ABC Supply Co. Inc. Opens Location in Boise, Idaho

Building products distributorABC Supply Co. Inc. has opened a new branch at 6417 W. Gowen Road, Suite 160, in Boise, Idaho. The newest location will give area contractors access to roofing, siding and other select exterior building products they need to run their businesses as well as support and expertise from ABC Supply’s associates.

Darin Weaver manages the branch and brings over 20 years of management experience, including nearly 10 years in the building materials industry. He joined ABC Supply’s Nampa, Idaho, team in August 2018 and completed the company’s Branch Management Training program earlier this year. Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Weaver looks to build meaningful relationships with professional contractors and help them grow their businesses.

“Darin’s management experience and industry expertise will be a great asset to Boise-area contractors as they strive to run successful businesses,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “He’ll lead an outstanding team dedicated to providing world-class customer service and resources contractors need to make their jobs easier.”

Branch hours are 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. MDT, Monday through Friday. The phone number is 208-202-3120.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

Metal Tiles Help Modernize Texas Bank’s Building and Brand

The design for the bank’s exterior incorporates metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wraps around the building, intersecting with the metal tile. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

When Southside Bank in Texas began a campaign to modernize its brand, management understood that the buildings it occupies play a significant role in branding. The existing flagship branch in Tyler, Texas, was re-imagined and renovated inside and out to reflect the contemporary way the bank now interacts with its customers.

Architect Chad Humphries AIA, RID, project architect and partner, Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, extracted the vision for the renovation from the Southside team and created the bank’s signature design element using metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wrapped around the building, and intersected with the metal tile at the entrances.

Humphries specified 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color. Also specified was 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze. Additionally, 500 square feet of Petersen’s composite rain screen in Classic Bronze finish was installed.

The building was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

“The tiles were the main design element we wanted on the entryways, to function as both wall and roof material, to blur the line between roof and wall,” Humphries says. “Metal tiles have been around in Europe for centuries, and we employed the PAC-CLAD Precision Series TS Tile as a modern option. Metal has a timelessness that is appealing, and in this project it achieved the aesthetic vision and performance needs we established.”

The tile concept on the entryways was such a success on this project that it will be duplicated on many other Southside Bank buildings. Humphries likes the metal tile’s low profile and the way it also adds texture to the wall. “I especially like the way the light interacts on the tile’s surface, which allows for a wall that changes its appearance as the sun progresses across the sky throughout the day,” he says.

When selecting products for any project, Humphries values how long a product has been on the market. “Even though the Precision Series TS Tile hasn’t been around a long time, it was Petersen’s version of a product with proven history and that was good enough for us,” he notes.

Design Challenges

Where the tile on the entryways met the standing seam roof, a junction not often encountered was created. The tile-to-panel junction was easy to deal with because ultimately it was a simple metal-to-metal joint, according to Humphries. “Additionally, the tile allowed for a 45-degree turn without requiring edge band,” he says.

A metal roof was chosen because of metal’s longevity, and the need to blend in to the building’s design, notes Humphries, who typically specifies some kind of metal element on every project. Design challenges included peeling back and sorting through the multiple phases of additions and renovations inside and outside of the building, ultimately to be truer to the original design of the building. “For example, in the 1970s they added a concrete superstructure. But in the 90s, rather than removing it, they built a giant green mansard roof over it. Over time the building’s design became a mixture of ideas with no clear vision in mind. Our job was to simplify and unify everything,” he explains.

Approximately 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze were installed. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

This project was the first one for installing contractor Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal in Longview, Texas, on which metal tile was involved, says Anthony McKinley, vice president, estimator and project manager. “The tiles tied into a valley with the existing roof, so we made sure they were cut properly and flanged,” he says. “Installation of the tile and standing seam roof was straightforward for our experienced crew. It was a slower process working with the tiles because we wanted to make sure the lines were straight, level and square. The details were custom so we took a little longer to make sure we measured correctly and got it looking right.”

All metal work on the building was performed by McKinley’s team. “This job was large in scope mainly because of the removal and replacement of the mansard roofing,” McKinley says. “After taking off the roof panels, we removed fake dormers to create a straight, plain look. We tore everything down to the wood deck. Ultimately, we were at least six months on the jobsite. Most of our time was spent removing the existing metal, which required a man lift, which is a slow process.”

“We felt it was important to make sure the owner and architect liked what we were doing by not making design decisions on our own,” McKinley says. “Some jobs you know what to do, but on this one we wanted to make sure the architect liked it. We figured out details to make it work for integrity and water intrusion, but also to give the architect the look he wanted. We figured out the details on our own because those typically aren’t specified.” Edge metal was fabricated by McKinley’s crew. “We love working with PAC-CLAD,” McKinley says. “They have superior products, and the technical help Petersen provides is very valuable.”

TEAM

Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, https://fitzpatrickarchitects.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: Snap-Clad 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Metal Tiles: Precision Series TS Tile, .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze, Petersen

New Fluid-Applied Membrane Is Designed to Be Tough, Virtually Odorless, Easy to Apply

Garland’s first ever fluid-applied seamless membrane, LiquiTec, forms a virtually impenetrable surface over aged modified bitumen, metal and single-ply roof systems, adding years of waterproofing protection. LiquiTec is an aliphatic polyurea coating system with a tightly bonded molecular structure that provides strength and durability similar to truck bed liners. LiquiTec is built to protect roof surfaces from damage caused by hail, foot traffic, wind scour and other impact.

According to the manufacturer, LiquiTec fully and partially reinforced systems exhibit extremely high tensile strength and remain flexible at temperatures down to -60°F (-51°C), which helps keep the coating from cracking or becoming brittle to ensure a complete watertight seal and long-term waterproofing protection. In addition to its strength, LiquiTec contains zero VOCs and is extremely low odor to allow roof work to be completed with minimal or no disruption at sensitive locations like schools, hospitals and other structures where people are present. 

This two-component product also undergoes a chemical cure process, rather than a moisture cure, so it cures quickly and with less disruption from weather, allowing for faster installation and waterproofing protection. 

“LiquiTec is the answer to so many of our customers’ waterproofing needs. Its unique formulation, strength and flexibility provides the right amount of toughness combined with superior waterproofing protection,” said Ed Buczek, Garland’s senior product manager of roof coatings. “And to top it off, the fact that it is extremely low odor, highly flexible, resistant to fungi and chemically cured allows it to be installed nearly anywhere and perform in the most extreme environments.”

For more information, visit www.garlandco.com

Firestone Building Products Aids Official Carbon Partnership Between Dow and the IOC

Marking the first carbon mitigation project in North America under the Official Carbon Partnership between Dow and the International Olympic Committee (IOC), Dow announced its collaboration with Firestone Building Products, a subsidiary of Bridgestone and a manufacturer of commercial building performance solutions. The collaboration is supporting the creation of an energy modeling tool to accurately describe reductions in cost, energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of commercial structures that use innovative polyurethane roofing insulation from Firestone Building Products. This insulation, developed by Firestone and enabled by Dow’s polyurethane raw materials, addresses low-temperature thermal drift without compromising the other performance metrics. 

“With cities growing at a rapid pace, it is paramount that we as an industry evaluate and implement innovative new materials to accelerate the adoption of solutions that mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in the infrastructure market segment,” said Dr. Nicoletta Piccolrovazzi, circular economy market director for Dow and global technology & sustainability director for Dow Olympic & Sports Solutions. “Firestone Building Products shares our vision, and enabled by the Dow-IOC Official Carbon Partnership, we’ve embarked on a mission that will empower architects, contractors and building owners to better identify energy saving solutions and improve decision-making, doing their part to create a low-carbon legacy.”

The new energy modeling tool – to be available on Firestone’s website in 2020 – is being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with funding support from Dow. With this new tool, commercial architects, property owners, roofing consultants and construction companies can scenario-test the potential long-term reductions in whole-building energy use and the associated GHG emissions resulting from installation of the ISOGARD newly-formulated Firestone polyurethane foam roofing insulation. Use-phase building energy consumption is compared within the modeling tool to alternative roofing technologies, allowing for informed selection of material and amount of insulation. This ability to compare performance will be particularly valuable for cold climate zones of the United States and Canada, where temperatures drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit and older polyurethane foam formulations experience a drop in their insulation performance. 

“Partnering with Dow and working with ORNL to create a modeling tool will help to validate, quantify and reinforce Firestone’s commitment to sustainable building solutions,” said Taylor Cole, president, Firestone Building Products. “Sharing the tool on our website for everyone to use is just another way we’re working with industry partners to not only provide attainable solutions for our customers, but to also work together to do our part in reducing carbon emissions.” 

The new whole-building energy modeling tool will be used to further promote and advance the adoption of Firestone’s ISOGARD roofing insulation, enabled by Dow polyurethane raw materials. ISOGARD foam is formulated to retain more of its R-value (insulating value) at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit compared to existing polyurethane foams. This formulation is designed to create tighter building envelopes and improve building energy efficiency, without changing the installation qualities—such as thickness, compressive strength, weight, and dimensional stability—of the roofing boards. The formulation is estimated to increase the R-value of the roofing material from 5.5 to 6.3 per inch when tested at 40 degrees Fahrenheit and lower. For commercial construction trade professionals, this translates to improved energy savings and can contribute to obtaining Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification.

This agreement is the second of several anticipated joint efforts that will result from the Collaborative Blueprint for unlocking carbon reductions announced last year by Dow. The first agreement was signed in April with PETRONAS Chemicals Glycols. The Blueprint underpins the Dow-IOC Official Carbon Partnership, initiated in 2017 to balance the operational carbon footprint of the IOC, and encourages organizations outside the Olympic movement to adopt programs for reducing carbon emissions while catalyzing change across value chains.  

For more information on Dow’s sustainability programs and the Dow-IOC Carbon Partnership, visit www.dow.com/en-us/sports/sustainability. For more information about Firestone Building Products, visit http://firestonebpco.com/.

Award-Winning Re-Roofing Project Showcases Quality Workmanship

Photo: Duro-Last

Replacing the roof on an occupied building with multiple tenants means not only meeting the needs of the building owner but several other businesses as well. When the roof is high above a busy metro area, the job can be even more demanding, but when the failing roof on a CBRE Group high-rise in Cambridge, Massachusetts, needed to be replaced, Commonwealth Building Systems was up to the challenge.

Located near the Longfellow bridge across the Charles River from downtown Boston, the building houses a variety of business and retail tenants. RMX Northeast Inc., the consultant on the project, specified the use of a PVC roofing system from Duro-Last to replace the existing stone-ballasted system and invited local contractors to bid on the project. Commonwealth Building Systems of Rockland, Massachusetts was awarded the job.

Photo: Duro-Last

Commonwealth is a commercial roofing and sheet metal contractor that focuses on the Boston and Cambridge area. Daniel Hulverson, principal at Commonwealth Building Systems, knew the logistics on the project would be a challenge. Due to construction taking place on the Longfellow Bridge at the time of the project, traffic in the area was diverted around the building, and use of a crane was limited to Saturdays. The Commonwealth team commissioned the use of a 300-ton crane on two consecutive weekends to remove the stone ballast, pavers, and existing EPDM membrane from the 180-foot-tall, multi-level roof.

“The ballast removal was probably the hardest part of the project,” Hulverson recalls. “We couldn’t do any work doing the week because of the tenants for one, because of the noise, and the Longfellow Bridge was under construction at the time. It was actually closed, so traffic was pretty much a nightmare.”

R.K. Hydrovac was called in to remove the stone ballast. The crane was used to hoist the vacuum hoses to the roof. “It was quite an undertaking on their end,” Hulverson says. “We got the stone ballast off and got all of the stock up there on two consecutive weekends. Actually, after the first weekend we were able to get started roofing. We stockpiled all of the trash and got most of the trash off on the second weekend. We had a couple more crane days to get trash out at the end, so we had maybe four of five crane setups in all.”

A Custom Solution

The new roofing system was designed to stand up to the area’s high winds. Leaving the existing insulation in place, the Commonwealth crew covered each roof area with 2 additional inches of Duro-Guard ISO II insulation, which was mechanically attached. The upper roof was above a steel deck, and the lower roof covered a concrete deck, so different fasters were used, but the fastening patterns were identical.

After the existing ballasted EPDM system was removed, crews installed a thermoplastic roof system manufactured by Duro-Last. Photo: Duro-Last

After the insulation was in place, the Duro-Last PVC membrane was attached using the Duro-Bond induction welding system. The membrane is delivered custom fabricated to fit the site. “Duro-Last comes out and pre-measures the job with our assistance, and then the sheets are made,” Hulverson says. “They give you a map and tell you where the sheets go. They measure around all of the penetrations, and everything is pre-cut. It’s pretty cool how it comes out. The rolls are listed A, B, C, D, and so on, and you just kick out the rolls and weld them in place. The sheets are pre-welded at any laps, so it reduces the amount of welding you are doing on the job and saves time.”

The Duro-Bond system uses specially coated plates that are screwed down to the deck before the membrane is put in place. The membrane is adhered to the plates using an induction welder.

Work began on the upper level and moved down to the lower level. “We went from side to side, working our way toward where the crane setup was going to be,” Hulverson explains

The upper roof was constructed over a mechanical room, so crews could work any time without fear of disrupting the tenants. Work hours were restricted on the lower level because it covered occupied business space. “We had to switch to very early hours in the morning because of the noise,” Hulverson notes. “We were starting at three in the morning so we didn’t disrupt the tenants.”

Commonwealth’s dedication to quality workmanship on the project earned the company Duro-Last’s Edge-to-Edge & Deck-to-Sky Award. Photo: Duro-Last

Staging areas were moved as the project progressed to limit the possibility of damage to the completed sections of the roof. On the last day, the roof membrane was protected by tarps and plywood as the final loads of debris were removed.

The safety concerns were straightforward. “There was a parapet wall that was above 42 inches high around the whole perimeter of the building, so safety-wise, this job was fairly easy for us,” Hulverson says.

Custom-fabricated curbs and stacks were utilized to help reduce rooftop labor. “All of Duro-Last’s curbs and pipe seals come pre-made, and they are all listed on that diagram,” Hulverson says. “You just unfold them and weld them. The corners are already pre-done. It’s a very nice system.”

Commonwealth’s sheet metal division installed all of the edge metal, which was custom fabricated by EXCEPTIONAL Metals. “Again, Duro-Last measures everything along with our superintendent, and it’s all sent out prefabrication,” Hulverson says. “The pre-assembled wall cap was installed on top of the walls.”

During the last phase of the project, Walkway pads were welded down in high-traffic areas.

Luckily, weather wasn’t a key factor. “There were some challenging windy days, as there always are in Boston, but nothing I can really remember that slowed us down to the point we couldn’t work,” says Hulverson. “The weekend crane setups and the size of the crane were unusual, but other than that it was a pretty smooth job. And the views are beautiful — you’re looking across the Charles River into Boston, so it was pretty nice.”

Commonwealth’s dedication attention to detail on this project earned the company Duro-Last’s 2018 Edge-to-Edge & Deck-to-Sky Award, which was presented in 2019. “Duro-Last was impressed by the neatness of the job, especially the wall flashing,” Hulverson says. “They were impressed with our workmanship. If there were any challenges or changes, we just met them head on and moved forward, like we typically do. The customer is always first.”

Hulverson believes the key to ensuring quality workmanship is dedicated employees, from top to bottom. “Our foremen are well trained, as are our superintendents, and I actually look over the jobs in the field as one of four owners,” he says. “We make sure the quality and craftsmanship are done the right way.”

TEAM

Roof Consultant: RMX Northeast Inc., Milford, Massachusetts, www.rmxne.com

Roofing Contractor: Commonwealth Building Systems, Rockland, Massachusetts, www.commonwealthbuildingsystems.com

MATERIALS

PVC Membrane: Duro-Last, www.duro-last.com

Insulation: Duro-Guard ISO II, Duro-Last

Edge Metal: EXCEPTIONAL Metals, www.exceptionalmetals.com

Novagard Sends Building Materials to Tornado-Ravaged Dayton Community

Novagard Solutions Inc., a Cleveland-based manufacturer of highly-engineered foams, sealants, coatings, lubricants, and thermal management products for the construction, electronics, transportation/automotive, manufacturing, medical and military markets, donated 38 skids of the company’s NovaFlexand NovaBond silicone and hybrid construction sealants (caulk) and weather-stripping to tornado-ravaged Dayton, Ohio. In May, the Dayton area was devasted with over 15 tornados damaging homes and businesses with rain and high winds. The materials donated directly to Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton will be used to install windows, doors, siding, shutters, and roofs. Two trucks, donated by MDL Logistics, transported the materials, which were worth more than $200,000. With over 30,000 tubes of caulk, thousands of homes will be able to be repaired and made livable before winter sets in on the damaged community.

“We have many employees from the Dayton area, and we felt this was a great opportunity to step in and address a critical need,” said Sarah Nash, CEO of Novagard. “Novagard is in a position to help with the recovery and repair of scores of homes. We also appreciate the partnership with Habitat for Humanity which is coordinating the use of our products directly with contractors.”

For more information, visit www.novagard.com.  

USGBC Opens Call for Proposals for the Next Version of LEED

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)announced a call for proposals to solicit feedback and concepts for the next version of LEED. USGBC created the LEED green building program 20 years ago to measure and define green building and to provide a roadmap for developing sustainable buildings. LEED is updated through a continuous improvement process and with each new version USGBC is evolving LEED’s approach and challenging the building sector to be more resource efficient and sustainable.

In April 2019, USGBC officially released the complete suite of LEED v4.1 rating systems. LEED v4.1 emphasizes the human experience and pushes project teams to create spaces that not only reduce carbon emissions, energy, water use and waste, but also improve the health and well-being of the people who live, work, learn and play in these buildings, cities and communities every day.

“With LEED v4.1 we have fundamentally transformed our rating system development process,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO, USGBC. “It has allowed us to become more agile and adaptable to incorporate real time feedback so that we can realistically raise the bar on the marketplace. We received an overwhelming response to our LEED v4.1 call for proposals, which has helped us to deliver on the market needs making LEED v4.1 successful and a market leader. Building on this success, we are excited to engage the market again to solicit ideas, proposals and feedback for improving LEED v4.1 and future versions of LEED. Together, we can continue the work we started with LEED v4.1 to ensure that LEED is not only the de facto leadership standard but also creating a better living standard.”

Cities around the world are mitigating climate risks by pledging to raise the bar to reduce carbon emissions. Investors are weighing their opportunities, consciously screening for projects that align with their values and prove winning ESG strategies. Building owners are pivoting focus to the occupants to reduce inequality, combat health concerns and deliver value to support the day-to-day needs of everyone and raise their living standard. The trajectory of LEED is to support these market changes by continuing to improve the performance throughout the lifecycle of buildings, advance net zero and net positive practices, and reward leaders based on their performance to enable building owners and city leaders to track progress toward environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals.

“There would be no LEED without the generous support of our members, advocates and stakeholders,” added Ramanujam. “I want to personally thank everyone who has supported us over the last 20 years and contributed to LEED’s development and growth. I am proud of what we’ve been able to do together this year with LEED v4.1, and I am excited and optimistic for what the future holds. I invite all members of the green building community to participate and help us define the vision for the next version of LEED as we work together to build a better future – because that future would not be possible without their leadership.

“Imagine a rating system adaptive and responsive to the ever-changing world around us. This is what we are working toward with LEED,” said Melissa Baker, senior vice president, LEED. “Now that LEED v4.1 is out and has been positively received by the community, we are exploring how we can strengthen LEED v4.1 and also plan what’s next for the rating system. We are working to ensure that LEED remains a global leadership standard, and we know that as we evolve LEED, industry feedback and support are critical.”

The USGBC community can participate in the call for LEED proposals session. Industry leaders can also join USGBC at the annual Greenbuild International Conference and Expo,  taking place in Atlanta November 19-22, 2019, for the “Future of LEED”  education session, which will review market feedback and provide updates on performance-based outcomes, transparency and continuous improvement to future versions of LEED.

For more information, visit https://new.usgbc.org/leed.

Vinyl Soffit Product Lines Now Available in Black

Alside adds black as color option in the company’s Charter Oak and D5 Punched Vinyl Soffit lines. The products are designed as an attractive, low-maintenance option for porch ceilings, overhangs or focal points where owners want to create high-impact appeal.

According to the manufacturer, Charter Oak features the exclusive TriBeam System, which provides unsurpassed panel rigidity and superior wind resistance. It is designed to span uneven surfaces while resisting sagging over long runs. For eaves, aeration openings hidden inside the panel’s grooves provide the airflow needed to reduce heat and humidity buildup in attics.

“We are pleased with our on-trend black color expansion for the Charter Oak and D5 Punched Vinyl Soffit,” said Shawn Hardy, senior vice president and general manager of integrated products, Associated Materials. “The new black color used as an accent in soffit applications mixes well with existing vinyl siding standard and architectural colors. It also provides countless options to achieve unique color schemes to better serve new construction and remodeling customers.”

In addition, the new Charter Oak and D5 Punched Vinyl Soffit offers a Lifetime Transferable Warranty.

This color expansion coincides with Alside’s seven new siding, soffit, trim and accessory colors as part of the Explorer Collection. Inspired by nature, these deep saturated hues, cool neutrals and bold shades will transform the appearance of any home. The new colors include on-trend grays, blue, red, green and timeless browns.

The Explorer Collection is available in full or in part on the following lines: Prodigy, Charter Oak, Odyssey Plus, Coventry, Conquest, Board & Batten and Williamsport, and comes with a Lifetime Limited Warranty. 

For more information, visit www.alside.com

Triangle Fastener Releases Two Updated Product Catalogs

Triangle Fastener Corporation announced the release of two new versions of the company’s catalogs, Cladding and Interior. Each catalog is market-specific and provides extensive information on a wide variety of available fasteners, sealants, tools, programs, and technical support. They conveniently outline various brands, sizes, and materials, making it easy to find the exact products needed for specific applications, including hard-to-find items. 

The catalogs are also a reliable source for information on screws, rivets, sealants, flashing, anchors, pins, bolts, bits, power tools, fall protection, abrasives, saw blades, tie wires, contractor supplies, installation tips, technical data, and much more.

Cladding Catalog

  • Metal Roofing
  • Metal Building
  • Post Frame

Interior Catalog

  • Drywall
  • Mechanical
  • Electrical 

For more information, visit www.trianglefastener.com

One-Component Liquid-Applied Flashing Requires No Primer or Mixing

CertainTeed introduces SmartFlashONE, a one-component, UV-stable, fluid-applied resin for steep and low-sloped roof flashing details and repairs. SmartFlash ONE offers roofing contractors an economical and convenient waterproofing solution in a ready-to-use, re-sealable can that requires no measuring or mixing to activate.

According to Abby Feinstein, commercial roofing product manager for CertainTeed, the ability for SmartFlash ONE to be applied without a primer and resealed for future use gives contractors an edge in terms of time, cost and ease of installation. “SmartFlash ONE delivers one-part labor efficiency with two-part performance,” said Feinstein. “With no primer or component mixing, contractors can work quickly without fear of the product setting up too fast or going to waste. And CertainTeed is so confident in the stress resilience and UV stability of the formula that we’re supporting the product with up to 20 years of warranty coverage, which is in line with the coverage afforded to two-part solutions.”

SmartFlash ONE resin is available in a 5-gallon pail (125-square-foot coverage) or a 1-gallon pail (25-square-foot coverage). The 1-gallon pail is available à la carte or as part of a Flash Pack which includes resin, fleece and application accessories. 

For more information, visit www.certainteed.com/commercial-roofing.