How ’Bout That, Sports Fans!

Late autumn can be the most beautiful time of the year. It is also a great time to be a sports fan. College and pro football are in full swing, the baseball season culminates in the World Series, and basketball and hockey get underway. There are a lot of great sporting events to get lost in during the fall, which is a good thing, because it’s also election season, and there is nothing more depressing than campaign commercials.

But sports can be more than just a distraction from a brutal TV news cycle. Growing up, I thought of sports as a parallel educational track that taught me just as much as — if not more than — my formal schooling. Whether you are paying attention or not, you absorb a lot of life lessons on the athletic field.

You learn that hard work pays off. You learn the value of teamwork. You learn that you can do your absolute best and still lose. You learn that crazy, unexpected things happen. You learn that people get hurt. You learn that authority figures can be wrong — that coaches, umpires and referees make mistakes. You learn what nepotism is. You learn that last year’s bitter rival can be this year’s teammate — and not such a bad person, after all. You learn that every once in a while, David really does beat Goliath.

There’s a reason people use a lot of sports metaphors. It’s especially common in the business world, where the relationship between individual achievement and group success plays out every minute of every day.

I remember once consoling a co-worker who was passed up for a promotion she thought she deserved, which went instead to the boss’s son. I didn’t tell her that this was a lesson I learned at age 10, when I realized the coach’s son was going to start at second base, and I had to find another position. At age 13, I learned that the rule about missing football practice meant missing that week’s game somehow did not apply to our star running back. At age 36, I learned that the last-place men’s league softball team can beat the undefeated first-place team in the first round of the playoffs. I also learned that cheap champagne can give you a wicked hangover.

So, as fall turns to winter, root for your favorite team and savor every victory. Remember, as someone once said, life is the ultimate team sport. Now, dust yourself off and get back in there.

California’s Alternative-Energy Paradigm Could Mean Opportunities for Roofing Contractors

Photos: PetersenDean Roofing & Solar

The importance of solar energy to provide renewable energy options and protect the health of our environment is a national movement that got a big boost in California recently. The state government adopted new policies to establish a more progressive foundation for the use of solar power in residential buildings as part and parcel of its pioneering “net-zero” mission.

While California is at the leading edge of solar energy production, other states such as Colorado, New Jersey and Virginia are not far behind. So, whether roofing companies are working in California or somewhere else in the country — especially the so-called “sunshine states” — it would be smart for them to better understand the state-of-the-art technologies as well as nuts-and-bolts mechanics of high-performance solar energy systems.

Solar Energy Systems on Every New Home

Of most interest to roofers in California is a far-reaching energy policy adopted earlier this year by the California Energy Commission requiring that solar photovoltaic (PV) electric systems be installed on virtually every new residential dwelling built in the state starting in 2020. “California is about to take a quantum leap in energy standards,” stated Robert Raymer, technical director for the California Building Industry Association. “No other state in the nation mandates solar, and we are about to take that leap.”

For California’s roofing industry, this pro-solar policy could open the door for significant new business opportunities as home builders prepare for the 2020 implementation.

California’s 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards requires that all residential structures install solar energy systems beginning in 2020. Photos: PetersenDean Roofing & Solar

California has been a leading proponent of solar power for the past decade with its goal of reaching net-zero energy usage by 2045. Committed to the long-term use of solar power, the California Energy Commission took a major step toward achieving that goal, and beyond, by adopting a policy in May of this year that will make solar energy systems standard on virtually every new home built in California starting in 2020.

California’s net-zero mission dates to 2007 when the Energy Commission adopted the goal aimed at making homebuilding so efficient “newly constructed buildings can be net zero energy by 2020 for residences and by 2030 for commercial buildings.” Under this policy, solar energy was considered one component of building more energy efficient homes — but was not required.

Now, the new solar mandate, officially called the 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards, requires that all houses, condos and apartment buildings up to three stories which secure building permits after January 1, 2020, install solar energy systems. The new CEC policy focuses on four key areas: smart residential photovoltaic systems; updated thermal envelope standards (preventing heat transfer from the interior to exterior and vice versa); residential and nonresidential ventilation requirements; and nonresidential lighting requirements. The standards also encourage demand-responsive technologies such as heat pump water heaters, improvements to a building’s thermal envelope to enhance comfort and energy savings by inclusion of high-performance insulation and windows.

“Under these new standards, buildings will perform better than ever, and at the same time they contribute to a reliable grid,” explains CEC Commissioner Andrew McAllister, who is the commission’s lead on energy efficiency. “The buildings that Californians buy and live in will operate very efficiently while generating their own clean energy. They will cost less to operate, have healthy indoor air and provide a platform for ‘smart’ technologies that will propel the state even further down the road to a low emissions future.”

A grid-connected residential energy storage system that synergistically combines solar and energy storage can greatly reduce a homeowner’s operational reliance on the local electric utility. Photos: PetersenDean Roofing & Solar

With the new standards in place, more advanced solar products and roofing systems will become the norm as consumers expect optimum performance and maximum savings from their solar investments. Based on a 30-year mortgage, the Energy Commission estimates that although the new standards could add about $40 to a residential homeowner’s average monthly payment, they will save consumers $80 on monthly heating, cooling and lighting bills.

“With this adoption, the California Energy Commission has struck a fair balance between reducing greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously limiting increased construction costs,” explains California Building Industry Association CEO and President Dan Dunmoyer. “This set of cost-effective standards ensures homebuyers will recoup their money over the life of the dwelling.”

SB 700 Boosts Storage Battery Use

California’s most recent pro-solar policy, SB 700, was signed into law by California Gov. Jerry Brown in September and promises to give use of solar energy another big boost in the state. The new measure extends California’s Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) for an additional five years, from the current January 1, 2021 expiration date until January 1, 2026. SGIP provides substantial rebates to homeowners through the state Public Utilities Commission for the installation of energy storage systems that save solar power for use during off hours such as evenings and cloudy days, or during utility blackouts.

This extension should also add to the demand for new and retrofit solar systems — a boost that could benefit roofing companies which also install solar panels.

Understanding this potential, PetersenDean Roofing & Solar is at the forefront of storage battery technology as a key component of our solar energy systems. To this end, we have partnered with SolarEdge, a global leader in PV inverters, power optimizers, and module-level monitoring services, and LG Chem, the world’s largest lithium-ion battery manufacturer. With this partnership in place, our company has made a major leap towards utilizing state-of-the-art storage battery technology as part of the solar packages we offer to our builder customers and home owners.

High-performance storage systems such as lithium ion batteries also dramatically increase the homeowner’s independence from utilities and the associated challenges related to stability and rate increases with lower energy costs. A grid-connected residential energy storage system that synergistically combines solar and energy storage can greatly reduce a homeowner’s operational reliance on the local electric utility. Simply put, modern batteries make it possible for homeowners to use stored solar energy not only during the night and possible blackouts, but during peak demand times when utility rates are at their highest, thus keeping their monthly utility bills lower.

On a macro level, storage battery technology offers electric utilities the opportunity to create a smarter power grid that, among other benefits, can give the utility better control over managing peak demand and thus reduce the need for new, extremely costly generation plants to cover that demand. Considering all the changes required by utilities and regulatory agencies as these entities respond to the new energy age, this transformational storage technology provides energy producers more creative ways to connect with home builders and home owners, giving them greater control over their efforts to save money and help our environment by using more renewable energy.

This also creates huge potential. The market research firm IHS Markit states that energy storage is considered critical to enabling power delivery systems that are heavily reliant on renewable energy, and batteries will play an important role in this transition. According to Grid-Connected Energy Storage Market Tracker by IHS Markit, 130 gigawatt hours (GWh) of battery energy storage will likely be installed worldwide between 2018 and 2025.

Need For Education

Continuing education is critical. As alternative-energy policies such as those adopted by California become more prevalent in states across the country, builders and their planners/architects must be in tune with the changing demands and requirements of structural design and implementation that optimize the performance of solar as well as other non-polluting energy producing systems.

“There is a lack of awareness and technical expertise with respect to creating cost-effective net zero energy communities,” explains Judi G. Schweitzer MRED, AMDP, CALGreen CAC, founder and owner of Orange County, California-basedSchweitzer & Associates. An energy consultant for the state as well as major residential developers, Schweitzer states emphatically that one of the top priorities to achieving optimum performance is education.

Whatever aspect of solar energy production in which a roofing company or other vendor may be involved, ongoing education is key to knowledge and success. To assist roofing companies with education and information, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA)hosts as part of its website The Rooftop Solar Resource (www.rooftopsolarresource.com). This site serves as a comprehensive resource for homeowners, business owners, building managers and consumers looking for information regarding solar rooftops, as well as a resource for contractors, suppliers, architects, designers and consultants seeking more information regarding the technical aspects of rooftop solar installations.

Nevertheless, while much has been written and says about solar energy and its benefits, education about system design and proper installation is at best, lagging. For example, we are still amazed as we do our on-the-ground assessments how many residential solar panel systems are improperly designed and installed, such as not orienting solar panels for maximum exposure to the sun.

Along with orientation, Schweitzer points out that the size of a solar PV system will depend on such factors as the location of a home and its relative climate zone. Obviously, solar panels will perform better on homes located in sunbelt states, but even in these regions, design and installation are critical to performance. One other point that falls under education: Something as basic as the correct color of a roof can improve the performance of a solar energy system. Combining a PV system with a so-called cool roof — usually white or light colored — can boost the performance of a solar system by as much as 10 percent. When it comes to the wise production of energy, every percentage point counts.

About the Author: Gary Liardon is president of the Consumer Group Nationwide at PetersenDean Roofing & Solar, a full-service roofing and solar company based in Fremont, California that employs 3,000 workers and operates in 11 states. For more information, visit www.petersendean.com.

Water-Repellent Sloping Material Promotes Positive Drainage

Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. launches Polyslope, a water-repellent, fiber reinforced, cementitious compound is designed to address standing water, promote positive drainage, and divert water off the roof.

According to the manufacturer, theproduct can be used to create positive drainage on roofs that have low spots and divert standing water. Polyslope is a blend of special binders, fiber, admixtures, selected aggregate, and powder polymers formulated to produce high bond strength and easy finishing. The product is mixed with 1.2 gallons to 1.3 gallons of water per 50-pound pail. Polyslope is ready to use after adding water and mixing. It is easy to screed and paintable after 48 hours.

“We are proud to bring this product to market and enable contractors to quickly resolve roof challenges,” said Ariel Lender, director of product management and codes and compliance. “Our mission is to deliver quality and innovative solutions to the roofing industry that are sustainable and help prolong the life of the roof.”

LEARN MORE

Visit: https://polyglass.us
Call: (800) 222-9782

Expert Tips For Shingling A Cone-Shaped Roof

Cone-shaped roofs are one of those projects that contractors either love to do or avoid like the plague.

A prominent architectural feature on Queen Anne- and Norman-style homes, cone-shaped roofs are also found on Armenian and Georgian churches and medieval towers and castles. Their sloping and curved geometric surfaces can be difficult and labor intensive to shingle, especially for roofers who are accustomed to working only with straight lines.

Whereas a simple pitched roof typically has two or more sides and a hip roof has at least four sides, a conical or turret-style roof can appear to have an infinite number of sides. Some cone-shaped roofs have three to eight flat sides that create more of a geometric shape, such as a pyramid.

So, the challenge is: How do you install flat shingles on this intricate, rounded surface?

The underlayment should be applied vertically, perpendicular to the eave, as shown in this figure from the ARMA Technical Bulletin titled “How to Shingle a Cone Roof.” (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Getting Started

Thanks to their flexibility, modern asphalt shingles can be installed on roofs of any shape.

To begin shingling a cone roof, you need to know three measurements: the length of the rafter, the diameter of the cone and the widest piece of shingle you’ll be using.

To determine the distance around the base of the cone, multiply its diameter by 3.14. For example, if the diameter is 20 feet, the perimeter would equal 62.8 feet. With a 12-inch-wide shingle, you would need 63 shingles in each row around the cone.

Precise calculations are necessary because shingle pieces will need to change shape and become narrower as you move from the base of the cone up to its peak.

Cutting the shingles is a task you can do ahead of time, by creating a template, or when you get to a particular part of the installation.

Safety Concerns

Because cone-shaped roofs are usually steep and high off the ground, consider hammering footholds into the roof for stable support while you work. Better yet, use scaffolding, which not only provides a platform for leaning a ladder onto the roof, it also serves as an easily accessible shelf for your roofing materials and tools.

On a flat-sided cone roof, use the standard hip and ridge installation method. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Underlayment and Ventilation

With preparations complete and safety equipment in place, you’re ready for the fun part: installation.

First, start by applying a good quality underlayment to the deck per the manufacturer’s instructions.

The underlayment should be applied vertically, perpendicular to the eave, following the flow pattern from the cone’s peak to its base. This process will help to prevent the material from wrinkling or buckling. You should end up with an overlap near the peak, which can be trimmed during underlayment application and before installing shingles.

Continue to overlap the underlayment vertically as you progress up the cone and use asphalt plastic cement to cement the lap edge. Alternatively, you can use a peel-and-stick underlayment. A self-adhering underlayment protects the eaves and flashing from wind-driven rain and covers any possible gaps between abutting shingles.

Next, check the ventilation. If the cone is open to the attic area, it should be part of the ventilation system. To accommodate static ventilation in the main portion of the attic, increase the requirement for the net-free area by the same square footage as the cone-shaped room. If the area is open to the living space, a ceiling fan can help force moisture and heat from the cone-shaped room to the main living area for dispersal. Using a room dehumidifier may also be helpful.

When working with a completely circular cone, use an off-peak, roll-type ridge vent at the peak for positive ventilation. The formula for cone-shaped rooms is consistent with any other residential area:

  • Equal intake and exhaust vents: 300 square feet of attic area = 1 square foot of net-free vent area
  • Exhaust vents only: 150 square feet of attic area = 1 square foot of net-free vent area

In cases with no ventilation, make the homeowner aware of potential issues with accelerated wear and how it can affect the product’s warranty. For more specific requirements, contact the shingle manufacturer.

Shingling Flat-Sided vs. Rounded Cones

After installing underlayment and addressing ventilation, you can start applying shingles.

When shingling a rounded cone roof, divide the roof into three distinct zones. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

If you’re working with a flat-sided cone roof, you can use the standard hip and ridge installation method. Snap vertical chalk lines from the cone tip to the eave center on each of the flat sides. Then apply shingles to the flat areas, cutting at the hips or joints. Use a standard hip and ridge shingle to complete the hip joints.

To ensure a continuous roofing line, snap horizontal chalk lines around the cone so that shingles will line up on adjacent sides.

Shingles on steep-sided cone roofs — those greater than 21/12 slope — may need to be hand sealed with asphalt plastic cement. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for steep-slope application.

When shingling a rounded cone roof, you won’t have a horizontal line to follow because of the curvature. If you try to create a line, butting the sides of the shingles together, the shingles will gradually curve downward and won’t correctly align when you encircle the cone.

To make installation easier, divide the roof into three distinct zones. Start applying shingles to zone one, at the bottom of the cone, and then work your way up to zones two and three.

While you are nailing, have another crew member help hold the shingles down around the curve so they are flush against the surface.

Side overlap of shingles is more noticeable in the upper portions of each cone. Trim shingles at an angle to make the joint parallel to water flow. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Because the cone shape tapers from the base to the peak, succeeding courses require less material.

The degree of horizontal offset and varied shingle cutouts will create a random appearance. When using standard three-tab shingles, trim each shingle for proper vertical alignment. A simpler alternative would be to use a randomly applied shingle that doesn’t need to be vertically aligned.

Shingling a cone-shaped roof may be challenging, but with the proper knowledge and execution, you can restore this architectural focal point to its full glory.

For more information from Atlas Roofing, including technical bulletins, installation instructions and product data sheets, visit atlasroofing.com.

The Power of Vacations

My dad keeps telling me that kids today don’t work very hard. By kids he means me — and I’m 57. It seems every time I turn around, though, I see an article that offers the opposite conclusion: Americans work too hard. They work longer hours and take less vacation time than their counterparts in other countries. By some accounts, the majority of American workers don’t even use all of the time off they are entitled to take. The sad part is, most workers do so because they want to be more productive. But working too long and too hard makes us less productive, not more. Vacation time is not only beneficial for personal health and well-being. Vacations also increase productivity.

Human bodies and brains have their limitations. We need some downtime to stay healthy and focused. It’s also during periods of rest and relaxation that some of the greatest discoveries have been made.

Whether it’s Newton resting by an apple tree or Watson and Crick taking a break by the seaside, it seems every scientific breakthrough I read about in high school came about when someone was goofing off. The notion of an epiphany — a flash of insight that solves a troubling problem — often seems to coincide with a break from work.

The “eureka” moment is said to derive its name from the story of the ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes, who came up with a method of solving a tricky problem after he slid into a nice hot bath. The story goes that he was trying to figure out how to measure the volume of irregularly shaped objects. Stumped, he took a break at the local bath house, where he suddenly realized that he could make the determination by the amount of water an object displaced. He then ran through the streets screaming “eureka,” which apparently means either “I found it!” or “I forgot my clothes!”

As I worked on this issue of the magazine, which focuses on education projects, I thought of the long summer breaks we had as students, which I now know are frenzied periods of construction for the roofing industry. I also spent a week in northern Michigan, where I hiked some beautiful trails with my wife, Patti, and Josie the Wonder Dog.

I can’t claim that I had any great insights into the nature of physics or science — or even better ways to produce Roofing magazine — but I did manage to locate some dog-friendly craft breweries and take in some glorious views of lake Michigan. Here’s hoping it makes me more productive.

Three Shingle Installation Mistakes That Cause Major Problems

By following installation guidelines, contractors can produce a more professional-looking roof that will be far less likely to experience problems a year, two years, or even 10 years down the road.

A roof that isn’t installed precisely the way it was intended can be both unattractive and incapable of standing up to extreme weather conditions. On a laminate shingle roof, overlooking seemingly small details, such as shingle alignment and nailing, can lead to serious problems. Here are some of the most common details that, when improperly executed, can have negative consequences later in the installation or after completion of the roof:

  1. No Starter Shingles/Improper Alignment of Shingles at Eave and Rake

CORRECT: This photo shows the starter shingle being installed correctly. Proper alignment is crucial when installing the starter shingles. Photos: Atlas Roofing

The starter shingle’s two purposes are water protection and wind protection at the eave and rake. A starter shingle is used to seal with the field shingle at the first course along the eave and rake. This helps prevent wind and water from getting beneath the shingle in this critical location. The underlayment is a secondary water barrier if any moisture gets beneath the shingles.

Starter shingles are installed so they overhang the edge of the eaves slightly to allow for water runoff. Then a course of shingles is installed on top of the starter shingles, forming a front line of defense for blow-offs and water damage.

INCORRECT: When starter shingles are not installed, water channels can form where the shingles align across the first course. Photos: Atlas Roofing

When roofers don’t use starter shingles and install the first course of shingles directly onto the eave or rake, water channels can form where the shingles align across the first course. Moisture can then come into direct contact with the roof deck. Shingles farther up the roof are protected by the courses beneath them, which catch and divert any water that happens to drip between the edges. The first course of shingles needs the same defense from the elements.

Tip: Proper alignment is important when installing both the starter shingles and the first course of shingles. If the starter shingles are not secured correctly at the eave or rake, and the first course of shingles is not nailed down evenly across the top of the starter shingles, the roof may be at risk for wind and/or water damage.

Manufacturer’s guidelines for the proper overhang spacing at the drip edge or rake should be followed precisely. If the starter shingle overhangs the eave too much, a gust of strong wind may lift the shingles and cause a blow-off.

  1. Improper Nailing

The obvious purpose of proper nailing is to ensure that shingles stay in place and don’t cause leaks. Local building

INCORRECT: Nail heads should be flush with the top of the shingle. All three of the nails in this photo are incorrectly installed. The nail on the left is over-driven, the middle nail is at the wrong angle, and the one on the right is under-driven. Photos: Atlas Roofing

codes and manufacturers’ instructions give roofing contractors the directions they need to fasten the shingles properly to the roof deck. Guidelines specify the number of nails per shingle and where the nails should be placed.

In laminate shingles, the nailing zone is referred to as the “common bond” area of the shingle. The “common bond” area includes the double-layer portion of the shingle down to the exposure and constitutes the proper nailing area as identified in laminate shingle installation instructions. The “common bond” nailing area must be targeted correctly in order to obtain the proper wind performance as advertised by the shingle manufacturer. Properly

INCORRECT: The nailing area must be targeted correctly in order to obtain the proper wind performance. In this photo, nails are improperly placed both above and below the common bond area. Photos: Atlas Roofing

placed nails go through two layers of shingles – penetrating through the previous shingle course underneath – attaching them securely to the roof deck. Nails placed outside the common bond area can void the roof’s warranty and prevent asphalt shingles from performing as intended during extreme weather.

Tip: Pneumatic nail guns are popular among many roofers. The pressure on the gun should be set correctly before use. Nail heads should be flush with the top of the shingle. If the pressure is set too high, the gun will overdrive the shingle, causing it to sink into the mat. Too low, and nails will be under-driven, meaning they will stick out above the top of the shingle. Incorrect pressure can also cause nails to be driven in diagonally.

Wind and wind-driven rain can lift improperly nailed shingles and cause water damage to the roof and possibly blow-offs. Using either too many or not enough nails can weaken the shingle’s performance, which can also result in blow-offs.

Finally, roofers who prefer hammers should be skilled enough to drive nails consistently into shingles at the right angle, not over- or under-drive them.

  1. Improper Shingle Alignment

Roof shingles are intended to be precisely aligned, both vertically and horizontally. Roofers lay out each course of

INCORRECT: Proper alignment of the shingles is crucial. In this photo, the top shingle has been placed too high. Photos: Atlas Roofing

shingles in a staggered, stepped pattern (think of a brick wall). The shingle edges of one course must be offset from the shingles below. Edges lined up with each other would allow water to seep through to the roof deck.

INCORRECT: The shingle at the top of this photo has been placed too low. Photos: Atlas Roofing

Installing shingles too high or too low compared to the previous course can affect the exposure, which in turn would affect the aesthetics, wind performance and seal strength of the roof. An improperly aligned shingle course would be very noticeable and have a wavy appearance that is unattractive and amateurish.

Tip: Manufacturer’s instructions for proper shingle alignment are printed on the shingle wrapper.

Eliminating Problems Pays Big Dividends

Roofers who are careful to avoid these mistakes can avoid unintended problems after installation. Using a starter shingle at the eaves and rakes can ensure that the installation is off to a good start. Paying attention to proper nailing and nail placement within the common bond area on all courses all the way up to the ridge can optimize the roof’s performance against wind and rain. Finally, carefully aligning each course of shingles both vertically and horizontally will give the finished roof a professional appearance and help to improve the homeowner’s curb appeal.

Replacing a Roof Drain on a Structurally Sloped Steel Roof Deck

Figure 1. Roof drain detail. Photos: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd.

What is the number one goal of any building owner when it comes to the roof? They don’t want water pouring through their ceilings damaging the interior of the building. How do you keep water out of the building? By keeping the water on the exterior of the building and directing it to the roof drains or other drain locations, such as scupper or gutters. The roof drain is, on a basic level, one of the simplest details on the roof, and yet it is flashed incorrectly time and time again. This paper will walk you through the process of replacing a roof drain on a structurally sloped steel roof deck and installing the new roof system and flashing.

Photo 1. The sump pan and drain body have been installed. Photos: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd.

First off, we are going to assume that the current drainpipe is adequate to handle the existing water volume and drain its portion of the roof, and that the drain pipe is in good condition. Our new roof system will meet the current R-30 requirements for continuous insulation above the roof deck in a roof near Chicago. So, our roof system will be composed of a mechanically fastened substrate board on the steel roof deck, a self-adhering vapor retarder, two layers of 2.6-inch insulation mechanically fastened, a 1/2-inch modified gypsum cover board set in bead foam adhesive, and fully adhered EPDM membrane. (See Figure 1.) We will also assume that the roofing contractor is acting as the general contractor for our scenario.

Now that we have our parameters out of the way, what’s first? I have never met a building owner that likes construction debris inside of their conference room or classroom, so the interior needs to be protected prior to the removal of the existing roof drain. This can be as simple as some Visqueen, but the interior protection needs to be installed prior to the removal of the existing roof drain. The one question that seems to come up is, who is installing this protection? The owner? The plumber? The roofing contractor? I like to put this on the plumber. He knows when he is removing the drain and installing the new one.

Once the interior protection is installed, we need to coordinate the removal of the existing roof system and installation of the vapor retarder with the removal of the existing roof drain, as well as the installation of the new metal sump pan, drain body and lead and oakum joint to the existing drain pipe. (See Photo 1.) This all needs to be done on the same day so that the roof can drain properly and that the vapor retarder can be terminated onto the roof drain flange. This part is critical, as with experience this designer has learned that the vapor retarder can be used as the seal between the extension ring and the roof drain flange and that the O-ring can be eliminated. The sump needs to be fastened to the roof deck around the perimeter at 8 inches on center and be centered on the drainpipe. The drain body then needs to be set over the drainpipe and lead and oakum installed between the drain body and drain pipe.

Installing the New Roof

So, now we have the roof drain body and the vapor retarder installed. Now comes the new roof system. To meet our R-30 requirements, we are going to need a base layer of 2.6-inch polyisocyanurate insulation and 4-foot-wide, 1/2-inch-per-foot tapered insulation sump around the roof drain. This sump will get us to the R-30 requirements of 4 feet from the roof drain as required by the current codes. If my math is correct, that will leave 3.1 inches of insulation at the roof drain. We will need a reversible collar and threaded extension ring to accommodate this height. When setting the reversible collar onto the drain bowl, set it in water cut-off mastic. If the drain ever becomes clogged, this will help to keep water from seeping under the reversible collar and into the roof system. Next the threaded extension ring is installed. First, install some water cut-off mastic onto the treads prior to engagement with the reversible collar. Once again, this will help to prevent water from entering the roof system if the drain becomes clogged and backs up.

Photo 2. The extension ring has been set lower than the cover board (yellow) and water cut off mastic has been installed on the extension ring flange. Photos: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd.

One of the main questions that I receive from the roofing and plumbing contractors is, “How high should I set the extension ring?” Well, it varies per roof system, but for our scenario it needs to be set flush with the top of the tapered insulation. We set it here because we have our cover board that has yet to be installed, and when the clamping ring is installed it will be lower than the cover board. Now back to the insulation; the 2.6-inch insulation should be installed as close to the extension ring as possible, chamfered as required to fit under the flange. Next the tapered insulation sump is installed. This should be installed as close as possible to the extension ring flange and chamfered as required to fit beneath the flange. All voids between the extension ring and the insulation should be filled with spray polyurethane foam insulation.

Once we have our insulation installed, next comes the cover board. The number one thing with the cover board and roof drain is having the cover board cut perpendicularly to the roof drain flange. (See Photo 2.) Do notchamfer the cover board. Chamfering the cover board may ease the transition of the membrane onto the extension ring flange, but it creates an unsuitable substrate surface for the bonding adhesive. And in my experience, water seems to end up ponding around the roof drain and not dropping into the roof drain. This will also allow the roof’s drain clamping ring to sit flat and below the roof surface of the roof.

Photo 3. The membrane has been correctly cut in a cloverleaf pattern. Photos: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd.

Now that our cover board is installed, we have the membrane and its transition into the roof drain. Water cut-off mastic is to be installed on the extension ring flange. How much you ask? One tube. Load that flange up. Make two thick beads with it. I have never heard a contractor say, “Man, using all of that water cut-off mastic on the job really set me back.” It’s a small item, but it is worth it.

After the membrane has been installed and the clamping ring is set, it’s time to cut a hole in the membrane to allow the water to get to the drain and off the roof. How big should the hole be? As small as possible is what some contractors might say. I ask a question to you now: what is the goal of the roof drain? If you answered to get the water off the roof as quickly as possible, you would be correct. Then why would the contractor want to cut a small hole in the roof membrane that would restrict the flow of water into the roof drain piping and off of the roof? I am dumbfounded as well. When we detail the roof drain, we call for the membrane to be cut back to within a 1/2 inch of the extension ring in a cloverleaf pattern around the clamping ring bolts. (See Photo 3.) This way there is no confusion on how far back the membrane is to be cut. Set the drain dome and the roof drain detail is complete.

So, there you have it. Now the roof can drain properly with a brand-new roof drain with no problem (fingers crossed).

Fact or Fiction? Mixing Exhaust Vent Types Is Problematic

Too often, attic exhaust vent types are mixed, which can short-circuit the airflow pattern in the attic space. Photo: Jerry Becker

Airflow dynamics dictates avoiding it. The manufacturers’ Installation Instructions caution against it. Building Code cites it as a violation. And yet it remains one of the most questioned, challenged and, unfortunately, ignored tips offered during our best practices in residential attic ventilation seminars.

Is it really a problem to mix or combine different types of attic exhaust ventilation (ridge vents, wind turbines, gable louvers, box vents and power fans) on the same roof above a common attic? And if it is, why will you see it so often driving through any city in North America?

Lack of information, misunderstanding the science, and resistance to breaking old habits all contribute to the persistence of mixed exhaust vents on today’s roofs. We asked roofing contractors to share their experiences to help explain what could go wrong.

Problem No. 1: Inefficient Airflow

The main reason combining different types of exhaust vents is problematic is that it disturbs the proper flow of the attic air. To best help fight heat buildup, moisture buildup and ice dams, attic ventilation must be a balanced system of intake vents (placed low on the roof in the soffit or at the roof’s edge) and exhaust vents (placed at or near the roof’s peak). This allows the incoming cooler, drier air to enter the attic at the lowest possible location, flush out any built-up heat and moisture from inside the attic all along the entire underside of the roof deck, and push it out through the exhaust vents high on the roof.

Power fans are a good exhaust vent option. So are ridge vents. But not when they are mixed together on the same roof above a common attic. Doing so could lead to inefficient airflow and weather infiltration. Photo: Sean Toms

But, if two or more different types of exhaust vents are in place, it short-circuits the system. Instead of the primary path of air being into the intake vents and out of the exhaust vents, the path is mostly between the two styles of exhaust vents. One of the types of exhaust vents becomes an intake vent because air will always follow the path of least resistance. Air will always look for the easiest, closest path to take. That path happens to be between the two types of exhaust vents. And that limits the distribution of the air to the upper region of the roof; or worse, it keeps the air circulating between the distances of the two vents closest to the peak. That is not the best way to remove heat and moisture buildup inside an attic.

“About five years ago, I had a seasoned roofer with me that just started working for our company,” recalls roofing consultant Jerry Becker, Roof Life of Oregon, Tigard, Oregon. “We walked up to this apartment complex and I noticed that there was a power fan alongside can vents (box vents) and very little intake ventilation. I placed a friendly bet with him stating that I know what the plywood already looks like underneath without looking at it. He argued with me and said, ‘This roof has plenty of ventilation; look at all the vents up top and it even has a fan!’ So, I told him that the plywood next to the fan and the closest can vents and up to the ridge is going to be perfect, but as soon as you drop down about a foot from the power fan the plywood will be as black as night.

“We go inside the attic and what do you think we found? Black microbial growth on the lower section of the roof. It was so black that it was wet. It is important not to mix exhaust vent types. It’s bad enough when you do it on a single dwelling home, but that same mistake in a multi-family home is deadly. Think of all the moisture that is created by all the families — the washer/dryer, dishwasher, sinks, showers and ourselves.”

Inefficient airflow not only can damage the roof deck but it can also prematurely age the asphalt shingles. “I see examples of this all the time,” says Trevor Atwell, owner, Atwell Exterior Services LLC, Greenville, North Carolina. “Premature aging of roofing materials, buckled sheathing and signs of rotten wood all due to the moisture and heat being trapped.”

Ironically, sometimes the desire to mix types of attic exhaust vents seems reasonable on the surface. The homeowner or the roofing contractor wants to improve the flow of air. Thus, adding more vents — even if they are different types — seems logical. But more is only better in this case if it’s more of the same type. If improved airflow is the goal, double-check if the correct type of exhaust vent is being used to match the size and design of the roof/attic and if it’s being supplied with a balanced amount of intake ventilation. Mixing exhaust is not the solution.

Box vents or power vents installed near a ridge vent can lead to inefficient airflow, which can damage the roof deck and prematurely age asphalt shingles. Photo: Trevor Atwell

“I have seen this in action and until it was explained to me why I should avoid it, the concept of mixed exhaust was a mystery I had to punt to a colleague or competitor” says Tim Chapin, owner, Your Safe and Healthy Home, Akron, Ohio. “I had a condo project with a very complex roof made even worse by the presence of ridge vents, gable vents, soffit vents, and box vents. I was amazed there was a problem because it seemed to be ventilated to the max. But now I know it was short-circuited.”

“We see it often with ridge vents and a power fan just below the ridge vent, or with box vents combined with ridge vents; sometimes all three. We call it the Ventilation Trifecta,” says Tom Picha, steep slope consultant, Affordable Roofing Inc., Aurora, Illinois. “More is good in some cases. Not all.”

“I had a house I was asked to inspect. The house had a ridge vent, box vents and vented drip edge on it,” says Jeffrey Heitzenrater, owner, Triple Peaks Roofing & Construction Inc., Westlake, Ohio. “The first thing wrong was two different types of exhaust vents. Upon a complete attic inspection, we found mold and mildew. The insulation was also packed tight at the bottom, blocking off the intake system the previous company installed. This particular roof was only eight years old and all the plywood is now bad. This was caused from the trifecta — no intake, box vents turning into intake and venting out of the ridge vent.”

Problem No. 2: Weather Infiltration

When you ask a vent to perform a task it has not been designed to tackle, you’re rolling the dice against Mother Nature. An exhaust vent mixed with another type of exhaust vent that suddenly is pulled into intake airflow duties as a result of short-circuiting is not only pulling in air, but whatever the air is carrying that very moment: rain, snow, debris. Exhaust vents are not designed to ingest anything.

One of the consequences of mixing attic exhaust vent types can be weather infiltration, such as the snow in this photo. Photo: Ron Bastian

“In the winter when freezing rain turns into fine ice particles, I observed several times the lower exhaust vents on the roof becoming intake vents instead of exhaust as designed and drawing in ice particles and snow,” says Steve DuCharme, owner, Innovative Builders Roofing & Construction, Edmond, Oklahoma.

“I have witnessed snow ingestion into the attic due to mixed exhaust vents,” says Corey Ballweg, owner and president, Mid Towne Construction Inc., Cross Plains, Wisconsin.

“I recall an attic several years ago that had ridge vent and two power fans. They installed two because they were told one wouldn’t pull enough heat out,” says Paul Vosen, president, Degenhardt Home Improvement, Madison, Wisconsin. “The house had no overhangs and the attic floor was insulated with a good vapor barrier. I was there in the rain and both power fans were running. The attic was so tight that the power fans were actually pulling rain in through the ridge vent. Never have I seen that before — nor have I seen it since, but I never forgot it.”

The weather infiltration problems that can result from mixing exhaust vent types may not catch a homeowner’s attention right away. Not many homeowners regularly check their attic.

“I worked on a roof that did not have any intake vents at the soffit but did have two gable vents in addition, a power fan, and four box vents,” says Scott Dennison, president, Dennison Exterior Solutions & Gutter Topper, Saint Joseph, Michigan. “Over the brief 15-year life of the roof, when the power vent would turn on it turned the four box vents into intake vents which sucked water into the attic and destroyed the roof deck adjacent and below the vent.”

The most common exhaust mixture our seminar attendees tell us they see: gable end louvers combined with something else. Often the homeowner demands that the roofing contractor leave the gable end vent in place despite the fact a ridge vent is being installed as an exhaust vent improvement. The homeowner’s reasoning: The gable louver adds a decorative touch to the home’s exterior. Solution: Do what Ron Bastian does.

“I’ve noticed snow and wind-driven rain coming in a gable end vent which was combined with a ridge vent,” says Bastian, owner and president, Bastian Roofing Inc., Richfield, Wisconsin. “We closed up the gable end vent from inside the attic and this cured the problem I was called out for.” By closing up the gable vent from inside, the attic short-circuiting is eliminated and the homeowner can still enjoy the cosmetics from the exterior.

“We have witnessed numerous issues related to short-circuiting,” says Shawn Bellis, owner, EPIC Exteriors, Overland Park, Kansas. “We’ve seen fine wind-driven Midwest snow sucked into the exhaust vents — gable vents mixed with ridge vents, for example.”

There’s a Much Better Way

Inefficient airflow, mold, rotted decking, prematurely aging shingles, and weather infiltration into the attic does not have to be the final outcome. There’s a better way, but it may take a commitment to educating the homeowner and fellow roofing contractors. I believe that’s one of the reasons our best practices seminars are so well received.

“I had mixed attic ventilation on my own home,” says Sean Toms, quality control inspector, S & K Roofing, Eldersburg, Maryland. “After attending the seminar a few years ago, I looked in my attic. I had condensation on the roof nails. I had a ridge vent, fully vented soffit and gable vents. I closed the gable vents and added insulation to my attic floor. Problem solved.”

“I seem to run into mixed exhaust vents every week. Homeowners think that the more types of ventilation on the roof the better they are,” says Richard Turner, owner, RJ Turner Remodeling, LLC, High Point, North Carolina. “After explaining the things I have learned in the Air Vent Inc. seminars, they quickly understand the correct way things should be done.”

About the Author: Paul Scelsi is marketing communications manager at Air Vent Inc., and leader of its Attic Ventilation: Ask the Expert™ seminars. He’s also chairman of the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association Ventilation Task Force. For more information, visit www.airvent.com.

Upgraded Cap Stapler Offers Easier Loading and Extended Tool Life

National Nail recently upgraded its 18-gauge Stinger CS150B Cap Stapler with an enhanced design that improves performance with easier loading, longer tool life, and tool-free adjustable exhaust. Shooting 200 caps and 200 staples before reloading, the versatile cap stapler now also provides a wider range of operating pressure (up to 120 psi), which makes it ideal for installing roofing underlayments, house wrap, and foamboard.

“We listened to our contractors to make several enhancements to the Stinger CS150B that make the tool even more efficient and easier to use over a longer period of time to meet the expectations of time savings on each job,” said Roger Szotko, STINGER Product Manager, National Nail. “Beyond that, the CS150B offers the same lightweight, compact design that reduces arm fatigue and with fewer stops to reload.”

The Stinger CS150B shoots 5/8-inch, 7/8-inch, 1-1/4-inch, and 1-1/2-inch length 18-gauge staples with full 1-inch plastic caps. It also includes an installed belt hook, trigger with bump-fire and sequential modes, and a durable carrying case.

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Tough Questions

I spent Father’s Day in a less than optimal spot — visiting my dad in the local hospital.

My father is 87, and a fall down the stairs resulted in life-threatening injuries. As I headed to the intensive care unit that first night, I didn’t know what to expect. However, I did know what my father’s wishes were regarding his care.

My dad is an attorney, and he prides himself on his estate planning, which is guided by two principles: taking care of his family and not paying a penny more in taxes than he has to. My brother, my sister and I know the details and who to contact when he passes away. But when my mom passed away unexpectedly more than a decade ago, we realized we didn’t know what her wishes were regarding critical care or even her funeral.

We learned from those mistakes. Our family discussed not only dad’s estate plan but his preferences for a funeral service (less funeral home, more Irish wake) and his thoughts about being kept alive by artificial means (no). I have a durable power of attorney in my briefcase and a form designating me as his patient advocate.

I was able to concentrate on the most important thing: making sure my dad got the care he needed. With the help of some talented and dedicated health care professionals, he’s doing much better now; he’s in a rehab unit and back on his feet. Hopefully we won’t need to look at his estate plans for a long time to come.

I can’t imagine going through the experience without that preparation. I thought back on the article about exit and succession planning in our last issue by Angie Lewis titled “Leaving Your Business Legacy.” In it, she details the advice of business planning experts Kevin Kennedy and Joe Bazzano of Beacon Exit Planning, who spell out retirement strategies. They also stress the importance of contingency planning — preparing for an unexpected illness or death.

If you haven’t read that article yet, I strongly urge you to do so. You can also log on to view an on-demand webinar on the same subject sponsored by Atlas Roofing.

Contact your attorney and get advice specifically tailored for your situation. Then talk to your family members and ask some tough questions. Take it from me, these conversations are not easy, but asking tough questions now can make difficult times a lot easier.