Butterfly Roof and Metal Wall Panels Highlight New Multipurpose Facility

Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility sports a butterfly roof over the main event space and two lower roof sections that cover offices, conference rooms and the kitchen. Each end of the building is open, with overhanging roofs, allowing for mountain views. Photo: Denise Retallack

The centerpiece of Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility in in Sevierville, Tennessee is a large event space that can be used by the district or rented to the public. The building also houses large conference rooms, a training room, a fitness area, administrative offices and a catering kitchen.

The design features large clerestory windows that flood the interior with natural light and a front canopy supported by steel columns. The facility’s exterior is dominated by its striking, V-shaped standing seam metal roof and metal wall panels, which are accented by brick and fiber cement siding.

“The roof was a major design element on this project from the beginning,” says A.J. Heidel, project manager for BarberMcMurry Architects in Knoxville, Tennessee. “We used the blue butterfly roof to accent the main assembly space and we used the lower roof as a wrapping element for the support spaces.”

To execute the design, it took a talented group of construction professionals including two Knoxville-based companies: Denark Construction, the general contractor on the project, and Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal Inc., the roof and wall system installer.

Crews from Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal installed approximately 13,500 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue on the roof. Photo: Denise Retallack

BarberMcMurry, Denark Construction, and Baird and Wilson had teamed up on other projects for the Sevier County Utility District (SCUD) in the past, so they were a perfect fit for this new construction project. The roof system chosen for the building is comprised of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue.

“We chose a standing seam metal roof because its material properties allow for a range of colors and ribbing patterns, and because of its ability to act as a wall cladding as well as roof,” notes Heidel. “We were able to give different characteristics to separate volumes by changing from blue smooth flat lock panels to Musket Gray ribbed panels while maintaining a similar method of installation.”

The design team originally explored using insulated metal panels for the roof and walls. “We were asked by Denark Construction to price this project,” says Jim Galbraith, vice president of Baird and Wilson. “I priced the insulated roof and wall panels and Denark came back asking if there were potential savings through value engineering. We submitted pricing for single-skin roof and wall panels and it was accepted.”

To make sure everyone was on the same page, pre-construction meetings involving the architect, general contractor and roof system installer included a mock-up of the panel system. “We had a mock wall with all of the roofing and wall conditions, and we met with them on site to go over all of the details,” explains Heidel.

The Installation

Baird and Wilson installed approximately 13,500 square feet of Tite-Loc roof panels on the roof, as well as 3,500 square feet of 16-inch Snap-Clad standing seam wall panels. “We also fabricated and installed gutter, downspouts, horizontal flush wall panels, low and high soffit, and fascia,” notes Galbraith.

After the metal deck topped with a nail base, insulation, and ice and water shield, the roof panels were installed and mechanically seamed. “The slope was less than 3:12, so the Tite-Loc panel was a perfect fit,” Galbraith says.

The exterior of the is features a mix of materials, including seamed metal wall panels, flush wall panels, fiber cement siding and brick accents. Photo: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

Work began on the butterfly roof. The valley features an internal gutter, which drains through downspouts that penetrate through the soffit and go down the front of the building, where they drain through underground pipes. “At the entrance we installed some horizontal blue flush panels that matched the roof,” notes Galbraith. “We also installed the fascia and soffit in Berkshire Blue, which matched the roofs on other buildings on the campus, which were also that color.”

The roof-to-wall transition was designed to make it appear the roof was wrapping around the building. “The roof panels were 16 inches on center, and the wall panels were 16 inches on center,” Galbraith explains. “The seams on the wall panels and the roof panels had to line up perfectly all the way down, so that was a bit tricky. You had to pay attention and do the math as you were going down to make it all work.”

Challenging Site

The limited area surrounding the building proved to be a major challenge on the project. “The building itself takes up much of the buildable area, leaving little room for things like parking and site drainage,” says Heidel. “We were able to avoid a water detention pond by using rain gardens on the site.”

The rain gardens are located against the main road, with parking spaces designed to shed water to that area, which includes native plants that thrive in a wet habitat. The pipes from the building’s downspouts flow there as well.

Tennessee’s spring weather was also a concern. “Construction took place in early spring, and the wind was whipping,” says Galbraith. “It was also rainy, and there was a corner where water would sit, so we had to be careful moving our lifts so they didn’t get stuck in the mud. The most difficult problem was manhandling the long roof panels. Many were more than 50 feet long.”

Photo: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

Despite the challenges, the project went smoothly. “BarberMcMurry prioritizes long-term client relationships, and this project is a great example of that,” Heidel says. “We have a history of successful projects with SCUD, and we continued that pattern through this project, which was delivered on time and on budget.”

“We work with our clients on designs that fit their brand, reflect their use, and are fully functional as well as beautiful,” Heidel continues. “That outlook is reflected in this project, too, through the overall design of the spaces and our creative use of materials. Finally, BMA is committed to sustainability and stewardship through design. In this project with SCUD, you can see sustainable design elements in the rain gardens, which filter and control the release of storm water as it leaves the site, and in the building’s clerestory windows and shaded curtain wall, which take advantage of daylighting.”

The project also showcases the quality workmanship of Baird and Wilson. Galbraith cited a quote from Charles R. Swindoll that serves as a company motto: “The difference between something good and something great is attention to detail.”

TEAM

Architect: BarberMcMurry Architects, Knoxville, Tennessee, www.bma1915.com

General Contractor: Denark Construction, Knoxville, Tennessee, www.denark.com

Roofing Contractor: Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee, www.bairdandwilson.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gaugeTite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue, Petersen, www.PAC-CLAD.com

Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gaugeSnap-Clad panels in Musket Gray

New Synthetic Slate Roof Tops Historic Owatonna City Hall

The city offices in Owatonna, Minnesota, are housed in a historic building that underwent a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

The massive brick complex in Owatonna, Minnesota, that currently serves as its city hall has an interesting past. According to Aaron Fitzloff, facility manager for the City of Owatonna, the structure was originally built in 1886 as the Minnesota Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children. The facility closed in 1945 and later became the Owatonna State School. “The state closed it in 1970, and the city of Owatonna took it over in 1974,” notes Fitzloff. “In 1975, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.”

The complex now houses administrative offices for the city and the Minnesota State Public School Orphanage Museum. Asphalt shingles had been installed on the roof at some point in the 1990s, but leaks developed over the years, and the city budgeted for a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. “The intent was to get the building back to its original state,” says Fitzloff.

Specifying a New Roof

The city consulted with Adsit Architecture and Planning, a full service architectural and interior design firm located in Minneapolis. When the firm completed a condition assessment for another historic building in Owatonna— the Firemen’s Hall —that project led to a request from Fitzloff to look at the city’s administration building.

Crews from Schwickert’s Tecta America installed more than 29,000 square feet of DaVinci synthetic slate. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

“Aaron realized that all of the roof systems were in need of replacement at this point,” says Gunstad. “He wanted to make sure, first and foremost, that we mitigated any moisture problems that were occurring up in the attic space. The project was about insulation as well as roofing.”

Finding the right roof system was crucial. Evidence suggested that the original roof was comprised of slate, but that couldn’t be confirmed due to a fire that had destroyed the main building in 1904. “Even before we did our research, we knew from our first look at the building that an asphalt roof on a building of this mass and scale did not look right,” Gunstad says.

Adsit Architecture specified a synthetic slate roof system manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes. “Right off the bat we felt that given the scale of the building that slate would have been prohibitively expensive for them, and they agreed,” Gunstad recalls. “We knew with the cost, ease of installation, the warranty, the weight — all of that — the synthetic slate would be a really good fit, and DaVinci had an enormous amount of color choices for the blends we needed.”

DaVinci’s Color Visualizer Tool was used to help determine the colors. A European blend of gray shades and purple was installed. As the project got under way, the hunch that the original roof was slate was confirmed. “When we got into reconstruction and were up digging around in the attic, we did find some old slate pieces,” Gunstad recalls. “Oddly enough, they were a perfect match for the colors we had chosen.”

Installing the Roof Systems

The installer on the project was Schwickert’s Tecta America, headquartered in Mankato, Minnesota. “We ended up being the only bidder on it, which of course you don’t know at the time,” notes Scott Haefner, Schwickert’s steep slope project manager.

The scope of work on the project included 60-mil Carlisle EPDM, new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim. Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

According to Haefner, the difficulty of the project is what made it appealing for the company, which thrives on projects others turn away from. “Those are the ones we look for — the ones that have some complexity to it,” says Haefner. “That’s where we can shine. We have our own metal shop, we can do all our own metal fabrication, and we can do the types of things that can really set us apart. It gives us an advantage because we don’t have to farm some of that work out, and we have complete control over the whole process.”

The scope of work included installing more than 29,000 square feet of the DaVinci synthetic slate. The roof also included low-slope areas, and for these a 60-mil EPDM from Carlisle was installed. Sheet metal work included new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim.

The safety plan was crucial, as the building would be open during the construction process. “You start with the safety plan,” says Haefner. “With staff and members of the public walking in and out, it is critically important in your pre-construction meetings to address those issues with overhead protection in certain areas, and blocking off certain areas when you’re working above them for the day.”

The safety plan incorporated scaffolding and personal fall arrest systems, as well as overhead protection for pedestrians. Photo: Schwickert’s Tecta America

Coordination with the city staff was critical. “Aaron Fitzloff helped us tremendously in that area,” says Haefner. “We had a standing meeting every Tuesday morning at 9, and that was always a big part of the conversation — safety and the sequence of what we were going to do that day. Aaron and I would also see each other every day also, typically. He was a great attribute to the whole project, for sure.”

Safety equipment included scaffolding and PFAS. “The vast majority of the building was scaffolded,” Haener says. “Fall arrest was anchored to the roof in areas we didn’t have scaffolding, and even where we did, the roof pitch was steep enough that everyone was always tied off with anchors and fall arrest systems.”

Work began in the late fall and progressed in sections. “That’s part of the beauty and charm of the building — its different additions and roof sections,” notes Haefner. “That also allowed us to focus on one area at a time. That’s typically what you do — you start and do a section that’s kind of an easy one to just get your feet underneath you and get a feel for how it’s going to go. There were some big, long planes of roof that we were able to get a start on and get a feel for the whole sequence.”

Schwickert’s steep-slope division handled the composite slate roof installation, while its flat roof division tackled the EPDM roofs.

Tying in flat and steep-slope roof systems was critical. Steep slope-crews completed most of their work first, using a Grace Ice & Water Shield product that is compatible with EPDM. “Let’s say you know the EPDM is going to go let’s say two feet up the slope of the roof, from flat to transition up the steep slope,” Haefner explains. “We’d leave off the bottom two or four courses of shingles, and leave the ice and water shield exposed, but not adhered.”

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Low-slope crew members would just flip up the ice and water shield and install the EPDM. Steep-slope crews would then install the metal flashing, adhere the ice and water shield, and add the final courses of shingles.

A snow retention system from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards was installed in several sections of the roof.

Re-roofing the large turret was made easier by DaVinci’s turret package, which supplies pre-cut tiles. “You give them some basic information, including the circumference and the pitch,” Haefner says.

It worked well on the project, with one minor hitch that was quickly remedied. “This one was a little different because it has a sort of witch’s hat appearance to it, where the pitch changes at the bottom,” Haefner says. “It’s not a typical cone shape. When I sent in the request for the package, I didn’t take that into account, and we needed to order some more shingles to finish the turret.”

The large finial on the turret was taken down, painted and replaced.

A heat mesh system was installed in certain areas that had been subject to ice dams in the past. The Warmquest Zmesh system consists of woven copper mesh, which was installed below the tile, sandwiched between layers of ice and water shield. “That was a tricky part of the installation,” says Haefner. “We had to run big transformers, electrical panels, and run conduit to these areas from the old attic.”

The Minnesota weather brought things to a halt in the mid-winter, and work concluded this spring.

Mission Accomplished

Haefner points to this project as proof of his company’s ability to complete projects with multiple scopes of work. “With steep slope, flat roof, sheet metal work, new gutters, insulation, and the electrical portion involved with installing the heat mesh system — it shows perfectly how we can install multiple complex systems that have to go together in a certain way,” he says. “That type of complexity is where we shine.”

The city and its residents have been pleased with the result, according to Fitzloff. “Feedback has been nothing but positive,” he says. “We cleaned all of the limestone around the whole building as well, and it looks fabulous.”

Gunstad notes that the project fulfilled its design goals: making the building sound and restoring it to its former glory. “Performance and maintenance of the project were our primary concerns, but design-wise, looking at this building, which is rather grand, we knew it lacked something — and that something was a substantial roof,” says Gunstad. “We wanted to give that visual prominence back to that building, which is a hallmark of the city.”

TEAM

Architect: Adsit Architecture and Planning, Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.adsitap.com

Roofing Contractor: Schwickert’s Tecta America, Mankato, Minnesota, www.schwickerts.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Slate: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Carlisle 60-mil EPDM

Leak Barrier: Grace Ice & Water Shield

Underlayment: Titanium UDL

Snow Retention: Rocky Mountain Snow Guards

Community Center Sparkles With New Metal Roof

The community center was re-roofed using a structural sub-framing system from Roof Hugger that allowed the existing metal roofing to remain in place while the new roof system was installed above it. Photos: Roof Hugger, LLC

Just down the road from Pigeon Forge, Gallatin, Dollywood and other popular attractions in the Smokie Mountains is the thriving community of Sevierville, Tennessee. This beautiful mountain town has a community center and a civic center that hosts multiple events throughout the year. The community center is housed in a 1985 vintage metal building manufactured by American Buildings. Due to its age, the building recently underwent a complete re-roofing with metal in a process commonly known as a metal-over-metal retrofit. The building was originally constructed using American’s trapezoidal standing seam profile, so the decision was made to utilize a structural sub-framing system furnished by Roof Hugger, LLC. This type of retrofit allows the existing metal roofing to remain in place. The structural sub-framing is installed over the existing roof and then a new metal roof system is installed, which becomes the finished weathering surface.

The local community leaders were not new to this type of re-roofing for aged metal roofs because of their experience with a 2017 project at Lanier Elementary School in nearby Maryville. This project was designed by Chuck Howard of Metal Roof Consultants (MRC) from Cary, North Carolina, the same company selected for the community center re-roof. MRC has years of experience with retrofit roofing of existing metal roofs, as well flat roofs that receive an engineered light-gauge steel framing system to create a sloped roof plane. On the community center project, MRC consulted with Doyle E. Jones of Sevierville, the architect and roof consultant on the Lanier Elementary project.

Morristown Roofing was awarded the community center project through a public bid process in early 2019. Founded in 1962 by the late Paul Horner, Morristown Roofing now has a footprint of quality roofs in six states throughout the Southeast. With an overall staff of about 55 employees, the company installs all types of roofing from single-ply membranes to metal. The company’s motto: “No project is too large, nor too small for Morristown Roofing.”

According to Ashley Horner of Morristown Roofing, this project was only the company’s second Roof Hugger installation. The job went smoothly, even with the building’s roof geometry having had sloped rakes, varying slopes, multiple valleys and other difficult transitions. Horner went on to say the Roof Hugger product has the ability to increase snow loading and has little to no impact on the occupants of the building. It also helps control the contractor’s liability by eliminating the need to remove the existing metal roof. In addition, with existing trapezoidal metal roofs that are notorious for varying center-to-center major rib spacing, the Roof Hugger sub-purlin design compensates for this issue. Factory oversize notching of the Z-shaped sub-purlin’s vertical web permits easy installation directly over the existing roof panel high ribs, allowing for base flange attachment into the existing purlins. The result is a structurally correct, low-profile, finished retrofit framing assembly ready to receive the new metal roof panels.

The project finished out with 54,000 square feet of 24-gauge  System 2500 metal roofing by MRS Metal Roofing Systems, Inc. Approximately 12,720 linear feet of Roof Hugger’s standard Model “D” sub-purlin with a 4.5-inch web height was installed. The new roof included a ColorGard snow retention system manufactured by S-5!

TEAM

Consultant: Metal Roof Consultants (MRC), Cary, North Carolina, www.metalroofconsultants.net

Roofing Contractor: Morristown Roofing, Whitesburg, Tennessee, www.morristownroofing.net

MATERIALS

Structural Sub-Framing: Roof Hugger, LLC, www.roofhugger.com

Metal Roof: System 2500, MRS Metal Roofing Systems Inc.,  www.metalroofingsystems.biz

Snow Retention: ColorGard, S-5!, www.S-5.com

Re-Roof of Busy Post Office Facility Becomes Award-Winning Project

Crews from Roofing Solutions replaced the 300,000-square-foot roof on the United States Post Office General Mail Facility in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Photos: Sam Barnes

The United States Post Office General Mail Facility in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, manages mail for the entire Greater Baton Rouge area. When the roof on the 300,000-square-foot building was nearing the end of its useful life, it was clear the roof replacement project would pose some big challenges. It was a given that the new roof system must prove durable and reliable to protect the mail delivery system that businesses and individuals rely on every day. It was also critical that the re-roofing work would not interfere with mail processing at the facility, which operates around the clock.

Architect Crump Wilson and Wharry Engineering specified an asphalt roofing system for the project — a two-ply modified bitumen system manufactured by SOPREMA. All parties agreed that asphalt was the best roofing solution for the facility due to its longevity, durability, and long-term dependability.

Roofing Solutions, LLC, headquartered in Prairieville, Louisiana, was invited to bid on the project. “We were the successful low bidder,” says Tupac de la Cruz, the company’s founder and operations manager. “When we started working on the planning and phasing, we realized the job was going to be an undertaking because, number one, it was a big-size job, and number two, the facility works 24-7.”

Completing the project without interrupting operations would be the biggest challenge on the project. Crews could not interfere with traffic flow and mail deliveries, and would have to protect people and sensitive machinery inside.

“Before beginning the re-roof project, we were given a full tour of the facility,” de la Cruz says. “It was an eye-opening experience to see the equipment, systems, and personnel that manage the mail delivery process from start to finish. You had to coordinate with the facility manager, the transportation manager, and multiple stakeholders to make sure that you did not interrupt all of the conveyor lines sorting all of the mail coming in and out of that facility every day.”

Working in Sections

The deck was exposed to the interior, increasing the risk of dust falling onto the equipment, so Roofing Solutions crews installed a 6-mm protective film using a Spyder lift. “We installed special sheathing underneath the deck to protect the conveyor systems and all of the equipment,” noted de la Cruz. “We also had to protect the workers and make sure that there was no noise, no dust, or any disruptions from anything to do with the roof replacement.”

Sunbelt Vacuum Service was contracted to remove the rooftop gravel. Then the old built-up plies were then cut up and removed by hand. “We had a metal deck, and we couldn’t put any heavy equipment on it,” de la Cruz recalls.

Work proceeded in sections to ensure everything remained watertight. “You had to cover everything you’d demo the same day,” de la Cruz says. “In the summertime in Louisiana, it can rain almost every afternoon.”

The new roof system included two layers of mechanically attached polyiso insulation, which was topped with SOPRABOARD, an asphaltic cover board, which was adhered with COLPLY adhesive. The two ply system was comprised of a base play and a cap sheet Designers chose SOPREMA’s Solar Granule cap sheet membrane, which provides the benefit of high reflectivity. Torches were not allowed on the project, so the membrane was set in cold adhesive. “Because we could not use any torches, all of the laps for modified bitumen cap had to be sheet welded with a robot like you were doing single-ply,” notes de la Cruz.

The roof system specified for the project was a two-ply modified bitumen system topped with SOPREMA’s Solar Granule cap sheet membrane.

Most of the roof area was clear sailing, but access at the jobsite was limited due to the busy transportation routes. “It was a nice, wide roof,” says del la Cruz. “The hardest part was getting the material from one end of the roof to the other, because we only had access at one point. No motorized vehicles were allowed up there, but we were able to use carts to move material from one end to the other.”

The roof features four large raised sections framed with clerestory windows, and the multiple levels sometimes made moving material difficult. “In some cases, you had to bring the material across one level, bring it up to another level and back down again,” says de la Cruz.

The existing skylights were replaced with new single-slope skylights manufactured by KalWall.

Safety and Security

The safety plan utilized mix of guardrails, perimeter flagging, and safety monitors, depending on the configuration of each section. “We also had to have a flagging man on the bottom to make sure we were not interfering with the 18-wheelers coming in and out with their packages,” de la Cruz says. “The project extended over Thanksgiving and Christmas, and you couldn’t imagine the amount of trucking that goes through that facility during Christmas.”

Making sure everyone was on the same page was crucial. Weekly planning meetings were supplemented with daily huddles. “We met with the facility manager every morning to make sure we let him know where we’d be and what we were going to do that day,” de la Cruz explains, “Every afternoon, we’d let him know what the plan for the next day was so they could plan ahead. It was a very proactive approach.”

The crew, which included 20 men during the peak of the project, usually accomplished 3,000 to 3,500 square feet of demo and roof replacement per day. The project was completed in seven months — three months ahead of schedule.

The project was recognized by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association as the Silver Award winner in the 2020 ARMA Excellence In Asphalt Roofing Awards program, which recognizes industry professionals for their high-performing steep-slope and low-slope asphalt roofing projects across North America.

“We had such pride in completing that project because it was so large and we had zero injuries, no issues, and the client was very happy. We decided to submit it, and we got the award,” says de la Cruz.

“We finished the project about three months ahead of schedule, and we were able to complete the job with no interruptions to the facility. We knew if we could do that, in the end it would be a successful project.”

For more information about submitting a project for the Excellence in Asphalt Roofing Awards, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

TEAM

Architect: Crump Wilson, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, www.crumpwilsonarchitects.com

Roof Consultant: Wharry Engineering, Garland, Texas, www.wharry.com

Roofing Contractor: Roofing Solutions LLC, Prairieville, Louisiana, www.roofingsolutionsla.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: SG Solar Granule Cap Sheet, SOPREMA, www.soprema.us

Cover Board: SOPRABOARD, SOPREMA

Skylights: Kalwall, www.kalwall.com

Metal Retrofit Project Protects Air Force Base

On this 7,800-square-foot building at Hurlburt Field, a new metal roof was installed over the existing roof using Roof Hugger sub-purlins. Photos: Roof Hugger

Over the past 15 years, Royster Contracting, LLC of Fort Walton Beach, Florida, has completed several metal-over-metal retrofit projects. Skip Royster, the company’s owner, started his general contracting firm in 1977, and it has a strong reputation for quality construction, with a focus on metal buildings, metal roofing and walls, and retrofit roof systems.

Royster’s newest retrofit roofing project was for the U.S. Air Force on a 7,800-square-foot building located at Hurlburt Field in Okaloosa County, Florida. This Air Force base is very familiar with retrofit roofing projects, with some stretching back more than 25 years. The existing building needed a new metal roof, but in lieu of removing the existing roof and replacing it, the Base Facility Construction department elected a metal-over-metal retrofit. In this case, a new metal roof was installed over new structural sub-framing from Roof Hugger that attaches directly to the existing roof’s support system, without removing the existing metal roof.

Officials at the base knew that it was possible to engineer the new retrofit system to meet current wind uplift design criteria for the area. In this case, the system was designed to meet a Category V hurricane with wind speeds of 157 mph. With the recent catastrophic Hurricane Michael damage at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base and elsewhere on the Florida Panhandle, this project just 82 miles away suffered no damage, even with Michael’s documented peak wind speed of 155 mph.

Roof Hugger provided 2,700 linear feet of the standard Model C sub-purlins, manufactured to fit over 12-inch on center PBR rib panel roofs. Central States Manufacturing of Lowell, Arkansas, furnished their 24-inch-wide Central Seam Plus trapezoidal standing seam roof in 24-gauge Brite white. The general contractor for the project was CCI Mechanical, LLC of Shalimar, Florida.

In addition to hardening the building with the increase in wind uplift resistance, the Base chose to include 3 inches of fiberglass insulation between the existing roof and bottom of the new metal roof. Hardening of building roofs is very common on metal-over-metal retrofit roofs in the coastal states. Many older buildings that were engineered for a 90 to 100 mph windspeeds must be upgraded to minimum code requirements that are currently at 120 mph inland and 130 mph for coastal areas; some parts of Florida and Texas have requirements of 155 mph or greater. U.S. Government facilities typically specify criteria that exceed locally adopted codes.

TEAM

General Contractor: CCI Mechanical, LLC, Shalimar, Florida, www.cci-alliance.com

Roofing Contractor: Royster Contracting, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, Florida, www.roysterconst.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Central Seam Plus Trapezoidal Standing Seam Roof, Central States Manufacturing, www.centralstatesmfg.com

Sub-Purlins: Roof Hugger, www.roofhugger.com

Composite Slate Roof Tops New Train Station

The 2,800-square-foot Wyandanch Station is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci composite slate roofing. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

These days, when trains stop at the Wyandanch Station in Wyandanch, New York, they’re traveling through a completely renovated, eye-stopping facility. Atop that train station can be found a new composite slate roof.

The state-of-the-art location is the most recent new train station constructed by the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR). The 2,800-square-foot structure is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing in a Castle Gray color.

As part of the Double Track Project, the LIRR built two new 12-car-long platforms that include a snow melt system, a pedestrian overpass with elevators, new stairs, new canopies and new platform shelters. The interior of the station features Terrazzo tile floors, a wood-paneled ceiling and chandeliers. Some 4,200 people use the train station each day.

The new Wyandanch Station is part of a revitalization effort called Wyandanch Rising. A highlight was the construction of the new train station and adding a second Long Island Rail Road track running through the Wyandanch area. The LIRR partnered with the Town of Babylon and Suffolk County in the site location and design of the new Wyandanch Station.

As construction progressed on the train station, Ashlar Contracting was brought in to work on the project and install the roof. “The roof is a key architectural element on the design of this station,” says Christopher Monahan, owner of Ashlar Contracting in Bohemia, New York. “The DaVinci composite slate was very easy to install and makes a large visual impact on this structure. The product looks like real slate and complements the entire look of this train station.”

Opened in September of 2018, the Wyandanch Train Station is receiving positive reviews from daily users and the general public. “We get compliments all the time on the train station,” says Peter Casserly, project manager with Bay Village Consultants Inc. out of Amityville, New York, developer of the site. “The entire facility has been well received by the immediate community and all those who utilize it. The roof plays a vital visual role in the train station. I’m pleased to say we’ve had no issues with it and look forward to it providing both shelter and beauty for the structure for decades into the future.”

TEAM

Roof System Installer: Ashlar Contracting, Bohemia, New York, www.ashlarcontracting.com

MATERIALS

Roof System: DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Putting a Lid on Gainesville’s New Airport Fire Station

The fire station’s standing seam metal roof was constructed with 22-gauge MegaLoc panels from Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing. Photos: Scherer Construction

When Gainesville Regional Airport leaders decided to retire the airport’s aging fire station, they knew the replacement facility had to be safe, secure and attractive from above.

After all, most of the passengers who flew to Gainesville in north-central Florida would only see the fire station’s roof from the sky, as their planes took off and touched down. What Gainesville Fire Rescue Station 6 needed was a roof that was tough as nails but also matched the city’s image as a healthcare and education hub.

The choice was clear: A standing-seam metal roofing system that was engineered to withstand hurricane-force winds and designed to look beautiful.

Clayton Crosier, owner of Crosier & Son Roofing in Gainesville, said during the four-week job the crew transformed what could have been a dull municipal building into a shining star at the two-runway airport.

“The roof turned out great,” Crosier says. “It’s one tough roof. It’s not blowing off, I can tell you that.”

Not only does the new fire station roof meet stringent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidelines, it protects against anything Mother Nature can throw at it.

Making Way for a New Fire Station

The move to the new fire station, officially called an aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) facility, began in late 2016. With two major airlines — American and Delta — flying out of Gainesville Regional and steady growth in passenger loads, a new ARFF facility had to be ready for new challenges.

When the original 5,600-square-foot ARFF station was constructed in 1979, 180,550 passengers boarded aircraft at Gainesville Regional. By 2018 (the most recent data available), the number of passengers had increased to 236,019. 

The new 9,589-square-foot facility allows for wider firetrucks and also adds training space.

At the same time, the building needed significant renovations, including a new roof and repairs to the crew quarters, electrical systems and plumbing. Storage space was also tight, in large part because firefighting equipment had been getting bigger over the years. The new structure allows for wider fire trucks and also adds training space.

After studying the possibility of a renovation, the airport authority decided to build anew in a different location on airport property. The chosen site is near the control tower and has a direct view and access to the runways, which is critical to emergency operations. The construction, funded by a $3.8 million FAA grant, was completed in fall 2017.

In planning for the new 9,589-square-foot facility, Crosier knew the roof was required to meet local, state and federal specifications. Per FAA rules, the new building needed to be constructed with fire-resistant materials and have systems in place to control noise. In addition, the building had to be low maintenance and designed with energy conservation in mind, among other factors. Finally, local and state building codes specified that the structure be built to withstand hurricane-force winds.

Fire Station 6 Cleared for Take Off

To meet the standards, Crosier knew the roof had to be heavy duty. He chose Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing’s mechanically seamed roof system MegaLoc in the color Nevada Silver, which complemented the building’s white concrete-block construction. The roof’s specifications called for 2-inch standing seams and 22-gauge steel, which was coated with a premium metallic paint.

To start the 114-square project, the Crosier & Son crew installed plywood sheeting over the existing steel joist system. On top, 5-inch rigid insulation with an R-value of 35 and Grace Ice & Water Shield HT high-temperature waterproof underlayment were installed. From there, the crew took meticulous care to custom fit the materials on site to prevent panel laps.

The roof was mechanically seamed at 180 degrees. Running the metal roof seamer was a two-person job, with one person at the ridge and the other at the eaves overhang to ensure accuracy. Several weeks after the roof was completed, Crosier & Son returned to install the metal soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts.

A Job Well Done

Since the construction was completed, the roof has successfully weathered severe weather, including Hurricane Michael in 2018. Looking back on the project, Crosier said he never doubted that the standing seam roof was a perfect fit for the ARFF building.

“With the size and scope of this project,” he said, “I am incredibly happy with the result of the hard work we all put in.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Crosier & Son Roofing, Gainesville, Florida, www.crosierroofing.com

Construction Contractor: Scherer Construction, Gainesville, Florida, www.schererconstruction.com

MATERIALS

Standing Seam Metal Roof: MegaLoc, Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing, www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Underlayment: Grace Ice & Water Shield HT, GCP Applied Technologies, www.gcpat.com

New System Avoids Tear-Off, Eliminates Leaks, Meets Strict Florida Codes

The Solid Waste Authority facility’s existing roof was re-covered with a symmetrical standing seam roof system from McElroy Metal. Photos: McElroy Metal

Advanced Roofing Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, runs its operation by the belief that what the customer wants, the customer gets.

The Solid Waste Authority (SWA) in West Palm Beach, Florida, had a building with an aging and leaking R-panel metal roofing system. “It was leaking everywhere,” says Mike Scardina, the Sheet Metal Department Manager at Advanced Roofing. “The original roof looked to be over 20 years old.”

Advanced Roofing is a commercial roofing company with nine locations, specializing in re-roofing, repairs and maintenance services for occupied buildings in Florida and the Caribbean. When it comes to commercial re-roofing to meet strict building standards and wind codes, Advanced Roofing has seen it all.

The roof panels were manufactured from .040-inch aluminum in Ash Gray. The panels are 16 inches wide, with pencil ribs.

This particular SWA building was used as a dumping site for foliage collected from the community. Eventually, the leaves are moved to a compost site or a recycling facility. Roof leaks were threatening electrical components and creating many problems in a small workshop within the building. The SWA wanted a permanent solution to fix the leaks and wanted a long-lasting solution for an area where hurricane-force winds are a constant threat.

The 238T symmetrical roof system was chosen because of its extremely high uplift capacity over the open framing and ease of repair if it would ever become damaged by a future storm. This system also eliminates the need for additional edge and corner framing typically required when re-roofing an open frame metal building like this, with existing 5-foot-on-center purlin spacing. Instead of a complete tear-off of the original R-panel roof, Advanced Roofing left the roof in place and installed Roof Hugger sub-purlins every 5 feet on-center —approximately 7,600 linear feet. Leaving the existing roof in place maintained the structural diaphragm that the R-panel provides to the building. The roof re-cover was completed with the 238T symmetrical standing seam roofing system from McElroy Metal in .040 aluminum. The assembly is approved for Florida’s High Velocity Hurricane Zone.

“SWA wanted their roof system engineered to the highest standard possible and in line with their goals of durability in the most extreme conditions, and that’s what we gave them,” Scardina says. “This system will last a long time and hold up under tough conditions.”

After the roll former was lifted into place by a crane, the panels were run at the eave.

McElroy’s 238T symmetrical standing seam systems do not have male and female seams; instead they are comprised of panels with matching left and right seams. The panels are joined with a mechanically seamed cap. The panels are non-directional and can be installed left to right, right to left or even from the center out. In addition to the installation benefits, symmetrical panels offer easy individual panel removal and replacement. Individual panels can also be re-installed, requiring only the purchase and installation of a new cap.

Before working on the roof, Advanced Roofing had to replace several rusting 20-foot purlins with new purlins. The roof panels for this project were .040-inch aluminum, painted Ash Gray, They were 16 inches wide with pencil ribs to reduce the appearance of oil canning. Seventy percent of the panels were 87 feet long and the remaining 30 percent were 100 feet long. All of the panels were run at the eave as Advanced Roofing used its in-house crane division to lift their 238T roll former into place.

To obtain HVHZ and Florida building code approval, the 238T roofing panels were installed with 100 percent 24-gauge continuous clips, meaning the clips run the entire length of each panel. The C-shaped clips are pre-installed back-to-back and run down each side of the panel and attached to the top of the Roof Huggers using two or three fasteners per side. Because of the extreme corner pressures and the 5-foot purlin spacing, a small 22-gauge plate was added on top of the clip base over the Roof Hugger in the edge and corner zones. After three holes were drilled through the plate, clip and Roof Hugger, an AB #14 screw was used to fasten the plate and clip to the Roof Hugger in the edge and corner zones.

Roof Hugger sub-purlins were installed every 5 feet on-center.

“It’s a special fastener that has a point and gets real fat where it meets the hex head,” says Tom Mahon, Sheet Metal Field Superintendent for Advanced Roofing. “It meets the uplift requirements for the area.”

Scardina and Mahon say to meet High-Velocity Hurricane Zone approval, the installation is more labor intensive, mainly because of the time needed to pre-drill plates, but the level of added durability makes it worth the work. The symmetrical panel legs are capped and the caps are secured by a seamer.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Advanced Roofing Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, www.advancedroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: 238T Symmetrical Standing Seam Roofing System, McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com

Sub-Purlins: Roof Hugger, www.roofhugger.com

Roof Restoration, Cooperative Purchasing Alliance Offer Savings for Taxpayers

Building I, shown here, had its existing a TPO roof restored using PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone coating. Photos: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company

After leaks appeared in their middle and elementary school buildings, the St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District in St. Joseph, Illinois, decided it was time to re-evaluate their roofs. Since it is a public agency, the school district began looking into the request for proposal (RFP) process, which can be costly and time-consuming. Thankfully, before they spent too much time or money, they were approached by Anthony Roofing and the Progressive Materials (PM) team.

Anthony Roofing, a Tecta America Company, inspected the roofs and determined they were in prime condition for a roof restoration, as opposed to two full roof replacements. Between this cost-saving measure and the use of the National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance (NCPA) contract, the Anthony Roofing/PM team was able to save the school district a substantial sum of money. The NCPA is a publicly bid contract that allows awarded vendors/contractors to streamline the RFP process for publicly funded work because it has already performed the competitive bid process.

Building II had an EPDM roof system, which was cleaned with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner prior to application of the coating to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing.

Anthony Roofing is one of Tecta America’s 70-plus locations and is certified to utilize NCPA contracts. Contractors are strongly examined and scrutinized by the lead public agency to become an award-winning contract holder. Contractors must prove a demonstrated track record of quality workmanship, customer satisfaction, and competitive pricing to be an NCPA vendor. Because of this relationship, St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District knew they were getting a top-quality contractor while saving substantial taxpayer money in the process.

Anthony Roofing was able to completely waterproof both buildings’ roofs in just four weeks using just one six-person crew. If the school district had elected to replace the roofs, the teams would have been double in size, taken double the time, and the school would have been vulnerable to even more water damage during the replacement process.

Restoring the Roofs

Building I had a single-ply substrate, which was ideal for the silicone coating process. Anthony Roofing completely restored the roof in three steps. First, crew members power-washed the existing TPO roof. They then patched seams, worn areas, and flashings. Finally, they applied PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone restoration system.

Building II’s roof had an EPDM substrate, so Anthony Roofing took additional measures to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing. They cleaned the EPDM with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner to prepare for power-washing process. They then power-washed the EPDM roof and patched seams, worn areas, and flashings before applying the coating.

In just four weeks, Anthony Roofing coated roughly 117,000 square feet of roof area for the school district. Both buildings qualified for a 20-year warranty. After calculating the cost savings, it was determined that a roof replacement for these buildings would have cost roughly $18 per square foot. The expert application of the silicone coating reduced the project cost to $3.55 per square foot, saving the school district an estimated $1.6 million. Combine that with the money and time saved by utilizing the NCPA cooperative purchasing contract to streamline the process, and you get two waterproof roofs, one happy school district, and thousands of satisfied taxpayers.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company, Aurora, Illinois, www.tectaamerica.com

MATERIALS

Roof Coating System: PM 3201 high-solids silicone coating, Progressive Materials, www.pmsilicone.com

Marina’s New Roof Is Its Signature Design Element

When the former Morrow’s Marina first hit the Ridley Township, Pennsylvania, real estate market, it seemed like this last piece of the town’s open space might soon become a townhome development. But the township’s board of commissioners had a different idea for the tumble-down, 14-acre property, sited on Darby Creek, less than a mile from the entrance to the Delaware River. In addition to a new public recreation amenity, some on the board also saw a possible income opportunity too good for the township to pass up.

“I think, with good management, there could be a lot of revenue in the future,” says Bob Willert, who was then the board’s president, of the financial benefits the marina could offer.

Over the years, the town has made improvements to the marina, boosting its popularity with boaters. And, with the recent opening of a new $6 million restaurant, along with marina offices, right on the waterfront, that income potential is becoming a reality. Owned by the township and leased to a local restaurateur, the new Stinger’s Waterfront has quickly become a popular destination. It’s also easy to find, even without a GPS, thanks to a standout metal roof finished in an impossible-to-miss Copper Penny hue.

Choosing the Roof System

While the color is certainly eye-catching, it was the classic PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad profile that first caught the attention of Clarice Jones, project architect with Catania Engineering Associates, the restaurant’s Milmont Park, Pennsylvania-based design firm. She knew the standing seams on the 10,500 square feet of Snap-Clad roof panels — complemented by a matching 1,500 square feet of vented PAC-750 Soffit Panels — would emphasize the crisp lines of the building’s contemporary façade.

Crews from E.P. Donnelly installed 10,500 square feet of PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels in Copper Penny and 1,500 square feet of matching vented soffit panels. Photos: © hortonphotoinc.com

“The seaming is punched out — I saw a particular style,” she says. “I liked the way the seam looked in profile; it was a nice tight look.”

E.P. Donnelly Inc., of Warrington, Pennsylvania, installed the roof, and it was a complicated project. The sloped design is interrupted on both sides with three triangular window dormers, requiring complex detailing. And a multi-gabled cupola required similar attention, though at a smaller scale. Donnelly’s project manager, Gerry Campi, suggested Petersen’s PAC-CLAD product to the general contractor — J.S. McManus Inc. of Chester Heights, Pennsylvania — as a better fit for this demanding project.

“I told the GC that Petersen was a much better product, and the GC made the switch,” Campi says. “We use the Snap-Clad profile regularly. It snaps together the best. It’s a really nice product.”

For Jones, metal was the only roofing option that would work; any other option would have looked too residential. But, interestingly, the bright metallic finish wasn’t her first choice. Initially, her plans had called for a more neutral gray, but the town’s business manager opted for the definitely-not-neutral Copper Penny shade. “They wanted something bolder,” Jones says. “It’s like a flame; I’m glad they chose it. It sparkles like a diamond.”

Building a Landmark

The roof design features a multi-gabled cupola as well as triangular window dormers.

After winning the project, J.S. McManus Inc. needed to complete the building construction on a tight schedule. Michael McManus, vice president of J.S. McManus, coordinated the work of subcontractors and worked closely with the architect, owner, restaurant owner, and the other prime contractors. “I had my superintendent, Tim O’Connell, who was on site to handle the day-to-day operations,” McManus notes. “We kept our focus on getting the steel superstructure completed as soon as possible so that we could get the roof installed. As with all projects, once the roof is installed, then you can really expedite the project since you don’t have to worry about being impacted by the weather. It took a lot of hard work from my team, and we all stayed focused and worked diligently to complete the project on time.”

As soon as they could, crews from E.P. Donnelly tackled the challenging installation. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time to ensure safety. The architectural features called for extra care during detailing to ensure smooth lines, and crews worked carefully to make sure that all areas were fully sealed and waterproofed.

Snow Retention System

Despite Ridley Marina being located in snow country, no snow retention had been specified for the project. “We actually brought this up to the owner and architect that no snow guards were specified for the metal roof, which would create a serious safety concern,”says Campi.E.P. Donnelly recommended installing the S-5! ColorGard system, citing it as the only system the company installs.

A ColorGard engineered snow guard system was added at the recommendation of the roofing contractor on the project.

Sourcing the snow guard system was an easy decision because Campi had worked with a specific distributor since 2013. Brock and Associates Metal Resources, based in Pittsburgh, fulfilled the necessary bill of materials. Brock is a manufacturer and distributor of exterior metal cladding systems for commercial and industrial applications.

The project called for thirty 8-foot sections of unpunched ColorGard rail. To attach the rail, 290 S-5-S Clamps were employed. Then, 290 Sno-Clips II and 290 VersaClips were installed to complete the engineered snow guard system atop the marina’s new copper penny roof. Of course, ensuring aesthetics remained an important design goal, and matching the roof color was crucial. The product allows color-matched strips of the roof metal to be inserted into the ColorGard sections, providing the necessary holding strength while still maintaining a streamlined appearance.

Since its completion, the Ridley Township Marina project has become a stunning showpiece for the area, and all involved with the project point to the roof as its most stunning architectural feature. Campi notes that the roof has become a billboard, of sorts, for the marina, visible from a nearby interstate highway. “When you’re coming down I-95 through Philly, that Copper Penny roof really stands out,” he says.

TEAM

Architect: Catania Engineering Associates, Milmont Park, Pennsylvania, www.cataniaengineering.com

General Contractor: J.S. McManus Inc., Chester Heights, Pennsylvania, www.jsmcmanus.com

Roofing Contractor: E.P. Donnelly Inc., Warrington, Pennsylvania

Distributor: Brock and Associates Metal Resources, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, www.brock-assoc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Soffit Panels: PAC-CLAD PAC-750 Soffit Panels, Petersen

Snow Retention System: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com