis, Arcdesign.us
General Contractor: Weddle Brothers Construction, Evansville, Ind., Weddlebros.com
Roofing Contractor: Associated Roofing Professionals, Terre Haute, Ind.
Roof System Manufacturer: The Garland Company Inc., Garlandco.com

Metal Roofing System Is the Answer for Rocky Mountain Home Retrofit

When it came time to replace the roof on this Colorado

When it came time to replace the roof on this Colorado custom home, the owner wanted a roof system that would look good and stand up to the elements. He chose the Riva Classic Copper Shingle from Vail Metal Systems. Photos: Vail Metal Systems

When the owner of a home situated in the Rocky Mountains was faced with replacing his 10,000-square-foot roof, he had a daunting set of criteria. He wanted a roof that would last longer and look better than the wood shake roof he had in place. He also wanted a roof that would be fire resistant, and one that would stand up to the elements in this harsh environment, as the home was situated high above the ski areas of Vail and Aspen in Colorado.

The elevation of this home is almost 10,000 feet, and snow loads are a major concern, as are high winds and exposure to ultraviolet rays. The homeowner needed a durable roof system that was designed for the Rocky Mountains, one that would add value to his investment.

He found the answer in Vail Metal Roof Systems. The product was originally developed in the Vail area more than 20 years ago by David Plath and his partners at Plath Construction for just these sorts of issues. “At the time, the roofs in Vail were failing in 15 to 20 years,” Plath remembers. “Maintenance cost were a huge, chronic problem for all types of roofing except cedar shakes. Clay tile was breaking at catastrophic rates. Copper standing seam roofs were being destroyed by sliding snow and ice dropping from upper roofs.”

Once installed, the copper panels

Once installed, the copper panels have an exposure that is 32 inches wide by 11 inches tall. Panels are held in place with clips that are fastened to the substrate, allowing for expansion and contraction. Photos: Vail Metal Systems

Plath’s goal was to develop a metal shingle product that was efficient to install, needed little or no maintenance, and could be priced competitively with standing seam metal roof systems. He came up with a metal shingle concept comprised of a folded panel 37.125 inches long and 13.5 inches wide, designed to look like four individual shingles side by side. When the product is installed, the exposure is 32 inches wide by 11 inches tall.

“I chose the metal shingle design because of its long history, with evidence of copper shingle roofs lasting centuries,” Plath recalls. “The copper shingle design was first tested in the winter of 1994. Our design didn’t invent metal shingle roofing, of course, but we did find a way to create a product with four metal shingles per panel. They were indistinguishable from custom, handmade metal shingles made by master craftsman.”

The Riva Series metal shingle has developed a history of meeting the needs of area homeowners since its invention, according to Plath. The company offers the product in copper and zinc, as well as steel and aluminum substrates pre-painted with PVDF coating systems in a variety of solid colors and print-coated patterns. “The durability of the roof system has been proven over many years with hundreds of installations, and we have a track record second to none in meeting these types of vigorous needs,” he says.

Replacing the Roof

For the Rocky Mountain retrofit project, the Riva Classic Copper Shingle was chosen. The original roof system had an insulation value of R-39, and the goal was to keep the house well insulated while installing the new roof system. This required a highly trained installer for the new roof, and no one had more experience than Plath Construction, the company originally co-founded by David Plath and now run by current owners Alberto Ortega and Francisco Castillo.

Ortega and Castillo worked in conjunction with Schaeffer Hyde Construction, the general contractor on the home when it was originally built. Rob Faucett of Schaeffer Hyde Construction was the project manager on the roof replacement project.

Photos: Vail Metal Systems

Photos: Vail Metal Systems

After the old roof was removed, the Vail Metal Roof system was installed. A layer of Grace Ice and Water Guard was applied to the deck, and new copper flashings and metal panels were installed per the manufacturer’s specifications. Clips were used to fasten the panels to the substrate and still allow for expansion and contraction. On this project, ridge vents were installed to control moisture buildup from the interior of the building.

The home was built with natural stone in a gorgeous landscape, and the homeowner wanted a roof system that would blend well with these architectural elements and make a strong statement as it stood up to the tough conditions. He found the right answer in the Riva Classic Copper Shingle, and he is pleased with the aesthetics and the performance of the roof, according to Plath.

At one time the product was licensed to another company, but Plath was recently thrilled to announce he is personally involved with Vail metal shingles once again as the owner of Vail Metal Systems. “Our customers love the product,” Plath says, “We have testimonials unlike anything I’ve ever heard throughout my career. It’s been my dream to manufacture this product and make it available to the industry, and relaunching Vail Metal Systems is the perfect retirement plan for a guy that doesn’t know when to slow down.”

TEAM

General Contractor: Shaeffer Hyde Construction, Avon, Colo., Shaefferhyde.com
Roofing Contractor: Plath Construction Inc., Eagle, Colo., Plathroofing.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Vail Metal Systems, VailMetal.com

Soprema to Host Building Envelope Clinic in New York

Soprema Inc. will be hosting a regional Building Envelope Clinic in New York on Oct. 10, 2017, for architects, consultants and contractors looking to further their knowledge, network and earn continuing education units. The clinic will be held at AIA New York, located at 536 LaGuardia Pl., New York, NY 10012.

The Building Envelope Clinic will begin at 9:00 a.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with a cocktail reception and prize raffle.

“We’re proud to be offering these clinics regionally to help support our consultants, contractors and architects,” said Sara Jonas of Soprema. “These courses continue to bring education to the forefront for our current partners, as well as those new to Soprema, while helping them to achieve credits to keep their accreditations.”

Courses offered during the Building Envelope Clinic include:

  • SBS-Modified Bitumen Technology –AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Wall Systems & Design – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Below Grade Waterproofing Systems & Design – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Vegetated Roofing Systems – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • PMMA/PMA Liquid Applied Membranes
  • For more information and to RSVP, click here.