Bay Harbor Yacht Club’s Patio Plaza Gets an Upgrade

The second-floor patio deck of the Bay Harbor Yacht Club was removed and replaced with a new system featuring fully adhered Versico TPO membrane beneath Hanover Porcelain Pavers. Photos: Versico

Located along the shore of northern Lake Michigan, the Bay Harbor Yacht Club (BHYC) is a stately building surrounded by natural beauty. In addition to a deep-water marina and sandy beach, members of this luxurious private club have access to a pool, tennis courts, a fitness center, and a variety of restaurants, from upscale to casual.

One of the most popular spots in the BHYC is the large, tiled patio deck that extends off the second-floor ballroom. The patio deck, which also serves as the roof of the spa’s outdoor relaxation area, provides a laid-back atmosphere for people to eat, drink, spend time with friends, and listen to live music while taking in spectacular views of Lake Michigan.

Crews from Doyle Roofing installed the 135-mil VersiFleece TPO using Flexible DASH adhesive.

In 2020, the patio needed repairs. The old tile pavers were damaged, resulting in leaks in the outdoor spa area below. A new system was designed that used a fully adhered 135-mil VersiFleece TPO membrane beneath Hanover Porcelain Pavers, which would provide much better waterproofing protection than the previous coating/tile paver system.

Doyle Roofing, Inc., was selected for the BHYC project based on the company’s 40-year track record of high-quality work all over northern Michigan. The Doyle Roofing team is trained and experienced in the installation of a wide variety of roofing systems on both new construction and re-roofing projects.

Removal and Replacement

The project started with removing the old tile pavers and coating system down to the concrete deck. Then the Doyle Roofing crew primed the concrete deck with Versico’s CAV-GRIP 3V Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer. CAV-GRIP 3V can be used in a wide range of temperatures, is low-odor and low-VOC, sets up quickly, and is easy to apply.

Hanover Porcelain Pavers were selected for their durability and aesthetics.

After priming, Doyle Roofing applied Versico’s Flexible DASH, a two-part urethane adhesive, to the deck. Flexible DASH is VOC-free, energy-absorbing, and impact-resistant, and it allows for a quick and totally non-penetrating system. Once the Flexible DASH set up, the crew then installed a 135-mil VersiFleece TPO membrane. VersiFleece TPO offers exceptional waterproofing protection, as well as durability, flexibility, and toughness due to its thickness, reinforcing scrim, and polyester fleece backing.

After the membrane installation was complete, it was time to install the paver system. The crew loose-laid a drainage/protection mat over the VersiFleece membrane, then installed the pedestal paver system. Versico’s Hanover Porcelain Pavers were selected because they are ideal for use as outdoor flooring. Porcelain Pavers are hard-wearing, anti-slip, weather-resistant, and capable of withstanding heavy loads without compromising aesthetics. These pavers are quick and easy to install and are resistant to acid, chemicals, mold, and salt.

The project was completed in May 2020. Work was completed in approximately one month. The Doyle Roofing crew reported that the job was made much simpler by the use of Flexible DASH Adhesive, which sets up much more quickly than standard bonding adhesives and allowed them to compete more work in less time.

BHYC’s new and improved patio plaza will provide a welcoming place for members to gather and socialize for years to come, while Versico’s VersiFleece membrane will keep the fitness center below dry and protected against leaks.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Doyle Inc. Roofing Contractors, Cheboygan and Petoskey, Michigan, www.doyleroofing.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 135-mil VersiFleece TPO, Versico, www.versico.com

Pedestal System: Hanover Porcelain Tile Pedestal Pavers, www.hanoverpavers.com

Florida Stadium’s Metal Roof Intimidates, Alludes to Campus Architecture

The softball stadium on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville features a steeply pitched metal roof that frames an impressive gateway into the ballpark. Photos: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

The renovated Katie Seashole Pressly Softball Stadium on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville might have all the latest amenities, but its design pays homage to the school’s earlier days.

The facility’s steeply pitched metal roof in a signature orange-red finish is a clear reference to the buildings surrounding the stadium, and it also frames an impressive gateway into the ballpark’s friendly confines.

“The university is known for its collegiate gothic architecture and high-pitch, orange-red gable roofs,” says Joe Walker, AIA, president of Walker Architects, the local firm that designed the stadium. “This project ran with the roof as the character-defining element of the exterior, and the final design is a direct nod to the collegiate gothic style.”

The collegiate gothic roots most clearly are seen in the stadium’s signature entryway. In addition to tying the stadium to the surrounding campus, this two-story structure elevated on brick columns makes a statement all on its own for fans — as well as Gator opponents.

“From a fan’s perspective, the geometry of the roof signals the entryway and frames the impressive — and, for a visiting team, intimidating — first glimpse of the field,” Walker says. “For a player, when you look at the elevation of the facility from the field, the central gable is a centerpiece positioned directly over home plate.”

Approximately 10,300 square feet of PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus panels in a Terra Cotta finish were installed as part of the project.

While officially a “renovation,” because the original 1996 field wasn’t altered, the upgraded facility has been largely rebuilt to include a new locker room, lounge training room and press box. According to Walker, the $15 million project is a tribute to the work head coach Tim Walton has done building the team into a national presence since joining the team in 2006. Since 2008, the Gators have made it to the Women’s College World Series eight times and have earned national titles twice.

Walker says metal roof panels were an obvious choice to create a visual link to the classic clay tiles that top many of the university’s older structures. “It was the product with the best look for the project price point and, aesthetically, it fit in well in this area of campus,” he says. “Plus, it has the benefit of being low maintenance and importantly, it does a great job of keeping water out.”

The architect specified 10,300 square feet of PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus from Petersen in a Terra Cotta finish for the project. He says the choice of this particular profile was aided by advice from the company’s technical staff. “It was Petersen that suggested we use the Tite-Loc Plus product with striations, knowing it would be a better product for our project with respect to minimizing oil canning and damage from potential impacts.”

Jacksonville, Florida-based Thorne Metal Systems handled the roof installation, which posed a few challenges, according to the company’s office manager Cody Thorne. “It was a particularly tight site – we could only work around the perimeter because they were working on the field,” he says, adding that the roof’s steep pitch also called for some extra attention. “It was 10:12, so a little more caution and safety were involved.”

TEAM

Architect: Walker Architects, Gainesville, Florida, http://walker-arch.com

Roofing Contractor: Thorne Metal Systems, Middleburg, Florida

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus in a Terra Cotta, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

John Ball Zoo’s Green Legacy Extends to Rooftops

The green roof on the meerkat habitat features native plants including Pennsylvania Sedge, Prairie Dropseed, and Lance-leaved Tickweed. Photos: LiveRoof

Since 1884, John Ball Zoo’s 40-acre stretch of land has continued to flourish in the heart of Grand Rapids, Michigan. At the turn of the 20th century, the zoo population consisted of local favorites such as raccoons and deer. By 1927, Charles Lindbergh deemed the park a popular enough site to address crowds of onlookers after his trans-Atlantic flight. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, the zoo expanded exponentially, adding a number of new exhibits including Monkey Island, an aviary, and an aquarium. In 1983, John Ball Zoo was the first zoo in Michigan to receive accreditation from American Zoo and Aquarium Association. Moving through the 21st century, the zoo continues to thrive with its innovative tiger exhibit, and a growing list of additions such as its most recent meerkat habitat.

John Ball Zoo has been a proponent of sustainability in all facets of its design — from the conservation of animals to creation of green spaces that make up the foundations to many of its exhibits. Living walls and living roofs are already a part of that architectural landscape, thanks to local experts such as LiveRoof, LLC. For more than a decade, John Ball Zoo and LiveRoof have turned many of its habitat roofs into viable and beautiful green spaces.

Living walls and living roofs are a big part of the zoo’s architectural landscape, including this green roof atop the bobcat exhibit.

In keeping with this partnership, a new milestone was recently reached. John Ball Zoo has built a first in the nation meerkat habitat that is SITES-centered. A new green certification that considers all aspects of a building’s sustainability, SITES is a set of comprehensive, voluntary guidelines together with a rating system that assesses the sustainable design, construction, and maintenance of landscapes. Unlike other green certifications, SITES is a voluntary assessment that is used from the earliest drafting phases, to the outlook of upkeep and maintenance for the foreseeable future. The zoo’s goal is to be certified with SITES Gold Certification, which would make John Ball Zoo the first zoo in the country to receive this rating and the first SITES v2.0 project in Michigan.

The meerkat habitat building is topped with the LiveRoof Deep system pre-grown with native plants in locally sourced growing medium. “While John Ball Zoo’s other green roofs are populated with sedum and allium selections, this one is different because it contains native grasses and herbaceous perennials,” says Allmon Forrester, the zoo’s horticultural director. According to Forrester, the existing relationship with LiveRoof was most important in selecting a green roof system because of the work their team has done with the zoo on multiple buildings and habitat enclosures. Forrester’s team worked closely with LiveRoof and J&L Roofing, the contractor that installed the green roof system, to secure the necessary documentation on the sustainability of the system, its growing and production methods, and plants.

The roof system beneath the living roof consisted of two layers of 3-inch polyiso insulation, DensDeck Prime cover board set in foam adhesive, adhered 60-mil EPDM membrane and a 60-mil EPDM slip sheet.

In 2008, John Ball Zoo’s first LiveRoof was installed atop the building in the lion habitat. Since then, additional green roof systems from LiveRoof have been planted atop buildings in habitats for monkeys, chimpanzees, bobcats, bears, and meerkats. Not only have the roofs been sustainable and met requirements for a number of green certifications, but they also have proved an aesthetic asset to the make-up of the zoo.

TEAM

Architect/Builder: Wolverine Building Group, Grand Rapids, Michigan, https://wolvgroup.com/

Roofing Contractor: J&L Roofing, Grand Rapids, Michigan, http://jlroofing.com

Green Roof Designer/Supplier: LiveRoof, LLC, Nunica, Michigan, https://liveroof.com

MATERIALS

Green Roof: LiveRoof Deep System, LiveRoof, https://liveroof.com

Quality Workmanship Ensures Top Performance of Stadium’s Roof

The grandstand and buildings of Liberty University’s softball stadium were topped with 19,000 square feet of metal roofing. Photos: NB Handy

When Liberty University wanted errorless work on the roof of its new softball stadium, the college turned to Roanoke, Virginia-based Mountain Roofing.

Mountain Roofing has served the Southwest Virginia market since 1998, focusing primarily on commercial projects. According to Adam Gheen, the company’s vice president, Mountain Roofing’s skilled crews are experienced in all types of roof systems including EPDM, TPO, standing seam metal, copper, slate, and asphalt shingles. The company also excels in historic restoration applications.

Gheen estimates that 40 percent of the company’s work involves metal roofing. When the roofing portion of Kamphuis Field at Liberty Softball Stadium was put out for big by Branch Builds, the general contractor, Gheen was confident his crews could execute the job. “I bid the project and coordinated it until the day the punch list was done,” he says.

The roof panel specified for the project was Fabral Power Seam 16-inch, 24 gauge Dark Bronze with shadow lines — a product often specified by the school to ensure campus-wide consistency on all metal roofing projects.

Fabral Power Seam 16-inch roof panels in Dark Bronze with shadow lines were specified for the project.

Kamphuis Field at Liberty Softball Stadium was designed to provide fans a great venue to watch softball action. The field is named after Dwayne Kamphuis, a legendary fast-pitch softball pitcher who played with Eddie “The King” Feigner as part of the renowned “King and His Court” traveling softball team.

The stadium includes 1,000 chairback seats, home, visitor and umpires’ locker rooms, as well as a team room, situation room, training room, coaches’ offices, indoor batting tunnels, two full bullpens, and a state-of-the-art press box.

Approximately 19,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed on the grandstand and buildings making up the complex. “We were left with the exposed metal deck,” Gheen recalls. “We installed two layers of insulation, which were mechanically attached, with an air and vapor barrier over top of that — Henry Blueskin RF200. After it was dried in and watertight, then we started installing the metal panels.”

The material distributor on the project was NB Handy. The prefabricated panels were brought in by tractor trailers and lifted to the roof by a crane. The panels are held in place with clips and mechanically seamed. The safety plan called for workers to be tied off at all times.

The project went smoothly, notes Gheen, with one exception. “This one was fairly straightforward. The one thing I remember is mud,” he says. “There was a lot of mud. That was a fairly big issue, not only for installation but safety.”

Workers had to take care to make sure mud did not cause any safety hazards, especially while climbing ladders. At times, crew members were forced to change out their boots before going up to the roof. “We had to keep the ladders as clean as possible, and of course, the roof surface had to be kept clean.”

Mountain Roofing has handled other projects at the university, so it was well prepared for the stadium installation. “The majority of the roofs are the Fabral Power-seam panel,” says Gheen. “They’ve been running that metal for years, and it’s a lifetime product. It’s the industry standard at LU.”

According to Gheen, the workmanship on the project shows what sets Mountain Roofing apart. “We’re known for our quality,” he says. “We really don’t press the ‘quantity’ button. Quality, all the way around — that’s what we base our company on. That shows through all of the products that we run.”

TEAM

General Contractor: Branch Builds, Roanoke, Virginia, https://branchbuilds.com

Roofing Contractor: Mountain Roofing, Roanoke, Virginia, www.mtnroof.com

Distributor: NB Handy, Lynchburg, Virginia, www.nbhandy.com

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: Fabral Power Seam 16 inch, 24 gauge Dark Bronze with shadow lines, Fabral, www.fabral.com

Underlayment: Blueskin RF200, Henry Company, www.henry.com

New Synthetic Cedar Roof Now Tops Arboretum

When the cedar shake roof on the Cox Arboretum had to be replaced, the decision was made to install synthetic cedar shakes manufactured by Brava Roof Tile. Photos: Brava Roof Tile

Anyone from Dayton, Ohio, will tell you that the 174-acre Cox Arboretum is one of the premier places to visit in the city, thanks to the daily free admission and neighboring Gardens MetroPark, which offers more beautiful gardens and green space for visitors to enjoy. For more than 50 years, the Arboretum has wowed residents and tourists alike. With its numerous trees, shrubs, specialty gardens, mature forests, and even prairies, it isn’t difficult to understand why.

Just the building itself can grab a visitor’s attention, with its beautifully curved design and cedar shake roof. These two features have become synonymous with the arboretum and the roof, in particular, is something the board at the arboretum hoped to preserve. Therefore, naturally, when it came time to replace the aging cedar shakes everyone loved so dearly, the board members wanted to do it right. They decided to go to Dayton-based architect Greg L. Lauterbach and contractor E. Lee Construction, a company that has been in business since 1955.

Choosing Synthetic

The board was soon faced with another decision: should they keep the real cedar shakes, which can be costly and difficult to maintain, or should they go a more modern route? While they wanted to preserve the roof’s look, they also wanted to ensure it was durable and long-lasting, and, for that reason, they decided to switch to synthetic shakes.

Sierra Brava Shakes on three different buildings on the Cox Arboretum’s property.
Brava’s standard cavity-back roofing shingles were used in the field of the roof, while “solids” were installed on the large turret.

They chose to go with synthetic cedar roofing for many different reasons. For one, while appearances are naturally important for Cox Arboretum, more important was the roof’s ability to handle the various types of weather conditions seen in Western Ohio. This area sees everything from seasonal rains, hailstorms, and high winds to heavy snow loads and extreme temperature fluctuations. As a result, it was critical to choose a roofing material that wouldn’t easily break or damage under such conditions. A synthetic cedar roof was chosen for its durability. The next step was making sure it captured the look of authentic cedar shake.

Lauterbach wasted no time in collecting samples of synthetic cedar shakes from various manufacturers for review. In the end, he chose to go with Brava Roof Tile for “the aesthetics of the tile and long lifespan.” Unlike some other brands, Brava Shakes truly mimic real cedar, offering lengths of 5 inches, 7 inches, and 12 inches, and varied thickness to recreate that classic split texture of natural wood.

The building is known for its curved design and distinctive turret

These aren’t the only reasons Brava was chosen, however. When it comes to durable roofing products with a long lifespan, Brava Roof Tile is among the industry’s toughest. Their synthetic shingles offer up to a Class A fire rating, a Class 4 impact rating, and can withstand wind speeds over 110 mph. Moreover, an installed Brava roof weighs a mere 350 pounds per roofing square, much less than some competitors and less than real cedar roofing shakes.

Brava Shake comes in a wide range of colors meant to mimic real wood. Lauterbach took his time before deciding on the Sierra Shake, a lighter wood-toned option with some darker highlights. He went with the Sierra Shake because it “best mimics the look of real wood shingles while having the benefits of composite.”

Ensuring an Authentic Look

As an arboretum, a place dedicated to trees and nature, having a natural-looking roof was critical. So, one of the board’s primary concerns was ensuring the most authentic appearance possible. Another major concern was how the Brava shingles would look on the property’s large turret. The decision was made was to purchase “solids” rather than Brava’s standard cavity-back roofing shingles for the turret.

Unlike traditional cedar roofs, a Brava roof is easy to install, with no breakage and no special tools required. While it is easier to install than other roofing options, neither E. Lee Construction nor Lauterbach had previously worked with Brava. The company representatives took a day to train them before they went to work on the Cox Arboretum project, ensuring crews knew what to do each step of the way. With that training, E. Lee Construction headed the project and completed it seamlessly. In the end, they installed the Sierra Brava Shakes on three different buildings on the Cox Arboretum’s property.

Cox Arboretum has a beautiful, realistic synthetic cedar roof thanks to Brava Roof Tile. Visitors continue to admire the exterior, and many are not aware that it isn’t a real cedar roof. Now, the Arboretum no longer has to worry about extensive roof repairs or maintenance, or even about what will happen to the roof in certain types of weather.

After this project, E. Lee Construction has gone on to use Brava Roof Tile on other projects throughout Ohio, proving it is a realistic, durable choice that will stand the test of time.

TEAM

Architect: Greg L. Lauterbach Architect, LLC, Dayton, Ohio, https://gllarchitect.com

Roofing Contractor: E. Lee Construction, Delphos, Ohio, https://eleeconstruction.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Shake: Brava Cedar Shake in Sierra, Brava Roof Tile, www.bravarooftile.com

Innovative Approach Solves Re-Roofing Puzzle at Oceanside Resort

The existing metal roof on the Ritz-Carlton Coconut Grove was removed and replaced with 30,000 square feet of the Sarnafil Decor PVC roof system. Photos: Coatings Application & Waterproofing Co.

Sometimes re-roofing projects are pretty straightforward. Others can present a complex puzzle. Sometimes looking at things in a different light can lead to an unexpected solution that proves more cost-effective and less intrusive for the building and its occupants.

The Ritz-Carlton Coconut Grove in Miami, Florida, serves as an excellent example. The hotel consists of two 26-story towers, and each was topped with a standing-seam metal roof, with steep sections transitioning to sloped roof sections at their base.

When the original standing seam roof reached the end of its service life, the owners solicited bids to replace it with a new standing-seam metal roof. The installation would require large construction cranes to be mounted near the entrance of the property.

Bill Devine, area manager for Coatings Application & Waterproofing Co., was convinced a new metal roof was not the answer. He proposed installing the Sarnafil Décor PVC system as an alternative, asserting it would be more cost-effective, more durable and less invasive to the hotel owners and guests.

Devine’s intimate knowledge of the jobsite helped him craft his plan. “We had an existing relationship at the Ritz,” he explains. “We went in about nine years before that to repair the metal roof that was up there. We patched it after some storms and painted it for them. We’ve helped them out with some other stuff over the years, and the consultants came in to talk to them about taking the metal roof off and putting a new metal roof back on it. That’s when I got involved to try to convince them otherwise.”

There were several key factors influencing Devine’s recommendation, including the harsh, corrosive oceanside environment, which is tough on metal. “I convinced them to use the Sarnafil PVC Decor Rib System, which has the appearance of a standing seam metal roof,” Devine says. “The average person who looks at it doesn’t know it’s not a metal roof, but it’s all PVC. The way I designed it, there is not one piece of exposed metal that can rust anymore.”

With the PVC system, all the roofing materials could be brought up using the service elevators, eliminating the need for a crane. To top it off, it would be less expensive than a new metal roof.

“What got us the job was when I gave him my price for the Sarnafil and told him I wouldn’t have to have a 200-300 foot crane sitting in front of the Ritz Carlton for eight months,” notes Devine. “I took the entire roof off and put the whole new roof on using the service elevator.”

Challenging Installation

Coatings Application & Waterproofing (CAW) installed approximately 30,000 square feet of the PVC system. The steepness of the roof sections posed obvious challenges, and CAW developed special swing stages to remove the existing metal roofing and install the Decor system. “That’s 250 feet in the air with a 23/12 pitch,” notes Devine. “It’s almost a wall.”

Coatings Application & Waterproofing used special swing stages to remove the existing roof and install the PVC system.

A detailed safety plan was paramount. Crew members had to be tied off 100 percent of the time, and all tools were tethered. Anchor points were attached to the building’s heavy-duty steel framing at the top of the towers. “We drilled through that and put anchors through those big beams and ran our safety lines and swing stages through that,” says Devine.

The plan was to take everything up through the roof hatches, including the swing stages, which were engineered to fold up for transport. Debris was taken out the same way.

“We pulled all of the metal off a section at a time and dropped it down through the roof hatch,” explains Devine. “Each side had a roof hatch and we dropped it through there to the floor. We had guys inside who separated the trash from the metal and stacked it. We recycled all of the metal.”

Logistics at the jobsite were very tight. “The property doesn’t really have a parking lot area — it has a parking garage — so we had no place to put dumpsters. We just had a few spots down in the parking lot to stack insulation and rolls, and we took material up the freight elevator whenever we were ready for it.”

Recycled metal and debris were also taken out via the freight elevator. “We brought it down on a Friday, and we had a guy with a truck who would meet us at the loading dock. We’d load all of the trash in his truck and he’d take it to the dump,” Devine says. “There was nothing easy about it.”

Work on the project included installing new drains, tapered insulation and PVC membrane in the internal gutters.

As the metal roof was torn off in sections, roof areas were covered with 1.5-inch isocyanurate insulation with quarter-inch DensDeck bonded to it with adhesive. The pre-assembled 4-foot-by-4-foot boards caused some difficulties. “We had to make modifications to the swing stage so they could stack insulation on it,” notes Devine. “We dropped all of the trash down through the roof hatch, but when we went to pull our insulation up, it wouldn’t fit through the roof hatch. We cut a 5-foot-by-1-foot hole in the roof deck on each side of the building and had the guys hand the insulation up through the slot in the roof deck. They’d stack it on the stage, take it up and start installing it.”

The insulation panels were fastened to the 20-gauge steel decking with 3-inch #15 screws and insulation plates, and a Sarnafil vapor barrier membrane was installed. The slots cut in the deck were repaired using flat-stock steel.

The Patina Green PVC membrane was adhered using Sarnacol 2170 adhesive. Crews on the swing stages worked from top to bottom, adhering about 2 feet at a time. “When they got to the bottom, then they would go back up to the top with welders and weld the laps,” Devine explains.

Applying the Decor ribs with a hot-air welder was the last part of the process. The swing stages had to be modified for this step as well. “We had to be held off far enough that we could run our welder and still keep it in a straight line,” Devine recalls. “It was a fun one.”

Work on the project included the internal gutter systems and mechanical areas. “Each corner has an internal gutter that extends 15 feet down one side and 15 feet down the other. Those were completely shot,” says Devine. “The only thing that saved them was the concrete underneath. Everything above was shot. We had to put tapered insulation and the Sarnafil membrane in those and put new drains in.”

There was no exposed metal on the project, according to Devine. The hips and ridges were made from SarnaClad Patina Green metal, which is wrapped in PVC, and the metal framing was also wrapped with PVC membrane.

Award-Winning Work

Work on the project began in February 2019 and was completed in November 2019, ahead of schedule. The project received the Sarnafil Project of the Year award for 2019. “Winning that award is a pretty good feeling,” says Devine. “We went through a lot, and Sarnafil was there to help us out.”

Detailed planning was crucial to the project’s success. “I had the luxury of plenty of time to think about all of the different things we were going to have to do,” Devine notes. “We had to make some changes out in the field, like cutting a hole in the deck, but most of it went pretty smoothly.”

Devine credits CAW’s experienced team for the success of the project. “I had a good crew,” he says, “Our foreman, Bob Hinojosa, he’s been with me for 30 years, and he is just good.”

According to Devine, this project demonstrates CAW’s ability to execute difficult projects. “We find the best way to do it,” Devine says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Coatings Application & Waterproofing Co., Saint Louis, Missouri, www.cawco.com   

MATERIALS

PVC Roof System: Sarnafil Decor Roof System, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil/

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, https://buildgp.com

Ford Plant Transformed into Museum and Hotel Is Crowned by Rooftop Deck

Built on the site of a Ford assembly plant, the 21c Museum Hotel in Oklahoma City is crowned by a rooftop deck that provides access to the plant’s original water tower. Photo: Mike Schwartz

The 21c Museum Hotel in Oklahoma City encompasses a contemporary art museum, a 135-room boutique hotel, event spaces, and Mary Eddies Kitchen x Lounge. It also features a rooftop deck with stunning views of the city.

The hotel was built at the site of an idle Ford Motor Company assembly plant originally designed by Albert Kahn. The building was refurbished to serve as the hotel and museum in the first phase of an ambitious development project. The Ford plant’s original water tower was retained during the renovation, and it is accessible via a catwalk from the rooftop deck, which also frames a green roof area.

The deck’s 1,500-square foot wood paver system was manufactured by Bison Innovative Products and installed by Elevated Paver Systems (EPS), headquartered in Oklahoma City.

According to Adam Fink, president of EPS, the company was founded in 2011 to serve the pedestal-set rooftop paver market in Oklahoma. The company specializes in difficult hardscape projects including rooftop pavers, pavers at grade, and architectural stone, including cut-to-size marble and granite. EPS was tapped for the deck installation by Lingo Construction, the general contractor on the project.

“It is a really unique venue and it was a unique construction project,” Fink says.

The building is crowned by its rooftop deck, which is comprised of 2-foot-by-2-foot, eight-plank Ipe Wood Tiles set on Bison Versadjust Pedestals. The pedestals were installed atop steel I-beams that were erected above the newly refurbished roof, which features a 60-mil PVC roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. The beams were installed along with the catwalk and an integrated railing system.

“This was a unique project for us because we are usually installing our systems right on top of the roof membrane,” Fink says. “Here we had a newly installed steel substrate that our pedestals rested on.”

Proper placement of the beams was crucial. “The flat part of the beam was pretty narrow, all things considered, so the biggest challenge in the whole scenario was to make sure that the steel was exactly right,” notes Fink.

The steel beams had to be at the correct elevation and proper spacing throughout their length, with a tolerance of plus or minus a quarter inch. According to Fink, the key to success was communication between the design and installation teams. “We worked carefully on the shop drawings and dictated the on center spacing,” Fink recalls. “Little things that usually don’t matter very much were critical here because the tolerances were so tight. The steel subcontractor did an excellent job.”

The pedestals were adhered to the beams using Dow Corning 795 silicone sealant, and the wood tiles were then locked into place. Crews used an automatic laser to make sure the tiles were level, using shims in areas where the steel beams were slightly off.

The green roof was also supported by a steel substructure. Since the roof framed the rectangular garden area, coordination was crucial here as well. The goal was to ensure that the tiles fit optimally. “We coordinated the shop drawings to make sure we didn’t have any small pieces,” notes Fink.

Safety concerns were minimal, as the area was surrounded by a large parapet wall and railings, and material could be brought to the roof by the freight elevator. The biggest concern for EPS crews was the trip hazard posed by the steel beams. “It was kind of like working above a kids’ jungle gym,” says Fink. “But it’s nothing we couldn’t cover in our toolbox talks.”

The deck installation went smoothly, and Fink credits detailed planning for the successful outcome. “Coordination was the key,” he says, noting that precise shop drawings and pre-engineering meetings were the most crucial elements of the project. “Once the steel was in place, we just took out field measurements and went at it from there,” he says. “It was all a downhill slide after that.”

Fink points to in-house drafting capabilities as a key strength of EPS. “We pride ourselves on our pre-construction submittals,” he says. “This job went really well. There weren’t any glitches because we prepared a very good plan and executed it.”

TEAM

Architect: Deborah Berke Partners, New York, www.dberke.com and Hornbeek Blatt Associates, Edmond, Oklahoma, www.hornbeekblatt.com

General Contractor: Lingo Construction Services Inc., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, www.buildwithlingo.com

Roofing Contractor: Coates Roofing Company Inc., Seminole, Oklahoma, www.coatesroofing.com

Roof Deck Installer: Elevated Paver Systems (EPS), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, www.okeps.com

MATERIALS

Pavers: Ipe Wood Tiles, Bison Innovative Products, www.bisonip.com

Pedestal System: Versadjust Pedestals, Bison Innovative Products

Roofing Membrane: 60-mil PVC,Johns Manville, www.JM.com

Innovative Solution Serves Up Perfect Blend of Color and Strength for Restaurant

A barrel-vaulted canopy made up of Pentaglas panels in a rainbow of hues lends a festive flavor to the outdoor dining area at Mexican Radio Restaurant. Photos: Kingspan Light + Air

Located in Oklahoma City’s Plaza District, Mexican Radio specializes in two things: tacos and cold drinks. The newly opened concept restaurant conceived by A Good Egg Dining Group occupies a lively, fun space.

The property’s major restoration includes a covered outdoor dining area. There, a translucent vaulted canopy crowns the space in a swirl of bright colors. Inspired by a colorful fine art glass installation, the owners and architect collaborated to find the right solution.

The canopy adds more than just a bright accent for diners: It creates an additional dining space that protects diners from the elements and makes the space useful nearly year round.

Style and Substance, on Budget

During the renovation, the outdoor dining area was demolished down to the existing steel tube structure. Kingspan Light + Air manufactured a fully engineered, customized and prefabricated vaulted canopy to fit the existing steel structure. Kingspan provided a clear anodized aluminum structure, and six unique glazing colors designed to bring the owner’s vision to life.

“We knew colored glass wouldn’t work on this budget,” says Zack Woods, AIA, with Gardner Architects. “But with the Kingspan product, we could get the bright tones of color the customer wanted, and we could cover more square footage, spanning a full patio instead of a very small area.”

Mindful of the project budget, Kingspan provided a variety of color panels with no high setup costs. Non-standard “off the rack” hues lend a lush, custom-job look. “The tones of colors used give this a unique feel and kept the budget on track,” Zack says.

The canopy provides a durable, inviting and comfortable venue for diners. Because one end of the canopy is open to the street and the other is connected to the building, the space is largely sheltered from the elements. Ceiling and attic fans circulate air and pull heat out in the warm summer months; patio heaters create a cozy space in the winter.

Providing more than just a comfortable environment, the Kingspan Light + Air Pentaglas canopy system is built to last. The system has undergone rigorous 10-year testing to ensure both color stability and impact durability over time. Should the need arise, the unique KLA system allows spot replacement of single panels, so the entire canopy does not have to be replaced.

TEAM

Architect: Gardner Architects, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, https://gardner.studio

Contractor: J&R Windows, Goldsby, Oklahoma, http://www.jandrwindows.com

MATERIALS

Barrel Canopy: 12mm Pentaglas in six colors, glazing, purlins and rafters, Kingspan Light + Air, www.kingspanlightandair.us

Dickies Arena Plaza Deck Extends the Experience

The Dickies Arena plaza deck hosts a variety of outdoor events and protects visitors and livestock in the exhibit space below. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

Commemorative events to celebrate the grand opening of Dickies Arena in fall 2019 ranged from a ribbon cutting party to Monster Truck competitions, and performances by Twenty One Pilots, the Black Keys and the Harlem Globetrotters. The arena is home to the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo and other sporting events.

Not all the action takes place under the domed roof, however. The Dickies Arena plaza deck provides not only breathtaking views of the Fort Worth skyline, but offers a high level of functionality, strength and performance to protect visitors and livestock.

According to Bill Shaw, operations manager at Dickies Arena, the plaza is designed to serve as an extension of the rodeo, enabling visitors to watch the livestock from above. Ten-to-12-foot windows built into the plaza deck provide a view of the 100,000 square foot warm-up area where animals work with their handlers before barrel racing and other rodeo events. A roadhouse tent hosts musicians for plaza deck performances held following the rodeo. And instead of a conventional courtyard, Dickies Arena boasts a “cork yard” wine and food space.

Functionality Fuses With Performance

From lush green spaces that provide a scenic vantage point for taking in the iconic Fort Worth skyline and views of nearby barns and stables to fire lanes for emergency vehicles and concert equipment deliveries, Dickies Arena requires a plaza deck that can deliver outstanding strength. And in Fort Worth’s unpredictable weather, it must also successfully manage storm water runoff. The insulation used in the roof — Owens Corning Foamular extruded polystyrene (XPS) — is key to delivering compressive strength and storm water management performance. But the team specifying insulation for this unique landmark encountered some unusual challenges.

Exhibit areas underneath the plaza deck can be configured to house livestock. During rodeos, a warm-up area for horses is set up underneath the pavilion.

With a plaza deck encircling the main arena of about 140,000 feet, the size, scale and slope of the Dickies Arena plaza deck all presented challenges for the insulation team, beginning with the estimating process. The plaza’s design required a blend of tapered, flat filler, and reverse tapered installation.

Each phase was broken into three layers. The reverse taper layer brings the slope of the roof back to a flat slope. The flat fill section raises the height of the roof without adding the weight that concrete would have contributed to the plaza. A traditionally sloped area above the slab and pavers directs water back to the drainage assemblies located in the top layer of the roof. These layers had to be carefully calculated for many sections around the jobsite that changed in priority as construction surged ahead of schedule.

All the calculations required an experienced team who could coordinate and collaborate in real time. Sunbelt Building Services LLC was the insulation distributor on-site and team members’ experience in the roofing industry proved to be an invaluable asset. As Sunbelt prepared the drawings, Owens Corning calculated the insulation estimates by computer and by hand to ensure accuracy, piece by piece, and then Sunbelt reviewed them again. “You’ll never get the correct material count if you don’t know how the roof is sloping, where the drains are located and how to interpret the structural architectural drawings,” says Darrell Evans, project manager at Sunbelt Services. The result of the estimating process showed the collaboration and teamwork were successful. The estimated insulation for one of the first phases was within two pieces of the material used on the jobsite.

Managing Storm Water

Based on the “sandwich” of the roof design, Dickies Arena required two sets of drains sloping in different directions, according to Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, and vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena.

The plaza deck had to be designed to withstand heavy stresses including emergency vehicles and equipment deliveries. Owens Corning Foamular extruded polystyrene insulation was specified for its compressive strength and storm water management performance.

The structure has one set of drains at the lowest level, where TREMproof 6100, a waterproofing membrane from Tremco, was hot-mopped into place over the concrete slab. On top of the waterproofing layer is the insulation and filter fabric, as well as the sand bed, Hanover pavers, and planters with trees. Slot drains at the top level collect surface water, and the drains at the lower level collect any water that works its way through that system. Extensive modeling was helpful in determining not only the placement of drains but precisely how much insulation should be used — and its depth and location — in various parts of the plaza deck.

Given all the activity taking place on the plaza roof, material weight was a huge consideration when selecting the roofing insulation. Emergency vehicles must be able to navigate the fire lanes that encircle the deck. Semi-truck trailers need to unload concert equipment and staging. From a building material perspective, the plaza deck supports 5 inches of concrete in addition to the weight of the insulation, with reverse tapering depths varying from 3 to 5 inches. In some areas, the plaza deck’s insulation is 12 to 13 inches deep.

While the project was originally specified to require 100-psi insulation, the team evaluated the Dickies Arena design structure and determined its design would allow weight to be distributed in a way that could be effectively managed by a 60-psi insulation. This exercise in value engineering revealed the lighter compressive strength XPS could deliver required strength and offer better economics. The plaza can support weight loads of 25,000 pounds.

Logistics Require a Team Effort

With the estimating complete and materials specified, supply chain management became an area of focus. Owens Corning worked with its manufacturing plants across the nation to coordinate logistics involved with production of XPS product and delivery to the jobsite.

A best practice on any construction project is to ensure products are not left unprotected and exposed to the elements, so communication and jobsite staging were coordinated between Owens Corning, Sunbelt and various contractors on the job. As XPS continues to expand slightly after manufacturing, the insulation was “aged” for 30 days after it came off the line. Owens Corning production plant teams, product managers and sales managers worked with a dedicated purchase order processor and a team of 20 to manage the plaza deck insulation project through to completion.

This detail from architect of record HKS Inc. shows the “sandwich” design of the plaza roof, which required slot drains at the surface and drains in the underlying slab. Image: HKS Inc.

On the jobsite, tapered pieces were sent up the slope and cut into specific rectangular sizes. Easily cut with a knife, structurally sound XPS isn’t prone to breaking into messy pieces and avoids random materials blowing away from the construction site. Given the sunny and windy climate in Fort Worth, the contractor kept exposed materials protected from sunlight and glued loose pieces together with a product that would not harm the insulation. Ordering the right amount of the right products at the right time was essential when considering up to 700 people were working on the project during peak construction periods.

The effect of the plaza deck gracing Dickies Arena can be summarized by modifying a common statement about Texas: “Everything is bigger and better in Texas.”

About the author: Tiffany Coppock, AIA, NCARB, CSI, CDT, LEED AP, ASTM, RCI, EDAC is the Commercial Building Systems Specialist at Owens Corning where she provides leadership in building science, system development, testing, and documentation.  

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Plaza Deck Installer: Sunbelt Building Services LLC, Dallas, Texas, www.sunbeltllc.com

MATERIALS

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com

Talented Team Designs and Installs Multiple Roof Systems for Dickies Arena

Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, hosts the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as concerts and sporting events. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

The new Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, was designed to echo the iconic Will Rogers Memorial Center, a historic landmark built in 1934. The site of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as other concerts and sporting events, Dickies Arena was designed to provide a modern entertainment experience and configurable event spaces that would stand the test of time. The multiple roof systems on the project — including the plaza deck surrounding the arena — were essential in delivering on these goals.

Dickies Arena features a domed main roof with a cupola at the top that pays homage to its historic neighbor. “One of the major themes, especially of the dome roof structure itself, was to have a kind of throwback to the original Will Rogers Center, which is still there,” says Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena. “The Will Rogers Center was one of the first buildings of its type to have a long-span steel truss roof system. We used that existing structure as the inspiration for the roof structure inside the arena. We have these very thin, elegant looking trusses that are very art deco.”

The new structure’s domed roof is surrounded by low-slope roofs and complemented by two towers topped with metal roofs. Dickies Arena also features a pavilion with a standing seam metal roof, which sits on a plaza deck that serves as an outdoor event space as well as a giant roof system covering exhibit space and areas for housing rodeo livestock. The venue is also designed to provide excellent acoustics for concerts and features luxurious millwork and finishes throughout to provide a touch of elegance. “I like to say that it’s a rodeo arena, but it’s designed like an opera house,” Nelson says.

It took an experienced team of design and construction professionals to envision and execute the project, including HKS, the architect of record; David M. Schwartz Architects, the design architect; The Beck Group, the general contractor; Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., the roof system installer; and Sunbelt Building Services LLC, the insulation distributor and installer of the plaza deck.

The Dome

The roof system specified for the dome featured an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil. “The roof system is one that we use pretty regularly on our large sports projects, the Feltback PVC,” notes Nelson. “It’s a lot more durable than other single-ply roof membranes, so we really like it a lot. Dickies Arena is an arena that wasn’t just built for the next 20 years; it’s meant to be there for the next 100 years, so we wanted to make sure we used nothing but the highest-quality materials, especially with all of the hailstorms that we can get out there in Fort Worth.”

The pavilion has a Fabral double-lock standing seam roof system.

The roof system installer, Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, tackled the dome roof first, followed by the low-slope sections and the metal roofs. Work on the dome roof began in July of 2018. “The project progressed pretty quickly,” says Jeff Eubank, vice president of Jeff Eubank Roofing Co. “The dome in and of itself was like two different projects. The top half of the dome is pretty workable and walkable, and the bottom 40 percent of the dome is almost vertical.”

The Sarnafil Decor system was installed over an Epic acoustical deck, which posed some logistical and safety challenges. “We had to engineer special anchors because a typical tie-off anchor could not be used,” Eubank explains. “Before we could set foot on the job, we had to engineer special tie-off anchors which nested into the acoustical deck.”

Eubank and a structural engineer worked with Epic Deck to construct anchor points that would meet requirements for fall arrest. The half-inch aluminum, F-shaped anchors were designed to rest in the flutes of the acoustical deck and featured a ring provide a tie-off point. They were set in place using a crane.

Safety concerns included the Texas weather. “Our biggest challenge came with the heat,” says Eubank. “Summers in North Texas are brutal enough, but at the end of last summer, a high pressure system just stalled over Fort Worth. We were in the middle of a drought, with temperatures up to 110 degrees. You’re up on a deck with nowhere to hide, and with it was pushing 200 degrees up there. From a life safety standpoint, we ended up pushing the dome installation to night work.”

The main roof on the arena’s dome was topped with an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil.

Crews applied approximately 250,000 square feet of material on a near vertical application at night, with lighting provided by six tower cranes. The project required 100 percent tie-off of men and equipment.

The original plan for the dome was to work top to bottom, but as work began, the cupola was incomplete, so the safety and logistical plans had to be radically changed. “We ended up basically making two rings around the dome, doing the near-vertical portion — the bottom 30 or 40 percent — first,” Eubank says. “We moved up and did another 360-degree loop around the top half of the dome once the cupola was done.”

The roof system was installed over the acoustical deck and loose-laid filler. After a 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime substrate board was installed, crews mechanically fastened two layers of Sarnatherm polyiso and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime. They adhered the Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback membrane, which was produced in a custom color called Agreeable Gray.

After the membrane was installed, the PVC ribs were heat welded into place to give it the look of a standing seam roof. “We installed over 16 miles of custom-color Decor ribbing,” notes Eubank.

The Logo on the Roof

The dome roof also prominently features the Dickies Arena logo, which took some advance planning. “We left an area of the ribs out on the east side anticipating the logo up there,” Eubank says. “That’s in another custom color. Sarnafil ran the custom color and templated the letters. The logo is roughly 130 feet by 10 feet, so we received a giant D, a giant I, a giant C, and so forth. Once these things are installed, there is no pulling them up — your only option is to tear the roof off. So, imagine working with a 10-foot letter, 200 feet up in the air, on a slope, and making sure it’s level.”

Eubank Roofing came up with a plan to use a section of 60-mil PVC membrane as a backer sheet. “We laid out this big backer sheet in Agreeable Gray and stenciled all of the letters across it,” Eubank explains. “We took the backer sheet up, got it lasered and leveled, and installed the solid backer sheet on the dome. It already had the stencils on it, so we were able fall back and install the individual letters. We didn’t need to line them up — we just had to fill in the blanks.”

The last steps in the dome installation included installing ribs in a second custom color to go through the letters. Helicopters also brought in three large Dickies signs, which were placed atop concrete pedestals treated with a Sarnafil liquid membrane.

Flat Roofs and Metal Roofs

On the low-slope sections that surround the dome, the Sarnafil G-410 Feltback was installed over structural concrete and fully tapered polyiso. “There is a tremendous amount of masonry work on this project, and it is gorgeous,” Eubank notes. “It was important, though, on the low-slope portions to let the brick work and stone work wrap up before any roofing membranes were installed.”

The design of the arena echoes the iconic Will Rogers Center, which was the inspiration for the thin, elegant steel trusses.

A vapor barrier was installed over the structural concrete deck. After masonry work was completed, crews installed a fully tapered polyiso system in ribbons of OM Board adhesive, then adhered 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime and the 80-mil PVC membrane.

The complex also features two different metal roof systems from Fabral. On the north side of the building, the two towers were capped with a flat-seam panel. Down at the plaza level, the pavilion was topped with a double-lock standing seam roof system featuring Fabral 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam panels.

According to Nelson, an area underneath the pavilion serves as a warm-up arena for horses during the rodeo, so the design was meant to evoke a rustic effect. “The cladding on that building is all quarter-inch steel with rivets on it,” Nelson points out. “Galvalume is finished to look like galvanized sheet steel, but it won’t tarnish or turn white or black like galvanized steel would — which is why they selected it — but it still has that kind of throwback look of a barn.”

Out of the Gate

Dickies Arena is now open to the public and is gearing up to host its first rodeo. The experienced team that built it has moved on to other projects, but they look back on their work on the new landmark venue with pride.

“I’m very proud of the people that I work with and the thought and care that they put into the project and the time that we take,” Eubank says. “A lot of our work is negotiated re-roofing, and I think that’s in large part because we take the time to think through a problem and come up with the best solution. I think that’s really highlighted here. You’ve got to take your time and do it right — and do it efficiently.”

Eubank commends the general contractor, H.C. Beck, for a smoothly operating jobsite. “The job was very well managed from a safety standpoint,” Eubank says. “The general contractor did a fabulous job of manipulating trade work and making sure no one was working overtop of anyone else.”

Nelson agrees, crediting the teamwork at every phase of the project for the successful outcome. “The partnership with David M. Schwartz as the design architect really worked very smoothly from our side,” Nelson says. “We worked very well with a talented team of consultants and who specialize in sports design. It’s a one-of-a-kind type of project.”

“My family has been in Fort Worth for five generations, and this is a project I’m just tickled to death about for the city,” says Eubank. “To be part of its install means a lot.”

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Design Architect: David M. Schwartz Architects, Washington, D.C., www.dmsas.com

General Contractor: The Beck Group, Dallas, Texas, www.beckgroup.com

Roofing Contractor: Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, www.eubankroofing.com

MATERIALS

Dome Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC with Sarnafil Decor ribs, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil

Acoustical Deck: Epic Metals, www.epicmetals.com

Cover Boards: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Low-Slope Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC, Sika Sarnafil

Cover Board: 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific

Metal Roof

Standing Seam Panel: 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam, Fabral, www.fabral.com

Underlayment: Fabral HT, Fabral

Plaza Deck

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com