Waterproofing Membrane Is Solvent Free

NOVALINK WMChem Link launches NOVALINK WM, a waterproofing membrane available in two- or five-gallon pails. NOVALINK WM is a cold-applied, single-component waterproofing membrane that cures by exposure to atmospheric and substrate moisture to form a continuous, tough, reinforced elastic seal. It is solvent-free and compliant with all known environmental and OSHA requirements, allowing its use in confined spaces with standard personal protection equipment.

For more information, visit www.chemlink.com.

Metal Panels Illuminate Institute for Contemporary Art at VCU

The exterior of the Institute for Contemporary Art features 28,000 square feet of zinc roof and wall panels. Photos: Rheinzink

The Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA) at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) will bring the most important, cutting-edge contemporary art exhibits in the world to the VCU campus and the city of Richmond. Located in the striking new Markel Center and designed by architect Steven Holl, the ICA offers 41,000 square feet of flexible space including a 33-foot-high central forum. The ICA features a dynamic slate of changing exhibitions, performances, files and interdisciplinary programs.

“We designed the ICA to be a flexible, forward-looking instrument that will both illuminate and serve as a catalyst for the transformative possibilities of contemporary art,” Steven Holl says. “The fluidity of the design allows for experimentation and will encourage new ways to display and present art that will capitalize on the ingenuity and creativity apparent throughout the VCU campus.”

In keeping with VCU’s master sustainability plan, the ICA incorporates state-of-the-art technologies and environmentally conscious design elements and makes use of numerous natural resources.

The exterior for the contemporary design features 28,000 square feet of Rheinzink roof and wall panels. According to Steven Holl Architects, “The prePATINA blue-grey Rheinzink exterior interfaces with clear and translucent glass walls and skylights that infuse the building with natural light and lessen reliance on nonrenewable energy. The zinc shares the same greenish-gray tonality as the matte glass, giving the building a shifting presence from monolithic opaque to multifarious translucent depending on the light.”

The Rheinzink panels were custom fabricated A. Zahner Company. They were installed by Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal. Photos: Rheinzink

The custom cassette panels were designed and fabricated by Rheinzink systems partner A. Zahner Company, Kansas City, Missouri, and installed by Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Wheeling, West Virginia.

The open joint metal panel rain screen system utilized 1.75-mm zinc. According to Zahner project manager John Owens, “The 1.75-mm zinc is a little heavier than normal but that’s what the architect wanted.” Zahner provided 1,200 total panels, of which 200 were curved. “We cut those panels radially as needed to fit the curved aluminum frame. All of that fabrication was done in our shop.”

Gary Davis, Zahner’s director of marketing, added, “We developed multiple panel systems using Rheinzink materials on a supply-only basis. To create museum-quality edges and detailing, Zahner digitally defined the scopes of work and fabricated from our 3-D model. Preceding construction tolerances were dealt with in a timely manner.”

TEAM

Architect: Steven Holl Architects, New York, www.stevenholl.com
Roofing Contractor: Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Wheeling, West Virginia, www.krsm.net
Metal Fabricator: A. Zahner Company, Kansas City, Missouri, www.azahner.com

MATERIALS

Zinc Roof and Wall Panels: 1.75-mm prePATINA zinc, Rheinzink, www.rheinzink.us

Working With Homeowners Associations Means Taking on Big Challenges

Glenwood Townhomes in San Dimas, California, includes 185 residential units, a clubhouse, standalone garage and park restroom building. The re-roofing project encompassed 250,000 square feet of shingles. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

A quick glance at the numbers reveals that Glenwood Townhomes in San Dimas, California, is not your everyday residential re-roofing project. Featuring 185 units plus a clubhouse, standalone garage and park restroom building, and requiring the installation of 250,000 square feet of shingles, the project is expansive in scope, to say the least. But for nearly 40 years, La Rocque Better Roofs has enjoyed taking on challenging roofing projects, and the team put a plan in place to take on a very ambitious and complex assignment.

With literally hundreds of homeowners impacted by the re-roofing project, the Glenwood Townhomes Home Owner Association (HOA) board of directors through its property management company, Personal Touch Property Management Company, actively sought a roofing company that had been in business for 20-plus years and, most importantly, was experienced in working with HOAs. Doug McCaulley, owner of Personal Touch Property Management Company, has managed Glenwood HOA for several years and knew he needed a company that was large enough and had the proper labor force to handle the size of the project — and would also be around to honor its warranty.

La Rocque Better Roofs has served customers throughout Southern California since 1981, and approximately 80 percent its business is focused on HOAs. The company has developed a process for effectively managing the multiple parties and considerations involved in HOA remodeling projects. Beyond the HOA board, other parties commonly involved in re-roofing projects include property management companies, roofing consultants, and maintenance and service organizations. From a project management perspective, challenges involved in HOA remodeling projects include dealing with any structural or code-related discoveries that arise once the project begins and minimizing inconvenience to residents.

The HOA board selected the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration shingle in Desert Tan. Members desired both the aesthetics and the benefits of solar reflectivity. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

Labor availability is a key consideration for HOA projects, as such projects require a sizeable labor pool to be available for an extended period. Rory Davis, vice president of HOA Sales at La Rocque Better Roofs, says a readily available roofing team was a key factor in the selection of La Rocque Better Roofs for the project. “We do not subcontract our workers and work with a team of 75-110 people, depending upon the time of year, so that the project stays on schedule,” says Davis.

While project management skills, logistical know-how and labor are all required for HOA projects, the most important element in a re-roofing project is satisfying the homeowners living in the community. All these considerations went into La Rocque Better Roofs’ approach to the re-roofing of Glenwood Townhomes.

A Customized Approach to Roof Removal

The design of the Glenwood Townhomes community presented some structural challenges. Detached garages adjacent to each building blocked access for workers during the removal process. La Rocque Better Roofs found a way to resolve this challenge, investing in customized, extra-wide, sturdy walk boards to bridge the distance between the homes and garages. The walk boards allowed roofers to remove roofing from the home and then walk the removed materials directly into the truck. “Walking the debris right to the truck was a big plus, because materials didn’t touch the ground and didn’t come into contact with mature shrubs and landscaping,” says Guy La Rocque, president and CEO. “It was reassuring to homeowners to know that nails and debris wouldn’t be dropped in their yards and exterior living areas.” The system also supported efficiency. La Rocque estimates the walk boards reduced tear-off time by four to five hours per building.

“Safety and efficiency on all of worksites are key factors in being a successful and sought-after company,” La Rocque states. “The rules and requirements are constantly changing with OSHA, and it’s our responsibility as the management team at La Rocque Better Roofs to make sure all our employees are always up to date with the latest information. Our weekly Tailgate Safety Meetings as well as our monthly safety and education meetings help us maintain a level of awareness. It’s one thing to be educated in OSHA’s safety requirements; it’s another thing to implement and monitor these safety procedures on our jobsites.”

Surprises are not uncommon when remodeling mature properties. During the re-roofing project, some fireplaces in the community were found to be unstable. La Rocque Better Roofs worked with city permitting officials and engineers to retrofit the fireplaces so that they remained safe and functional without requiring a complete tear-down and rebuilding of the fireplaces.

Communication and the “Contractor Bubble”

Among the many steps La Rocque Better Roofs employed to simplify the process, Guy La Rocque says communication with residents was especially valuable. “We scheduled after-hours meetings with the residents to keep them informed about the project, answer their questions and let them know what to expect,” he says. “Over the years, we’ve found the best thing you can do is get homeowners involved. You can never communicate enough, so we let residents know what time our crews would be on site, where the crews would be working and what we expected to accomplish. “

Crews from La Rocque Better Roofs made sure to protect the landscaping as the project progressed. The company has made working for HOAs its primary focus. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

From La Rocque’s perspective, too many contractors operate in a “contractor bubble,” losing sight of other opportunities to add value to both homeowners and the contractor’s business. Listening to homeowners helps open up opportunities that may exist for additional work. “When you get homeowners involved, you get a different perception of what needs to happen,” La Rocque says. “The majority of us are homeowners, but many times we forget the most important thing we want from a contractor is communication.” He adds that the construction industry has suffered from a perception that too often contractors show up and leave whenever they want, leaving the customers in the dark. No one likes to be surprised. Keeping the homeowner informed can go a long way toward achieving more satisfied customers and generating more referrals.

Davis says that communication has never been more important than today, in the era of social media. “Yelp has become the new Better Business Bureau,” he says. “Social media provides more opportunities than ever before for consumers to either pat us on the back or criticize us.”

 Changing it Up

The Glenwood Townhomes community was built in 1973, and the roof replacement provided an opportunity to introduce trending colors and technology improvements to residents’ roofs. The HOA board wanted to select a color that would lighten up the overall look of the community and also take advantage of solar reflectivity. The HOA selected the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration shingle in Desert Tan.

Asked about the shingle manufacturer’s involvement in the project, Davis says manufacturers’ reps can make a big difference. “Availability is key, and a willingness to bring samples onsite or address any problems that come up is critical. You learn a lot by how a manufacturer deals with any problems that arise. We may go years without a problem, but when something happens, we want someone who will step up,” he says. He also likes the Owens Corning Sure Nail technology and says the strip that ensures optimal placement of each nail is a plus.

HOA projects are not for every contractor. But through planning, establishing strong relationships with engineers, permitting organizations and other partners, thoughtful approaches to on-site challenges and most importantly, listening to customers, HOAs present an opportunity for contractors to take on projects of size and style.

Iconic Structure at Utah State Gets New Roof Over Summer Breaks

The roof on Utah State University’s iconic Old Main structure was replaced over the course of three summers by the team at KBR Roofing. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

There was no summer break for the team at KBR Roofing these past three years. As soon as school ended in May for students at Utah State University, the team got to work on re-roofing the iconic Old Main structure on campus.

Originally built in 1889, Old Main has served its community for more than 125 years. Now listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, the imposing structure is home to the president of the university and a multitude of offices and classrooms.

“Every summer we tackled a different phase of the re-roofing project,” says Brent Wood, project manager at KBR Roofing. “This structure is so critical to the university that it made complete sense to invest in composite roofing. The old, curling gray wood shingles simply had to come off.”

Each summer, the crews from KBR Roofing focused on a different element of the project. “We encountered a few challenges along the way,” Wood notes. “First, since the structure was built so long ago, many of the walls were not square. Second, due to a fire on the north side in 1984, this section of the roof had to be re-sheeted. Third, we had to fabricate four new cupolas. And fourth, we had to custom create a pedestrian bridge 106 feet on top of the center to access the east tower.”

With all their challenges, Wood relates that the easiest part of the project was installing the DaVinci Roofscapes Fancy Shake tiles. “We used the regular shake on the roof surface and then the beaver tail and diamond tiles to accent different parts of the structure,” Wood says. “They were a dream to install.”

Passing Historical Review

Before installation began, representatives of Utah State University and Design West Architects sought permission to use the composite shake tiles on the Old Main project.

Originally built in 1889, Old Main is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites. The building houses the president of the university and a multitude of offices and classrooms. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

“USU has an on-campus architectural review committee that monitors and approves all changes to buildings, signage and landscaping,” says Quin E. Whitaker, PE MBA, structural engineer/project manager at Utah State University. “Our Facilities team was required to meet with the State Historical Department of Utah to gain approval of the Fancy Shake shingles. When we met with the state’s representative, he declined all proposed roofing samples, including one from DaVinci. We asked him to go look at the DaVinci tiles installed on our Geology building back in 2012. As soon as we got there, he immediately told us the composite tiles looked great and met his expectations.”

Getting approval was critical, notes Whitaker. “Old Main is our flagship building,” he says. “It houses the president of the university, her staff and many other administration officials and classrooms. We didn’t wish to skimp on the quality of this roofing product. Gaining approval on the DaVinci product was especially important since we anticipate that five historic buildings on the campus quad (including Old Main) will all have the same composite roofing tiles installed in the coming years. The DaVinci product has an authentic look, backed by a strong warranty, which we appreciate.”

Going the Extra Mile

With the green light received, KBR Roofing started the Old Main roofing project in May of 2015. At the same time, the roof specialists from the university’s carpentry shop created new cupola bases.

“Bryan Bingham and Mike McBride at our university were intimately involved in the project,” says Whitaker. “I’ve never seen the level of craftsmanship that they were able to achieve for the cupola bases. Everyone involved in this project gave 110 percent.”

A cupola on the backside of the structure features beaver tail tiles. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

Going the extra mile involved quite a few special considerations for KBR Roofing on this project. The team manufactured a 15-foot pedestrian bridge to allow access from the roof to one of the towers. Located more than 100 feet in the air, the new bridge complements the building’s structure and meets code requirements.

On the north side of the building, workers crafted new metal sheeting on four finials. At the south tower, the stone finials were in need of renovation. The roofers contracted with Abstract Masonry to revitalize the stone, mortar joints and other surrounding brick features. They also contracted with Rocky Mountain Snow Guards for snow fences and snow guards that were installed around the entire structure. Drift II – two-pipe snow fences were put in place at the eaves over pedestrian and vehicular areas as a barrier to snow movement with RG 16 snow guards applied in a pattern above to hold the snow slab in place.

“Three of Old Main’s four towers now have a new DaVinci roof on them covered with the company’s attractive diamond shingles,” says Whitaker. “KBR Roofing was amazing. They also had to radius the railing for the two large rotundas. This company, in my estimation, is top notch and the only company that could have pulled off this project.”

TEAM

Architect: Design West Architects, Logan, Utah, www.designwestarchitects.com
Roofing Contractor: KBR Roofing, Ogden, Utah, www.kbrroofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Fancy Shake composite cedar tiles, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com
Snow Guards: Drift II and RG 16, Rocky Mountain Snow Guards, www.rockymountainsnowguards.com

Meticulous Preparation Sets Up Restoration Project for Success

Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Officials at Roma High School in Roma, Texas, knew they needed a new roof. The tile roof on the main complex was more than 25 years old, and some components were clearly failing. They didn’t realize that many of the leaks and resulting wall deterioration were caused by other problems as well. Luckily, they reached out to design and construction professionals who did their homework, diagnosed all of the key problems, and developed a plan to fix them. The crowning touch of the building envelope restoration plan was a beautiful standing seam metal roof, and the success of the project is proof that hard work pays off not only in the classroom, but on top of it.

The Consultant

As its building envelope consultant, Roma Independent School District chose Amtech Solutions Inc., headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The full-service architectural, engineering, and building envelope consulting firm has been in business since 1982. Working out of the company’s Rio Grand Valley (RGV) office located in Pharr, Texas, Amtech Solutions inspected and evaluated the entire site and reviewed legacy documents to identify the underlying issues.

They found quite a few, notes Michael Hovar, AIA, RRO, LEED AP, a senior architect and the general manager of the company’s RGV office. “They thought all they had was a roofing problem,” he notes. “But we saw right away that not properly managing water off the roof was the cause of wall deterioration, which then became leaks into the building. Our experience with the entire envelope and all facets of design and construction really helped us on this one.”

Roma High School in Roma, Texas, underwent a three-phase building envelope restoration plan in 2016-2017. After the walls were repaired and restored, the roof and mechanical equipemt were replaced. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Amtech Solutions put together a presentation for the school board to detail what they discovered and the plan they proposed to remedy the situation. The company also worked with the school district to help develop a budget.
The restoration plan was split up into three phases. The first phase focused on restoring the walls and windows. The second phase encompassed roof replacement and installing new mechanical equipment. The third phase involved improving drainage, grading and other site repairs.

Amtech Solutions decided not to bid the project out to a general contractor, but rather to bid each phase separately. “We decided to split it up into stages and do it logically, starting with the walls first,” Hovar says. “For the walls, we got restoration contractors who specialize in wall restoration work.”

Restoration Services Inc. (RSI) of Houston, Texas handled the first phase in the summer, as the wall repairs would be louder and more disruptive to students. The roof replacement project was scheduled for the fall. “Once all of the stuff on the ground was done, that allowed us to do the re-roofing work throughout the school year, which also helped the price,” notes Hovar. “Our experience has always been that if we have good cooperation with the contractors and the school staff, at the end of the job they end up being best friends. And that’s exactly what happened. At the end of the job, they were sad to see the roofers go.”

Amtech Solutions convinced the school district the plan would work. “It took some coordination, communication and cooperation, and it took a motivated owner that was willing to do this and trust us,” Hovar says. “They looked to us for guidance, and we said, ‘We do this all the time. We do roofing projects throughout the year, occupied and unoccupied, and we do it in a way that respects what the occupant’s needs are.’”

When it came time to specify the roof system, school board members were divided; one faction wanted to install a new tile roof, and the other wanted to go with metal. “The interesting thing is, for the historical architecture of the area, both of those roofs are appropriate, so from the standpoint of historical significance, either one works,” Hovar says. “In the end, it was quite a bit more expensive to utilize tile than it was to utilize a metal roof.”

The Roof Systems

The decision was made to go with a standing seam metal roof from McElroy Metal on the vast majority of the complex, including the main roof, the gymnasium, and two freestanding structures — the art and industrial arts buildings — that had been added over the years. The main tile roof was removed and replaced with McElroy’s 138T Panel, a 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel in Brite Red. McElroy’s 238T Panel, a 24-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel, was specified for the gym, as well as the art and industrial arts buildings. In a cost-saving measure, the color on the gym roof was changes to Galvalume Plus. In all, more than 233,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed.

Before

“The reason we picked this roof system is we’ve had a lot of great experience with it,” Hovar says. “We love that panel because they can actually bring the roll former to the jobsite. That gives the roofing contractor a lot more options on how he can load the roof and sequence the job. The other beauty of this panel is that it has unlimited movement. The panels itself slides back and forth over a fixed clip. It also flashes like a dream.”

Low-slope roof areas adjacent to the gym were replaced with a two-ply modified bitumen system from Siplast. CPI Daylighting manufactured a new skylight for the atrium.

As part of the roofing phase, gutters and downspouts were added. “There was nothing controlling the water before on this project,” Hovar says. “We designed a gutter system with expansion joints as per SMACNA guidelines. The contractor made absolutely beautiful shop-welded aluminum downspout boots.”

The most crucial detail was a custom-made saddle that solved the problem of water infiltration at the transition between the roof and walls on the wings. “This ultimately simple solution addressed one of the major design flaws that plagued the facility from the first days of occupancy,” Hovar notes. “We modeled the three-dimensional design of those saddles, and the contractor welded them in his shop. He fabricated them out of .080 aluminum and they were seamless. The restoration contractor had already installed all of the through-wall flashing, so all the roofer had to do was put counterflashing in and do his work around it. He was able to fly without being slowed down by a mason on the job.”

The Roofing Contractor

The roofing phase of the project was handled by Rio Roofing, headquartered in Harlingen, Texas. The company primarily installs low-slope and metal roofs, and its focus is on large commercial and institutional projects. ““We do nearly 90 percent public bonded work,” notes Hedley Hichens, vice president of Rio Roofing. “We found out that whether it’s a small job or a big job, the paperwork is still the same, so we try to make it worthwhile.”

The company worked on the Roma High School project for about a year, wrapping up the roofing phase of the project in November 2017.

After the structure’s main roof was removed, the tile was replaced with a standing seam metal roof featuring McElroy’s 138T Panel in Brite Red. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

The decision was made to tackle the wings on the main roof first. “During the pre-con meetings, we met with the principal and the superintendent and asked, ‘Which wings are the worst?’” Hichens notes. “There was one wing that was the most problematic, so we started with that area first.”

Rio Roofing began by tearing off the existing tile roof. “There were about 1,925 squares of concrete tile we had to remove,” Hichens notes. “We had crews on the roof tearing off tile, crews on the ground palletizing the tile and storing it in the parking lot.”

As crew members removed the old tile and felt, others followed behind and installed polyisocyanurate insulation and Polystick MTS, a waterproofing underlayment designed for high-temperature applications. “We did 40 or 50 squares a day, moving down the wing,” Hichens says. “We dried in the whole school. Then we came back with the 138 panel.”

On top of the gym and other buildings that received the 238T panel, the existing metal roofs were left in place. “We put flute fill on top of the old panels. Then we screwed down 3/8-inch Securock, primed it and put the Polyglass underlayment down on top of that,” Hichens explains. “That 24-inch panel is a great panel to work with because every time you put one down, you’re 2 feet closer to finishing.”

Installing the New Roofs

The school’s main roof covers a central hub with eight wings coming off of its octagonal skylight. Where the wings tie together, access was limited.

“It was a tight squeeze,” Hichens says. “Getting in there and getting out was difficult. I think our fork lift only cleared one of the walkways by 2 or 3 inches. It’s a big campus, but the layout was difficult at the school.”

Once the wings were dried in, sheet metal crews installed the edge metal and 4,000 linear feet of gutters. They also started forming the panels.

Typically, Rio Roofing lifts the roll former to the roof edge, but it was difficult to get a large lift next to the building, so in this case the roll former was left on the ground. It was moved from wing to wing as the job progressed. “We used a New Tech roll former on this project,” Hichens says, “We would put the roll former parallel to each wing and store the panels on the ground in each area.”

Panels were hemmed and notched using a Swenson Snap Table Pro and lifted to the roof with a fork lift and a special cradle. Crews used a hand seamer to set temporary seams and followed up with a robotic seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. “The panels are easy to install,” Hichens says. “You get about four guys 10 feet apart to engage the panels and clips and you just keep going. At the end of the day crews put the seam caps on.”

On the low-slope areas, Rio Roofing installed approximately 47,000 square feet of the Siplast two-ply SBS modified system, which was torched down over new lightweight concrete. “For their size, the low-slope areas had a ton of mechanical equipment and ductwork up there,” notes Hichens. “There were a lot of key details.”

Rio Roofing custom-manufactured numerous curbs and details, including the saddles over problem areas at the walls. “We have a full welding shop,” Hichens notes. “We have a full machine shop. We make all of our own curbs here, so there is no lead time for ordering curbs, and we are sure they’ll fit.”

Teamwork

Work on the project has now moved on to a fourth phase: installing translucent panels over the swimming pool. Hovar believes teamwork was the key to the project’s success. “We had such a good contracting team, we did good field work to begin with, and we had an understanding owner,” he says. “Designing it wasn’t easy, but thankfully our experience helped. We just had a really good team to execute it, all the way around. That’s what makes for a great, project, right? When everybody is invested in a good outcome, they always support everybody else.”

Communication was also essential, and Building Information Modeling (BIM) helped keep everyone on the same page. “We modeled the project on our BIM software, and it helped everyone understand the scope and challenges. The BIM model allowed the owner see exactly what the project would look like, and it helped the contractor understand the staging and logistical challenges before the project was bid,” Hovar says. “There were no surprises.”

TEAM

Architect and Consultant: Amtech Solutions Inc., Pharr, Texas, www.amtechsls.com
Roofing Contractor: Rio Roofing, Harlingen Texas
Wall Restoration Contractor: RSI-Restoration Services Inc., Houston, Texas, www.rsi-restorationservices.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Metal Panels: 138T panel (16 inches wide, 24 gauge) and 238T Panel (24 inches wide, 24 gauge), McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com
Underlayment: Polystick MTS, Polyglass, www.polyglass.us
Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com
Skylight: CPI Daylighting, www.cpidaylighting.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Membrane: Paradiene SBS, Siplast, www.siplast.com

Fire Protection Safeguards Are a Key Focus of New Cold Storage Facility

Two years after a fire destroyed its old complex, Dick Cold Storage decided to build a new facility in Columbus, Ohio. Designed by Tippmann Innovation, the building offers the most up-to-date technology, as well as additional fire protection safeguards. Photo: Ryan Leasure

When the executive leadership at Dick Cold Storage decided to build a brand-new facility, the company made certain that the new structure would have increased fire protection — especially with its roofing system.

Dick Cold Storage opened a new facility in June, less than two years after a fire completely destroyed its previous facility in Columbus, Ohio. The new building, designed by Tippmann Innovation, offers the best equipment and most up-to-date technology for cold storage facilities. There are also additional fire protection safeguards, such as fire access doors, horns and strobes, additional pull stations at doors, linear heat detection in freezers and automatic smoke vents.

The roof of the building includes 18 BILCO automatic smoke vents that allow firefighters to bring a fire under control. The vents allow for the escape of smoke, heat, and gasses in a burning building. The Dick Cold Storage building where the 2016 fire occurred was not equipped with automatic smoke vent protection.

“Two of the biggest challenges we face in fighting any fire are heat and smoke,’’ says Steve Martin, Battalion Chief for the Columbus Fire Department. “The heat of the fire radiates on everything surrounding it, causing the flames to spread and causing rapid degradation of structural elements.”

A Ferocious Blaze

More than 400 firefighters battled the fire at Dick Cold Storage, which broke out at approximately 9 p.m. on a Friday. No one was hurt in the fire, but residents in the neighborhood evacuated the area for fear they would be exposed to chemicals used to refrigerate food in the warehouse. The cause of the fire was not determined.

“At that time, you just feel completely lost,’’ Don Dick, the company President, says about his thoughts as he watched the blaze roar through the building where his family had done business for nearly a century. “You have no idea what will happen to your business.”

The building is topped with a single-ply roofing system featuring 45-mil and 60-mil TPO. Photo: Ryan Leasure

Because the building lacked smoke vents, firefighters were stymied. Martin said the smoke impeded visibility, made it difficult to assess damage to the structure and find the origin of the fire. Even with tanks of fresh air on their backs, the brave Columbus firefighters could do little more than watch the blaze burn itself out. The fire was contained within 18 hours but had not been completely extinguished for days.

“Buildings that do not lend themselves to ventilation, such as cold storage buildings, are especially dangerous to firefighters. If there is no known life-safety issue, firefighters will retreat to a defensive position and fight the fire from outside the building instead of going inside,’’ Martin notes.

The fire at Dick Cold Storage would not have been prevented with smoke vents, but the devastating property loss could have been minimized. Firefighters may have been able to aggressively attack the blaze, but because of the lack of visibility and uncertainty of the structural damage within the building envelope, Martin and his crew had no other alternative other than to wait for the fire to die.

A Better Approach

Dick Cold Storage executives made sure to include smoke vents in its new building. Manufactured by The BILCO Company, the custom-made vents measure 7 feet by 18 feet and include a quad leaf design. Tippman worked with Spohn Associates to procure the vents. The size of a building, among other factors, determines the number and size of vents required for a building. The vented space must comply with fire codes.

The roof of the building is equipped with 18 BILCO automatic smoke vents that allow smoke, heat, and gasses to escape from a burning building. Photo: Ryan Leasure

Tippmann worked with Spohn Associates, The BILCO Company’s Indiana based sales representative, to determine the number of vents used for the new building.The vents include a Thermolatch II positive hold/release mechanism designed to ensure reliable operation when a fire occurs. It also automatically releases vent covers upon the melting of a 165°F (74°C) fusible link. Gas spring operators are designed to open the covers against snow and wind loads and include integral dampers to ensure that the covers open at a controlled rate of speed.

“Vents will allow for the removal of heat and smoke will potentially slow the spread of fire,’’ Martin says. “They will also permit firefighters to see and enter the building, to possibly extinguish the fire early, preventing the entire building from becoming a loss.”

Roofing Solutions for Cold Storage Buildings

Like the rest of the materials used in building a cold storage facility, architects need to choose roofing components carefully. The thermal properties and unique usage of cold storage buildings require extra attention to detail in choosing the construction materials.

One of the most critical is constructing vapor-tight and energy efficient roof systems. Tippmann used a single-ply roofing system with 45-mil and 60-mil TPO, which serve as excellent vapor barriers. Single-ply systems also minimize air leaks. Those leaks can lead to thermal loss and excess moisture.

Tippman also paid extra attention to the vapor barriers, which are used to prevent moisture from damaging the fabric of the building. It’s also incumbent on roofing contractors to choose the proper insulation to maximize energy efficiency.

When fire engulfed the facility, firefighters could do little more than watch the blaze burn itself out. The fire was contained within 18 hours was not completely extinguished for days. Photo: Walker Evans, Columbus Underground

Improperly installed or inefficient roofing materials could lead to disastrous consequences for cold storage buildings. Vapor leaks and excess moisture could create bacterial growth. Other side effects could include structural damage from ice buildup on walls and slabs, higher utility costs, safety issues for workers and equipment that may require more maintenance or not reach its expected lifespan.

Tippman Innovation served as the architect, general contractor and roofing contractor for the project. “Tippmann Innovation’s experience and reputation in cold storage building is well-known and respected,’’ Don Dick notes. “After touring one of Tippman’s newly-completed projects, we were very impressed with the company’s commitment to quality, design, and technology. We’re confident that our new facility will be at the cutting edge of cold storage innovation.”

State-of-the-Art Facility

The new facility for Dick Cold Storage incorporates the latest in cold storage technology. The ceilings are 50-feet clear, creating six million cubic square feet of storage space. There are 15,000 pallet positions and seven multi-temperature storage rooms.

Cold storage facilities are used for keeping food products and other perishables for distribution to supermarkets and other retail outlets that sell to consumers. Dick Cold Storage’s Columbus location serves customers in a 550-mile radius, covering a geographic area that reaches Wisconsin, Alabama and New York and a population of more than 138 million people.

The new facility includes LED lighting, frozen, cooler and dry storage, and the most energy-efficient refrigeration equipment. “We want to be able to move product extremely fast,’’ Don Dick says. “We’re very conscientious of food safety and storing product, so we try to do everything the right way.”

Dick Cold Storage made a huge financial investment in its new facility, and Tippmann Innovation paid tremendous attention to all of the construction materials, especially the roofing. With a new building that can better withstand the potential of a catastrophic total product and facility loss that can be caused by fire, the business heads into its second century with new goals and new vitality.

“When you have time to think, you realize you just gotta get up and running and get back to what you are doing,’’ Don Dick says. “You have to be as efficient as you can. We thought it was dead, but you can’t think that way. You have to think what we are going to do from this day forward.”

Historic Colorado School Readies for Winter With New Metal Roof System

Ouray School recently underwent a two-phase renovation project that involved improvements to the structure, which was built in 1936. Improvements include a new standing seam metal roof and snow guards designed to withstand the area’s tough winters. Photos: S-5!

Historic Ouray School in Ouray, Colorado, has undergone several renovations in the last 80 years, and the latest included a new standing seam metal roofing system with a snow guard system designed to ensure the safety of students, faculty and visitors.

The original school was built in 1883, when the school district was founded. That original structure was destroyed by fire in 1936, when a new facility was constructed adjacent to the original site. Additions were made to the school in the 1970s, in the 1990s and in 2003. After a full assessment in 2014, the existing facilities were found to be structurally safe and worthy of a thorough renovation, including the addition of a standing seam metal roof that covered the entire building, additions and all.

“We kept the slope at 2:12 because we didn’t want the roof sticking up real high,” says Joel Cox, AIA, of RTA Architects in Colorado Springs, Colorado. “After the first winter, everything is performing the way everyone expects it to be performing.”

The project was a two-phase renovation that involved improvements to the original structure, erected in 1936. The redesigned facility includes innovative 21stcentury learning spaces to support modern curriculum delivery and an emphasis on safety for all students and staff.

The New Roof and Snow Guards

Douglass Colony Group of Commerce City, Colorado, installed 18,000 square feet of standing seam metal roofing from Firestone. The snow guard system selected for the Ouray School was ColorGard from S-5!, with a Charcoal Grey insert to match the standing seam panels.

According to Anthony Sanchez, superintendent on the project, Douglass Colony crews began by installing the fascia, soffits, gutters and downspouts. One of the more unusual facets of the project were the metal details installed at the top of the walls, which were recreated to closely replicate the historic look. “We built each individual piece,” Sanchez notes. “We installed them along with the fascia, and then installed the gutter, drip edge and receiver flashing for the roof.”

Crews from Douglass Colony installed the Firestone Una-Clad UC-6 double-lock standing seam panels. Once the roof system was in place, crews installed approximately 1,600 linear feet of the S-5! ColorGard snow guard system. Photos: S-5!

The standing seam metal roof was installed on top of a nail base and Firestone CLAD GARD SA high-temperature underlayment. After the roll former was lifted into place, the Una-Clad UC-6 double-lock standing seam panels were rolled out directly onto the roof, where they were staged for installation. The installation went smoothly, Sanchez notes, despite the number of hips and ridges. “We followed all of the Firestone details,” he says.

The double-lock standing seam system was specified for its durability, as the area typically experiences tough winter weather. “We used the 180-degree seam because of the elevation,” Sanchez says.

Once the roof system was in place, approximately 1,600 linear feet of the snow guard system was installed. Depending on the length of the standing seam metal panel, some sections required two or three rows of S-5! ColorGard.

“We wanted a continuous snow guard system, instead of individual plastic pieces that are screwed down through the roof,” says Cox. “The ColorGard is attached without penetrating the roof and it performs better, that’s the main reason we installed it on the Ouray School. There is pedestrian traffic on three sides of the building, so preventing snow and ice from sliding off the roof was obviously important.”

Cox credits his S-5! rep with suggesting the best layout for the project. “We have one row about one foot up from the eave, a second row about a quarter way up the roof and another row about midway up the roof, spaced in line with S-5! suggestions,” he notes.

The snow bar system was easy to install, according to Sanchez. The non-penetrating system attaches to the standing seams with set screws. “We just followed the pattern they laid out,” Sanchez says.

Weather was not an issue on the project, and despite the remote location, the jobsite didn’t pose any real difficulties, according to Sanchez. “The days were pretty short, though, as there were mountains on both sides,” he notes.

In addition to the new sloped roof and attic addition, the renovated school features south and southeast vestibule additions, security upgrades, new entry steps, new windows, HVAC system upgrades, a fully replaced fire alarm system to meet current codes and the addition of a full, building sprinkler system.

TEAM

Architect: RTA Architects in Colorado Springs, Colorado, www.rtaarchitects.com
Roofing Contractor: Douglass Colony Group, Commerce City, Colorado, www.douglasscolony.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: Una-Clad UC-6, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com
Underlayment: CLAD GARD SA, Firestone Building Products
Snow Guards: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Roof System Helps School Stand Up to Severe North Atlantic Weather

Crews from North Shore Roofingdried in the entire roof system and then installed the two-ply modified roof system manufactured by IKO. Photos: IKO

The new Brookside Intermediate School in Portugal Cove-St. Philips, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada is a $24 million project. The two-story structure serves students in grades five through nine, and includes 31 classrooms, a gymnasium, and a commercial kitchen, as well as a library, science labs, a home economics room, a technology and fabrication lab, two music rooms, an art room and a computer lab.

The durability and sustainability of the roof and wall systems were crucial considerations during the specification process, as the building would have to perform well in the extreme weather conditions common in the easternmost province of Canada.

The roof system specified, a two-ply SBS modified bitumen application, is one Terry Casey knows like the back of his hand. Casey is the general manager of North Shore Roofing, Ltd., headquartered in Paradise, Newfoundland. Its parent company, Atlantic Roofers, Ltd., headquartered in Cocagne, New Brunswick, has been in business for 42 years. The Newfoundland branch was established in 1992, adopting the name of North Shore Roofing.

North Shore Roofing specializes in low-slope roof systems, both new construction and retrofit. “Primarily our business is two-ply modified bitumen systems, single-ply membranes — TPO, EPDM, PVC — and the occasional roof coating,” Casey notes. “We will travel all over the province, but our dominant market is the metropolitan St. John’s area.”

Brookside Intermediate School was one of a number of new construction projects initiated by the government in the past three years that the company has worked on. “This was a brand-new school put out to tender by the government of Newfoundland and Labrador,” Casey says. “We were the low bidder to Marco Services, who was the general contractor.”

Casey believes durability was a key consideration in the roof system specified, which has been a staple on government projects. “The government of Newfoundland has a standard roofing spec, and this is the system that was specified,” he says. “In this one, we chose to go with IKO.

The wall system incorporates IKO Enerfoil Insulation, which was utilized as the masonry cavity wall insulation due to its high R-value per inch and weather-resistant aluminum facers. Photos: IKO

The IKO two-ply modified roof system was primarily installed over a steel deck, which was topped with 1/2-inch DensDeck Prime cover board, a vapor barrier, tapered extruded polystyrene (EPS) insulation, 2 inches of IKOtherm polyisocyanurate insulation, and a 6-millimeter protective board. The two-ply IKO SBS modified system was then torched down. The TorchFlex TP-180-FF base sheet was torched to the protective board, and the TorchFlex TP-250 cap sheet was torched to the base sheet. “The EPS was adhered to the vapor barrier with IKO Millennium adhesive,” Casey explains. “The same adhesive was used to adhere the 2 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation to the EPS.”

One 12,000-square-foot section of the roof was covered with a concrete deck, which was designed to allow another story to be added to the building in case of future expansion. In this section a TorchFlex base sheet was installed to serve as a vapor barrier. North Shore also installed permanent fall arrest anchors — a feature Casey would like to see replicated more often. “I wish every project was like it,” he says.

IKO also supplied the wall systems on the project, which were installed by Reddick Brothers Masonry.

Smooth Installation

As sections of the deck were put in place, North Shore Roofing sprang into action. “We made the building watertight with the DensDeck and vapor barrier so that the general contractor could continue on with construction inside the building,” Casey says. “We did that over the entire roof area before we installed the rest of the system.”

Work began on the concrete section first, and as the spring weather improved, the roofing work began in earnest. “Once the vapor barrier was on, each section of the roof had a plan for the tapered insulation,” says Casey. “We put the pieces together like a puzzle so that the drainage was 2 percent slope to the roof drains to avoid any ponding water.”

The new Brookside Intermediate School in Portugal Cove-St. Philips, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is a $24 million project. The durability of the roof system was a key consideration, and the government specified a two-ply modified bitumen system. Photos: IKO

Tapered insulation was installed to meet the design for four-way positive drainage. Casey explains that staging the area properly can make installation much more efficient. “There’s a bit of skill involved in that your foreman has to know where and when each piece has to be put in place,” he notes. “Your materials have to be placed on the roof so you’re not chasing the product all over the place. You have to make sure everything is up on the roof in the right spot to maximize your labor on the job.”

After the rest of the insulation and protection board were in place, the base sheet was torched directly to the protection board. “The membrane sheets have to be sealed to the board you’re torching to as well as sealed to one another,” Casey says. “You want to make sure you have a good bleed out of bitumen to ensure the membranes have been bonded together to form one monolithic sheet, if you will.”

Once the base sheet is installed, all of the details are flashed, so North Shore crews made sure all of the penetrations were completed before installing the cap sheet. “Once all your base sheet is installed, any projections going through the roof — your exhaust fans, air conditioning units, plumbing stacks and fall arrest anchors — they are all installed before the cap sheet is installed. Once your finished cap sheet is on it should look like everything was all is place and ready to go. You don’t want to be doing patchwork afterward.”

When installing the gray cap sheet, care must be taken to make sure the application is aesthetically pleasing. With contrast between the black bitumen and the gray top sheet, the goal is to be consistent and clean with your bleed out. “There was uniformity in our bleed out, so when you’re looking over the laps, it looks like it’s one long, continuous sheet,” he says. “When you’re looking against the laps, you can see the bleed out, but as long as it’s a consistent bleed out, it looks very neat. The boys do a great job of doing that.”

The skill of the crew is the key to a successful torch application, according to Casey. “It’s got everything to do with experience,” he says. “With anybody that’s doing this for the first time, you’re going to have areas where there’s no bleed out, and areas where there’s too much bleed out. When you’re doing this consistently and you’re doing it well, you’ll typically have right around 1/4 inch.”

Before the cap sheet was installed, permanent roof anchors from Thaler Metals were installed. “There is a square plate with four bolts that go down through the roof, and there is another plate that goes on the underside of the deck,” Casey says.

Because the permanent anchors were installed near the end of the project, the safety plan featured safety rails and temporary anchor points. Crews installed the safety rails on top of the parapets and had the system inspected by OSHA. For areas in which the railings could not be installed, crews tied off to temporary, removable and reusable roof anchors, also manufactured by Thaler.

Penetrations were flashed at the base sheet stage and again at the cap sheet stage per the manufacturer’s specifications. “All of the manufacturers, including IKO, have specific detailing for many, many types of penetrations going through the roof,” Casey says.

The installation process, led by foreman Shawn Higdon, went very smoothly. The jobsite was easily accessible and the weather posed no big problems. “This one was pretty wide open,” Casey says. “It’s a fairly large school with multiple roof areas. There were very few times where somebody was in our way or we were waiting for somebody. Change orders for other trades created some minor problems, but nothing serious.”

Juggling crews as the work progressed was perhaps the toughest part of the project, according to Casey. “Labor is always a challenge,” he says. “We had to move people from one job to the next job because everything wasn’t ready for us at one time. Moving back and forth from project to project was probably the most challenging thing on that job.”

TEAM

Architect: Fougere Menchenton Architecture, St. John’s, Newfoundland, www.fougeremenchenton.ca
General Contractor: Marco Services, St. John’s, Newfoundland, www.marcogroup.ca
Roofing Contractor: North Shore Roofing, Ltd., Paradise, Newfoundland
Wall System Installer: Reddick Brothers Masonry, Church Point, Nova Scotia

MATERIALS

Roof System
Modified Bitumen Membrane: TorchFlex TP-180-FF base sheet, TorchFlex TP-250 cap sheet, IKO, www.iko.com
Protection Board: Protectoboard, IKO
Insulation: IKOtherm, IKO
Vapor Barrier: MVP Vapour Retarder, IKO
Adhesive: Millennium Adhesive, IKO
Cover Board: 1/2-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com
Roof Anchors: Thaler Metal, www.thalermetal.com

Wall System
Vapor Barrier: AquaBarrier, IKO
Insulation: Enerfoil, IKO

Challenges With Metal Roof, Manpower Overcome at Alabama School

At Indian Springs School in Birmingham, Alabama, the first phase of a three-phase construction plan included building three new classroom buildings and a new administration building, as well as re-roofing the library. The roofing portion of the project included 45,000 square feet of 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD roof panels manufactured by Petersen. Photos: Petersen

When founded in 1952, the master plan for Indian Springs School in Birmingham, Alabama, called for campus development to maintain focus on the lake at the center of the school’s wooded 350-acre property. During the past 30 years, however, focus was lost, so a new plan was made to demolish some existing structures and construct buildings that re-establish a connection to the lake. The school enrolls 280 students in grades 8-12.

Phase one of a three-phase construction plan consisted of constructing three new cypress-clad, single-story classroom buildings and a new administration building, plus a re-roof of an existing library building. Oversight of design and construction was handled through a partnership of Lake Flato Architects in San Antonio and ArchitectureWorks in Birmingham. The first phase utilized 45,000 square feet of Petersen’s 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge Snap-Clad and Tite-Loc roof panels in Cool Color Zinc. The new buildings, which added 18 classrooms and 18 administrative offices, achieved LEED Silver status.

Installation of the PAC-CLAD roof was completed by Quality Architectural Metal and Roofing in Birmingham. The combination of panels was determined by the roof pitch, according to Eddie Still, the company’s vice president and project manager. “We used the mechanically seamed Tite-Loc panel on a few areas with pitches that required that profile, which amounted to less than 2,000 square feet,” he notes.

The roof systems were designed to extend over covered walkways, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor areas. Photos: Petersen

Some of the buildings feature monitors, which provide daylighting to each classroom, onto which QAMR installed PAC-CLAD flush panels for both the vertical and horizontal sections. This was a big job, Still notes. “Installation went smoothly, but finding manpower to get it done was the problem,” he says. “The job was big with multiple buildings, and I wasn’t able to stop all of our other projects for this one job. So, we approached it like four small jobs. This sounded good in theory, but there were delays with the work in front of us which impacted my schedule. This meant I had to put two crews out there to catch up. And then I had to call one of my friendly competitors and put one of his crews out there to help out. I’ve never done that before, but it worked out. Plus, these architects were good to work with. We had no issues at all on this project. We worked smoothly together.”

Still notes he frequently uses Petersen’s Snap-Clad panel. “The panel performs well and we’ve never had problems with it,” he says. “You don’t need to reinvent the wheel; you just need a product you can depend on. We have a 30-plus year relationship with Petersen and they’re great to do business with.”

ArchitectureWorks, which was first to join the project and managed the construction portion, formed a partnership with Lake Flato because of its focus on school design. “In general terms, Lake Flato was the design architect doing the master planning, and ArchitectureWorks was the architect of record, or executive architect, that completed construction documents and oversaw the construction phase,” says Greg Papay, FAIA and partner at Lake Flato. “We get asked to team up on jobs all the time, but they don’t all go as smoothly as this one did. ArchitectureWorks was great to work with.”

The design team sought to respect the school’s original structures’ simple forms and materials while opening the new buildings to nature. “Our notion was that 21st century schools could actually feel more like 19th century schools,” Papay explains, referring to the firm’s back-to-basics approach.

Focus on the Roof

All new buildings feature a roof that extends over covered walkways. “The roof shape allowed us to create transition spaces around each building that blur the lines between indoor and outdoor areas,” Papay says. “We chose a metal roof for longevity, attractiveness and efficiency properties. Plus, Birmingham used to be the steel capital of the South, so to have it on the buildings was a subtle reference to that local history.”

The new buildings at the school achieved LEED Silver status. Photos: Petersen

The school’s Southern U.S. location was also taken into account, notes Papay. “It was important to find balance between heat gain and glare inside from reflectivity off a neighboring roof, so we had to find the right color that addressed those issues,” he says “In the end we chose PAC-CLAD’s Cool Color Zinc.”

Lake Flato’s approach to building materials is to allow each to express its nature, where steel and wood in this application remain light in appearance. “We want a metal roof to look thin at the edge, so we don’t use heavy fascia. Some people wrap roof edges with fascia and don’t care if its appearance is thick or heavy, but fascia is not part of our approach; we were mindful of the details,” Papay says.

Papay points out that these buildings have subtle geometry shifts to accommodate natural rock groupings on the land. Therefore, he notes, “there was some roof detailing required where it was not turning at 90 degrees with a simple ridge/valley, so there was some metalworking trickery required at that point. Also, we created roof monitors which are smaller elements that required refined metal work. The roof looks great thanks to a great installation job.”

TEAM

Architects: ArchitectureWorks, Birmingham, Alabama, www.architectureworks.com, and Lake Flato Architects, San Antonio, Texas, www.lakeflato.com
General Contractor: BL Harbert International in Birmingham, Alabama, www.blharbert.com
Roofing Contractor: Quality Architectural Metal and Roofing, Birmingham, Alabama, www.qualityarch.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge Snap-Clad and Tite-Loc PAC-CLAD panels in Cool Color Zinc by Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Asphalt Roof System Helps Protect Home Against the Elements While Raising Curb Appeal

The Topsail Residence is a private estate in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Its roof encompasses approximately 10,600 square feet. Photo: Reliant Roofing

With the sunshine state regularly experiencing a beautiful and warm subtropical climate, it’s no surprise that Florida ranks second in the United States for tourism, ranking only behind California. However, actually living in this paradise has challenges of its own — extreme humidity, powerful winds and torrential rains can test the limits of any roofing system. To keep pace with Florida’s erratic weather conditions, proper roof design, installation and maintenance are paramount. The Topsail Residence, a private estate in Ponte Vedra Beach, is a testament to how selecting the right roofing system makes a world of difference.

Previously, the homeowners had an extensive addition on their property, which consisted of adding a new two-story section to the home. A short time after remodel, the roof began to leak, causing widespread damage as well as unsightly water spots throughout the home.

The homeowners sought the expertise of Pillar to Post Home Inspectors, who discovered issues with the roof. They quickly recognized such frequent and substantial leaking required immediate attention before other, bigger problems occurred. So, they suggested the homeowners contact a roofing contractor for a further assessment.

“After inspection, the problem immediately became apparent,” says Sean Shapiro, CEO of Reliant Roofing, the Jacksonville, Florida-based company hired to install the new roof. “We found torn shingles, signs of extensive foot and ladder traffic, and leaks.”

The roofing system appeared to lack some of the key components required for weather resilience and durability, according to Shapiro. “In some areas, there was no flashing installed whatsoever, allowing rainwater the perfect leak point to pour into the home,” Shapiro notes. “The problem was just as bad where the second story met the roof below. The water was free to run through every nook and cranny. Every aspect of a proper installation of a roofing system is important, especially something as essential as flashing.”

The contiguous U.S. average annual rainfall is 32.1 inches, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Jacksonville received 65.91 inches of rainfall in 2017 –more than double the contiguous national average, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Living only 22 miles southeast of the city, the homeowners needed a roofing system that would help to protect them against Florida’s high winds and frequent rainstorms. Reliant had the solution — a new asphalt shingle roof.

A new roof system featuring GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles was installed by Reliant Roofing in 2017. Photo: Reliant Roofing

“The homeowners didn’t feel comfortable just patching the leaks. They wanted protection against future leaks and the area’s common threats: high winds and stormy weather,” Shapiro says. “Therefore, we recommended installing a completely new roofing system with designer asphalt shingles.”

Reliant began by tearing off the shingles on both the older and newer sections of the roof, bringing in two full teams to tackle all 10,600 square feet. Having dealt with numerous high-wind conditions on other roofing projects, Reliant chose GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles in the color Stone Wood to provide the homeowners with a durable, long-lasting shingle, a key component of a beautiful new asphalt roofing system.

“When it storms in Florida, it storms,” added Shapiro. “We wanted to install a system that could withstand torrential downpours and high winds. Additionally, it was hard to overlook the durability shingles provided at an affordable cost.”

GAF Timbertex Premium Ridge Caps were installed on the hips and ridges to provide leak protection with extra dimensions to complement the roof. Reliant hand sealed every hip and ridge cap shingle and used GAF StormGuard Self-Adhering Leak Barrier to help protect the roof deck. Crews also installed custom counterflashing to address any potential defects in the stucco. Thanks to Reliant’s craftsmanship and the shingles’ ease of installation, the homeowners received a beautiful new asphalt roofing system in just five days.

The new asphalt roof will not only help to protect the homeowners against the elements and restore their comfort of living, but also provide them incredible curb appeal for years to come.

For their work on the Topsail Residence project, Reliant Roofing received the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Silver Award from the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA).

Each year, ARMA seeks the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America. The Topsail Residence showcases how asphalt roofing provides durability and reliability in the face of harsh weather, while also providing aesthetically stunning designs.

ARMA is now accepting low and steep-slope asphalt roofing projects completed in 2018 for its 2019 Awards Program. Roofing professionals may submit multiple submissions, and there is no fee to enter. The program recognizes projects that exhibit innovation, performance and beauty, and which lead the way in roofing breakthroughs, such as advanced weather protection, green roofing or unique system design. The submission deadline is December 31, 2018.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems or to learn more about ARMA’s Awards Program, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.