The Stud Wall and the Roof

Photo 1. With a stud wall parapet, inappropriate wall substrate and base anchor screws into a material with low pull-out resistance, this roof blew off in what would be considered moderate winds. Images: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LTD.

How do I start an article on a topic that is so problematic, yet it’s not being addressed by designers, roof system manufacturers, FM, SPRI, NRCA or any other quality assurance standard? Like many transitions in the building industry, the use of metal studs in exterior wall construction and roofing in new construction developed out of the twin concerns of value engineering and cost reduction. It has crept silently forward without any real consideration of the possible effects this less robust construction method would have on roof system performance. 

Photo 2. When the base anchors pull out of the substrate, the membrane becomes unsecured and will lift up. Here the membrane was observed lifting to heights of 3 to 4 feet, at which point it popped the coping off.

You would think that someone along the line would say, “Hmm, I wonder how strong, effective or appropriate a screw fastener through a modified gypsum board sheathing would be?” Let me answer that question: Worthless. (See Photos 1-3.) 

There are many issues with metal stud wall construction as it relates to roofing: air drive, moisture, interior pressures, and membrane adhesion to substrate, just to name a few. This article will address only one concern: The base anchor attachment horizontally into steel stud walls, most often clad with a modified gypsum substrate board. (See Photo 4.)

Why Is This a Concern?

Photo 3. All the base anchor screws pulled out of the substrate except one that was into the stud, which just tore away when the rest of the membrane lifted.

Problems often begin in the design phase when the condition is not detailed appropriately. (See Figures 1 and 2.) The architect/engineer/ designer shows some lines and figures that the roofing contractor or manufacturer will make it work — and specifies a 20-year warranty. The designer’s first mistake is to think that contractors and manufacturers design. They do not.If I were a betting man, I would guess that 99 percent of the specified wall substrate for roof-side metal stud walls is a product that is unacceptable for roofing base flashing application. You’re smiling now, aren’t you? Been there, huh? Designers often have little knowledge as to how a roof system, or even a roof membrane, is installed, and thus don’t even realize the errors of their ways. If they did, they might realize that at the very least a base anchor attachment is at 12 inches on center, and at some time a screw is going to have to go horizontally into the inappropriate sheathing substrate. Concept 1: Architects design. I know this is scary.

Figure 1. This is a common architectural stud wall parapet detail. No base anchor is even being acknowledged, nor is the concern with vertical vapor drive in the stud wall cavity. This type of detailing, in my opinion, is below the standard of care of the architect.

Architects and designers who do not prepare project-specific details seem to love manufacturers’ standard details, which are provided as a baseline for developing appropriate project-specific details. They are not an end all, and thinking they are is a huge mistake. Another common mistake is not realizing that manufacturers do not have a standard detail for base anchor attachment into metal stud walls. This is probably because they never imagined that anyone would really try to anchor into such a poor substrate. Concept 2: Manufacturers produce products that can be assembled in a roof system; they do not design.

Oh, but the contractor will make it work. Yeah, right. Concept 3: Contractors install materials provided by the manufacturer, as specified by the designer; they do not design. Are you starting to see a trend here?

You can now see the conundrum of the blind leading the blind. 

So, to be clear:

  • Architects: Design
  • Manufacturers: Produce products
  • Contractors: Install materials

To say it a bit clearer:

  • Architects: Design
  • Manufacturers: Do Not Design
  • Contractors: Do Not Design

Read it again and see where the responsibility lies. Of course, the manufacturer needs to produce quality materials, which sometimes does not occur, and contractors need to install the materials correctly, which sometimes does not occur.

Pull-Out Strength

So that we can get this detail correct, let’s look at pull-out strengths of various materials. But let’s start with trying to determine what pull-out resistance is required. For our example, let’s use 60-mil TPO, a common roofing membrane on new construction projects. 

Figure 2. This parapet detail has been well thought out in regard to thermal drive and concerns with condensation within the stud wall cavity, but ignores how the roof membrane will be attached to the wall. The insulation thickness will result in an unbraced section of the screw and allow rotation before it pulls out of what is assumed to be a gypsum base sheathing.

Manufacturers report on their data sheets for 60-mil TPO tear strength of around 130 pounds of force (lbf). The test for this isn’t pulling the membrane out from base anchors, but it’s a good start for our discussion. I suspect that if base anchors are attached at 9 inches or 12 inches on center that the series of fasteners will elevate this value.

Given that we know that the tear resistance of TPO with a series of fasteners is greater than the ASTM D751 Tearing Strength test, I will suggest that we need a substrate with a pull resistance greater than 260 lbf, or twice the tear strength value. After that the membrane will tear itself out from around the fastener plate. 

To determine the pull-out resistance of various sheathing materials, I had the pull-out resistance of a base anchor screw tested on several materials by Pro-Fastening Systems, a specialty distributor focusing on commercial roofing in the Midwest that provides certified pull-out testing. Three pull-out tests were performed on each material. (See Photo 5.) The mean resistance values are as follows:

Photo 4. This exterior view gives a good idea of how inadequate gypsum-related products are in regard to providing a pull-out resistance. A 16-, 18- or 20-gauge plate should have been placed at the stud wall from the concrete deck up above the anchor point.

1/2” plywood: 422 pounds

5/8” plywood: 402 pounds

1/2” glass-faced gypsum: 13.3 pounds

1/2” integral fiber reinforced gypsum: 110 pounds

22-gauge steel deck: 646 pounds

22-gauge acoustical steel deck: 675 pounds

18-gauge steel stud: 1,086 pounds

26-gauge metal stud: 646 pounds

16-gauge steel plate: 1,256 pounds

18-gauge steel plate: 978 pounds

20-gauge steel plate:724 pounds

22-gauge steel plate:625 pounds

So as a starter we eliminate all the typical gypsum-based sheathing materials from being used at the base of the roof. I’m not keen on plywood either, as over time, as the plywood dries, the pull-out strength lessens. Additionally, gluing to wet plywood never works well. 

Designing the Base Anchor on Metal Stud Walls

Photo 5. Various materials were tested to determine their pull-out resistance. The results confirmed what intuitively most roofing contractors would know — that gypsum-based products have very little holding power.

The concept is simple — provide a substrate with a pull-out resistance greater than the tear strength of the roofing membrane attached in series. So, let’s pretend you’re drafting. Come on now, get your paper out, a number 2H pencil, a parallel rule and triangle to get the feel of the detail — no CAD for you today. For our example, assume you’re in the Chicago area, minimum R-value of 30, tapered insulation and 24 feet from the drain to the wall. 

First, draft and show the roof deck and your wall, roof edge and studs. Now you’re ready to start your detail. First go to your roof plan, where you have shown all the tapered insulation, and calculate what the thickness will be at your studs. Remember, code requires thickness within 4 feet of the drain. For our detail, you’re near Chicago and thus the height of a tapered insulation layout might be as follows. For the R-30 at the roof drain with a substrate board, insulation and cover board, let say for simplicity it’s 6.5 inches (1/2-inch cover board + 5.4 inches of code-required insulation + 1/2-inch cover board). Now you need to calculate the tapered insulation. For our example, the distance from drain to wall is exactly 24 feet. With a taper of 1/4-inch per foot tapered that is 6.5 inches (1/4 inch x 24 feet = 6 inches, plus the 1/2-inch starting thickness of the tapered). If you plan to use foam adhesive, add 3/8 inch per layer of foam, and be sure you understand all the layers in a tapered system. So, at the wall, the insulation will be approximately 13 inches. With the screw and plate anchor say, 2 inches above the insulation surface, we have a height of 15 inches. So, let’s say we need a substrate capable of pull-outs at least 18 inches in height from the roof deck.

Figure 3. Design of a stud wall parapet includes delineating all the components and tells the contractor what is expected. Burying such information in the specification does no one any good, as the architect most likely will not know to review the shop drawings to those requirements.

Now, I know you are thinking, “OMG, 18 inches — I can cut in a little 6-inch strip at the top of the insulation.” Don’t do it. The strip will not have any continuity or strength and will often buckle under load. Additionally, this continuous substrate piece needs to be placed on the stud. 

Back to your drafting board. Draw in against your stud a continuous 16-, 18- or 20-gauge galvanized steel plate. Depending if the membrane is to be taken up and over the stud wall or terminated some distance above the roofing, the rest of the wall can be clad in less robust materials. Pick any substrate that is roofing membrane compatible and place it over the continuous steel plate and studs above. Tell the contractor how often you want the substrate anchored.

Figure 4. We often find that a simple isometric drawing showing the construction of stud wall parapets is helpful in informing all the related trades how their work interrelates.

Draw in your substrate board, vapor retarder, insulation (and don’t forget to show and call out the spray foam seal between the insulation and wall, as there is often a void). Bring your membrane to the wall, turn it up 3 inches fully adhered to the substrate and show a plate and screw. Call this plate and screw out and note the spacing on the drawing; I’ve never seen a spec up on the roof. The base flashing can now be delineated coming down over the anchors and out onto the flat. Depending on the material, show a weld or seam tape. Now compare your detail to Figures 3 and 4. Who has properly designed the condition?

Remember

There are many issues and concerns with steel stud walls and roofing. This issue with substrate cladding in regard to the interface with the roofing system is only one that I see again and again on projects that have wind damage issues. By carefully designing the roof termination conditions, taking into account all the possible impacts and then detailing the conditions properly, your standard of care can be met and the owner well served.

About the author: Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, CSI, RRP, is a principal of Hutchinson Design Group Ltd. in Barrington, Illinois. For more information, visit www.hutchinsondesigngroup.com

The Future of Construction Projects: Geofencing, BIM and Smart Contracts

The modern-day construction project is quickly moving into the future. Within the next few years, an automated materials delivery truck will deliver an order of lumber to a project site without the need for physical labor, and as the material is incorporated into the project a 3D model will be automatically generated and stored on blockchain. Three technologies that roofing contractors and those involved in the construction industry need to be aware of are geofencing, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and smart contracts. Together, these three technologies will forever alter the modern construction project landscape.

What Is Geofencing?

Geofencing is a virtual perimeter around a single point with predefined boundaries created for a real-world area such as a construction site.1Geofencing uses either Global Positioning System (GPS) or Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) to map the boundaries and track objects traveling in and out of the virtual perimeter. 

GPS is a satellite-based global navigation system that provides geolocation anywhere on Earth where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites. Geofencing with GPS works well when applied to construction projects due to its ability to be used anywhere in the world. GPS technology works with geofencing software to track equipment and people, as well as sending real-time alerts and notifications to project managers and contractors. 

RFID uses electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects. The most common use of RFID is tracking large retail store product movement and inventory. In fact, RFID technology has replaced the old barcode system because it is more efficient. RFID tags may be attached to heavy equipment and/or on employee’s personal protective equipment (PPE) to track their movements in order to give contractors a deeper understanding of the project workflow and needs. 

Tags or other electronic communication tools (i.e., GPS, iPhone, etc.) placed on/in physical objects communicate instantly with administrators using geofencing software. Geofencing software installed on computers, iPads, and other electronic devices allows the user to receive real-time information on who and what has entered or left the geo-fenced area, as well as other information such as object height and time spent in the area. The devices with geofencing software can receive text messages, email notifications, phone calls, and other forms of communication indicating when an object has left or entered a geo-fenced area. 

Programs that incorporate the geofencing software may be programmed to set up “triggers” that notify the administrators when an object has left the geo-fenced area. For example, heavy equipment can be retrofitted with a RFID tag that is set to trigger when it leaves a geo-fenced area and instantaneously send a notification to a project manager’s phone or tablet, allowing the manager to immediately act upon the information.

How Can Geofencing Technology be Used by Contractors?

Contractors can apply geofencing technology to a number of different aspects related to most construction projects. Fortunately, most contractors already supply project managers and other supervisors with mobile devices capable of using geofence software, making implementation of geofence programs an easy next step. Purchasing RFID tags and GPS equipment is one of the only primary costs associated with this new technology. 

· Security: An obvious and practical application geofencing provides contractors and equipment owners with is security. Heavy equipment, expensive machinery, and other tools can be equipped with RFID tags that, when moved outside the geo-fenced area, will immediately send a notification to a project manager or owner, via text message or other, informing them that the equipment has moved. This gives the party receiving the alert an opportunity to immediately call emergency services and report a theft-in-progress, rather than discovering the theft at a later date and reporting it at that time. Further, with stolen vehicle technology, a contractor, project manager, or equipment owner may also disable the equipment to fully prevent the theft. 

Installing RFID tags on expensive construction equipment provides those with vested interests in construction projects with the ability to lower costs related to theft and theft recovery. Further, preventing construction project theft will lower the high costs associated with project delays caused by replacing equipment. 

· Material Supply: Geofencing software will allow contractors and project managers to have ample electronic data to monitor the progress of construction projects. For one, geofencing software will specify when supplies have been delivered to the project, how long they have been on site before incorporation into the project, and where the materials have been incorporated. This allows contractors and project managers to better allocate materials to reduce the amount of overstock and loss or damage of materials due to non-use. As will be discussed in much greater detail later in the article, combining geofencing technology with smart contracts will heavily reduce costs associated with material delivery and payment problems. 

· Fleet Management: Geofencing can also be used to monitor the arrival and departure of trucks on a project. Placing RFID tags or installing geofencing software on the trucks navigation system will allow for easy monitoring of the truck’s movement. Project managers can receive immediate notification when a fleet truck arrives or departs from the project. This will allow the contractor to save on administrative expenses related to tracking fleet movement. Geofencing will also allow fleet owners to monitor the amount of time trucks take to move from point A to point B in order to better coordinate the fleet in the future. 

· Labor Savings and Monitoring: The data collected from geofencing software can be used to supplement claims for overtime and the amount of labor used during a construction project. Often contractors are forced to litigate issues relating to the number of employees working on a jobsite, the number of hours worked, and when the workers were on site. Geofence technology will allow contractors to store and compile labor information in an easy-to-use format to save on expensive litigation costs. 

Further, project managers will be able to monitor whether employees remain within the authorized project perimeter. This allows contractors to ensure employees remain diligent and focused on their work and reduce labor costs due to inefficient labor. In addition, if/when disputes arise as to whether employees worked a number of hours of overtime, both parties will have the geofencing data to quickly resolve the dispute and return to business as usual. All that is necessary to achieve the aforementioned benefits is placement of RFID tags on PPE or installation of geofencing applications on employees’ smart phones.

· Site Grading: Geofencing software installed on heavy equipment can help track with greater accuracy and increase progress towards proper grade, as opposed to using traditional methods such as survey stakes. A GPS device may also be installed within the heavy equipment’s cabin, allowing the operator to accurately monitor his or her progress. All of this information can be relayed to the project manager to better assist in deciding when to order supplies and labor to move on to the next phase of the construction project. 

· Increased SafetyGeofencing perimeters can be created around hazardous work areas to prevent unauthorized employees from entering the area and risking injury. This can be accomplished by creating the perimeter and setting RFID tags to send an alert to a project manager when unauthorized personnel enters the dangerous area. The project manager can then contact the foreman to ensure that the employee moves to a safer location or trigger an onsite siren. Contractors who utilize geofencing software for all employees, via their smart phones, can even have an alert sent to the specific employee who has entered the unsafe area, warning them to leave immediately. 

Geofencing tags located on mobile equipment can also monitor the speed that the equipment is traveling. If the equipment exceeds the safe speed limit, a foreperson can be notified. 

As it should be clear, geofencing technology offers contractors an abundance of benefits that will drive down costs and time associated with project completion. While geofencing will have a positive impact on projects, there still will be costs associated with implementing and using the new technology.

The Costs of Geofencing Technology

As previously stated, most contractors already supply project managers and other supervisors with the equipment necessary to implement geofencing (i.e., tablets, smart phones, and laptops). Therefore, one of the largest drawbacks, that being the initial cost of implementation, is already at least partially covered. 

The next step contractors wishing to implement geofencing technology must take is purchasing software compatible with the hardware already in the hands of project managers. The software will need to be implemented by a third party specializing in geofencing. The price of this software will likely pay for itself with the savings associated with geofencing. Further, resources previously allocated towards expensive and time-consuming data analysis will be no longer necessary as geofencing software will automatically compile the data on its own. 

One initial drawback will be training project managers and other employees to use the geofencing software. Contractors and project managers will need to initially educate themselves through third-party geofencing professionals on the ins-and-outs of using the technology. The next step will be educating employees on the intricacies of geofencing technology. If contractors opt to use geofencing software on smart phones, tablets, and other electronic devices, the employees will need to know how to respond and comprehend alerts and notifications sent to their devices. This requires a review and update of the employee manual. 

Any change to the workflow of a construction project will have its obvious costs and adaptation period; however, the future is fast approaching and contractors should prepare to embrace this new technology.

Building Information Modeling (BIM)

In addition to creating a better understanding of material movement and location, RFID and other geofencing tech can be combined with BIM to supplement 3D models of a construction project. According to the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard Project Committee, BIM is “a digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility” that can be used as a “reliable basis for decisions … from earliest conception to demolition.”2For example, RFID tags may be placed on decking material, and as the decking material is placed on the structural components of a building, a real-time 3D model is augmented to reflect the addition.

Before BIM, building design was reliant on computer-aided design (CAD). CAD creates a model of a building using three dimensions (width, height and depth), which are in turn used by roofing contractors to complete roofing projects. BIM uses CAD concepts and adds more dimensions, such as time and cost, to give project managers a more complete understanding of project workflow. 

The entire project can be modeled prior to construction beginning by using BIM, allowing for better preconstruction coordination among roofing contractors and other parties on the project. A roofing contractor can have a better understanding of materials and labor needed, as opposed to using older and simpler CAD technology. Further, project managers can use BIM software in concert with smart contracts to automate most of the project. A more detailed discussion of smart contracts and BIM is included later in the article; however, a better understanding of smart contracts and blockchain is necessary before delving into that discussion. 

Blockchain and Smart Contracts

The advantages offered by geofencing technology are abundantly clear. As previously mentioned this article, two of the technologies that will forever reshape the construction project landscape are geofencing and smart contracts. To better understand what smart contracts are and how they will also help drive the construction industry into the modern era, a basic understanding of blockchain is necessary. 

If you’ve ever used Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive, then you already have a basic understanding of blockchain. Certain cloud-based programs allow a number of users to access a document at the same time, and as each user edits or adds to the document, all of the other users are able to view these changes and additions in real time. Blockchains work in an analogous manner. They are a database that tracks transactions, in the order they occur, and creates a record of each transaction. 

By combining blockchains with smart contracts, as well as BIM, a new form of project management can be, and already has been, created. In its simplest form, a smart contract is “a computer program that works on the if/thenprinciple.”3For example, ifa roofing contractor has installed decking on a building, then an inspection is requested to ensure the decking has been properly installed. If the roof deck passes inspection, then the roofing contractor is paid for his work and can be given authorization to continue to the next phase of the roofing installation. All of the different smart contract sections, as well as changes made to them, will be permanently recorded on the blockchain, eliminating a number of different issues inherent with typical project management.

Smart contracts work together on what is known as a Decentralized Autonomous Organization (DAO). The DAO is an organization that is run through rules encoded as the smart contracts. The DAO provides the ability of blockchain to deliver a secure record of the different transactions that occur. This enables roofing contractors and other individuals involved on a construction project to view the current status of the project on a fixed record that encompasses all of the transactions that have taken place.

Smart Contracts and Geofencing

Geofencing data, RFID triggers, and notifications can be used as a supplement to smart contracts that govern a construction project. Working together, these two dynamic technologies can increase project efficiency and lower project costs. 

· Materials: One of the biggest geofencing and smart contract applications is through material purchase, delivery, use, and payment. All contractors are familiar with the problems inherent in construction projects regarding payment. Subcontractors who finish their work want to be promptly paid, they want to have regular disbursements of payment if the payment isn’t to be made in full at project end, and they want the retainage held by the general contractor/owner. General contractors want to ensure that the work performed by their subcontractors passes inspection before releasing funds and will hold on to the retainage until such inspection is passed. When disputes arise as to the quality or progress of work performed, late payment issues will inevitably rear their ugly heads. With blockchain, many of these issues can be avoided, or at the very least mitigated, through the use of smart contracts which automatically provide payment when different aspects of a project are completed.

Just as with subcontractors and general contractors, the same issues arise between subs, general contractors, and their material suppliers. Issues arise over the delivery timing, prompt payment, payment amount, and a host of related problems. Combining smart contracts and geofencing, many of these problems can be alleviated. 

Using the if/then principle and site grading example mentioned previously, if the site grading equipment communicates to the project manager that proper grade has been achieved, then materials, such as concrete and steel, can automatically be ordered for delivery to begin the fill process. Once materials arrive on the site, and a project manager verifies that they are as contracted for, a trigger will be sent to the blockchain automatically sending payment to the material supplier. Further, if the materials arrive on time, labor may be directed to complete the site grading and filling process of the construction project. This simple example demonstrates the amount of resources saved and increased project efficiency from use of this new technology. 

· Labor: Another symbiotic effect from combining geofencing technology with smart contracts has to do with paying employees for their labor. As previously stated, geofencing allows contractors to monitor when and for what amount of time employees are on-site. Smart contracts allow employees to be paid automatically for labor performed. 

Employees who wear geofencing RFID tags or have geofencing software applications installed on their smart phones will be able to have their clock-in and clock-out times automatically recorded based on their entering the geofence perimeter. The geofencing software can communicate this information to the smart contract, and release payment according to the specific terms programmed in the contract. This removes the clerical and human error often found in standard time-keeping tools used today.

· Reduced “Paper Trail” Litigation: Owners and suppliers have become well aware of the legalities involved in most construction projects and are often ready to take advantage of the unprepared roofing contractor. When a construction project ends up in litigation, the party with most detailed and descriptive paper trail will typically be the most successful in the courtroom. 

Most contractors know to keep accurate written records of all communications involving disagreements over workmanship, material arrival or other potential information that is involved in claims on a project. These written records can include change orders, emails, text messages, and other correspondence. 

Geofencing and smart contracts will work to remove a number of the costs associated with litigating disputes between contractors and their employees when it comes to overtime and other employment related issues, as the data will be stored on the blockchain. A blockchain is “essentially a distributed database of records, or public ledger of all transactions or digital events that have been executed and shared among participating parties.”4Once a record has been created on the blockchain, it can never be deleted. This allows for instant verification that a transaction has occurred and allows for participants to view the transaction. Blockchain removes uncertainty from the playing field and allows for consensus between parties. All those involved with a construction project will be able to view transactions as they happen, eliminating uncertainty that usually comes with whether an employee was on-site and for what amount of time. 

Smart Contracts, Geofencing and BIM

Smart contracts and geofencing information can be used even further by being embedded within a BIM model that is secured by blockchain. BIM software allows data inputs from multiple sources. These sources can include smart contracts and geofencing data. 

As stated earlier, BIM can incorporate more than just the three standard dimensions of width, height, and depth. BIM can incorporate time and cost. The dimensions of time and cost can be further supplemented with smart contracts within the BIM software so that the entire project is centered on one convenient application. Building on the prior example of placing RFID tags on roof deck materials, once the roof deck has been installed, BIM software can work with the smart contract if/then principle to automatically send payment for completion of a portion of the scope of work, and request the next phase of the project to begin.

Through the use of blockchain technology, smart contracts, BIM and geofencing, construction projects could enter into a new, technology-driven, risk adverse system that reduces disputes and increases the likelihood of prompt payment and project efficiency. Roofing contractors and the rest of the construction industry will need to work together over the coming years to adapt to this new phase of construction projects. Soon all aspects of a construction project will be included in a singular platform that allows all those involved, including contractors, government officials, lawyers, and so on to work dynamically to reach project completion. 

About the author: Trent Cotney, CEO of Cotney Construction Law, is an advocate for the roofing industry and serves as General Counsel for FRSA, RT3, TARC, WSRCA and several other roofing associations. For more information, contact the author at 866-303-5868 or www.cotneycl.com.

Author’s note: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation. 

Sources

Building Codes: Everyday Tools for Disaster Preparedness and Relief

In the days following the powerful assault of Hurricane Michael on the Florida Panhandle, images of widespread devastation headlined television news coverage and print media. Not as prone to hurricane activity as the rest of Florida, the area hit by the almost Category 5 storm had many older homes built prior to the enactment of stricter building codes put into place after Hurricane Andrew in 1992. As a result, many structures built to less stringent requirements were unprepared to weather the onslaught of wind, rain, and debris tossed by Michael’s sustained 155-mph winds.

Nothing can guarantee a structure’s integrity when faced with such brutal conditions. However, contrast the post-storm condition of those older structures with that of newer buildings and the benefits of more rigorous regulations are clear. The aerial images of the impacted communities illustrate the value of implementing building codes that can contribute to greater resiliency both for the structures themselves and for the safety and comfort of the people and property contained within them during and after a storm makes landfall.

Media coverage of the storm’s aftermath included profiles of some of the structures that fared better than their neighbors. The New York Timesran a profile entitled, “Among the Ruins of Mexico Beach Stands One House, Built ‘for the Big One’” and the Washington Post published an article entitled, “Houses intact after Hurricane Michael were often saved by low-cost reinforcements.” 

When interviewed on CNN, Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Brock Long said, “… there’s a lesson here about building codes. The key to resiliency in this country is where our local officials and state officials are going to have to do something proactively to start passing building codes to high standards.” 

As is often the case in the wake of a disaster, there is a profusion of interest in exploring strategies to protect communities and properties from devastation. These articles and interview reveal that building structures with conscious attention to resiliency can offer markedly improved performance in extreme weather. As an added bonus, many of the products and processes that deliver this resiliency can also contribute to decreased energy usage and operational costs for buildings regardless of the weather they’re subjected to.

Even before this summer’s series of destructive storms, elected officials and government agencies were working to implement wide-ranging strategies to protect our communities. Updating state and local building codes, which exist to safeguard life and protect private and public interests through regulating the design, construction practices, construction material quality, location, occupancy usage, and maintenance of buildings and structures, is one of the most effective ways to increase the safety and resiliency of our built environment.

Congressional Action

On two occasions this year, Congress enacted reforms for disaster preparedness that raise the profile and importance of building codes in planning for and recovering from disasters. The nation’s disaster relief law — the StaffordAct— was first reformed as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act and later reformed with permanent fixes under the FAA Reauthorization bill passed in October 2018. 

Under these amendments, building code adoption and enforcement are added as eligible activities and criteria used in grant programs aimed at reducing the impact of future disasters. In other words, states that act to adopt modern building codes and standards will be eligible for additional federal assistance in the event disaster strikes. Moreover, the reforms allow damaged buildings to be rebuilt with federal support to better withstand future events, rather than merely restored to their pre-disaster condition. 

While these changes do not specifically address energy codes, adopting and updating building codes will also lead to improvements in energy performance. Energy efficiency is a key part of a building’s — and a community’s — ability to withstand and quickly recover after a disaster. For example, a well-insulated building can maintain a comfortable temperature when power is lost or intermittent. Building energy codes will also encourage the construction of more robust building envelope systems that can help avoid the crippling effects of moisture intrusion that are common in severe weather events.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the first nine months of 2018 (through October 9) resulted in 11 weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding $1 billion each. Moody’s Analyticsestimates that losses resulting from Hurricane Michael will cost between $15 and $21 billion. Damage to homes and businesses are a major contributor to the total financial impact of a disaster. 

Buildings constructed to meet or exceed modern building codes can therefore play an important role in reducing the overall economic impact of natural disasters. According to the “Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: 2017 Interim Report”published by the National Institute of Building Sciences, the model building codes developed by the International Code Council can save the nation $4 for every $1 spent. In addition, designing new buildings to exceed the 2015 International Building Code(IBC) and International Residential Code(IRC) would result in 87,000 new, long-term jobs and an approximate 1 percent increase in utilization of domestically produced construction material.

While people, pets and some belongings can be evacuated to safety with enough warning and resources, buildings can’t be moved to higher ground or be rebuilt overnight in anticipation of an oncoming storm. Indeed, buildings are often the only things separating people from the brutal forces of natural disasters. The protection they offer is often determined by the quality of the construction materials and the installation methods used, which are themselves often regulated by the safety standards in place at the time of original construction or major renovation. 

The recognition by Congress that modern building codes deliver an answer to disaster preparedness is a positive for homeowners and businesses across the country. States now have added incentive to prepare for tomorrow by enacting and enforcing better building codes today. And more exacting building codes will create momentum to raise the bar for all of the codes that work together to create stronger and more resilient buildings that will contribute to better outcomes in extreme weather and reduced energy consumption in any weather. 

About the author: Justin Koscher is president of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA). For more information, visit www.polyiso.org.

Weather, Congress Among Variables Likely to Affect Industry in the Year Ahead

As we move forward in 2019, the roofing industry can expect to be influenced by two sometimes out-of-control, difficult to predict forces: the weather and the United States Congress. Add to the equation a shifting economic outlook, as well as uncertain immigration policies, and you have a potentially toxic mix that makes any projection difficult. But there are some constants in the current environment that can help guide strategies for the roofing industry, and here’s our take on what to expect as this decade winds to a close.

There may be some limited success in tackling immigration reform, but don’t expect enough change to mitigate the labor shortage experienced by roofing companies. The Trump-promised wall has yet to be built, but actions to slow illegal immigration have been somewhat successful. The roofing industry has pressed for immigration reform; experts estimate that worker shortages account for up to 20 percent in lost roofing business each year, and sensible immigration reform could help end those shortages. The Center for Construction Research and Training, or CPWR, points out that in some construction occupations, including roofing, more than half of the workers are of Hispanic origin. So, the roofing industry certainly has a compelling case to be made for reform. 

Balancing the demand for secure borders against the need for additional workers has so far failed to produce meaningful legislation. Given the intense disagreement on how to move forward, 2019 will most likely be another year of bipartisan gridlock on this issue. The encouraging news comes from two areas of activity: innovations that promote ease of roofing installation, and industry efforts to certify roofing workers and increase the prestige of working in the trades. These efforts may help to recoup some of the business that has been lost because of the labor shortage, but only rational immigration reform will help to meet the unmet demand.

The weather may, in fact, be more predictable than the lawmakers who just assembled on Capitol Hill. Late in November of this past year, the Federal Government released the National Climate Assessment, the fourth comprehensive look at climate-change impacts on the United States since 2000. The Congressionally mandated thousand-page report delivered a sobering warning about the impact of climate change on the United States and its economy, detailing hownatural disasters are becoming more commonplace throughout the country and predicting that they may become much worse. 

While some may challenge the reality of long-term climate change, statistics tell us that short-term increases in cataclysmic weather events are an indisputable fact of life. And a temporary lull in these disasters cannot be taken as a sign of a change in weather patterns. For instance, as of early August this past year, the Tropical Meteorology Team at Colorado State University downgraded the forecast for the rest of the year, until November 1, from      “slightly above average Atlantic hurricane season” to less than anticipated. They were correct, for a while. No hurricanes formed in the Atlantic during the rest of August, making it the first season in five years without a storm of hurricane magnitude. But just as forecasters were declaring victory over unpredictable nature, Hurricane Florence delivered a pounding to the Carolinas in early September, and in October Hurricane Michael devastated much of the Florida panhandle. The erratic weather patterns did not stop at the end of the hurricane season: an early December storm dumped as much as a foot of snow on parts of the Carolinas that rarely see that much during an entire winter. So much for the predicted respite from extreme weather conditions.

The difficult-to-predict weather is creating one certainty for the roofing industry: customers will increasingly be looking for durable materials and systems that can withstand weather extremes. Additionally, the focus is turning to anticipating destructive weather and mitigating its potential impact by creating resilient structures. ERA has just produced its first annual report, “Building Resilience: The Roofing Perspective.” We anticipate updating this product each year to help provide the roofing industry with the latest approaches to creating resilient roofing systems. 

Unpredictable labor markets and unpredictable weather patterns are defining the “new normal” for our industry and will no doubt be part of our reality in 2019. But based on past performance, there’s at least one certainty we can count on: the roofing industry will come out ahead in the face of these challenges, providing our customers with innovative products and superior service and providing our employees with a work environment that ensures a secure future.

About the Author: Jared Blum is the executive director of the EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), www.epdmroofs.org, and serves as chair of the Environmental and Energy Study Institute. 

Why Do I Need a Marketing Plan?

As marketing professionals who have worked in the roofing industry for more years than we like to admit, we are very aware of the challenge that contractors have in developing and implementing successful marketing programs. With the flurry of lead generation companies popping up seemingly every day, and the SEO companies who promise first page of Google results, how can you decide what to spend money on and how do you know what will work? 

It’s very tempting to fall victim to “spray and pray” marketing, where you throw some money to a bunch of different things, spray some marketing ads or mailers out there and pray that it works and the phone rings. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Success comes from having a plan in place that supports your business goals and provides consistent activities and messaging. 

We know that marketing for roofing contractors can be confusing, frustrating and elusive. Most roofing contractors are craftsmen and women who have started businesses by understanding and excelling at roofing, waterproofing and building envelope technology. They are not marketing professionals, so it is hard to change gears and figure out how to sell or promote their services while also running operations, estimating, sales and the business overall. A good marketing plan helps drive marketing without having to worry all the time.

Taking the time up front to strategize and plan on how to market your business successfully enables you to move on to other challenges of the day, week or month. A good plan can be the template for what needs to happen daily, weekly and monthly to keep marketing on task. It also eliminates daily questions or sales calls for additional marketing initiatives. By creating and sticking to a yearly plan, you are simplifying the day-to-day decisions that can stymie progress.

Fewer approvals and more action reduce the stress put on decision makers and puts the action into the hands of the marketing professionals. Whether it is a person in the office, an agency or a marketing coordinator implementing the marketing plan, by being prepared ahead of time you will reduce the stress of making reactive decisions or, worse, doing nothing due to lack of time and/or planning.

A good marketing plan will also save you money. Without a plan it is easy to say yes to that advertising salesperson from the local media or free coupon website; or that great new advertising concept for ad words or events that is purchased mid-year without planning or research. It can cost the company in lost time, low productivity and extra expense when you do not budget in advance. When you formulate a plan and establish a budget, you can still move money around if necessary, but there is a set allocation to work within.

Timing is important. Look at starting your yearly marketing plan in the fall if possible. It should be a planned exercise to review the past year and look at the upcoming year. Reviewing statistics, campaigns and lead/close ratio is important before starting on the tactical plans for advertising, PR and direct marketing. By organizing budgeting meetings or even off-site working retreats with your leadership team (ideally comprised of leadership from sales, operations, accounting and marketing), you can take the time to review past performance while setting new goals that reflect growth. By being conscious of past performance, you will set the stage for developing strong marketing programs for the next year.

Establish Your Goals

In fact, you should not even start looking at a marketing plan until you have your goals set. What are the company’s plans for growth next year? Will there be new services or products? Will there be any changes in overall company mission? Marketing supports the goals of the company and supports the sales team in attaining the revenue and profitability goals that make a company successful. If you do not have strong goals and plans, then marketing will most likely flounder.

Regarding sales, it is critical that marketing works hand-in-hand with sales. The marketing plan needs to reflect the goals of the sales team so that the marketing activities are nurturing and delivering the right types of leads for sales success. If the goal is to grow metal roofing but marketing is delivering asphalt shingle leads that are not upgradable, both teams will fail. 

By understanding the types of customers the sales team is looking for and the products and services they will be selling, a marketing plan can be created that will result in success for all departments as well as for the company.

By creating a marketing plan for your roofing business, you are taking the time to determine the ideal customer for your business and how you will attract, convert, close and delight that customer. A good marketing plan that is well thought out will address every stage of the sales and marketing process and detail how you will retain the attention of past customers while also gaining ongoing referrals.

So, let’s get back to that original question: how will you know where you should be spending your marketing dollars? Well, it depends. That’s the reason developing your marketing plan is so important. During the process you will have identified your goals and ideal customers. If your business goal is to focus on commercial roof restorations, then you want to invest dollars where your customers can be reached. You might consider joining your local chapter of a building owner or facility manager’s group, or implement an advertising program on LinkedIn that targets specific job titles in your area. 

On the other hand, if your business goal is to focus on residential roof replacements, you might consider a digital advertising program that is geofenced to target neighborhoods with homes that are 20 years or older and will soon need a new roof. The strategies that you use to reach your customers really depend on what you have determined in your marketing plan.

Your marketing plan serves as a guide for your business. It spells out your company’s positioning statement, the markets you will serve, your yearly goals, your brand promise, the tasks and timelines as well as the tools and technology needed to achieve your goals. It will also help you determine budget and resources needed to implement the tasks, campaigns and initiatives detailed in the plan. 

About the authors: Heidi J. Ellsworth and Karen L. Edwards specialize in the roofing industry, helping contractors, manufacturers and associations achieve their marketing, branding and sales goals. They have authored two books: “Sales and Marketing for Roofing Contractors” and “Building a Marketing Plan for Roofing Contractors.” Both are available in the NRCA Bookstore and on Amazon. 

Proper Documentation Can Be the Key to Dispute Resolution

Ever been told to dance like nobody’s watching? 

That advice is great for weddings and end-zone celebrations. But after wrapping up a week-long trial, your exhausted, cynical lawyer probably thinks “write every email like it will one day be a courtroom exhibit” is far better advice than the dancing thing.

This might sound needlessly frightening, but for construction professionals working on challenging projects, documentation can make or break the ability to successfully negotiate — or, if it comes to it, prove the merits of — a dispute with another party. 

Below are some items that, if handled properly, can help companies establish their side of case and that, if handled poorly, can constitute problem areas. 

Contract Documents and Statutory Notices 

Many legal rights on a project come from the parties’ written contract agreement. Basic measures like ensuring the both parties have signed — and not just received — the contract can be crucial to preserving these rights. It is also a good practice to keep a copy of the signed contract and all attachments in a location where it is accessible to project managers and others who have authority to deal directly with the other party. As always, reading the contract in advance, and perhaps consulting with an attorney before signing the contract, is an important practice. 

Having a checklist for every project can also help ensure that good practices are routine, and not just employed for especially difficult projects. If practices are done on every project, no matter the size or complexity, it is easier to ensure that companies will comply with them. 

Potential project checklist items include: 

  • Has a written contract been signed by both parties and saved in the project file? 
  • Are certificates of insurance on file for all subcontractors? 

Checklist items for privately owned projects: 

  • Have any statutorily required project statements, notices of contract, or notices of subcontract been properly filed and served? 
  • Have any statutory prerequisites to filing lien claims been met — such as North Carolina’s requirement to serve a Notice to Lien Agent? 

Checklist items for publicly owned projects:

  • Has the payment bond been obtained?
  • If required by state or federal statute, has the payment bond surety information been sent to all parties?
  • Have statutorily required notices of contract or notices of subcontract been properly served or filed? 

Notices 

Most written prime contracts and subcontracts require parties to give written notice to the other party to communicate various things, like change orders, claims for extra payment, or the other party’s breach or default. Failure to provide notice using the proper means and by the required deadline can prevent contractors from asserting their contractual rights. To ensure compliance with contract provisions, ensure that a copy of the contract is accessible to the project manager and that notices are dated, signed (if applicable), and that copies of the notice are preserved. If notices are sent by email, a good practice is trying to obtain a delivery or read receipt. Notices to cure should state specifically what is expected of the other party in order to cure a default and what will occur if the other party does not cure the default. 

Where Notices are concerned, do the following:

  • Keep a copy of the signed, written contract in a place where project managers can easily access it.
  • Send requests for change orders and additional time or money in writing.
  • Send notices to the right person. The written contract usually dictates to whom notices should be sent, and sending notices to a person with managerial authority is generally recommended. 
  • Consult with an attorney and send a written notice before invoking contractual remedies like self-correcting defective work, supplementing a subcontractor’s workforce, or terminating a subcontractor. 
  • Maintain copies of any letters, correspondence, or notices sent to another party, including copies of proofs of service like Certified Mail cards, email read receipts, or fax confirmation sheets. 

Confirming Emails 

Emails and text messages constitute the bulk of the written communication on most construction projects today. Both emails and text messages — whether they are sent from work or personal devices — are discoverable in legal cases, meaning that companies will be required to provide them to other parties in the case during the litigation process. This may be true whether or not the company or sender believes they are relevant. The implication is twofold: contractors should send emails and text messages with care and should assume that they could one day be seen by an opponent, judge or jury. On the other hand, when used effectively, emails and text messages can be used to accurately document parties’ agreements and understandings about what will occur on the project. 

With all communications, but particularly email, attorney-client privilege is an additional concern. The attorney-client privilege protects communications between an attorney and his or her client. The client has the right to keep these communications confidential in nearly all situations. However, the attorney-client privilege can be waived if communications are shared with third parties. The ease with which people can forward and share emails makes waiving the privilege dangerously easy. In some situations, waiving the privilege once can mean waiving it in future situations. 

Below are some do’s and don’ts that can result in helpful, not harmful, emails.

DO

  • Send emails to document conditions on a project. 
  • Send emails to confirm important conversations, especially ones about dates of mobilization or that contain notices. 
  • Respond to any emails that accuse you or your company of failing to fulfill any contractual obligation. 
  • Ensure you have access to the emails of any employees who leave the company. 

DON’T

  • Don’t forward your correspondence with your attorney to others. This could waive the attorney-client privilege. 
  • Don’t copy people outside of your company on emails to your attorney. This could waive the attorney-client privilege. 
  • In a dispute over fulfilling contractual obligations, don’tlet the other party have the last word. If you are sent an email accusing you of wrongdoing, not responding to an email can make it appear that you agree with it. 
  • Don’t send emails from your personal account. If you ever need to pull and produce all of the emails related to a project, it will be much easier to do if you are only pulling from one account per employee. 
  • Don’t use profanity or offensive language or phrases. If there is anything you would be ashamed of a judge or jury seeing you say, think twice before typing it. 

Daily Reports and Photographs

Daily job reports, if done well, can serve as a diary of what occurred on a project. While emails can be helpful, too, photographs do not lie, and daily reports with objective information like number of workers, hours worked, and weather conditions can effectively corroborate a company’s narrative of a story or dispute another side’s version. 

These types of documents typically have to be authenticated in court in order for them to be admissible as evidence, so if possible, it is best for the person who wrote a report or took a photograph to be able to testify about the origin of the document itself. 

Recommended procedures include: 

  • Have competent, trusted employees, such as project managers, take photographs and complete daily reports. 
  • Have a system in place for uploading photographs and saving them in the construction file so that they are centrally located, not just stored on employees’ individual phones or tablets. 
  • Ensure all photographs are dated or otherwise stored so that dates and identities of the people who took the photographs can be accessed. 
  • Complete daily reports documenting conditions like date, weather, number of workers, and anything pertinent occurring on the project site.  

About the author: Caroline Trautman is an attorney with Raleigh, N.C.-based Anderson Jones PLLC. Questions about this article can be directed to her at ctrautman@andersonandjones.com.

Author’s note: The above article is not, and should not be construed as, legal advice. For specific advice, consult with an attorney licensed in your state.

Your Organization Works Best When the Right People Are in the Right Positions

Have you ever watched a football game and thought about your business? I did that the other day. It struck me that there is great value in considering your business as if it were a football team. The basic structure is set. What matters is who occupies each position — and that includes the staff.

When we look at a football organization, we see specific positions that require certain skills. It’s pretty clear. There can be crossover where a player has skills that fit more than one position. This makes the team more flexible.

We can use the football org chart for a company as a whole, or for a department within a company. The hierarchy works just as well in either. While the structure is important, the behavior of the people in the various positions has tremendous value.

What does it take to become a Super Bowl-worthy football team? The right people have to be in each position. The leadership has to be skilled at coaching the players. Everyone has to appreciate their role as part of the whole and contribute consistently. 

The degree to which the leadership directs the team is directly related to how seasoned the team is. A young team — one that hasn’t worked together before — requires more direction and management. The more seasoned, experienced team can work with less direction and more autonomy. 

Let’s use the New England Patriots as our example. We can easily argue that the right people are in the right positions from the head coach to the assistants to the entire player roster. There is a respect throughout the organization — everyone respects everyone else’s ability to do their jobs. This respect is translated into expectations. There is consistent conversation about what is going on during a game. Ideas are discussed, plays are attempted, and adjustments are made as needed.

Sometimes the quarterback calls an audible, changing the play in the moment. Members of the defense are often communicating with their teammates about what they see on the other side of the line. Players change positions prior to the snap. 

Why does this matter to business leaders? How we successfully lead determines whether we have a Super Bowl team or not. And that is directly related to how successful our company continues to be.

There are four things that we can take from a Super Bowl football team to lead our businesses more effectively. They are referred to by the acronym PECK:

  • People
  • Empowerment
  • Communication
  • Kudos

People

Every organization works best when the right people are in the right positions. It’s about skillset and attitude. Each role has specific functions that must be completed accurately, effectively, and in a quality fashion. It’s critical for the leadership to look first at someone’s attitude, second their skill set, and third, their accomplishments. Too often, leaders promote people beyond their ability. Or they put someone in a job because they need the position filled. Those are inadequate reasons and lead to failure. 

Start from the job description. What skills does the person need to possess in order to do the job well? Match them and you are far ahead. The attitude you are looking for is one of team player, commitment, can-do; the person should be able to work independently and with little direction. To ensure you are hiring someone who really is suited to the position, consider their past performance in a similar position.

Remember — a good salesperson won’t necessarily be a good sales manager. The positions require different skills.

Empowerment

Want to get a lot out of your staff? Empower them to take ownership of their job. Many leaders think they have to micromanage every action of every employee. The truth is this — micromanaging signals a lack of trust. When you don’t trust that your employees know what to do, or will go ahead and do their jobs, you hover, monitor, and micromanage. It’s disrespectful and only causes low morale. You don’t get what you are hoping for; quite the opposite.

When you have the right people in the right positions, it’s easy to empower them to perform at their best. The right people have the right skills and know what to do. They are able to analyze a situation and adjust if necessary. They are able to work together toward a common goal. And they understand how their participation impacts the organization as a whole. 

Empowerment is a show of respect. It makes everyone’s job easier.

Communication

Communication is the key to success in any organization. The more we share information, and solicit input/feedback, the more cohesive our team will be. Everyone on the team should know and understand the goals of the organization as well as the reasons behind any initiatives. Things can change, and those changes can have an impact on how the employees do their jobs and live their lives. Sharing the “why” behind all decisions mitigates any concerns or challenges moving forward.

Along with sharing these details, seeking information, ideas, and feedback is one of the best ways to involve staff members in the actual operation of the business. It may be limited to their role in the company. The point is that open, honest, and reciprocal communication builds camaraderie and increases buy-in.

The opposite is also true and deserves mentioning. Withholding information and failing to seek input tells your people you don’t value them. After all, if you respect and care about people you communicate with them. 

Kudos

Celebrate successes, no matter how small. Acknowledge individual accomplishments. Positive feedback and reinforcement work wonders for continued commitment to the team. Considering our Super Bowl team, there’s a variety of celebration activity, from end zone celebrating to coaches patting players on the head or the back. Accomplishments are celebrated. When people feel appreciated, they excel.

Take a look at your company and ask yourself, “Is this a Super Bowl team?” If you’re not sure, it’s worth a deeper dive. Consider whether you have a PECK system in place. The good news is you can make adjustments and institute changes at any time. You can turn things around and create an environment where everyone performs at their best.

About the author: Diane Helbig is a leadership and business development advisor helping business owners around the world. She is the author of Lemonade Stand Sellingand Expert Insights,as well as the host of the “Accelerate Your Business Growth” podcast. For more information, visit www.seizethisday.co.

The Top 40 Products of 2018

The following product roundup features the Top 40 products of the year, as chosen by the readers of Roofing magazine. The products were selected based on the number of reader requests for sales leads through the Reader Action Card in the print issue and the number of clicks on the website, www.RoofingMagazine.com, including those generated through our monthly e-newsletter. The product generating the most leads from each print issue is also featured as our “Roofers’ Choice” product, and the 2018 winners are also included here. If you have a new product you’d like us to consider for a future edition of our Materials & Gadgets section, please email Editor-in-Chief Chris King at chris@roofingmagazine.com.

Roof Leveling Compound Helps Eliminate Ponding Water

GreenSlope is a roof leveling compound that helps eliminate water ponding areas on flat rooftops. The cured material is similar to that of a professional running track or playground surface and can withstand tough climates as well as heavy foot traffic. According to the manufacturer, the product is designed to fill in low areas and bring the roof back to its original slope, directing water toward drainage areas. It is designed for use on EPDM, TPO, PVC, modified bitumen and metal roofs. Made from EPDM, GreenSlope is lightweight, durable, and able to withstand freeze-thaw cycles. Other uses include protecting curbs, filling low areas near drains, establishing walk pads and filling pitch pans. Greenslope.co

New Product Line Secures Rooftop Pipes and Struts

Green Link introduces a family of custom-engineered, molded straps and caps for securing pipes and struts for its KnuckleHead rooftop support product line. Straps have been designed for both Heavy Pipe and Strut Support KnuckleHeads, while a cap design was developed for Lite Pipe Supports. All are molded from tough, weatherproof urethane and feature a striking “safety yellow” color. The Heavy Pipe KnuckleHead strap secures a 3-inch outside diameter pipe, while the Strut Support strap fits steel or aluminum Unistrut-type channel. The Lite Pipe Support cap is designed to secure a single 1-inch nominal pipe or two ½-inch nominal pipes. The Strut Support straps are available in nominal pipe sizes ranging from ¼ inch to 6 inches. www.Greenlinkengineering.com

Stainless Steel Bi-Metal Drill Screws Are Corrosion Resistant

Triangle Fastener Corporation introduces a full line of 304 stainless steel bi-metal self-drilling screws. Bi-metal screws have heads and threads made of 304 stainless steel, providing corrosion resistance and ductility. A hardened carbon steel drill point welded to a stainless steel body allows the screw to drill and tap steel up to 1/2 inch thick. The screws are used to attach aluminum, stainless steel, insulated metal panels (IMPs) and when ductility is needed in the connection. They are available in #12 and 1/4-inch diameters in lengths up to 12 inches. Head styles include: hex washer head, pancake head and button head. www.Trianglefastener.com

Insulation Board Contains No Halogenated Compounds

GAF introduces a new non-halogen polyisocyanurate insulation: EnergyGuard NH Polyiso Insulation Board. According to the manufacturer, the development of EnergyGuard NH Polyiso Insulation Board demonstrates the GAF commitment to providing architects, contractors, and building owners with affordable products that help them meet their sustainable and environmental design goals, by offering products that do not contain halogenated compounds. As with their current EnergyGuard Polyiso Insulation, this product line offers high insulating values to help save on energy costs and is available in a variety of thicknesses. Easy cutting in the field provides the installer with simple fabricating on the roof deck. www.GAF.com

Pre-Weathered Fastener Matches Corten Panels

Lakeside Construction Fasteners offers the new high-strength COR-10 WOOD-Xfastener, which is engineered to secure Corten metal panels into hardwood decking substrates. It is pre-weathered for an exact Corten metal panel color match, eliminating the need to wait for fasteners to be painted or weathered to match. The fastener is available in sizes from 1 inch to 3 inches, and it features an EPDM washer to ensure a sealed protective barrier. According to the manufacturer, its high-low threads and sharp T-17 cut point allows the fastener to quickly penetrate the Corten metal panel for low-cost installation. www.Lakeside-Fasteners.com

Insulation Board Designed for High Load-Bearing Applications

Kingspan Insulation has expanded its commercial product offering by introducing GreenGuard Type VII XPS Insulation Board. The product is designed for high load-bearing engineered applications requiring insulation with a minimum compressive strength of 60 psi. Type VII XPS is primarily used in commercial roofing applications, such as protected membrane and pedestal paver systems. According to the manufacturer, the insulation board offers an R-value of 5.0 per inch of thickness and meets ASTM C578 Type VII requirements. The product retains its insulating properties over time, has high water resistance and is HCFC-free. Kingspaninsulation.us

Portable RhinoBond Hand Welder Designed for Use in Tight Spaces

OMG Roofing Products introduces the RhinoBond Hand Welder. Based on patented Sinch Technology, the portable RhinoBond Hand Welder is designed to help roofers weld RhinoBond Plates in tight spaces, such as under raised rooftop equipment, and on vertical surfaces. The ergonomically designed tool features a vibrating handle and an indicator light that lets roofers know when the tool is activated and when the weld cycle is complete. The base is recessed and features centering indicator lines to help usersproperly align the tool over installed RhinoBond Plates for optimum bonding and improved productivity. www.OMGRoofing.com

High-Visibility Primer Improves Adhesion for Acrylic Coatings

KM Coatings offers KM SP 1000, a VOC-compliant, solvent-based primer designed to improve the adhesion of acrylic coatings to most aged TPO and PVC membranes. According to the manufacturer, using this primer with a KM-approved acrylic coating provides excellent coverage and long-term protection. Its orange color enables strong identification for the applicator to achieve complete monolithic surface application. www.KMcoatings.us

Two-Component SPF Adhesive Provides More Coverage

Soprema introduces a low-pressure, two-component spray polyurethane foam (SPF) adhesive to its DUOTACK family of roofing adhesive products. DUOTACK SPF was designed to provide quick, efficient adhesion of PVC membranes, insulation and cover boards to approved substrates. According to the manufacturer, the product was developed by Soprema chemists with vast knowledge and experience in the roofing and polyurethane foam industry to provide 50 percent more coverage and a faster flow rate than competing products. It also has usability in multiple applications without the need for extensive inventory and expensive equipment, like pace carts. www.Soprema.us

Adhesive-Free Attachment System Eliminates Temperature Restrictions

Carlisle SynTec Systems introduces its RapidLock (RL) Roofing System. This adhesive-free system uses VELCRO Brand Securable Solutions to fully attach 115-mil FleeceBACK RL EPDM or FleeceBACK RL TPO to InsulBase RL or SecurShield HD RL polyiso insulation. According to the manufacturer, the RapidLock system does away with temperature restrictions, has no VOCs or odors, offers wind uplift ratings comparable to traditional fully adhered single-ply systems and has a Factory Mutual 1-90 approval rating. The adhesive-free system also saves time and labor. www.CarlisleSynTec.com

High-Performance Adhesive/Sealant Anchors Rooftop Supports

Green Link offers a new adhesive/sealant designed for use with the company’s KnuckleHead Rooftop Support System. The product bonds and seals the KnuckleHead Universal Base and is effective on a wide range of roof surfaces. The new adhesive/sealant has been specially formulated to adhere to PVC, EPDM, TPO, and modified bitumen, as well as the KnuckleHead base itself, which is composed of glass-reinforced nylon. According to the company, it will not discolor from UV exposure, can be applied at temperatures as low as 32 degrees, and is capable of joint movement in excess of 35 percent. www.Greenlinkengineering.com

Cap Stapler OffersEasier Loading and Extended Tool Life

National Nail announces the upgraded 18-gauge Stinger CS150B cap stapler with an enhanced design that improves performance with easier loading, longer tool life, and tool-free adjustable exhaust. Shooting 200 caps and 200 staples before reloading, the versatile cap stapler now also provides a wider range of operating pressure (up to 120 psi) for installing roofing underlayments, house wrap, and foamboard. The Stinger CS150B shoots 5/8-inch, 7/8-inch, 1-1/4-inch, and 1-1/2-inch length 18-gauge staples with full 1-inch plastic caps. It also includes an installed belt hook and durable carrying case. www.Stingerworld.com

Composite Shake Shingles Offered in New Colors

DaVinci Roofscapes launches the Nature Crafted Collection of composite shake shingles, which includes three realistic, nature-inspired colors: Aged Cedar,Mossy Cedarand Black Oak.According to the manufacturer, each new color reflects different progressive aging processes found on real shake shingles. Each tile has been crafted to resist fire and impact, along with high winds, mold, algae, fungus and insects. The Nature Crafted Collection is available on all DaVinci Multi-Width and Single-Width Shake composite roofing tiles. www.DaVinciRoofscapes.com

Solar Mounting Platform Designed for Exposed Fastener Panels

S-5! introduces the SolarFoot, a mounting platform designed for exposed fastener metal roofing. With four points of attachment, it provides an ideal mounting platform to attach the L-Foot of a rail-mounted solar system or other ancillaries to the roof. According to the manufacturer, the SolarFoot ensures a durable, weathertight solution for the life of the solar system and the roof. Each piece contains two reservoirs of a factory-applied butyl co-polymeric sealant, allowing a water-tested seal. Simply peel the release paper from the butyl sealant and fasten through the predrilled holes in the base of the SolarFoot. www.S-5.com

3-D Modeling Tool Aids in Solar Design Projects

Aurora Solar Inc., a solar design software company, offers SmartRoof, a tool that allows anyone to accurately and easily model residential and commercial sites for solar projects. According to the company, SmartRoof intelligently infers the internal structure of a roof after a few clicks, reducing solar design time and difficulty.According to the company, SmartRoof requires just an outline of the perimeter of the roof to automatically infer its internal structure. It allows solar designers to drag and drop dormers into the model.The remote site modeling tool enables designers to intersect multiple roof structures, making modeling of complex roof structures significantly easier. www.AuroraSolar.com

Perforated Starter Shingle Designed to Save Time, Reduce Waste

TAMKO Building Products introduces the Perforated Starter shingle to its roofing product line. Made from fiberglass mat coated with asphalt and surfaced with ceramic granules, the Perforated Starter course shingle is the answer to roofing contractors need for an easy to install starter strip prior to shingle application. The perforation ensures that contractors no longer lose time field cutting shingles to the appropriate size while reducing related waste. The product can be used with TAMKO’s full line of asphalt shingles, including the Heritage series laminated asphalt shingles and Elite Glass-Seal 3-Tab shingles. www.TAMKO.com

Snow-Retention System Utilizes Snap-Fit Design

AceClamp offers the Color Snap, a patented snow-retention system that utilizes a snap-fit design. The product ships to roofers with fully assembled, ready-to-install components and snap-in ice clips. Color Snap is available for either standing seam metal roofing or membrane roofing with a variant of the product known as Color Snap-M. According to the company, both varieties offer greater installation flexibility, are easier to install, and help to reduce labor costs by minimizing preparatory tasks. www.AceClamp.com

Sheet Metal Brake Designed to Reduce Labor Costs

Roper Whitney releases the Autobrake 1212, which is designed to provide accuracy and repeatability when forming 12-gauge mill steel and 14-gauge stainless steel. It features the rotating Kombi beam, which expands the machine’s folding capabilities to produce straight to box and pan bending in just 11 seconds. The box tooling is 6.3 inches in height, precision ground and laser hardened to 60. Pieces are also laser etched with the length of the tool for easy box setup. Optional left-hand or right-hand back gauge extension provides superior material positioning. Maximum 12-foot back gauge travels in less than three seconds and is provided by the six-stage design combining high speed with compact space requirements. www.RoperWhitney.com

Modified Bitumen Products Can Now Be Applied in Colder Temperatures

CertainTeed’s Flintlastic SA (self-adhering) modified asphalt low-slope roof systems can now be installed in temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the manufacturer, the products can be installed using an application method that is safe for both installers and building occupants, as it uses no kettles or flames and has no hazardous or noxious fumes. Roofing pros only need a hot air welder and silicone roller to complete installations in cold weather, and the change is designed to help alleviate costly weather delays while making a direct impact on roofing contractor’s bottom line. www.CertainTeed.com

Multi-Purpose Joint Sealant Adheres to Damp Surfaces

Kemper System AmericaInc.offers GreatSealPE-150, a single-component joint sealant designed for long-lasting weathertight seals. According to the manufacturer, it is ideal for sealing joints in roofing, walls and masonry, as well as gaps around penetrations, flashings, windows and doors. According to the company, the product adheres even on damp surfaces, can be applied in cold weather, and in most cases, without a primer. It bonds aggressively to most building materials, including wood, vinyl, glass, fiberglass, foam insulation, asphalt, modified bitumen, EPDM, PVC, PIB rubber, and Kynarcoatings, as well as painted, galvanized and anodized metals. www.Kempersystem.net

New Colors Available for Concrete Tile Line

Boral Roofing LLC introduces a set of new colors for its signature concrete roof tile line. Inspired by the beach landscape, the six new hues in the collection are particularly well suited to complement homes of the contemporary and transitional architectural styles, according to the manufacturer. The collection includes new colors Ashen Blend, Café Sand Blend, Mottled White Blend, Atmosphere Blend, Oceana Blend, and Beach Blonde Blend, with each shade reflecting an element commonly found at the seaside. The tile is low maintenance, offers a Class A fire rating, and is fully recyclable at the end of its life on the roof. www.Boralamerica.com/roofing

New Sealant and Patch Mastic Designed for Durability, Sustainability

Chem Link launches NovaLink FP, a flash and patch mastic product, available in a 10.1-ounce cartridge. NovaLink FP is a high-quality, moisture-curing elastomeric waterproofing and sealant designed to fill, seal and level grout lines, voids, seams and surface damage on construction materials prior to application of liquid waterproofing. According to the manufacturer, the product is also useful for repairing roof leaks, asphalt shingles, roof valleys and seams, chimney flashings and in emergency roof repair situations. www.ChemLink.com

Shingles Offer Time-Release Technology to Fight Algae Growth

Seeking to reduce the prevalence of unsightly shingle discoloration caused by blue-green algae growth, which impacts 80 percent of U.S. homes, GAF introduces StainGuard Plus Technology. According to the manufacturer, the company’s proprietary time-release copper ion technology releases 10 times as much stain-fighting copper as its traditional copper coated mineral granules to better resist the growth of algae. This technology is currently available on GAF’s Timberline Ultra HD Stainguard Plus labeled shingles and is backed by a 25-year limited warranty against blue-green algae discoloration. www.GAF.com

Fasteners Designed to Attach Sheeting Over Rigid Insulation

Triangle Fastener Corporation expands its line of BLAZER Drill Screws with new sizes designed to attach metal panels over rigid insulation. These unique screws have two different threads with a gap in between that eliminates jacking of the panel during installation. According to the manufacturer, the special 1/4-14 “high thread” under the screw’s head secures the metal panel tightly against the head for optimal seal. The screws have a BLAZER3 drill point for fast penetration with less effort and a TRI-SEAL spray coating for corrosion protection. They are available in lengths including: 1-7/8, 2-3/8, 3-1/4 and 4 inches. www.Trianglefastener.com

Hip and Ridge Product Offers Added Thickness

TAMKO Building Products Inc. introduces its new Heritage Designer Ridge asphalt shingle. Constructed with SBS modified bitumen technology, the high-profile ridge product is designed to add a look of polished sophistication to finish asphalt roofing projects with style, according to the manufacturer. Two layers of asphalt shingles are laminated together to produce the high-definition appearance of added dimension in the Heritage Designer Ridge, which is up to a half inch thicker than TAMKO’s standard Heritage hip and ridge product.The product is offered in 10-inch and 8-inch overlap. www.TAMKO.com

Storm Repair System Uses Shrink Wrapping Technology

Stormseal is a storm recovery system that protects damaged roofs or walls with a patented wind-, rain- and hail-resistant polyethylene film. The technology, pioneered in Australia, is now available in the United States. According to the manufacturer, Stormseal is designed to replace flapping, leaking, flyaway tarpaulins. The low-density patented polyethylene film is cut and fitted at the worksite with the heat “shrink wrapping” technique, changing the chemical structure of the film and enhancing its strength. www.Stormseal.com

New Electric Hoist Moves Operator Away From the Load

Safety Hoist Company launches its new electric material hoist, which moves the operator a safe distance away from the hoist and its load. According to the manufacturer, its unique pendant control makes this one of the safest hoists available today. The hoist runs on 110-volt electric household current, and its controlled descent enables safe, smooth transport both up and down. The electric hoist is quiet, environmentally-friendly, and free from harmful emissions, so it can be used both indoors and outdoors. It can handle up to 500 pounds without sacrificing speed or efficiency. www.SafetyHoistCompany.com

New Line of Fasteners Designed for Extreme Environments

The new 40-year Ply-Lo Extreme line of fasteners from East Coast Fasteners is designed for extreme environments. According to the manufacturer, Ply-Lo Extreme was successfully tested in accordance to ASTM B117 for more than 3,000 hours of salt spray. With all the features of the original Ply-Lo fastener, the Ply-Lo Extreme is available in #10, #12 and #14, with a 40-year warranty. www.Plyco.com

Adjustable Steep-Slope Roof Anchor Aids Ladder Access

The RIDGEPRO is a versatile and adjustable roof anchor that can be connected to the peak before stepping onto a steep-slope roof, allowing a safe transition on and off ladders on roofs with pitches ranging from 6/12 to 12/12. The innovative arch straddles ridge vents, and the adjustable, pitch-specific settings are designed to maximize contact between the product and the roof surface. Constructed from solid, aircraft-grade aluminum, it exceeds industry standard of 5,000-pound tensile strength test when anchored. www.TheRidgePro.com

Primer Adheres to Single-Ply Membranes

Everest Systems offers Everprime All Ply, a primer for various new and aged single-ply membranes. According to the manufacturer, this high-quality, plasticizer free, single component, solvent-based primer can be applied by a spray brush or a roller. The product is designed to provide exceptional adhesion to new and aged TPO and PVC membranes. In addition, this high-performance coating provides excellent surface for subsequent application of acrylic, 100 percent solids Silicone and fluoropolymer coatings. www.Everestsystemsco.com

Work Gloves Offer Advanced Fit, Safety and Comfort

PrimeSource Building Products offers GRX Gloves, a brand-new line of quality gloves designed to promote hand safety and offer value for American workers. According to the manufacturer, GRX Gloves offer workers the latest technology in comfort, fit and safety to deliver a range of tighter fitting, more breathable gloves for a variety of applications and weather conditions. The GRX glove line will be available through the PrimeSource network of pro-contractor supply location and pro-supply locations like 84 Lumber and BMC. www.PrimesourceBP.com

Retrofit Roof Drains Feature Integrated Vortex Breaker

OMG Roofing Products introduces a new line of retrofit roof drains called Hercules-Plus. The drains feature integrated vortex breaker technology, which helps improve drain performance to quickly remove water from the roof. According to the manufacturer, independent performance testing shows that Hercules-Plus RetroDrains provide up to 2.5 times greater flow capacity than original Hercules Drains without vortex breaker technology. Drains are available in four sizes: 3 inches, 4 inches, 5 inches and 6 inches, and with an optional TPO or PVC coated flange for direct membrane attachment. www.OMGRoofing.com

Conductive Primer Developed for Electronic Testing

Detec Systems has developed TruGround, a conductive primer which enables accurate electronic leak detection (ELD) testing on conventional roof membranes including black EPDM, TPO, PVC, modified bitumen, hot and cold fluid applied. According to the manufacturer, TruGround must be installed directly below the membrane per ASTM D7877. TruGround can be used for quality assurance testing on newly installed membranes and is chemically compatible with fully adhered, mechanically attached and torch-down membranes. Once applied, ELD testing can be performed for the life of the roof. Future breaches or seam voids can be quickly pinpointed, allowing repairs to be done immediately, preventing costly moisture damage from occurring. www.DetecSystems.com

Structural Acoustical Roof Decks Reduce Noise Levels

Tectum Structural Acoustical Roof Deck solutions from Armstrong Building Solutions provide predictable noise absorption, durability, and sustainability to meet building design needs. Composite roof deck options provide R-values up to 44. By providing noise absorption up to 0.80, the panels often eliminate the need for additional acoustical treatments, providing faster and easier installations than standard steel roof decks. According to the manufacturer, Tectum Roof Decks are an ideal noise reduction solution for large, high traffic, exposed structure spaces such as auditoriums, gymnasiums, arenas, pools, ice arenas and multi-use facilities. www.ArmstrongBuildingSolutions.com

Underlayment Can Be Used in Vertical Applications

MFM Building Products announces that its Ultra HT Wind & Water Seal high-temperature roofing underlayment can be used for vertical side wall applications. This self-adhering membrane is composed of a cool white, cross-laminated, high density polyethylene film laminated to a high-temperature rubberized asphalt adhesive system rated to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the manufacturer, this premium product is extremely tough, is self-sealing around fasteners and offers a 90-day UV exposure rating. The company states that Ultra HT is ideal for vertical applications under metal panel systems and parapet walls capped with metal tiles. Special installation instructions must be followed for all vertical applications. www.MFMbp.com

Gravity Vent Delivers Natural Ventilation

Acme Cone Company introduces a new gravity vent that delivers natural ventilation for buildings with single-ply roofs when windows and other ventilation solutions are not an option.The vent is available in standard sizes of 12, 18 and 24 inches in white, gray and tan. It is now available for order and immediate shipment.According to the company, contractors using Acme Cone’s prefabricated flashings benefit from more efficient and productive crews who aren’t spending unnecessary time flashing in the field. www.AcmeCone.com

Fluid-Applied Roofing System Available in New Colors

Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenancelaunches six new AlphaGuard BIO Top Coat colors: light gray, medium gray, dark gray, sand, beige and safety yellow. The line enables Tremco Roofing to better support its customers’ aesthetic and safety requirements on the company’s AlphaGuard BIO projects. AlphaGuard BIO, Tremco Roofing’s fluid-applied roofing system, is an excellent choice for restoring older but still functional roofs; both the Top Coat and Base Coat have received BioPreferred certification from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.The new colors add to an already robust palette for AlphaGuard Top Coat, which includes such options as terra cotta, garnet and patina green. www.TremcoRoofing.com

Pitch Pans Can Be Used on Horizontal and Vertical Surfaces

The new ShapeShift line from Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. is a single solution for creating pitch pans for use in virtually any low-slope roofing job, including with smooth modified bitumen systems and on both horizontal and vertical surfaces. The line — consisting of ShapeShift Pitch Pan straight and outside corner sections and MP Liquid Sealant — can be used with EPDM, TPO, PVC, metal, spray polyurethane foam (SPF), elastomeric acrylic coating, smooth modified bitumen and smooth built-up roofing systems. The straight and corner sections feature interlocking joints and snap together to form square and rectangular pitch pans 4 inches by 4 inches and larger. www.MuleHide.com

Ridge Vent Provides 15 Square Inches of Net Free Area Per Foot

Keene Building Products offers Viper Vent, a patented, lightweight ridge vent that provides 15 square inches of net free vent area per linear foot. According to the manufacturer, its double-density edge provides superior strength and rigidity, ensuring its ability to maintain a sleek finished look that makes it virtually invisible from the curb. The filter is manufactured with extra thick fibers, and the company states the UV resistant textile allows it to provide superior airflow over its lifetime. Viper Vent is available in a variety of lengths and can be applied on an asphalt, wood, tile, metal, or slate roof. www.KeeneBuilding.com

Dual-Component Extruder Minimizes Downtime

The Garlock Cyclone 5/15 Dual-Component Extruder is designed to significantly reduce the time and materials needed to adhere rigid insulation and cover boards to structural roof decks, as well as adhering fleece backed single-ply membranes in both new roofing and recover operations. The Cyclone equally dispenses a two-component, 1:1 ratio low viscosity polyurethane adhesive. Users can access connectors and load chemical containers from the front without kneeling or crouching, and the adjustable gun assembly and ergonomic design help reduce application errors and training time. www.GarlockEquip.com

 

Benefits of High-Density Polyisocyanurate Cover Boards for Roofing Systems

High-density polyiso cover boards are designed to provide a combination of impact resistance, energy savings, and ease of installation to enhance the long-term performance of a commercial roof system. Photo: Firestone Building Products

Roofing projects, whether new construction or renovation, require careful product selection to balance cost with performance. Many contractors choose to include cover boards in their roof designs to enhance overall system durability and lower long-term maintenance costs, particularly for low-slope commercial roof applications. There are many cover board products currently available — ranging from traditional gypsum board to highly engineered polyisocyanurate (or “polyiso”) technologies. Across product types, cover boards are an important component in roof systems that provide a rigid substrate and protection for other components of the roof system.

Selecting the right cover board for your project means verifying that the product will work with the chosen membrane type to provide a stable foundation for the roof and suitable protection for the underlying insulation. Understanding the unique benefits of a high-density polyiso cover board product can help roofing contractors reduce labor costs and save money during the construction process, while also contributing to lower building energy usage over the long-term life of the roof system.

Benefits of High-Density Polyiso Cover Boards

High-density polyiso cover boards provide a combination of impact resistance, energy savings, and ease of installation that make them a compelling option. They are manufactured with coated glass facers that provide well-recognized versatility during installation and service-life durability. By adding a high-density polyiso cover board, roofing contractors can enhance the long-term performance of a commercial roof system in addition to providing the following advantages:

  • Lightweight: High-density polyiso cover boards, on average, weigh 66 to 80 percent less, when compared to other products of the same thickness. Individual boards are light enough to be carried by a single worker, reducing manpower requirements.
  • High-density polyiso cover boards are light enough to be carried by a single worker, reducing manpower requirements. Photo: Firestone Building Products

    Water resistance: The water absorption by volume of high-density polyiso cover boards is about four percent—much lower than traditional boards. High-density polyiso cover boards will not rot or dissolve and can maintain their integrity under adverse weather conditions.

  • Fewer truckloads: High-density polyiso cover boards can be shipped with about three times more square feet per truckload, requiring fewer trucks, which leads to fuel and transportation savings, as well as reduced traffic congestion on job sites.
  • Reduced product staging time: High-density polyiso cover boards require less crane time with lower hoisting, loading, and staging costs. The cover boards are easier to carry and maneuver around the roof. Pallets need not be broken or redistributed as they might need to be with other products.
  • Ease of cutting: Unlike traditional gypsum boards which require heavy-duty saws or cutters to resize, high-density polyiso cover boards can be easily scored and cut using a utility knife. A single worker can measure and cut boards to size, increasing the productivity of the roofing team.
  • Weight: When considering a building’s structural design, high-density polyiso cover boards will contribute less dead load to a roof than other alternatives. Lighter dead loads can add up to savings in structural costs for new construction and fewer headaches when reroofing an existing building.
  • Greater R-value: In addition to providing suitable protection to a roof system, high-density polyiso cover boards can increase the thermal resistance of the roof and provide two to five times more R-value than other cover board options.
  • Virtually dust-free: High-density polyiso cover boards are made with polyisocyanurate foam found in insulation products, which contribute less dust during cutting. This can decrease potential seam contamination of the roof cover prior to waterproofing the laps. Reduced dust and the absence of silica particles also enhances worker safety. And, less mess also means improved productivity for installers.
  • Mold: High-density polyiso cover boards resist mold growth when tested under ASTM D3273. This makes the products highly suitable for applications prone to elevated moisture conditions.
  • Resiliency: Higher compressive strength and flexibility in cover boards improves a roof’s resistance to damage from foot traffic, heavily loaded carts, dropped hammers and other tools.
  • Versatility: High-density polyiso cover boards can be used in new construction, reroofing, and recover applications. They are suitable in mechanically attached, adhered and ballasted roof assemblies.

High-Density Cover Boards Help Ohio High School Achieve LEED Gold Certification

When the Green Local School District in Ohio began making plans for a new high school to be built in Smithville, they wanted to build for the long-term. Recognizing that operating costs should be factored into building budgets, they set a goal to seek LEED Gold certification for the new building.

The new high school in Smithville, Ohio, was designed to achieve LEED Gold certification. It features a PVC roof system including high-density polyiso cover boards.

The school district was eager to design for lowered heating costs in the brutal Ohio winters through smaller, more efficient mechanical systems. Achieving that energy efficiency required designers to look at the whole building envelope with an eye toward maximizing insulation and minimizing the thermal and vapor conductivity of the building components.
Their roofing solution? Charcoal-colored PVC membrane to capture winter sunlight over polyiso roof insulation and 1/4-inch high-density polyiso cover board from Johns Manville.

Advanced Industrial Roofing Inc., based in nearby Massillon, installed the components over the school’s structures — 12 distinct roofing areas of varying size and slope. With such a complex job, they were grateful for the ease of handling and cutting the high-density polyiso cover board and for the sturdy protective surface it provided during the installation.

What Can Visiting a Car Dealership Teach You About Closing Quotes After Roof Inspections?

Assessing a roof is easy. Assuming you have the basic technical skills, which are not difficult to learn, analyzing a roof and determining what deficiencies are present, what needs to be done, what can wait, all of that, really isn’t that hard to do.

So, why do so many roofing contractors have trouble selling the repairs their reports recommend? (And when they don’t sell the repairs they often think the problem is with their report format). Let’s see if we can bring some clarity to this.

Years ago, in my role as roofing consultant, I had a client give me a copy of an assessment report performed by a roofing contractor with a quote for about $36,000 of recommended repairs to correct deficiencies they found on a shopping center. I had also inspected the roofs and I agreed that everything they presented was a legitimate deficiency. So, what did I recommend to my client? I recommended we do none of it!

Let me give you a bit more information about the roof. In the three years that my client had owned the 84,000-square-foot shopping center, they have never had single roof leak and the well-installed gravel surfaced built up roofs were about eight years old. Do you really think a building owner is going to spend $36,000 on an 84,000-sqare-foot shopping center that had never leaked?

When you drop your car off at the body shop to have them fix a scratch on the right rear quarter panel on your car, you don’t expect them to fix the scratch, repaint the whole car, install new rims and tires, tint the windshield and upgrade the radio.

Tip 1: Most roofing contractors doing assessments produce reports and quotes “recommending” way too much work.  Just because something on a roof isn’t perfect doesn’t mean you have to fix it, at least right away. For instance, just because that EPDM wall flashing is starting to bridge, you and I both know it isn’t going to rip open for at least another three or four years and perhaps longer. (And there are exceptions, sure, but if you are on the roof regularly, monitoring it, there is no chance you won’t see it coming.) When you quote the repair of those flashings, it is the same as getting a quote to “install new tires and rims, tint your windshield and upgrade the radio” when you took your car in for that scratch on that right rear quarter panel.

There is another factor that comes in to play. When you dropped your car off at the body shop and when you see a quote to do all that unrequested work, you know you don’t need it. That isn’t the case with the typical building owner and his roofs.

The typical building owner, property manager, facility manager, building engineer, asset manager knows less about roofs than your receptionist. Think about that for a minute. While there are exceptions to this rule, they are few and far between. Do you know what that means? It means that they are not going to understand the report you produce. You can tell them what a flashing is and they will nod their head up and down. That doesn’t mean they understand. If you, instead, asked them to explain to you what a flashing is and you listen to their answer you will quickly discover that they have no real idea what a flashing is. But here is what they do know: They don’t need to spend $36,000 on a shopping center that doesn’t leak. Since they can’t understand your report, they just do none of it.

Tip 2: If you give them a laundry list of things to choose from, they will often choose “none of the above. ”So, make sure you explain why each of these things is necessary and the possible consequences of not doing them.

Tip 3: “Sell” your assessments as a way to manage an aging roof. While we can all agree that roofs should be inspected regularly, let’s also agree that the roofs that most need to be inspected regularly are aging (or problematic) roofs. Especially when you are trying to start work with a potential new client, point out that it is often possible to cost effectively extend the life of an aging roof, and the best way to figure out exactly if that might be possible and how to do it is with a formal assessment. Importantly, this also gives you a context for understanding what they are after and makes it much easier to avoid the issues mentioned in both Tips 1 and 2.

Let’s say you decide to buy a new car. You walk into the dealership and lady behind the desk says, “Just a minute, I’ll get somebody for you.” Shortly, a mechanic in greasy coveralls comes walking out the service area, wiping the grease off his hands with a rag. He walks you over to a car on the show floor and says, “You should buy this one. It is a real good car.” That isn’t how it works? Really? (And, do you think that mechanic should be surprised when you don’t buy that car? Then why are you surprised when your estimators only sell one in five estimates they put out for repairs?)

Does the professional salesman you actually buy your new car from know as much about how that car works as the mechanic? Probably not. Then why do you suppose auto dealers use salespeople to sell cars rather than mechanics or others with excellent technical expertise? Because salespeople know how to sell. In our industry, we routinely see commercial roofing service salespeople closing over 60 percent of their sales. Once you made the adjustments recommended in the first three tips, if you are not closing 60 percent or more of your service estimates coming off assessment reports, you need to follow the advice in Tip 4.

Tip 4: Hire a true sales professional to sell. When your payroll clerk and bookkeeper are both off work due to maternity leave and an auto accident, would you grab two guys from a tear-off crew and have them do the bookkeeping and payroll? If a couple of guys don’t show up on a Monday at the start of a large tear-off, do you send your payroll clerk and bookkeeper out to help with the tear-off? Then don’t expect the guy who you have assessing your customers’ roofs to also sell them the work you are quoting. Hire true sales professionals and watch your revenue grow.

By following these tips, the quality of your assessments will go up and so will your closing ratios.