PrimeSource Receives Patent on Premium Grip-Rite ShingleLayment

PrimeSource Building Products recently was awarded a U.S. patent for its innovative design of a synthetic underlayment called ShingleLayment, the only synthetic underlayment in the market designed to protect your roof and look like a shingled rooftop during construction.

“Homeowners don’t want to be looking out at a sea of blue tarps or product logos covering unfinished roofs during a construction project,” said Peter Barrego, VP of Global Sourcing. “We decided to create an effective synthetic underlayment that also looks good.”

According to Barrego, synthetic underlayments have quickly become industry standard, replacing petroleum-laden asphalt roofing felt, known commonly as tar paper. But these products feature brand logos or bright colors. ShingleLayment is available in an exclusive patented shingle print pattern, making it the only AC 188 listed underlayment that gives the appearance of a finished roof while a home is under construction or under repair.

In addition to improving the look of a project provides immediate roof deck protection and a long-lasting secondary water-shedding layer ShingleLayment is made of tough UV-treated woven polypropylene and has a high tensile strength that resists wind blow-off and can resist the sun’s harmful rays for up to 180 days. Combine these features with a non-skid walking surface and you have the ultimate roofing underlayment, according to the company.

“PrimeSource is always looking for innovative products to add to our portfolio,” said Building Materials Group Manager Andy Spyhalski. “We know we are a key supplier and we want to respond to our customers’ needs and give them innovative choices.”

ShingleLayment® is available in three weight classes: lightweight ShingleLayment® LWE; mid-weight ShingleLayment-15 Pro; and heavyweight ShingleLayment Premium.

According to the manufacturer, all ShingleLayment styles are third-party tested to ICC AC 188, Florida Statewide Building Code and are backed by PrimeSource’s limited warranty.

For more information, please visit www.PrimeSourceBP.com.

Roof Vent Designed Specifically for Clothes Dryers

The DryerJack is the first roof termination designed for the demanding needs of venting clothes dryers. Made in the USA of Galvalume and available powder coated in black, brown or white, DryerJacks are built tough. Building code disallows screens and requires that dryer terminations have a backdraft damper. With a patented curved damper, the DryerJack meets code requirements and goes further. To safely vent dryers, airflow restriction must be minimized to prevent lint blowback and the fire hazard that creates. A passageway of 21 square inches delivers nearly zero airflow restriction, allowing the dryer to operate at peak performance.

The 26-gauge Galvalume DryerJack is available in two models. Model 466, at less than 5 inches tall, delivers safe venting through the roof and low-profile aesthetics. When you need room for high-profile tile or to accommodate heavy snowfall, select model DJK486. It’s as efficient as model 466 but provides more clearance above the roof.

For more information, visit www.dryerjack.com.

Upgraded Cap Stapler Offers Easier Loading and Extended Tool Life

National Nail recently upgraded its 18-gauge Stinger CS150B Cap Stapler with an enhanced design that improves performance with easier loading, longer tool life, and tool-free adjustable exhaust. Shooting 200 caps and 200 staples before reloading, the versatile cap stapler now also provides a wider range of operating pressure (up to 120 psi), which makes it ideal for installing roofing underlayments, house wrap, and foamboard.

“We listened to our contractors to make several enhancements to the Stinger CS150B that make the tool even more efficient and easier to use over a longer period of time to meet the expectations of time savings on each job,” said Roger Szotko, STINGER Product Manager, National Nail. “Beyond that, the CS150B offers the same lightweight, compact design that reduces arm fatigue and with fewer stops to reload.”

The Stinger CS150B shoots 5/8-inch, 7/8-inch, 1-1/4-inch, and 1-1/2-inch length 18-gauge staples with full 1-inch plastic caps. It also includes an installed belt hook, trigger with bump-fire and sequential modes, and a durable carrying case.

LEARN MORE
Visit: www.stingerworld.com
Call: (800) 968-6245

Iconic Structure at Utah State Gets New Roof Over Summer Breaks

The roof on Utah State University’s iconic Old Main structure was replaced over the course of three summers by the team at KBR Roofing. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

There was no summer break for the team at KBR Roofing these past three years. As soon as school ended in May for students at Utah State University, the team got to work on re-roofing the iconic Old Main structure on campus.

Originally built in 1889, Old Main has served its community for more than 125 years. Now listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, the imposing structure is home to the president of the university and a multitude of offices and classrooms.

“Every summer we tackled a different phase of the re-roofing project,” says Brent Wood, project manager at KBR Roofing. “This structure is so critical to the university that it made complete sense to invest in composite roofing. The old, curling gray wood shingles simply had to come off.”

Each summer, the crews from KBR Roofing focused on a different element of the project. “We encountered a few challenges along the way,” Wood notes. “First, since the structure was built so long ago, many of the walls were not square. Second, due to a fire on the north side in 1984, this section of the roof had to be re-sheeted. Third, we had to fabricate four new cupolas. And fourth, we had to custom create a pedestrian bridge 106 feet on top of the center to access the east tower.”

With all their challenges, Wood relates that the easiest part of the project was installing the DaVinci Roofscapes Fancy Shake tiles. “We used the regular shake on the roof surface and then the beaver tail and diamond tiles to accent different parts of the structure,” Wood says. “They were a dream to install.”

Passing Historical Review

Before installation began, representatives of Utah State University and Design West Architects sought permission to use the composite shake tiles on the Old Main project.

Originally built in 1889, Old Main is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites. The building houses the president of the university and a multitude of offices and classrooms. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

“USU has an on-campus architectural review committee that monitors and approves all changes to buildings, signage and landscaping,” says Quin E. Whitaker, PE MBA, structural engineer/project manager at Utah State University. “Our Facilities team was required to meet with the State Historical Department of Utah to gain approval of the Fancy Shake shingles. When we met with the state’s representative, he declined all proposed roofing samples, including one from DaVinci. We asked him to go look at the DaVinci tiles installed on our Geology building back in 2012. As soon as we got there, he immediately told us the composite tiles looked great and met his expectations.”

Getting approval was critical, notes Whitaker. “Old Main is our flagship building,” he says. “It houses the president of the university, her staff and many other administration officials and classrooms. We didn’t wish to skimp on the quality of this roofing product. Gaining approval on the DaVinci product was especially important since we anticipate that five historic buildings on the campus quad (including Old Main) will all have the same composite roofing tiles installed in the coming years. The DaVinci product has an authentic look, backed by a strong warranty, which we appreciate.”

Going the Extra Mile

With the green light received, KBR Roofing started the Old Main roofing project in May of 2015. At the same time, the roof specialists from the university’s carpentry shop created new cupola bases.

“Bryan Bingham and Mike McBride at our university were intimately involved in the project,” says Whitaker. “I’ve never seen the level of craftsmanship that they were able to achieve for the cupola bases. Everyone involved in this project gave 110 percent.”

A cupola on the backside of the structure features beaver tail tiles. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

Going the extra mile involved quite a few special considerations for KBR Roofing on this project. The team manufactured a 15-foot pedestrian bridge to allow access from the roof to one of the towers. Located more than 100 feet in the air, the new bridge complements the building’s structure and meets code requirements.

On the north side of the building, workers crafted new metal sheeting on four finials. At the south tower, the stone finials were in need of renovation. The roofers contracted with Abstract Masonry to revitalize the stone, mortar joints and other surrounding brick features. They also contracted with Rocky Mountain Snow Guards for snow fences and snow guards that were installed around the entire structure. Drift II – two-pipe snow fences were put in place at the eaves over pedestrian and vehicular areas as a barrier to snow movement with RG 16 snow guards applied in a pattern above to hold the snow slab in place.

“Three of Old Main’s four towers now have a new DaVinci roof on them covered with the company’s attractive diamond shingles,” says Whitaker. “KBR Roofing was amazing. They also had to radius the railing for the two large rotundas. This company, in my estimation, is top notch and the only company that could have pulled off this project.”

TEAM

Architect: Design West Architects, Logan, Utah, www.designwestarchitects.com
Roofing Contractor: KBR Roofing, Ogden, Utah, www.kbrroofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Fancy Shake composite cedar tiles, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com
Snow Guards: Drift II and RG 16, Rocky Mountain Snow Guards, www.rockymountainsnowguards.com

RICOWI Releases Roofing Investigation Report on Hurricane Irma

The RICOWI Board of Directors announced the release of an investigation report on Hurricane Irma on September 23, 2018. The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) Committee deployed volunteer hurricane wind investigators after Hurricane Irma made landfall. Team members for the hurricane wind investigations were wind engineers, roofing material specialists, insurance analysts, structural engineers, and consultants. The report may be downloaded at: https://www.ricowi.com/reports/download/9

The WIP mission is to investigate the field performance of roof assemblies after major wind storm events, factually describe roof assembly performance and modes of damage, and formally report results of investigations and damage modes for substantiated wind speeds.

This Program places experts in the field that have the required product knowledge and program training to ensure that sound, scientific and unbiased reporting occurs. Buildings will be safer, property losses will be reduced and industry will meet the challenge with clear insight as to needed direction. The reports generated by RICOWI investigation teams are utilized to help educate, improve products, installation techniques, safety and reduce overall roofing and insurance costs for the industry. The results will also provide a valuable resource to FEMA and state emergency management agencies.

“This is an important undertaking by the report writers and team members,” said RICOWI chairman David Balistreri. “As always, the uniqueness of research reports from RICOWI is the ability to produce an unbiased factual report.”

RICOWI conducted five of the most comprehensive roofing investigations of hurricane stricken areas: Hurricanes Charley (Aug. 13/04), Ivan (Sept. 16/04), Katrina (Aug. 29/05) Ike (Sept. 13/08), and a smaller investigation for Hurricane Irma (Oct. 31/17). All research reports are available online as a download at www.ricowi.com.

 

 

Meticulous Preparation Sets Up Restoration Project for Success

Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Officials at Roma High School in Roma, Texas, knew they needed a new roof. The tile roof on the main complex was more than 25 years old, and some components were clearly failing. They didn’t realize that many of the leaks and resulting wall deterioration were caused by other problems as well. Luckily, they reached out to design and construction professionals who did their homework, diagnosed all of the key problems, and developed a plan to fix them. The crowning touch of the building envelope restoration plan was a beautiful standing seam metal roof, and the success of the project is proof that hard work pays off not only in the classroom, but on top of it.

The Consultant

As its building envelope consultant, Roma Independent School District chose Amtech Solutions Inc., headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The full-service architectural, engineering, and building envelope consulting firm has been in business since 1982. Working out of the company’s Rio Grand Valley (RGV) office located in Pharr, Texas, Amtech Solutions inspected and evaluated the entire site and reviewed legacy documents to identify the underlying issues.

They found quite a few, notes Michael Hovar, AIA, RRO, LEED AP, a senior architect and the general manager of the company’s RGV office. “They thought all they had was a roofing problem,” he notes. “But we saw right away that not properly managing water off the roof was the cause of wall deterioration, which then became leaks into the building. Our experience with the entire envelope and all facets of design and construction really helped us on this one.”

Roma High School in Roma, Texas, underwent a three-phase building envelope restoration plan in 2016-2017. After the walls were repaired and restored, the roof and mechanical equipemt were replaced. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Amtech Solutions put together a presentation for the school board to detail what they discovered and the plan they proposed to remedy the situation. The company also worked with the school district to help develop a budget.
The restoration plan was split up into three phases. The first phase focused on restoring the walls and windows. The second phase encompassed roof replacement and installing new mechanical equipment. The third phase involved improving drainage, grading and other site repairs.

Amtech Solutions decided not to bid the project out to a general contractor, but rather to bid each phase separately. “We decided to split it up into stages and do it logically, starting with the walls first,” Hovar says. “For the walls, we got restoration contractors who specialize in wall restoration work.”

Restoration Services Inc. (RSI) of Houston, Texas handled the first phase in the summer, as the wall repairs would be louder and more disruptive to students. The roof replacement project was scheduled for the fall. “Once all of the stuff on the ground was done, that allowed us to do the re-roofing work throughout the school year, which also helped the price,” notes Hovar. “Our experience has always been that if we have good cooperation with the contractors and the school staff, at the end of the job they end up being best friends. And that’s exactly what happened. At the end of the job, they were sad to see the roofers go.”

Amtech Solutions convinced the school district the plan would work. “It took some coordination, communication and cooperation, and it took a motivated owner that was willing to do this and trust us,” Hovar says. “They looked to us for guidance, and we said, ‘We do this all the time. We do roofing projects throughout the year, occupied and unoccupied, and we do it in a way that respects what the occupant’s needs are.’”

When it came time to specify the roof system, school board members were divided; one faction wanted to install a new tile roof, and the other wanted to go with metal. “The interesting thing is, for the historical architecture of the area, both of those roofs are appropriate, so from the standpoint of historical significance, either one works,” Hovar says. “In the end, it was quite a bit more expensive to utilize tile than it was to utilize a metal roof.”

The Roof Systems

The decision was made to go with a standing seam metal roof from McElroy Metal on the vast majority of the complex, including the main roof, the gymnasium, and two freestanding structures — the art and industrial arts buildings — that had been added over the years. The main tile roof was removed and replaced with McElroy’s 138T Panel, a 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel in Brite Red. McElroy’s 238T Panel, a 24-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel, was specified for the gym, as well as the art and industrial arts buildings. In a cost-saving measure, the color on the gym roof was changes to Galvalume Plus. In all, more than 233,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed.

Before

“The reason we picked this roof system is we’ve had a lot of great experience with it,” Hovar says. “We love that panel because they can actually bring the roll former to the jobsite. That gives the roofing contractor a lot more options on how he can load the roof and sequence the job. The other beauty of this panel is that it has unlimited movement. The panels itself slides back and forth over a fixed clip. It also flashes like a dream.”

Low-slope roof areas adjacent to the gym were replaced with a two-ply modified bitumen system from Siplast. CPI Daylighting manufactured a new skylight for the atrium.

As part of the roofing phase, gutters and downspouts were added. “There was nothing controlling the water before on this project,” Hovar says. “We designed a gutter system with expansion joints as per SMACNA guidelines. The contractor made absolutely beautiful shop-welded aluminum downspout boots.”

The most crucial detail was a custom-made saddle that solved the problem of water infiltration at the transition between the roof and walls on the wings. “This ultimately simple solution addressed one of the major design flaws that plagued the facility from the first days of occupancy,” Hovar notes. “We modeled the three-dimensional design of those saddles, and the contractor welded them in his shop. He fabricated them out of .080 aluminum and they were seamless. The restoration contractor had already installed all of the through-wall flashing, so all the roofer had to do was put counterflashing in and do his work around it. He was able to fly without being slowed down by a mason on the job.”

The Roofing Contractor

The roofing phase of the project was handled by Rio Roofing, headquartered in Harlingen, Texas. The company primarily installs low-slope and metal roofs, and its focus is on large commercial and institutional projects. ““We do nearly 90 percent public bonded work,” notes Hedley Hichens, vice president of Rio Roofing. “We found out that whether it’s a small job or a big job, the paperwork is still the same, so we try to make it worthwhile.”

The company worked on the Roma High School project for about a year, wrapping up the roofing phase of the project in November 2017.

After the structure’s main roof was removed, the tile was replaced with a standing seam metal roof featuring McElroy’s 138T Panel in Brite Red. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

The decision was made to tackle the wings on the main roof first. “During the pre-con meetings, we met with the principal and the superintendent and asked, ‘Which wings are the worst?’” Hichens notes. “There was one wing that was the most problematic, so we started with that area first.”

Rio Roofing began by tearing off the existing tile roof. “There were about 1,925 squares of concrete tile we had to remove,” Hichens notes. “We had crews on the roof tearing off tile, crews on the ground palletizing the tile and storing it in the parking lot.”

As crew members removed the old tile and felt, others followed behind and installed polyisocyanurate insulation and Polystick MTS, a waterproofing underlayment designed for high-temperature applications. “We did 40 or 50 squares a day, moving down the wing,” Hichens says. “We dried in the whole school. Then we came back with the 138 panel.”

On top of the gym and other buildings that received the 238T panel, the existing metal roofs were left in place. “We put flute fill on top of the old panels. Then we screwed down 3/8-inch Securock, primed it and put the Polyglass underlayment down on top of that,” Hichens explains. “That 24-inch panel is a great panel to work with because every time you put one down, you’re 2 feet closer to finishing.”

Installing the New Roofs

The school’s main roof covers a central hub with eight wings coming off of its octagonal skylight. Where the wings tie together, access was limited.

“It was a tight squeeze,” Hichens says. “Getting in there and getting out was difficult. I think our fork lift only cleared one of the walkways by 2 or 3 inches. It’s a big campus, but the layout was difficult at the school.”

Once the wings were dried in, sheet metal crews installed the edge metal and 4,000 linear feet of gutters. They also started forming the panels.

Typically, Rio Roofing lifts the roll former to the roof edge, but it was difficult to get a large lift next to the building, so in this case the roll former was left on the ground. It was moved from wing to wing as the job progressed. “We used a New Tech roll former on this project,” Hichens says, “We would put the roll former parallel to each wing and store the panels on the ground in each area.”

Panels were hemmed and notched using a Swenson Snap Table Pro and lifted to the roof with a fork lift and a special cradle. Crews used a hand seamer to set temporary seams and followed up with a robotic seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. “The panels are easy to install,” Hichens says. “You get about four guys 10 feet apart to engage the panels and clips and you just keep going. At the end of the day crews put the seam caps on.”

On the low-slope areas, Rio Roofing installed approximately 47,000 square feet of the Siplast two-ply SBS modified system, which was torched down over new lightweight concrete. “For their size, the low-slope areas had a ton of mechanical equipment and ductwork up there,” notes Hichens. “There were a lot of key details.”

Rio Roofing custom-manufactured numerous curbs and details, including the saddles over problem areas at the walls. “We have a full welding shop,” Hichens notes. “We have a full machine shop. We make all of our own curbs here, so there is no lead time for ordering curbs, and we are sure they’ll fit.”

Teamwork

Work on the project has now moved on to a fourth phase: installing translucent panels over the swimming pool. Hovar believes teamwork was the key to the project’s success. “We had such a good contracting team, we did good field work to begin with, and we had an understanding owner,” he says. “Designing it wasn’t easy, but thankfully our experience helped. We just had a really good team to execute it, all the way around. That’s what makes for a great, project, right? When everybody is invested in a good outcome, they always support everybody else.”

Communication was also essential, and Building Information Modeling (BIM) helped keep everyone on the same page. “We modeled the project on our BIM software, and it helped everyone understand the scope and challenges. The BIM model allowed the owner see exactly what the project would look like, and it helped the contractor understand the staging and logistical challenges before the project was bid,” Hovar says. “There were no surprises.”

TEAM

Architect and Consultant: Amtech Solutions Inc., Pharr, Texas, www.amtechsls.com
Roofing Contractor: Rio Roofing, Harlingen Texas
Wall Restoration Contractor: RSI-Restoration Services Inc., Houston, Texas, www.rsi-restorationservices.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Metal Panels: 138T panel (16 inches wide, 24 gauge) and 238T Panel (24 inches wide, 24 gauge), McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com
Underlayment: Polystick MTS, Polyglass, www.polyglass.us
Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com
Skylight: CPI Daylighting, www.cpidaylighting.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Membrane: Paradiene SBS, Siplast, www.siplast.com

Historic Colorado School Readies for Winter With New Metal Roof System

Ouray School recently underwent a two-phase renovation project that involved improvements to the structure, which was built in 1936. Improvements include a new standing seam metal roof and snow guards designed to withstand the area’s tough winters. Photos: S-5!

Historic Ouray School in Ouray, Colorado, has undergone several renovations in the last 80 years, and the latest included a new standing seam metal roofing system with a snow guard system designed to ensure the safety of students, faculty and visitors.

The original school was built in 1883, when the school district was founded. That original structure was destroyed by fire in 1936, when a new facility was constructed adjacent to the original site. Additions were made to the school in the 1970s, in the 1990s and in 2003. After a full assessment in 2014, the existing facilities were found to be structurally safe and worthy of a thorough renovation, including the addition of a standing seam metal roof that covered the entire building, additions and all.

“We kept the slope at 2:12 because we didn’t want the roof sticking up real high,” says Joel Cox, AIA, of RTA Architects in Colorado Springs, Colorado. “After the first winter, everything is performing the way everyone expects it to be performing.”

The project was a two-phase renovation that involved improvements to the original structure, erected in 1936. The redesigned facility includes innovative 21stcentury learning spaces to support modern curriculum delivery and an emphasis on safety for all students and staff.

The New Roof and Snow Guards

Douglass Colony Group of Commerce City, Colorado, installed 18,000 square feet of standing seam metal roofing from Firestone. The snow guard system selected for the Ouray School was ColorGard from S-5!, with a Charcoal Grey insert to match the standing seam panels.

According to Anthony Sanchez, superintendent on the project, Douglass Colony crews began by installing the fascia, soffits, gutters and downspouts. One of the more unusual facets of the project were the metal details installed at the top of the walls, which were recreated to closely replicate the historic look. “We built each individual piece,” Sanchez notes. “We installed them along with the fascia, and then installed the gutter, drip edge and receiver flashing for the roof.”

Crews from Douglass Colony installed the Firestone Una-Clad UC-6 double-lock standing seam panels. Once the roof system was in place, crews installed approximately 1,600 linear feet of the S-5! ColorGard snow guard system. Photos: S-5!

The standing seam metal roof was installed on top of a nail base and Firestone CLAD GARD SA high-temperature underlayment. After the roll former was lifted into place, the Una-Clad UC-6 double-lock standing seam panels were rolled out directly onto the roof, where they were staged for installation. The installation went smoothly, Sanchez notes, despite the number of hips and ridges. “We followed all of the Firestone details,” he says.

The double-lock standing seam system was specified for its durability, as the area typically experiences tough winter weather. “We used the 180-degree seam because of the elevation,” Sanchez says.

Once the roof system was in place, approximately 1,600 linear feet of the snow guard system was installed. Depending on the length of the standing seam metal panel, some sections required two or three rows of S-5! ColorGard.

“We wanted a continuous snow guard system, instead of individual plastic pieces that are screwed down through the roof,” says Cox. “The ColorGard is attached without penetrating the roof and it performs better, that’s the main reason we installed it on the Ouray School. There is pedestrian traffic on three sides of the building, so preventing snow and ice from sliding off the roof was obviously important.”

Cox credits his S-5! rep with suggesting the best layout for the project. “We have one row about one foot up from the eave, a second row about a quarter way up the roof and another row about midway up the roof, spaced in line with S-5! suggestions,” he notes.

The snow bar system was easy to install, according to Sanchez. The non-penetrating system attaches to the standing seams with set screws. “We just followed the pattern they laid out,” Sanchez says.

Weather was not an issue on the project, and despite the remote location, the jobsite didn’t pose any real difficulties, according to Sanchez. “The days were pretty short, though, as there were mountains on both sides,” he notes.

In addition to the new sloped roof and attic addition, the renovated school features south and southeast vestibule additions, security upgrades, new entry steps, new windows, HVAC system upgrades, a fully replaced fire alarm system to meet current codes and the addition of a full, building sprinkler system.

TEAM

Architect: RTA Architects in Colorado Springs, Colorado, www.rtaarchitects.com
Roofing Contractor: Douglass Colony Group, Commerce City, Colorado, www.douglasscolony.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: Una-Clad UC-6, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com
Underlayment: CLAD GARD SA, Firestone Building Products
Snow Guards: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Challenges With Metal Roof, Manpower Overcome at Alabama School

At Indian Springs School in Birmingham, Alabama, the first phase of a three-phase construction plan included building three new classroom buildings and a new administration building, as well as re-roofing the library. The roofing portion of the project included 45,000 square feet of 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD roof panels manufactured by Petersen. Photos: Petersen

When founded in 1952, the master plan for Indian Springs School in Birmingham, Alabama, called for campus development to maintain focus on the lake at the center of the school’s wooded 350-acre property. During the past 30 years, however, focus was lost, so a new plan was made to demolish some existing structures and construct buildings that re-establish a connection to the lake. The school enrolls 280 students in grades 8-12.

Phase one of a three-phase construction plan consisted of constructing three new cypress-clad, single-story classroom buildings and a new administration building, plus a re-roof of an existing library building. Oversight of design and construction was handled through a partnership of Lake Flato Architects in San Antonio and ArchitectureWorks in Birmingham. The first phase utilized 45,000 square feet of Petersen’s 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge Snap-Clad and Tite-Loc roof panels in Cool Color Zinc. The new buildings, which added 18 classrooms and 18 administrative offices, achieved LEED Silver status.

Installation of the PAC-CLAD roof was completed by Quality Architectural Metal and Roofing in Birmingham. The combination of panels was determined by the roof pitch, according to Eddie Still, the company’s vice president and project manager. “We used the mechanically seamed Tite-Loc panel on a few areas with pitches that required that profile, which amounted to less than 2,000 square feet,” he notes.

The roof systems were designed to extend over covered walkways, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor areas. Photos: Petersen

Some of the buildings feature monitors, which provide daylighting to each classroom, onto which QAMR installed PAC-CLAD flush panels for both the vertical and horizontal sections. This was a big job, Still notes. “Installation went smoothly, but finding manpower to get it done was the problem,” he says. “The job was big with multiple buildings, and I wasn’t able to stop all of our other projects for this one job. So, we approached it like four small jobs. This sounded good in theory, but there were delays with the work in front of us which impacted my schedule. This meant I had to put two crews out there to catch up. And then I had to call one of my friendly competitors and put one of his crews out there to help out. I’ve never done that before, but it worked out. Plus, these architects were good to work with. We had no issues at all on this project. We worked smoothly together.”

Still notes he frequently uses Petersen’s Snap-Clad panel. “The panel performs well and we’ve never had problems with it,” he says. “You don’t need to reinvent the wheel; you just need a product you can depend on. We have a 30-plus year relationship with Petersen and they’re great to do business with.”

ArchitectureWorks, which was first to join the project and managed the construction portion, formed a partnership with Lake Flato because of its focus on school design. “In general terms, Lake Flato was the design architect doing the master planning, and ArchitectureWorks was the architect of record, or executive architect, that completed construction documents and oversaw the construction phase,” says Greg Papay, FAIA and partner at Lake Flato. “We get asked to team up on jobs all the time, but they don’t all go as smoothly as this one did. ArchitectureWorks was great to work with.”

The design team sought to respect the school’s original structures’ simple forms and materials while opening the new buildings to nature. “Our notion was that 21st century schools could actually feel more like 19th century schools,” Papay explains, referring to the firm’s back-to-basics approach.

Focus on the Roof

All new buildings feature a roof that extends over covered walkways. “The roof shape allowed us to create transition spaces around each building that blur the lines between indoor and outdoor areas,” Papay says. “We chose a metal roof for longevity, attractiveness and efficiency properties. Plus, Birmingham used to be the steel capital of the South, so to have it on the buildings was a subtle reference to that local history.”

The new buildings at the school achieved LEED Silver status. Photos: Petersen

The school’s Southern U.S. location was also taken into account, notes Papay. “It was important to find balance between heat gain and glare inside from reflectivity off a neighboring roof, so we had to find the right color that addressed those issues,” he says “In the end we chose PAC-CLAD’s Cool Color Zinc.”

Lake Flato’s approach to building materials is to allow each to express its nature, where steel and wood in this application remain light in appearance. “We want a metal roof to look thin at the edge, so we don’t use heavy fascia. Some people wrap roof edges with fascia and don’t care if its appearance is thick or heavy, but fascia is not part of our approach; we were mindful of the details,” Papay says.

Papay points out that these buildings have subtle geometry shifts to accommodate natural rock groupings on the land. Therefore, he notes, “there was some roof detailing required where it was not turning at 90 degrees with a simple ridge/valley, so there was some metalworking trickery required at that point. Also, we created roof monitors which are smaller elements that required refined metal work. The roof looks great thanks to a great installation job.”

TEAM

Architects: ArchitectureWorks, Birmingham, Alabama, www.architectureworks.com, and Lake Flato Architects, San Antonio, Texas, www.lakeflato.com
General Contractor: BL Harbert International in Birmingham, Alabama, www.blharbert.com
Roofing Contractor: Quality Architectural Metal and Roofing, Birmingham, Alabama, www.qualityarch.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge Snap-Clad and Tite-Loc PAC-CLAD panels in Cool Color Zinc by Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

OSHA Seeks Members to Serve on Committee for Improving Construction Workers’ Safety and Health

OSHA is accepting nominations for individuals to serve on the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health. The group advises the Secretary of Labor on developing standards and policies affecting the construction industry. OSHA is seeking employee, employer, state safety and health agency, and public representatives with experience and expertise in construction-related safety and health issues to fill 14 vacancies. Nominations must be submitted to www.regulations.gov or by mail or facsimile before November 16. For more information, read the Federal Register notice.

New Coating Line Includes Silicone and Acrylic Elastomeric Products

ALSAN CoatingsSoprema Inc. launches a new collection of silicone and acrylic products under the brand name of ALSAN Coatings. ALSAN Coatings are ideal for maintaining and extending the life of existing roofs by protecting them from natural weathering.

The ALSAN Coatings line is comprised of:

  • ALSAN Coating SIL 402, a low-VOC, high-solids, single-component silicone roof coating that forms a durable weatherproof coating for exceptional UV protection and resistance to standing water. This maintenance coating is intended for application over existing single-ply (TPO, PVC, EPDM and CSPE), modified bitumen, BUR, and metal roofing systems and/or approved existing coatings.
  • ALSAN Coating AC 401, a high-quality, plasticizer-free, water-based, acrylic elastomeric roof coating that is tested in accordance to ASTM D-6083. ALSAN Coating AC 401 is highly reflective and offers outstanding flexibility and resistant natural weathering. This reflective coating is intended to be applied over existing single-ply (TPO, PVC, EPDM and CSPE), modified bitumen, BUR, and metal roofing systems and/or approved existing coatings.
  • These products are supported by several primer options that allow the coatings’ use across a range of roofing materials and help prevent asphalt bleed-through, inhibit rust and promote adhesion. Additional accessories include an all-purpose cleaner, Polyfleece polyester fabric for reinforcing seams and flashing, walkway coatings/granules, silicone caulk and butyl fleece tape. Both ALSAN Coating SIL 402 and ALSAN Coating AC 401 are available in white and custom colors.

    “With the addition of ALSAN Coatings, SOPREMA now has an answer for virtually every roofing need and budget,” said Tom Stuewe, product manager, SOPREMA. “The ALSAN Coatings line now allows customers to reduce rooftop temperatures and prevent premature aging caused by UV rays, reduce energy consumption and costs, and extend the life of existing leak-free roofs that could be comprised of a variety of substrates—all at an economical price point. These materials also offer a low environmental impact, thanks to low-VOC content and their ability to extend roof lifespans, reducing landfill waste associated with tear-offs.”

    For more information, visit www.soprema.us.