Innovative Solution Serves Up Perfect Blend of Color and Strength for Restaurant

A barrel-vaulted canopy made up of Pentaglas panels in a rainbow of hues lends a festive flavor to the outdoor dining area at Mexican Radio Restaurant. Photos: Kingspan Light + Air

Located in Oklahoma City’s Plaza District, Mexican Radio specializes in two things: tacos and cold drinks. The newly opened concept restaurant conceived by A Good Egg Dining Group occupies a lively, fun space.

The property’s major restoration includes a covered outdoor dining area. There, a translucent vaulted canopy crowns the space in a swirl of bright colors. Inspired by a colorful fine art glass installation, the owners and architect collaborated to find the right solution.

The canopy adds more than just a bright accent for diners: It creates an additional dining space that protects diners from the elements and makes the space useful nearly year round.

Style and Substance, on Budget

During the renovation, the outdoor dining area was demolished down to the existing steel tube structure. Kingspan Light + Air manufactured a fully engineered, customized and prefabricated vaulted canopy to fit the existing steel structure. Kingspan provided a clear anodized aluminum structure, and six unique glazing colors designed to bring the owner’s vision to life.

“We knew colored glass wouldn’t work on this budget,” says Zack Woods, AIA, with Gardner Architects. “But with the Kingspan product, we could get the bright tones of color the customer wanted, and we could cover more square footage, spanning a full patio instead of a very small area.”

Mindful of the project budget, Kingspan provided a variety of color panels with no high setup costs. Non-standard “off the rack” hues lend a lush, custom-job look. “The tones of colors used give this a unique feel and kept the budget on track,” Zack says.

The canopy provides a durable, inviting and comfortable venue for diners. Because one end of the canopy is open to the street and the other is connected to the building, the space is largely sheltered from the elements. Ceiling and attic fans circulate air and pull heat out in the warm summer months; patio heaters create a cozy space in the winter.

Providing more than just a comfortable environment, the Kingspan Light + Air Pentaglas canopy system is built to last. The system has undergone rigorous 10-year testing to ensure both color stability and impact durability over time. Should the need arise, the unique KLA system allows spot replacement of single panels, so the entire canopy does not have to be replaced.

TEAM

Architect: Gardner Architects, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, https://gardner.studio

Contractor: J&R Windows, Goldsby, Oklahoma, http://www.jandrwindows.com

MATERIALS

Barrel Canopy: 12mm Pentaglas in six colors, glazing, purlins and rafters, Kingspan Light + Air, www.kingspanlightandair.us

Re-Roofing a Frank Lloyd Wright Home

The Thomas P. Hardy House in Racine, Wisconsin, was designed and built in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Frank Lloyd Wright. Just the name brings to mind images of beautiful homes. So, when the team at Allrite Home & Remodeling had the opportunity to work on one of Wright’s creations, they jumped at the chance. A year later, the newly-added DaVinci Single-Width Shake roof brought the team industry recognition along with praise from Frank Lloyd Wright enthusiasts.

The home, on the shore of Lake Michigan, is located in Racine, Wisconsin. It was designed and built in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright for attorney Thomas P. Hardy. The stucco finished front, intricately detailed windows and breathtaking waterfront views make this a home like no other in the neighborhood.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Wisconsin, the Thomas P. Hardy House has changed hands seven times. In 2012, the then-homeowner began working to restore the home to its former beauty.

The exterior was repainted to the original terracotta color. The foundation was jacked up and rotting beams were replaced. And, original light fixtures and pocket doors were all restored. As the restoration progressed, Allrite Home & Remodeling was brought in by the home’s newest owner to tackle the roof.

Selecting the Right Shake Roof

“The homeowner had three very important priorities for this historic renovation project,” says Randy Miller, owner of Allrite Home & Remodeling. “First, they wanted cedar shake, just as Frank Lloyd Wright had intended for the roof. However, they wanted to take advantage of modern advances in materials. Second, they wanted to be environmentally responsible. And third, they wanted the roof selection to please Frank Lloyd Wright loyalists.”

Many years prior, previous owners had asphalt roofing installed on the home, which was not consistent with Frank Lloyd Wright’s style. After reviewing a variety of products, the current owners decided on a composite shingle that simulates a cedar shake roof.

Single-Width Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes in the natural Aged Cedar color was chosen to restore the original appearance to the home’s exterior.

“The DaVinci product has the right quality, texture, color and warranty that the owners wanted,” says Miller. “The Single-Width Shake in the natural Aged Cedar coloring brought back the original appearance to the home exterior. As an added bonus, the composite shake shingle has a longer lifespan and will require far less maintenance.”

Soon after the team started removing the old roof, they noticed significant fire damage to the rafters above the kitchen area. Apparently a fire in the early 1960s extensively damaged the inner structure of the roof.

“The current owners had no idea so much harm had occurred,” says Miller. “We proceeded to replace the damaged wood. That was important so the home will be structurally sound and able to support the new roof.”

According to Miller, safety was also a concern. The home is located on a steep bluff overlooking Lake Michigan. High winds were a challenge as the team worked to keep materials, tools and technicians secure.

Another challenge was the location of the home on a busy road. There was also a walled-in yard. This meant there was not a good staging location for materials or a dumpster. They were able to squeeze a dumpster onto the property, but neither the placement nor the access was ideal.

Finishing Touches

After the installation of the composite shake roofing came the finishing touch: copper accents. The area around the chimney had previously been plain brown flashing. It was decided to update it with copper flashing that will continue to add character to the home as it ages and patinas.

“Installing the copper without it rippling required our expert technicians to be extremely precise as they worked,” says Miller. “Then there was the added pressure of knowing that every step of this project was being scrutinized.”

Copper accents were added, including copper flashing around the chimney.

“There are Frank Lloyd Wright fans and enthusiasts both online and in our community who watched our progress closely,” Miller continues. “They wanted to make sure every step of the way that we honored the original design of the home.”

For their successful efforts, the team at Allrite Home & Remodeling won an award in the 2019 National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) Milwaukee Remodeler of the Year Awards competition. The home received a Silver Award in the category of “Residential Historical Renovation/Restoration.”

“Our company has installed many DaVinci composite roofs during the past 15 years,” says Miller. “We’re proud of all of them. However, this project was a true labor of love. We’ve now added our mark to a beloved historical home in our community. Our entire team takes great satisfaction in knowing we were able to help bring a longer life to this Frank Lloyd Wright home.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Allrite Home & Remodeling, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, https://allriteremodeling.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Single-Width Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Air Vent Podcast Series to Focus on Residential Attic Ventilation

Air Vent launched a podcast series titled “Airing it Out with Air Vent.” The first episode is titled “Most Homes Have Incorrect Attic Ventilation. So What?” and it is available HERE

“We’re using the podcast as an extension of our commitment to collect and share best practices and solutions in the residential attic ventilation industry,” the company said in a statement. “We have an initial lineup of topics we think you’ll find very useful and interesting because we pulled them from the Q & A portion of our popular in-person seminars, “Attic Ventilation: Ask the Expert.” Our plan is to expand on those topics in greater length than the seminar format allows.”

Episodes will be added to the podcast library inside Air Vent University on the company’s website. Past episodes will be available to listen to at any time. Listeners can also make topic suggestions by clicking here

For more information, visit http://airvent.com.

NRCA Launches Podcast Series

The National Roofing Contractors Association has launched a new podcast series, “Stories of an Extraordinary Industry.” Episodes will share roofing professionals’ firsthand accounts of their meaningful experiences and stories of inspiration, generosity and success in the roofing industry.

In the first episode, “House Flipper to Roofing Industry Leader,” sponsored by Owens Corning, Toledo, Ohio, NRCA CEO Reid Ribble is joined by NRCA Chairman of the Board Nick Sabino, president of Deer Park Roofing Inc., Cincinnati, to discuss Sabino’s rise through the industry. In the second episode, “Roofing Industry Rallies Around Ambitious Goal,” sponsored by the Roofing Alliance, Charles Antis, founder and CEO of Antis Roofing & Waterproofing, Irvine, Calif., shares his story of rallying the roofing industry to adopt the roofs of 165 Ronald McDonald House Charities houses in the United States.

NRCA will release a new podcast episode biweekly, and the first season of the podcast will have 10-12 episodes. Episodes are available at roofingstories.podbean.com; on NRCA’s website at nrca.net/podcast; or wherever you get your podcasts, including Apple and Spotify.

For more information about NRCA, visit www.nrca.net

OSHA Issues Guidance to Help Construction Workers During the Coronavirus Pandemic

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has launched a webpage with coronavirus-related guidance for construction employers and workers. The guidance includes recommended actions to reduce the risk of exposure to the coronavirus.

Employers of workers engaged in construction (such as carpentry, ironworking, plumbing, electrical, heating/air conditioning/ventilation, utility construction work, and earth-moving activities) should remain alert to changing outbreak conditions, including as they relate to community spread of the virus and testing availability. In response to changing conditions, employers should implement coronavirus infection prevention measures accordingly.

The webpage includes information regarding:

  • Using physical barriers, such as walls, closed doors, or plastic sheeting, to separate workers from individuals experiencing signs or symptoms consistent with the coronavirus;
  • Keeping in-person meetings (including toolbox talks and safety meetings) as short as possible, limiting the number of workers in attendance, and using social distancing practices;
  • Screening calls when scheduling indoor construction work to assess potential exposures and circumstances in the work environment before worker entry;
  • Requesting that shared spaces in home environments where construction activities are being performed, or other construction areas in occupied buildings, have good air flow; and
  • Staggering work schedules, such as alternating workdays or extra shifts, to reduce the total number of employees on a job site at any given time and to ensure physical distancing.

Visit OSHA’s coronavirus webpage frequently for updates. For further information about the coronavirus, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

U.S. Department of Labor Adopts Revised Enforcement Policies For Coronavirus

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has adopted revised policies for enforcing OSHA’s requirements with respect to coronavirus as economies reopen in states throughout the country.

Throughout the course of the pandemic, understanding about the transmission and prevention of infection has improved. The government and the private sector have taken rapid and evolving measures to slow the virus’s spread, protect employees, and adapt to new ways of doing business.

Now, as states begin reopening their economies, OSHA has issued two revised enforcement policies to ensure employers are taking action to protect their employees.

First, OSHA is increasing in-person inspections at all types of workplaces. The new enforcement guidancereflects changing circumstances in which many non-critical businesses have begun to reopen in areas of lower community spread. The risk of transmission is lower in specific categories of workplaces, and personal protective equipment potentially needed for inspections is more widely available. OSHA staff will continue to prioritize COVID-19 inspections, and will utilize all enforcement tools as OSHA has historically done.

Second, OSHA is revising its previous enforcement policy for recording cases of coronavirus. Under OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements, coronavirus is a recordable illness, and employers are responsible for recording cases of the coronavirus, if the case:

Under the new policy issued today, OSHA will enforce the recordkeeping requirements of 29 CFR 1904for employee coronavirus illnesses for all employers. Given the nature of the disease and community spread, however, in many instances it remains difficult to determine whether a coronavirus illness is work-related, especially when an employee has experienced potential exposure both in and out of the workplace. OSHA’s guidance emphasizes that employers must make reasonable efforts, based on the evidence available to the employer, to ascertain whether a particular case of coronavirus is work-related.

Recording a coronavirus illness does not mean that the employer has violated any OSHA standard. Following existing regulations, employers with 10 or fewer employees and certain employers in low hazard industries have no recording obligations; they need only report work-related coronavirus illnesses that result in a fatality or an employee’s in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye. 

For further information and resources about the coronavirus disease, please visit OSHA’s coronavirus webpage.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

New Bath and Dryer Vent Designed for Shingle Roofs

Lifetime Tool & Building Products LLC introduces the Lifetime Bath-Dryer Vent for shingle and metal roofs. This vent is pleasing to the eye, complements any quality installation, and offers a 50-year product warranty. The proprietary design enables the housing structure to mount to the plate without rivets, fasteners and sealants — common leak points in existing vents. The vent assembly is crimped into the seamless deep-drawn plate with an EPDM gasket, which is designed to guarantee a forever water-tight seal.

The shingle vent plate is 24-gauge galvanized Kynar with 4 inches of flashing on the sides, 6 inches at the top and 3.5 inches at the bottom. According to the manufacturer, most existing vents have less than half of these needed requirements, which exponentially increases the likelihood of edge leaking. In independent laboratory testing, the Lifetime Bath-Dryer Vent exceeded 110 mph in the ASTM T166-18 – Wind Driven Rain Test.

The product features a 24-gauge galvanized Kynar cap that is clad onto a high-temperature polymer with a heat deflection above 212 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the company, this carefully tested premium polymer ensures that the Bath-Dryer Vent retains its mechanical properties for decades of use.

Additionally, the cap assembly is attached with two black oxide stainless fasteners that are easily removed with a screwdriver and 316L stainless clips for easy removal of the cap for periodic maintenance, perfect for multi-family roofs. A gold anodized aluminum damper, preventing white corrosion, and its passivated stainless-steel axle is mounted on the angled structure to ensure condensation drainage and provides protection from wind and rain penetration. Its built-in weep holes, wind walls and recessed EPDM noise bumpers help eliminate clatter. The EPDM bumpers also permit a small amount of warm air to pass between the structure and damper to reduce the chance of condensate freezing. A snap-in high-quality polymer frame has a stainless steel screen included for use in bath venting only.

Finishing the assembly is a proprietary 6-inch-high, 4-inch round, 26-gauge G90 galvanized drop with a unique button punch/window snap connection assembly. A 4-inch/3-inch reducer is also included.

“I am passionate about creating true solutions for roofing components, and I believe that the Lifetime Bath-Dryer Vent is a game changer,” said Roger Cline, Managing Partner and Chief Engineer at Lifetime Tool & Building Products LLC.

LEARN MORE

Visit: www.lifetimetool.com

Call: (877) 904-1002

Shock-Absorbing and Retractable Lanyards Prevent Dropped Objects

Ergodyne announced six new additions to its Squids line of trapping, tethering and topping solutions designed to prevent dropped objects on the worksite. The launch includes two shock-absorbing tool lanyards, two retractable lanyards, a water bottle holder/trap and tape measure trap.

“The new shock absorbing and retractable lanyards improve on already great designs for lighter weight, lower profile tool tethering solutions,” said Nate Bohmbach, Ergodyne Product Director. “In addition to evolving those products, we’ve also bumped up the size of our water bottle and tape measure traps to be able to accommodate larger gear.”

The retractable tool lanyards feature a cut-resistant Dyneema cord and are certified to tether hand tools up to 0.5lbs / 0.23kg in retracted state and prevents tools up to 2lbs / 0.9kg from becoming falling objects. 

Shock-absorbing tool lanyards feature corrosion-resistant stainless steel carabiners and are certified to tether tools up to 15 lbs / 6.8 kg. 

The new larger size bottle holder secures up to 33.8 oz / 1L water bottles, containers or canisters. It features a stainless steel belt clip for attaching to tool belts and fall protection harnesses and durable D-ring for tethering to tool lanyard. 

The new larger size tape measure holder is designed to accommodate larger tape measures (30-40 ft / 9-12m). It features a stainless steel belt clip for attaching to tool belts and fall protection harnesses, and a durable D-ring for tethering to tool lanyard. 

According to the manufacturer, all of the products are third-party tested to the ANSI/ISEA 121-2018 standard for dropped object prevention.

“Last year, the industry saw an increase in the number of workers injured by falling objects — that’s a major problem,” said Tom Votel, President and CEO of Ergodyne. “Continuing to innovate and improve upon solutions in the drops prevention category is more important than ever.”

For more information, visit www.ergodyne.com

Carlisle Construction Materials Changes Name of Its Coatings, Adhesives, Sealants, and Elastomers (CASE) Business

Carlisle Construction Materials, an operating segment of Carlisle Companies Incorporated, announced that it is changing the name of its CASE business from Accella Polyurethane Systems to Carlisle Polyurethane Systems (CPS). Carlisle acquired the Accella Performance Materials family of companies in November 2017, which included spray foam insulation, tire fill, and CASE businesses. In 2019, the spray foam insulation business was rebranded to Carlisle Spray Foam Insulation and tire fill into Carlisle TyrFil. This name change to Carlisle Polyurethane Systems will complete the evolutionary process to incorporate the CASE business into the Carlisle family of companies.

Carlisle Polyurethane Systems brings to the industry a premier level of product innovation, technology, and above all else; customer service. According to the company, CPS is driven to answer your unmet needs. Whether delivering project-based solutions or creating economic value through differentiated technology, it is the goal of CPS to deliver a polyurethane solution to help solve your problems with the speed and scale to meet your most challenging demands. Carlisle Polyurethane Systems will continue to focus on foams, surface and specialty coatings, binders, casting resins, adhesives, sealants, and elastomers. 

A unique combination of service, the premium Carlisle Experience customers have come to expect, technical support, and customized solutions differentiates Carlisle Polyurethane Systems. For most every spray, pour, and cast application customers might require; CPS has advanced problem-solving solutions to ensure that its material will match specific application needs. By partnering with customers, CPS can fully support various polyurethane system needs and provide the right solution at the right time. According to the company, this degree of tailored customization – and a commitment to not only meet, but also exceed, the expectations of a diverse base of customers in multi-disciplinary industries – sets Carlisle Polyurethane Systemsapart from nearly every other polyurethane chemistry space player. 

“The Carlisle brand represents industry-leading innovation, supply chain excellence, and customer problem-solving and we are thrilled to leverage those attributes; as well as the storied history of our parent company; in our new name,” stated Bill Brengel, Vice President and General Manager for Carlisle Polyurethane Systems. “This name change completes the evolutionary process to incorporate our CASE polyurethane business into the Carlisle family of companies.”

Carlisle noted no changes in product formulations or credentials are planned with this name change.

For more information, visit www.carlisleps.com.

Polyglass Names New Director of Finance

Polyglass U.S.A., Inc., announced the hire of András Kerényi as the company’s new Director of Finance. Kerényi brings with him extensive experience and education in finance and economics.

“We are proud to welcome András Kerényi to the Polyglass team,” said Scott Lelling, Director of Strategic Marketing at Polyglass. “He has the knowledge and drive to support employees across the company and help us grow our business, and he plays a valuable part in Polyglass delivering innovative roofing and waterproofing system to our customers.”

Kerényi joins Polyglass after 12 years as Controller at MAPEIHungary Kft., where he was also a critical member of the senior leadership team working on budgeting, pricing, sales reporting, negotiation, and more. Educated in the United States, U.K., and Hungary, Kerényi brings extensive experience in international business and a fresh perspective to the Polyglass team. He hopes to guide the Polyglass finance department to supporting the company’s overall goal of engaging with customers to learn about and meet their waterproofing and roofing needs.

For more information, visit Polyglass.us.