MFM Building Products Unveils New Corporate Website

MFM Building Products, a manufacturer of a full envelope of waterproofing and weather barrier products for the building industry, launched a new corporate website. The new website is optimized for viewing on a desktop, tablet or mobile device, making the site easier to navigate when on the jobsite. The site features a “Resource Center” where all of the company’s literature, specifications, approvals and videos can be downloaded. Another site feature is a company blog, which gives contractors and distributors useful articles and installation tips on many of the company’s products.

MFM was founded in 1961 and has more than 55 years of experience in the manufacture of exterior, self-adhering waterproofing products. The product line consists of low slope roofing membranes, steep slope roofing underlayments, window and door flashing tapes, below- and above-grade waterproofing membranes, and specialized construction tapes. All products are manufactured in the USA.

For more information, visit www.mfmbp.com.

Contractor Restores the Roof on the Museum Beneath St. Louis’ Historic Gateway Arch

Western Specialty Contractors restored the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. This photo shows the protection board being installed prior to adding the leak detection system.

Western Specialty Contractors restored the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. This shows the protection board installed prior to adding the leak detection system.

The St. Louis branch of Western Specialty Contractors recently completed a project to restore and waterproof the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the iconic Gateway Arch on the St. Louis Riverfront. The work is part of a multi-phase project, spearheaded by nonprofit organization CityArchRiver Foundation, to expand and renovate the underground museum, plus renovate the grounds surrounding the Arch. The Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, which includes the Gateway Arch, Museum of Westward Expansion and the surrounding park, is maintained by the National Park Service.

Opened to the public in 1976, the Museum of Westward Expansion has undergone very few changes since its grand opening. The size of a football field, the museum features rare Native American Indian artifacts and materials documenting the days of Lewis and Clark and the 19th century pioneers who shaped the history of the American West.

Work on the 100,000-square-foot museum roof project began with removing sod and sandy soil covering the top of the roof and 10-28 inches of Elastizell engineered fill using a bulldozer. Next, the existing waterproof membrane was removed from the structural concrete deck.

After two layers of modified bitumen sheet waterproofing were installed, crews apply a coat of adhesive to adhere the asphaltic protection board.

After two layers of modified bitumen sheet waterproofing were installed, crews apply a coat of adhesive to adhere the asphaltic protection board.

Once the deck was exposed, Western crews went to work identifying and repairing leaks in the existing museum lid that had been present for many years, as the existing waterproofing had exceeded its lifespan. Several methods were used to evaluate the condition of the structural concrete deck, which included a chain-drag sounding along with visually identifying delamination and cracks.

Western crews then installed a two-ply Laurenco modified bitumen sheet waterproofing system covered with WR Meadows PC2 protection board. An electronic leak detection system followed by a permanent leak detection grid system were installed over the protection board. Crews then installed a layer of 1-1/2 inch, 60-psi Dow extruded polystyrene with an additional layer of the protection board and a J-Drain 780 drainage mat.

The next phase of the project involved waterproofing the 42,000-square-foot horizontal lid and the 37,000-square-foot vertical walls of the museum addition. Western’s scope of work in this area included installing a two-ply modified bitumen sheet waterproofing and protection board, as well as an electronic leak detection system, along with two layers of extruded polystyrene. A layer of extruded polystyrene was also installed on the vertical walls, followed by the drainage mat on both the horizontal and vertical walls.

During portions of the project Western crews were working over occupied space, as the museum was largely operational during construction.

During portions of the project Western crews were working over occupied space, as the museum was largely operational during construction.

Additional waterproofing of the north and south museum entrances encompassed approximately 13,800 square feet, which included approximately 5,000 square feet of deck around each leg of the Arch.

The museum was largely operational during construction, and for much of the project Western crews were working over occupied space. The company sequenced the removal of existing roofing material so that they could remove, clean and install new roofing material daily to keep the museum dry during construction.

Testing was a daily requirement during the waterproofing installation. Western was required to complete a pull test for every 500 square feet and take moisture readings for every 100 square feet. Daily observation reports had to be completed during the waterproofing application, with all testing results and location tests documented along with the weather conditions. Additionally, Western crews took 50 photos daily to document the testing and work area.

Construction on the Arch grounds began in August 2013, while renovations to the museum and visitor center began in April 2015. The multi-phase project is still underway, and the improved underground Museum of Westward Expansion is expected to be finished by summer 2018.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Western Specialty Contractors, St. Louis, Westernspecialtycontractors.com

MATERIALS

Waterproofing System: Laurenco Waterproofing, Laurencowaterproofing.com
Protection Board: WR Meadows, WRmeadows.com
Extruded Polystyrene: Dow, Dow.com
Drainage Mat: J-Drain, J-Drain.com

Solar Mounting Platform Designed for Exposed Fastener Panels

SolarFootS-5! introduces the SolarFoot, a mounting platform designed for exposed fastener metal roofing. With four points of attachment, it provides an ideal mounting platform to attach the L-Foot of a rail-mounted solar system or other ancillaries to the roof. According to the manufacturer, the SolarFoot ensures a durable, weathertight solution for the life of the solar system and the roof. Each piece contains two reservoirs of a factory-applied butyl co-polymeric sealant, allowing a water-tested seal. Simply peel the release paper from the butyl sealant and fasten through the predrilled holes in the base of the SolarFoot.

For more information, visit www.s-5.com.

Fans and Community Rally to Replace Barrel Roof at Roadside America

Crews from Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling battled winter weather to install a new fully adhered EPDM roofing system from Mule-Hide Products Co.

Crews from Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling battled winter weather to install a new fully adhered EPDM roofing system from Mule-Hide Products Co. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Lovingly and meticulously crafted over a period of more than 60 years, the 6,000-square-foot display of miniature villages at Roadside America in Shartlesville, Pennsylvania, has been featured on the HISTORY channel and in such books as “1,000 Places to See in the USA & Canada Before You Die” by Patricia Schultz and “Weird Pennsylvania” by Matt Lake. To area families, however, the museum is more than just a funky tourist attraction. It is a treasure that has been shared by four generations—one that must be passed on to future generations.

So, when the building’s nearly 65-year-old barrel roof began to fail, threatening to shutter the museum and put its gems in storage for good, the community and fans far and wide rallied. Nearly $80,000 was raised, roofing crews worked in between winter storms, and a new EPDM roofing system was installed to protect the masterpiece below.

A Life’s Work

Dubbed “The World’s Greatest Indoor Miniature Village,” the display at Roadside America is the life’s work of its sole creator, Laurence Gieringer. Fascinated by miniatures from an early age, he made the first piece in 1902 and continued expanding the collection until his death in 1963. The result is a breathtaking snapshot of American rural life spanning more than 200 years, from a frontier town with saloons and horse-drawn wagons and carriages to a 1950s Main Street with a movie theater and tail-finned Chevys. The collection includes 300 hand-built structures, 600 miniature light bulbs, 4,000 tiny figurines, 10,000 hand-made trees, working model railroads and trolleys, moving waterways, wall paintings, and replicas of such landmarks as Mount Rushmore, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, and Henry Ford’s original shop in Dearborn, Mich. The twice-hourly patriotic “Night Pageant” features an illuminated Statue of Liberty and the playing of America’s national anthem and Kate Smith’s rendition of “God Bless America.”

Originally housed in the basement of Gieringer’s childhood home and later in the carousel building of an abandoned amusement park, Roadside America moved to its current home in 1953. Still a family business, it is now owned by Gieringer’s granddaughter Dolores Heinsohn, and operated by his great-granddaughter Bettina Heinsohn and her husband Brian Hilbert.

A Preservation Mission

A carpenter by trade, Gieringer fabricated the rafters for the museum’s 80-square-foot-by-123-square-foot barrel roof

Years of water penetration had damaged the existing roof, and a complete tear-off and replacement was in order. The original rafters and roof deck were sound.

Years of water penetration had damaged the existing roof, and a complete tear-off and replacement was in order. The original rafters and roof deck were sound. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

himself. In 2016—63 years later—they and the original wood plank deck were still in place. According to Carl Rost, general manager of contractor Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling Inc. of Wernersville, Pennsylvania, the hot-mop-down tar roof had been coated “20 times more than it should have been.” Time and weather had taken their toll. A severe snowstorm in January 2016 brought wind and tree damage. Consistent rain would cause leaks into the attic, with water sometimes dripping to the show floor below.

An elaborate water collection and removal system was created to protect the priceless miniatures. Buckets were placed in the exhibit and items moved whenever water started dripping to the show floor. Tarps—22-feet-by-22-feet—were hung in the attic, zig-zagging through the space to catch water and funnel it into 55-gallon barrels, which were then emptied by pumps.

Supporters Rally

While the patches and stopgap measures had done their job, they clearly were not a permanent solution. A new roof—and a major fundraising effort to pay for it—were needed.

Even with Bachman’s Roofing and the teams at roofing system manufacturer Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. and the Reading, Pennsylvania, branch of building materials distributor ABC Supply working to keep costs as low as possible, the new roof would cost $80,000. Roadside America launched a GoFundMe.com campaign, raising nearly $19,000. Two anonymous donors contributed the remaining $60,000.

For many supporters, including Bachman’s Roofing Owner and President Eric Bachman and ABC Supply Branch Manager Jeff Smith, helping Roadside America was a matter of ensuring that a family tradition spanning four generations lives on. Their parents had brought them to the museum as children. They, in turn, took their kids, who are now sharing it with their families.

There was no question about helping Roadside America, Rost says. “Eric met with Brian and, within minutes, told him ‘We have to make this work.’”

EPDM Roofing System Selected

A 60-mil EPDM roofing system was chosen for its ease of installation on a barrel roof, its durability and its cost-effectiveness.

After the original roof system was removed, fiberboard insulation boards were fastened to the existing deck with screws and plates. The EPDM membrane was fully adhered using a fast-drying, freeze-resistant, low-VOC bonding adhesive. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

The original plan was to recover the existing roof, reducing costs and, with winter weather at hand, allowing the crew to get the job done as quickly as possible. Once work began, however, the damage caused by years of water penetration was evident and the job switched to a complete tear-off and replacement.

EPDM roofing systems are common in Berks County, where Shartlesville is located. The membrane’s ease of installation on a barrel roof reinforced the choice to use it on Roadside America’s building.

“We’ve done quite a few barrel roofs and have found that EPDM works best,” Rost says.

Roofing membranes have “memories,” he explains. Rolled tightly for shipping, they want to snap back to that state when laid out on the jobsite. They must be given sufficient time to flatten out prior to installation, or wrinkling can occur. EPDM membranes “relax” much more quickly than other membranes do, particularly in the cold temperatures that the Bachman’s Roofing crew would be working in. The membrane also remains flexible in hot and cold temperatures, enabling it to be easily curved over the barrel roof’s rafters.

“We knew that EPDM would give us a fast, wrinkle-free installation,” Rost says.

EPDM also is less slippery than other membranes, points out Rob Keating, territory manager with Mule-Hide Products, helping ensure that snow will not slide off the curved roof, potentially injuring a museum guest or employee walking below. A snow rail manufactured by Alpine Snow Guards was specified and installed to alleviate previous issues with snow and ice sliding down the roof and damaging an air conditioning compressor.

A black membrane was chosen for its lower cost and because, with eastern Pennsylvania having more heating days than cooling days, it could help the museum manage its heating costs, Rost says. A 60-mil membrane was selected for its durability and long expected lifecycle, he adds, helping the museum reduce its ongoing maintenance costs and prolong the day when re-roofing would again be required.

The rafters—made of one-by-twos, one-by-fours, one-by-sixes, one-by-eights, one-by-tens and one-by-twelves to create the roof’s barrel shape—were still sound.

Fiberboard insulation boards were fastened to the existing deck boards with screws and plates. To accommodate the roof’s irregular shape and the cold temperatures, the EPDM membrane was fully adhered using a fast-drying, freeze-resistant, low-VOC bonding adhesive.

In addition to the barrel roof, the crew replaced an existing 625-square-foot low-slope section of EPDM roofing on one side of the building’s front.

Working Around Winter Weather

January and February bring snow, sleet, ice and wind to Shartlesville—certainly not ideal conditions in which to undertake a re-roofing project. Despite unfavorable weather forecasts, the Bachman’s Roofing crew began work as soon as the necessary funds had been raised and Roadside America gave the green light.

Roadside America is dubbed “The World’s Greatest Indoor Miniature Village.” On display at the museum are more than 300 hand-built structures, 600 miniature light bulbs, 4,000 tiny figurines, and 10,000 hand-made trees, as well as working model railroads and trolleys. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

“The displays inside are priceless, and if they were damaged by water they couldn’t be replaced,” Rost says. “So, we said we’d work through the bad weather, taking time off as necessary.”

Work began on January 9, 2017. Thanks to some interference by Mother Nature, what normally would have been a one- or two-week job took six weeks. A crew of 10 completed the tear-off and eight professionals installed the new roofing system.

“Our crew endured,” Rost says. “One morning they called to tell me that they wouldn’t be able to work that day. I said ‘The storm went through last night. What’s the deal?’ They said that the parking lot was a sheet of ice. I had to see for myself, so I drove out there. The moment I got out of the car, I fell onto the completely iced-over parking lot.”

Given the roof’s slope, extra attention was paid to safety. Crew members worked carefully, without rushing—particularly when working along the roof’s steep edges. Everyone was harnessed while on the roof and followed all other relevant safety regulations. Rost and the firm’s safety inspector spent extra time monitoring the jobsite.

Mission Accomplished

With the re-roofing project complete, the buckets, tarps, barrels and pumps that once kept Roadside America’s miniature villages dry have been put away. A spring, a summer and an early fall have come and gone, with no leaks. The museum has been saved.

Hilbert extended thanks to those who made it possible. “Without the generous support of so many donors, this project wouldn’t have happened,” he says. “Where do you find that these days?”

Rost adds, “Now future generations can come and enjoy what four generations of our families have already enjoyed.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling Inc., Wernersville, Pennsylvania, Bachmansroofing.com
Local Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., Reading, Pennsylvania, ABCsupply.com

ROOFING MATERIALS

EPDM Membrane: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc., Mulehide.com
Low-VOC Bonding Adhesive: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.
Fiberboard Insulation: Continental Materials Inc., Continentalmaterials.com
Snow Guard: Alpine Snow Guards, Alpinesnowguards.com

Federal Agency Relies on Silicone Coating System to Protects its Roof

The coating forms a seamless membrane. DLA chose to cover the previous gray coating with a white coating finished with granules to minimize heat absorption. Photos: GE Performance Coatings

The coating forms a seamless membrane. DLA chose to cover the previous gray coating with a white coating finished with granules to minimize heat absorption. Photos: GE Performance Coatings

The cold, snowy winters and hot, wet summers in Scotia, New York, put immense stress on local buildings’ roofs. A damp climate with conditions that often involve standing water can take a toll on conventional roof coatings. That was the reason the federal Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) first chose a waterproof silicone roof coating for its Scotia facility in 1996.

“Most building owners in this area spend thousands, sometimes hundreds of thousands, each year keeping their roofs intact,” says Dave Landry, director of operations for DLA, adding, “After using Enduris by GE, we spend almost nothing in comparison.”

More than two decades later, the coating’s 15-year extended warranty had long run out and DLA was ready to reapply. As in 1996, the alternative to resealing would have been a costly and intrusive tear-off. “We had a terrific first experience with Enduris roof coating,” says Landry. “Twenty-two years later, there was no question about who we’d use.”

Efficient Installation

The GE Performance Coatings team inspected the roof for damage before the work began. After more than two decades of punishing conditions, on average less than five mils of the original 21.5-mil coating surface had worn away. Because silicone coatings are seamless, the roof was also protected from expansion and contraction cycles caused by temperature

More than 20 years after applying a silicone roof coating on the roof of the Defense Logistics Agency in Scotia, New York, PUFF Inc. returned to conduct another installation.

More than 20 years after applying a silicone roof coating on the roof of the Defense Logistics Agency in Scotia, New York, PUFF Inc. returned to conduct another installation. Photos: GE Performance Coatings

fluctuations, which can tear apart dissimilar materials where they overlap. In the end, only 5 percent of the 275,000-square-foot roof required repair—the rest just needed a few more mils of coating. DLA chose to cover the previous gray coating with white coating finished with granules, helping to lower the amount of heat absorbed by the roof and add further protection.

The applicator, PUFF Inc., also experienced the benefits of the silicone coating. “During the seven-week project, we lost only one day to rain,” says Bill Rush, operations manager at PUFF Inc. and an approved applicator for GE Performance Coatings. “If it had been an acrylic coating, we would have likely lost a week to predicted rain delay. Additionally, there were two days that rain came unexpectedly from over the mountains, when the forecast was a 10 percent chance of rain.”

A quicker installation meant savings for the PUFF Inc. team—hotel rooms, per-diem expenses, and the opportunity cost of missing other jobs add up fast. Rush also felt a personal connection to the DLA’s positive experience. “I led the installation 20 years ago,” he says. “It’s a matter of great pride to see how well the system held up.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: PUFF Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia, Puffinc.com

MATERIALS

Coating System: Enduris by GE, GE Performance Coatings, GE.com/silicones

GAF Joins NRCA’s One Voice Initiative, Becomes NRCA Partner Member

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has announced GAF, Parsippany, N.J., has joined NRCA’s One Voice initiative, upgrading its associate membership to “partner member.”

In early 2017, NRCA launched its One Voice Initiative to unite the roofing industry and speak with one voice about matters critical to the roofing industry’s continued success. To ensure all industry sectors are given an opportunity to participate, NRCA amended its bylaws to allow manufacturers, distributors, architects, engineers and consultants that choose to participate to become full members of the association. Previously, such rights were reserved only for contractor members.

“There is unique opportunity for the roofing industry to address the major issues we face. However, our work can only be accomplished with commitments from leaders from all sectors of this great industry,” said Reid Ribble, NRCA’s CEO. “Only together as a roofing community can we take this transformational approach to address our issues and concerns and achieve success in the future.”

Issues currently affecting the roofing industry include workforce development and certification; advancing the industry’s public policy agenda; building codes and insurance; and increasing professionalism throughout the industry.

“GAF is proud to the join NRCA’s One Voice initiative to increase awareness of the issues affecting the roofing industry, and to drive for sustainable change,” said GAF President Jim Schnepper.

For more information about NRCA and its One Voice initiative, visit www.nrca.net/onevoice.

National Women in Roofing Announces Association Staff

National Women in Roofing (NWIR), a national organization focused on the empowerment of women within the roofing industry, announced that is now fully staffed to handle all management functions of the organization.

“This is a significant milestone for our organization,” stated Heidi J. Ellsworth, NWIR chair. “It’s only been 18 months since the organization began, and we’ve grown to over 600 members and now have the support of a team of contracted staffers to ensure the success of the organization.”

NWIR has put together a talented team of consulting contractors that includes:
• Ellen Thorp, principal of Meridian Consulting, as executive director
• Sarah Harwerth‐De Marco, owner of 6 Sides Marketing, as graphic designer and
communications consultant
• Julie Massaro, owner of JBM Business Solutions, as member services consultant
• Michelle Schulp, owner of Marktime Media, as web designer
• Jessica Schaller, principal, The Accounting Resource, LLC, as bookkeeper
• Barb Ilyes, president, Go Figure Inc., as accountant
• Hilary Morgan, senior associate, Trent Cotney Construction Law Group, as general counsel

“We’ve been successful getting started because of the amazing support provided by our volunteer members, who serve on various committees and give their time to keep the organization moving and growing,” explained Ellsworth. “We will continue to have working committees who contribute to the growth and success of NWIR and should see even more positive traction now that we have this strong team of staff members to support us.”

For more information, visit www.nationalwomeninroofing.com.

Multi-Purpose Joint Sealant Adheres to Damp Surfaces

Kemper System GreatSealKemper System America Inc. offers GreatSeal PE-150, a high-performance, single-component, multi-purpose joint sealant designed for long-lasting weathertight seals. According to the manufacturer, it is ideal for sealing joints in roofing, walls and masonry, as well as gaps around penetrations, flashings, windows and doors.

Based on a polyether sealant, GreatSeal PE-150 contains no solvents and very low VOCs. The multi-purpose indoor/outdoor sealant exhibits excellent weathering properties with a service range of 200oF to minus 40oF (93oC to minus 40oC), movement capability of +/- 25 percent, and zero shrinkage.

According to the company, the product adheres even on damp surfaces. It can be applied in cold weather, and in most cases, without a primer. It bonds aggressively to most building materials, including wood, vinyl, glass, fiberglass, foam insulation, asphalt, modified bitumen, EPDM, PVC, PIB rubber, and Kynar coatings, as well as painted, galvanized and anodized metals.

GreatSeal PE-150 is part of a family of construction sealants from Kemper System. The GreatSeal brand also includes GreatSeal LF-500 Liquid Flashing compatible with Roof Guardian elastomer-based roofing products, and GreatSeal LT-100 polyether Liquid Tape compatible with Wall Guardian FW-100A, a liquid-applied fibered acrylic air barrier. All three brands are in the STS Coatings line, acquired by Kemper System America in 2016.

For more information, visit www.kempersystem.net.

METALCON 2017 Wraps Up Successful Show in Las Vegas

METALCON 2017 was held in Las Vegas Oct. 18-20, and according to show management, exhibitors at the largest international event for the metal construction industry networked with more than 5,000 attendees, including designers, builders, developers, contractors, fabricators and suppliers from more than 50 countries.

“This is one of the unique venues in the world where we have access to our entire value chain,” said Mark MacDonald of Valspar. “We see everyone from coil coaters all the way down to building product suppliers, regional roll formers and even roofing contractors. It gives us an opportunity to network with our current customers, talk about new business opportunities, as well as meet our future customers. There really isn’t another venue quite like this, and we are happy to be here.”

“It’s been an incredible attendee show,” said Scott Cosens of Samco Machinery, manufacturers of custom metal roll-forming equipment. “We have never seen this type of volume of people. We were running out of paper on our leads. All I can tell you is, if you are not coming to METALCON, you are missing out, and what’s even more amazing, I am finding that still again, all of these suppliers and providers are coming from all over the world, not just the U.S. and Canada. We are never not going to be here. We have been here for well over two decades, and we are already back for next year.”

A newcomer to METALCON this year was DuPont Tyvek Protec, a synthetic roofing underlayment product. “We couldn’t be more excited to be here,” said Roofing Segment Leader Susan Homan. “Honestly, after the first day, our expectations have been exceeded. The quality of the crowd here is really great. We have had really great engagement with contractors and other professionals alike, so we are really glad to be at METALCON.”

Another new exhibitor was Stubai, an Austrian manufacturer of roofing and metalworking tools. “We decided to come to METALCON because we can meet our final customers who actually work with our tools,” said Sites Manager Lukas Braun. “It is interesting for us to get to know how they use the products, but we can also get in touch with decision makers, new retailers, and existing retailers. For us, the U.S. is a very big country so it is more convenient for us to meet all of our customers here.”

Geoff Stone with MetalForming Inc., a provider of high-tech sheet metal component manufacturing machines, has attended all 27 METALCON shows. “This was an absolutely terrific show,” said Stone. “The marketplace is in great condition. There’s lots of folks spending money. I think we probably did somewhere in the neighborhood of $3 or $4 million dollars’ worth of business as a result. As usual, METALCON is our most important show, and we’ve really enjoyed being here.”

Lee Ann Slattery, sales support manager for ATAS International Inc., manufacturers of metal panels, has also attended METALCON for many years. “This year, especially, seems to be a very busy show for us,” said Slattery. “We’ve had a lot of attendees come by our booth, a lot of questions being asked and a lot of different types of people attending. We have talked to contractors, building owners, international folks and facility mangers, so it really has drawn a wide variety of people, and that’s one of the reasons we like doing this show.”

Ken Buchinger of MBCI, manufacturers of metal roofing and wall panels, has been in the industry for more than 40 years and has attended every METALCON. “I have seen this industry grow over the years,” said Buchinger. “I have also seen it become much more complex from the standpoint of product offerings, product installation and the details on roofs, so installers need good information and training. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and METALCON provide quite a few training programs to help contractors, both with installation and how to run their businesses.”

“The show itself is great because you have the opportunity to meet different manufacturers and contractors, learn from each other and learn about ancillary products available to integrate into your offerings,” said Buchinger. “Its’s a great opportunity for contractors, whether you have been one for just a few years or for many years; there is always something to learn at METALCON.”

“2017 has been an incredible year for METALCON,” said Jonathan Rider, an MCA Board Member and Chief Administrative Officer with D. I. Roof Seamers, manufacturers of roof seaming tools. “This year we broke all kinds of records with attendance and pre-registration, with booth sales and even with on-site sales. It also offered a whole new take on our education track with incredible success and amazing new topics such as drone services for roof inspections, marijuana laws and new litigation affecting the work force. We are going to continue developing the education track in conjunction with the AIA to adapt to the industry’s needs and the way our needs are changing in the field.”

“This year’s attendees were from all over the world,” said Rider. “We are really branching out as METALCON is becoming truly an international show, and we had a lot of incredible feedback from our exhibitors on how great the international attendance was. In addition, local attendance was fantastic. So many local erectors and builders left their job sites and came out on to the show floor to join us. They were elated with the technology and new innovations offered on the show floor by exhibitors.”

“2018 promises to be the biggest year in recent history for METALCON,” said Rider. “Charlotte is an amazing city. You can expect a bigger show, more attendees and the newest technology available.”

This year’s metal roofing games, another sold-out event, awarded a total of $8,500 to its winners. Six teams of two competed in five “competitions,” inspired by this year’s theme “Aces of Las Vegas.” Each competition paid $500 to the winning team. Top awards each day included a Daily Points Award of $750. The winner on Wednesday was Joe Arnold and Paul Kulb of Thomas Phoenix International. On Thursday, Matt Cox and Justin Hopta, also of Thomas Phoenix International, were the winners. On Friday, both teams came together in a face-off where Cox and Hopta were victorious in taking home the MCA METALCON National Metal Roofing Championship and $2,000. Next year’s teams will be able to pre-register for the Charlotte games beginning in February 2018.

“Las Vegas was the best show for us in years,” said Claire Kilcoyne, METALCON Show Director. “Business is back! The aisles were packed, and exhibitors were thrilled with the traffic, leads and sales. We saw an increase in international attendance, successfully raised $4,000 for the America’s Fund and once again, enjoyed a full house for the MCA Triumph Awards. We are already gearing up for Charlotte, which promises to be another great show.”

METALCON is produced by PSMJ Resources Inc. and sponsored by The Metal Construction Association. For more information, visit www.metalcon.com.

Atlas Roofing Appoints New Director of Private Label and Tapered Services

Atlas Roofing Corporation has promoted Shaun Kerschen to Director of Private Label and Tapered Services, within the Roof and Wall Insulation division. According to the company, Kerschen has worked for Atlas since 2002, where he started as a Design Engineer for the Atlas EPS division. Shortly after, he transitioned over to the polyiso roof insulation side of the business to become a Tapered Specialist and eventually relocated to Atlanta in 2006. Since beginning his career with Atlas Corporation, Kerschen has acquired more than 15 years of experience in the roofing and insulation industry.

“As a company, we’re proud to have leading industry talent like Shaun, who choose to build their careers with Atlas Corporation,” said Steve Heaton, Vice President Sales and Marketing of Atlas Roof and Wall Insulation Division. “Shaun first made his mark as a tapered specialist for our best-in-class tapered roof insulation systems, which set him on the path to ultimately lead our Tapered Department. We look forward to continued departmental and private label growth under Shaun’s leadership as the Director.”

In his new role, Kerschen will work closely with Tim Milroy, who was also recently promoted to take over as Director of Sales – Roof Insulation within the Roof and Wall Insulation Division.

For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.