Roof System Protects Health Care Facility in Northern Saskatchewan

The roof system specified for the William Charles Health Centre was a two-ply modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by IKO. Photos: IKO

When the $11.5 million William Charles Health Centre was built north of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, durability and longevity were key considerations in the design and construction. The facility provides a variety of health care programs to meet the needs of the Montreal Lake Cree Nation.

The roof and walls were designed to last, even in tough weather conditions. The roof system specified was a two-ply modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by IKO. IKO’s Aquabarrier AVB was selected as an exterior peel-and-stick air and vapor barrier to support the facility’s exterior insulated wall system.

Oakwood Roofing& Sheet Metal Co., headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba, installed both the roof and wall systems. Founded in 1977, Oakwood Roofing is a full-service roofing and sheet metal contractor handling all types of commercial and residential projects including new construction, roof replacement, service and maintenance. The company also has a Building Division.

“We do all types of roofing and repairs,” notes Brett Laing, an estimator and project manager with Oakwood Roofing. “We do infrared scans, roof reports and assessments, budget pricing for new and re-roof projects, as well as metal cladding and composite panels. We also provide custom roof maintenance programs for companies, property owners and property managers.”

The company was invited to bid on the William Charles Health Centre installation by NDL, the construction manager on the project, and emerged as the low bidder. The roof on the new construction project was approximately 18,500 square feet. On either side of a slight peak, the metal deck slopes to the exterior, where gutters were installed for drainage. The slope on one side of the roof was 13.9 percent, and on the other it was 21.8 percent.

“The roofing wasn’t too difficult,” says Laing. “It’s a conventional two-ply mod bit system, but some of the components are not used that frequently. We use Z-girts to hold the insulation in place in high-wind applications.”

The first step was mechanically fastening 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime to the steel decking. Then a vapor barrier was torch-applied to the cover board. Two 4-inch layers of IKOTherm insulation were installed using Z-girts. Oakwood Roofing fabricated the Z-girts in the company’s sheet metal shop and installed them spaced 24 inches on center. The two layers of insulation and Z-girts were installed perpendicular to each other.

The insulation layers were topped with a layer of half-inch DensDeck Prime. “We used torch tape on all the laps, and ultimately torched the TP 180 FF base sheet from IKO over the top, and then torched the cap sheet to that.”

Oakwood Roofing also installed the wall systems. “We also installed the vapor barrier and longboard siding on this project,” says Laing. “It was a pretty good project for us.”

The remote location posed some difficulties, as crews stayed near the site. Weather is always a concern, and it can be even more problematic when crews are working remotely, but there were no delays on the project. The weather was mild and coordination of trades at the jobsite was excellent, according to Laing.

“NDL was the construction manager on the project, and they are very well organized with their scheduling,” he notes. “It was nice to work with such a professional team, and there were no issues. Everything went smoothly.”

The roof system was specified for its durability and ability to withstand severe weather conditions. “IKO put their name behind it and warranted the roofing system for 15 years,” Laing says. “They came out and made sure it was installed by us to their requirements. The project qualified for a no dollar limit warranty for 15 years, so that says it all right there about how durable the system is.”

Safety First

The fall protection plan incorporated warning lines at the perimeter and personal fall arrest equipment. “Everyone was tied off at all times on the roof,” Laing says.

For torch-down applications, the company’s policy it to institute a two-hour fire watch every time a torch is turned off. “We basically go around and test areas with a thermal gun,” Laing says. “Obviously, if temperatures are dropping, then we are headed in the right direction. We want to ensure that no hot spots are getting hotter, there is no fire risk, and that everyone is safe.”

Oakwood Roofing bears a Certificate of Recognition (COR), a nationally trademarked and endorsed program instituted by participating members of the Canadian Federation of Construction Safety Associations (CFCSA). “We are COR certified at Oakwood Roofing, so we hold our degree of standing to the highest for everyone involved — the workers, the owners of the building, the other trades,” Laing says. “Safety is at the very top of our list when we get into a project.”

For Oakwood Roofing’s experienced crews, this project was just another day at the office — even if the jobsite was 11 hours from home. “We’ve done a lot of work in the Prairie Provinces, in Ontario and into the Northwest Territories,” says Laing. “We are a special company. We wouldn’t have survived for 44 years if we weren’t. We’ve developed special skills and methods to overcome any obstacles that come our way, including extreme weather.”

TEAM

Architect: Patrick R. Stewart Architect, Chilliwack, British Columbia

General Contractor: NDL Construction Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba, www.ndlconstruction.com

Roofing Contractor: Oakwood Roofing& Sheet Metal Co., Winnipeg, Manitoba, www.oakwoodroofing.com

MATERIALS

Cap Sheet: Torchflex TP-250-CAP Heat Welded Cap Sheet, IKO, www.iko.com 

Base Sheet: Torchflex TP-180-FF-Base Heath Welded Base Sheet, IKO

Insulation: IKOTherm Commercial Roof Insulation, IKO

Wall Vapor Barrier: IKO AquaBarrier AVB Vapour Barrier, IKO

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Carefully Engineered Metal Roof System Now Protects Cancer Center

Garland’s R-Mer Loc standing seam metal roof system provides the health center with proven watertight performance. The panels lock into one another, allowing for quick and easy installation. Photos: The Garland Company, Inc.

The original standing seam metal roof over the Cancer Center at CHI St. Joseph Health in Bryan, Texas, was peppered with white repair material at the seams, in the valleys, at transitions and around penetrations. At flashings or other complex details, sealants and single-ply membranes had been used to stop water intrusion. But the repairs, which appeared to have been done numerous times over the years, didn’t work. The roof continued to leak into the cancer treatment center, making it all the more critical to find a permanent solution.

Physicians Realty Trust, a real estate investment trust company, purchased the facility in 2016, and part of the purchase agreement required the real estate company to fix various issues within two years. The roof was given the highest priority. The building was constructed in 1996 and it had been added onto at one point, with the original roof tied into the new roof — creating additional waterproofing challenges. At the time of purchase, the original standing seam roof was only 20 years old, well under its expected service life.

A building envelope expert conducted a thorough inspection of the roof and deemed it beyond repair due to its faulty design and poor installation that had led to years of water intrusion. The roof was removed down to the wooden deck, revealing even more issues of rotted wood and wet insulation. Problem areas were cut out and replaced to provide a solid foundation for the new roof.

The design of the new roof system was carefully and meticulously engineered to ensure complete watertight protection of the more than 25,000-square-foot facility. The roof system as installed by TeamCraft Roofing, located in Garner, North Carolina. With the roof’s numerous slopes, hips, and valleys, it was critical that even the smallest details be given the utmost attention. As an indication of the complexity of this building, there were 292 different Garland R-Mer Loc metal panel sizes manufactured for the roof — each one designed to fit seamlessly next to the other to create a watertight seal.

In addition to its strength and proven performance, R-Mer Loc panels, as the name suggests, lock into one another, allowing for quick and easy installation. The integral standing seam design of R-Mer Loc provides excellent spanning capability as well as architectural appeal. The heavy-duty, 18-gauge one-piece concealed clip design accommodates thermal movement and its internal gutter/anti-siphon feature helps protect against the elements.

Prior to the installation of the metal panels, an ice and water shield underlayment was applied to the deck to provide an additional layer of watertight protection. The panels, once sorted and organized, were lifted to the roof by a crane. The facility remained operational throughout the installation, which took about three months to complete.

Garland is a full-service manufacturer, meaning in addition to the materials provided for the project, its local representative assisted with budgets, writing specifications, contractor selection, scheduling and project oversight. These services proved beneficial to Physicians Realty Trust, as its project manager was based in Colorado and relied heavily on Garland to manage the project.

“Projects like these are extremely complex when they involve a practicing clinic with typical weekday office hours,” says Ryan Yetzer, LEED GA and Capital Projects Manager with Physicians Realty Trust. “Thankfully, the Garland team and our highly-skilled onsite contractor closely monitored the project from start to finish. As a result, the installation ran very smoothly and our healthcare providers are pleased with the results.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: TeamCraft Roofing, Garner, North Carolina, https://tcrfg.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: R-Mer Loc, The Garland Company, Inc., www.garlandco.com

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab Features a Striking Standing Seam Metal Roof

The roof of Shirley Ryan AbilityLab incorporates striking V-shaped sections of standing seam metal panels and a tapered EPDM system. Photos: AJBROWNIMAGING.COM

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab provides rehabilitation services to help patients recovering from severe conditions including traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, strokes, and cancer. The organization’s new 25,000-square-foot outpatient facility in Burr Ridge, Illinois, features a unique, uplifting roof design incorporating angled, V-shaped sections of standing seam metal roofing.

The low points in the center of each section and other low-slope areas are covered with an EPDM roof system. At the building’s perimeter, the roof and walls frame clerestory windows that allow natural light to flood the interior.

It took a talented team of construction professionals to execute the design conceived by architects in HDR Inc.’s Chicago branch. Willie Hedrick, Division Manager of All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, notes that he and his team worked closely with the architect and the general contractor, Krusinski Construction of Oak Brook, Illinois, at each phase of the roof installation process.

“Initially the architect had specified a very nice but very expensive Terne-coated stainless steel panel,” notes Hedrick. “The project had budget issues, so we offered the Petersen prefinished steel panel as a value engineering option. The mechanically seamed Tite-Loc panel could handle the low-slope application and also came in a variety of colors. We also offered a 20-year watertight and finish warranty. For approval, we built a mockup for the architect and owner to review and also provided several references for completed projects around the Chicagoland area that they could visit to see finished examples of the proposed panel and color.”

Three different sections of the facility sport the Petersen’s V-shaped PAC-CLAD metal roof, with the wedges on each side sloping down to a valley in the center. Within the valley, the Carlisle SynTec EPDM roof system was installed over tapered insulation to ensure water would flow properly to the roof drains.

“The EPDM was an appropriate selection on the balance of the roof,” Hedrick says. “The workability of EPDM with tight, intricate details worked well throughout the project but especially within the gutter troughs between metal panel wedges.”

After the building’s metal deck was topped with half-inch DensDeck Prime and a self-adhered vapor barrier, crews from All American Exterior Solutions installed tapered polyisocyanurate insulation and 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime cover board. They then fully adhered 8,600 square feet of 60-mil EPDM.

All American then installed 21,500 square feet of 24-gauge steel PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc standing seam panels. The metal panels were installed over Carlisle WIP 300 HT underlayment, which topped 5/8-inch fire-rated plywood and 7 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation. Finishing touches included 3,800 square feet of Petersen .032 aluminum PAC 750 soffit panels and PAC 2000 prefinished Kynar column covers.

Installation Challenges

The weather was a concern, as the roof installation began in November and typical Midwest winter weather was looming. “The metal roof would be a time-consuming installation, so initially we focused on getting the building watertight for the GC by installing the EPDM roof and the metal roof underlayment, including insulation and plywood,” Hedrick explains. “The WIP 300HT allows for a 180-day exposure time to UV, so it gave us ample time to install the metal roof while ensuring watertightness in the space being finished below.”

Communication between all of the trades involved on the project helped ensure everything went smoothly. “There were trade coordination meetings with both the carpenter and the plumber,” Hedrick explains. “With the carpenter, we had to coordinate blocking heights to accommodate the tapered insulation. Also, due to the limited height to work within the gutter troughs and because the deck came down to a true V in the valley, we did an in-place mockup with the plumber to see how low the drain bowl could physically be set. Based on that elevation, we ordered custom EPS tapered edge panels to offset the V shape and provide a flat base to begin our tapered insulation system.”

Other details needed to be refined, including roof-to-wall transitions. “We worked with the GC and other trades to modify the detail for superior performance,” notes Hedrick.

Safety was always top of mind on the project. “Fall protection was the biggest safety concern,” Hedrick says. “We set up warning lines 6 feet from the edge creating a controlled access zone. Any work outside of the warning lines required workers to have 100 percent fall protection. All of the fascia and rake trim pieces were installed from an aerial lift.”

The installation was a complicated one, but All-American Exterior Solutions was up to the challenge. “We take pride in our ability to offer a range of products with a quality installation,” Hedrick says. “Our experience with multiple systems and manufacturers gives us the knowledge to be able to advise the design team on an appropriate product based on performance expectations balanced with budget.”

“Personally, I enjoyed the complexity and challenge that came with this project,” Hedrick concludes. “By no means is it a typical application; it required some critical and ‘outside the box’ thinking. I also enjoyed the collaborative nature a project like this requires. It was really a team approach between All American Exterior Solutions, the architects, the general contractor, and the other trades. The final product really shows that.”

TEAM

Architect: HDR Inc., Chicago, Illinois, www.hdrinc.com

General Contractor: Krusinski Construction Company, Oak Brook, Illinois, www.krusinski.com

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

EPDM Roof: 60-mil EPDM, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Underlayment: CCW WIP 300, Carlisle WIP Products, www.carlislewipproducts.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Creating a Homelike Environment at Flatrock Manor

Flatrock Manor’s main roof features a mechanically fastened TPO system from Mule-Hide Products Co. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co.

Flatrock Manor owner and chief executive officer Nicholas Burnett saw tremendous potential in the shuttered building. It was the right size. It was designed for providing health care, serving first as a hospital and later as a hospice. It was situated on 10 acres of scenic property complete with a nature trail, a gazebo and a pond that is home to swans, geese, ducks and painted turtles. Its exterior included beautiful Mid-century modern details.

Burnett had long been seeking an opportunity in Goodrich, Michigan, to open a new location for Flatrock Manor, a group of foster care centers in Mid-Michigan for adults with special developmental and behavioral needs. The empty building would fit the bill. But first, it would need some TLC and a more homelike atmosphere.

Tri-County Roofing of Flushing, Michigan, and Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects of Flint, Michigan, helped make that happen. A new TPO roofing system was installed to fix long-standing leaks and provide durable, low-maintenance performance. The additions of a mansard roof and gabled accents gave the building’s exterior a more residential aesthetic while retaining its distinctive architectural details.

The new facility opened in December 2019 and is now home to 30 residents.

Preserving the Look

The building is a fixture in Goodrich, a 1,900-resident suburb of Flint. Built in the early 1960s, the facility was originally a 53-bed, full-service hospital. In 1997 it became a hospice. That facility closed in 2013 and the building remained vacant until Flatrock Manor purchased it.

The exterior of the original 18,000-square-foot building embraced the Mid-century modern style popular in the era. Subsequent additions that brought the facility to 23,000 square feet followed suit for a cohesive look.

The building, shown here before renovation work began, was originally a full-service hospital. It was purchased by Flatrock Manor to serve as a foster care center for adults with special developmental and behavioral needs.

The existing roofing system was quintessential Mid-century modern. The built-up roof was surrounded by a slim, 1-foot-high parapet wall with an aluminum cap. A gabled front canopy shielded patients and visitors from the elements while arriving at or leaving the hospital.

While the exterior’s design perfectly suited a hospital, it was too institutional for a facility that would be its residents’ long-term home.

Happily, the task of adapting the building for its new purpose fell to Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, the same firm that designed the original hospital nearly 60 years earlier. The team embraced the challenge of striking the right balance between preserving architecturally significant features and meeting regulatory guidelines governing the design of long-term care communities.

“Initially we tried to glorify the Mid-century style of the building,” says Michael Murphy, project manager with Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects. “We completed several elevation studies to incorporate some modern ways of dealing with the parapet. Ultimately, we had to go back to the drawing board to achieve a more residential look.”

The gabled roof above the canopy at the main entrance was the starting point from which other design elements took their cue. A mansard roof was incorporated around the building. To balance the main entrance, a gabled canopy was added at a second entryway on the building’s front. Twenty accent gables were spaced out along the building’s entire exterior and gables were added above rear and side entrances.

“We played with the value of scale when incorporating the mansard roof with the horizontal façade of the building,” Murphy says. “We made it more substantial, so it doesn’t look like a short little mansard roof that has been pushed onto the building.”

Owens Corning TrueDefinition Duration Designer shingles in Merlot were chosen for the mansard roof and gables, bringing added warmth to the façade. They were complemented by fascia and soffits from Quality Aluminum Products in Cranberry. Cultured stone in a sandy shade was added on the gable walls and around the windows to accent the original terra cotta-toned brick walls.

A Roof to Perform for the Long Haul

The building’s existing roofing system — ballasted EPDM on top of a built-up roof with fiberglass insulation — was leaking and the EPDM membrane was “in horrible shape,” according to Tim McKnight, president of Tri-County Roofing. “We found nothing but saturated insulation,” he adds. “The only reason that more water hadn’t gotten into the building’s interior was because the asphalt on the BUR roofing system kept it out.”

Both the EPDM and BUR systems would need to be torn off.

During the re-roofing process, a mansard roof was added to give the building a more residential appearance.

The steel 22-gauge B deck remained in good condition and original plans called for it to be retained, but requirements for the new HVAC system and ductwork meant that it, too, needed to be removed and replaced. Mother Nature chose to not make the process easy. Facing a month of frequent rain, the Tri-County Roofing crew worked as quickly as possible and did their best to keep the building’s interior dry; for example, tearing off the existing roof bit by bit around the edges to make space for the carpenters to frame in the new mansard roof before beginning work on the rest of the roof.

In selecting the new roofing system, longevity and hassle-free performance were the top considerations.

“The client wanted something that would last 20 years with no issues,” McKnight says, noting that such performance would require withstanding the broad spectrum of Mid-Michigan’s weather, which ranges from warm, sunny summers to cold, snowy winters.

The client’s original preference was to install a new EPDM system, but McKnight recommended a mechanically fastened TPO system for its durability, easy maintenance and cost effectiveness. A system featuring a white, 60-mil membrane from Mule-Hide Products Co. was specified.

Ensuring Positive Drainage

A new 22-gauge steel B deck was installed. It was dead level to accommodate the building’s plumbing system, which made getting the insulation right essential. Tapered expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulation is designed specifically for such applications, making it the ideal choice for this project.

The building’s existing drainage system — in which water flows from the roof to storm drains in the basement — did not change in the renovations. The Tapered Solutions team at ABC Supply Co. worked from drawings to design a take-off that would provide positive drainage. Even the best drawings are not 100 percent reflective of the reality on the roof, however, so the Tri-County Roofing installation crew inevitably encountered instances where the insulation was slightly off-center from the sump or the real-life walls were not quite where they were shown on the plans. In those cases, the crew fabricated pieces of EPS or polyiso insulation on the jobsite to achieve the proper drainage.

Completing the Installation

The TPO membrane was mechanically attached for a fast, cost-effective installation. “We were able to achieve the 20-year warranty the client wanted without the added labor and materials costs of a fully adhered system,” McKnight explains.

New roof hatches also were installed, providing safer, easier access to the roof — both during the reroofing project and for ongoing maintenance of the roof and rooftop equipment.

For the teams at both Tri-County Roofing and Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, the most rewarding part of the project was learning about the residents who will live at Flatrock Manor and helping provide them with a comfortable home.

“It was cool to learn about what Flatrock Manor does for people with special needs and see how they’re helping families and meeting needs that you forget are out there,” McKnight says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Tri-County Roofing, Flushing, Michigan, www.tricountyroofingofmidmichigan.com

Architect: Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, Flint, Michigan, www.architectsinmichigan.com

Roofing Insulation Take-Off: Tapered Solutions (ABC Supply Co.), www.abcsupply.com/services/tapered-solutions

Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: 60-mil white TPO, Mule-Hide Products Co., www.mulehide.com

Shingles: TrueDefinition Duration Designer shingles, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com/roofing

Soffits and Fascia: Quality Aluminum Products, www.qualityaluminum.com

A Talented Team Meets the Needs of New Children’s Hospital

Key priorities for the roof on the new Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital included durability, resilience and low maintenance. Photos: Roofing Solutions LLC

Roofing is a rewarding job; it is worthwhile to know someone or something is safer thanks to your work and craftsmanship. Every day across North America, roofing systems are helping keep people, possessions and businesses safe. In 2017, a mission to help heal the children of Louisiana began at the groundbreaking ceremony for Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital.

When the hospital opens in the fall of 2019, it will join a statewide network providing families greater access to physicians trained to care for children in more than 25 specialties. The new hospital will also join the Children’s Miracle Network, a nonprofit group that relies on donations, community support and fundraising partners. Comprised of 170 hospitals in the United States and Canada, the group treats more than 22,000 children a day, and 1 in 10 children in North America are treated by the network each year.

To help protect such an important building, a high-quality roofing system was mandatory. So, the local professionals from Roofing Solutions LLC were enlisted to identify a roofing system that matched the building owner’s requirements: durability, resilience and low maintenance.

Designing the Roofing System

“We were invited to participate in the designing process, and it quickly became more than just a project,” says Tupac de la Cruz, the founder and operations manager of Roofing Solutions LLC. “Due to the nature of the building, we needed roofing materials that possessed exceptional strength and a low-maintenance factor to avoid possibly loud disturbances from upkeep.”

The roof system incorporates designs that reflect the diverse ecosystem of the Louisiana bayou. The theme is carried over to the internal design elements, with each floor evoking the area’s woodlands, marshes and coasts. Photos: Roofing Solutions LLC

The system also needed to support extensive foot traffic and aesthetic customizations, according to de la Cruz. Portions of the roof were colored and decorated to reflect the diverse ecosystem of the Louisiana bayou, helping make the view more comforting. This matched internal design elements too, where each floor is designed to spotlight vibrant ecosystems from throughout Louisiana — including woodlands, marshes and coasts — along with animals indigenous to each region.

“The lower section’s roof is visible from many of the rooms above. By decorating it, we hoped to create a fun surface that would provide the children a greater sense of ease and calm,” notes de la Cruz. “From a professional standpoint, ‘resilient’ became a distinct qualification in the material selection process.”

After conversing with the building owner and HKS Architects, Roofing Solutions LLC decided to install 924,000 square feet of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified bitumen for its proven performance, durability, lifecycle value, resilience and low maintenance.

“When we compared the options, modified bitumen was the best choice for the type of application and the performance the owner was looking for,” says Lauren Reynolds, the business development manager for Roofing Solutions LLC. “Modified bitumen has stood the test of time and proven its capabilities — especially in terms of strength and function — so the decision was made to install an asphalt roofing system.”

Installing the Membranes

The roof system was manufactured by SOPREMA. SOPRA-ISO+ polyisocyanurate foam insulation and a 1/4-inch SOPRABOARD cover board were mechanically fastened to the prepared structural steel deck. The insulation’s closed cell structure is bonded to inorganic, coated glass mat facers on the top and underside. The semi-rigid cover board is composed of a mineral-fortified, asphaltic core formed between two fiberglass reinforcing piles designed to enhance the strength and impact resistance of the system and help protect the insulation below.

Roofing Solutions LLC installed 924,000 square feet of modified bitumen roof system. Photos: Roofing Solutions LLC

For the base ply of this multi-ply system, a layer of ELASTOPHENE FLAM 2.2 SBS-modified bitumen was heat welded to the cover board. The base membrane is reinforced with a high-quality, random glass fiber mat and is surfaced with polyolefin burn-off film to optimize welding. The asphaltic cap sheet used was ELASTOPHENE FLAM LS FR GR, a fire-retardant membrane that’s surfaced with ceramic coated granules.

For the flashings, SOPRALENE FLAM 180 was used due to its dimensionally stable, non-woven polyester mat that adds toughness and durability. The flashing cap sheet selected, SOPRALAST 50 TV ALU, incorporates a high strength glass scrim and the topside is surfaced with a reflective aluminum foil, which is designed to improve UV resistance.

“We felt an asphalt roofing installation would provide the best long-term value and reliability,” de la Cruz says. “We worked closely with the architect and general contractor to ensure a proper application of these high-quality materials.”

While Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital’s roof is complete, the entire project will not be finished until the fall. When the hospital officially opens, it will begin helping children from across the state heal.

Recognized for Asphalt Roofing Excellence

For its displays of craftsmanship, Roofing Solutions LLC was honored at the International Roofing Expo by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) through its Excellence in Asphalt Roofing awards program. The free-to-enter program recognizes outstanding steep and low-slope asphalt roofing projects and contractors from across North America.

“Excellence in Asphalt Roofing allows us to recognize contractors who use asphalt roofing systems to make a difference in their communities,” says ARMA’s Executive Vice President Reed Hitchcock. “Asphalt roofing’s aesthetics, durability and reliability provide peace of mind to building and homeowners alike. We are truly proud that asphalt roofing played an important role in establishing Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital.”

Submissions are now open for the 2020 Excellence in Asphalt Roofing awards program. To submit your project or to learn more about asphalt roofing systems, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

About the Author: Chadwick Collins is ARMA’s Director of Technical Services. For more information, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Roofing Contractor: Roofing Solutions LLC, Prairieville, Louisiana, http://roofingsolutionsla.com

MATERIALS

Insulation: SOPRA-ISO+, SOPREMA, https://soprema.us

Cover Board: 1/4-inch SOPRABOARD, SOPREMA

Base Ply: ELASTOPHENE FLAM 2.2 SBS, SOPREMA

Cap Sheet: ELASTOPHENE FLAM LS FR GR, SOPREMA

Base Flashing: SOPRALENE FLAM 180, SOPREMA

Flashing Cap Sheet: SOPRALAST 50 TV ALU, SOPREMA

Re-Roofing a Busy Hospital Poses Logistical Challenges

At Holmes Regional Medical Center, Advanced Roofing replaced 32,000 square feet of roofing on four different levels. Photos: Smith Aerial Photos

When leaks on the existing roof on the Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne, Florida, became too much to bear, the need for a new roof on four levels of the building was obvious. But so were the numerous difficulties posed by removing and replacing the roof on an active hospital. To make matters more complicated, the areas affected were directly over the hospital’s main entrance and the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), which cares for premature infants.

It would take a talented team of roofing professionals using the right products to install a durable roof system without disrupting patient care. Advanced Roofing Inc. was up to the challenge.

Advanced Roofing is a full-service commercial roofing contractor based in Florida. The company’s corporate headquarters is in Fort Lauderdale, with offices in Sanford, Tampa, Miami, Jupiter, Fort Myers and Jacksonville. According to Jason Carruth, branch manager of the Sanford location, the company installs almost every type of low-slope and steep-slope roof system. “We do production, service, maintenance — anything to do with commercial roofing,” he says. “Our specialty is re-roofing occupied buildings.”

For Holmes Regional Medical Center, a two-ply modified system with a reflective coating from Tremco was specified. This was an ideal fit for the re-roofing application at the hospital, notes Carruth, as it was a cold-applied system with low VOCs. “As a certified Tremco applicator, we were invited to bid on the project, and we were successful with the contract,” says Carruth.

High Degree of Difficulty

The project involved the complete tear-off and replacement of the roofs on the four lowest levels of the hospital, totaling approximately 32,000 square feet. These included two of the most sensitive areas on the building. “We did the whole section over the main entrance where everyone drops people off,” notes Carruth. “Another section was directly over the NICU center. We did the staging and handled personnel coming in and out on four roof levels over that area. The entire roof section also surrounds an open-air atrium below, so we had to roof around not only the main entrance, but an atrium as well.”

No torches could be used on the project, so cold-applied modified system from Tremco was specified. It was topped with a reflective coating. Photos: Advanced Roofing Inc.

Safety was the top priority, both on the roof and on the ground. “We had to have full-time supervision on the ground,” Carruth says. “We had ground safety monitors that worked for us, and they had to coordinate traffic at the drive-through and the turnaround, as well as the pedestrian walkway, which was right at the edge of our staging area.”

The site posed numerous challenges, as the lone staging area was limited and the schedule was subject to change at a moment’s notice due to emergency surgeries. “Work over the NICU unit was a little more involved due to the fact that we were almost continually on call,” Carruth explains. “On days we were able to work, we had to be ready to stop if there was anything critical going on.”

Work began in the areas with the most problems. “We started in different sections based on the priorities of the hospital,” Carruth notes. “We initially focused on the areas where the leaks were the worst.”

After the problem areas were fixed, work proceeded in sections, working from the back to the front to minimize traffic on completed areas. The process involved tearing off the existing built-up roof down to the concrete deck and installing a temporary roof to keep everything watertight. Then tapered insulation was applied in cold adhesive, followed by a cover board and the two-ply smooth modified system. The last step was the application of the Alpha-Guard MT coating, which was set in a polyester mat.

Logistics, loading and disposal of debris was a complicated process, as crews could only load the roof at one point accessible to a telehandler — a 10K Lull. This meant much of the material had to be moved a long way across the roof. “We had to haul all of the material and all of the debris from the old roofs across a level, down a level, and up a level to one spot,” Carruth explains. “Mobilization was a little bit difficult on it because we were only allocated one staging area.”

Tear-Off and Installation

Advanced used a 10-man crew on the project, doing most of the demolition work at night and installation work during the day. The fall protection plan included Raptor tie-off carts and anchor points at higher levels of the building.

Photos: Advanced Roofing Inc.

Mechanical roof cutters were used to tear off the existing built-up roof. In some sections, lightweight concrete also had to be removed. Debris was placed in a custom-fabricated trash box with a lid that had special forks for use with the telehandler. “We cut the old roof into small sections and just used hard elbow grease to pop them off the bottom,” Carruth says. “We utilized a Lull and a trash box to dispose of the that debris, driving it over to the dumpster, which was in the parking lot.”

After the temporary roof was installed, tapered insulation was set in a low-rise foam adhesive. This was topped with half-inch Securock cover board and the modified sheets. The two-ply Tremco system consisted of a PowerPly HD base sheet and Composite Ply HT top sheet, both set in PowerPly adhesive. Before the coating was applied, all of the edge metal and trim were installed. “We put all of flashings in, put all of the sheet metal on, we put the counterflashing in,” notes Carruth. “All metals were installed on this project were stainless steel, as it was in Melbourne and pretty close to the coast.”

The Alpha-Guard MT base coat and Alpha-Guard MT top coat were set in Permafab polyester fabric. The coating was applied using a squeegee.

The system supplies the benefits of solar reflectance, which include lowering the roof temperature and minimizing utility costs, but the roofs also had to be aesthetically pleasing. “There are patient rooms that look down in this roof, so that’s why we went with the light gray coating, which still supplies the necessary SRI [Solar Reflectance Index] value,” Carruth points out.

Minimizing Disruptions

The work areas also necessitated other considerations for patients and staff. “We had guest rooms where we had to hang tarps up so people couldn’t see us working at the time,” notes Carruth. “There were passive air louvers that we had to cover to keep debris from the tear-off from getting inside the building. We also had to put charcoal filters in all of the air intakes.”

The work schedule could change on a moment’s notice, so the roofing crews kept in almost constant contact with facility managers. “We’d provide them with a weekly schedule and every day we let them know where we would be working and what we’d be doing. If anything changed, we’d hear about it from their facility people and adjust on the fly.”

The project was completed on time, despite numerous weather delays and interruptions because of surgeries in the NICU. “The communication between the manufacturer’s rep, the owners and ourselves was excellent,” Carruth says. “Pre-planning is everything. When the key players on a job are all on the same page, that’s when a project ends up being successful.”

Success on this project meant protecting the patients and pleasing the owner with a top-quality system. The roof system was designed for high-priority, high-sensitivity projects, and there are few areas that are more sensitive than a neonatal intensive care unit. But these types of projects are familiar territory for Advanced Roofing.

“This is what we do. We re-roof occupied buildings,” Carruth says. “Not only are we putting on a roof system, we’re dealing with customers, we’re watching the weather forecast and making sure the roof is always watertight. The experience Advanced has roofing occupied building is why Tremco and Holmes selected us for the project. We know how to handle those situations and keep the roofs watertight on a daily basis.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Advanced Roofing Inc., headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. www.advancedroofing.com

MATERIALS

Cold-Applied Modified System: PowerPly HD and Composite Ply HT, Tremco, www.tremcoinc.com

Roof Coating: Alpha-Guard MT in Light Gray, Tremco

Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com

Contractor Has the Right Prescription for Medical Office Building

Texas Traditions Roofing installed the metal and TPO roofs on the Pflugerville Parkway Medical Office Building, as well as the metal wall panels, soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

The Pflugerville Parkway Medical Office Building features a metal roof, a TPO roof, metal wall panels, soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts. The new construction project was perfect for Texas Traditions Roofing, which prides itself on its versatility and quality craftsmanship.

Headquartered in Georgetown, Texas, the company handles a variety of commercial and residential work. “Residentially we do replacements and custom home new construction,” says Michael Pickel, estimator, Texas Traditions. “On the commercial side, we do mostly new construction, but we also do commercial repair and replacement as well.”

Pickel was the estimator on the project, but he feels the term “estimate” doesn’t begin to cover what his job entails. “We want to be the experts and provide all of the information for the general contractor, rather than just throwing an estimate at them,” he says. “We take that responsibility very seriously, whether it’s residential or commercial. We don’t necessarily like the word ‘estimate’ because it sounds like you’re guessing and just hoping it’s right. We understand that commercial new construction involves an estimate, but what we try to do is just be very specific and clearly define what we’re going to be doing, how we’re going to be doing it, and what the manufacturer and what the NRCA recommends us to do. That way nothing is incorrect, it’s not going to leak, obviously, and you have the backing of the manufacturer because it was installed properly.”

Multiple Systems

The scopes of work included two sections of metal roofing — a peaked section in the middle of the main roof and a shed roof off to one side of the building. A TPO roof system was applied over the main roof on either side of the metal roof in the center. “We started with the metal roofing panels on the top first, and then worked our way down to the lower section on the side,” Pickel notes. “Shortly after that, we came back and installed the TPO roof. It was pretty open, so it was fairly easy to put that down.”

The low-slope roof sections were covered with a 60-mil TPO system manufactured by GAF. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

The metal roof system manufactured by Sheffield Metals features 1.5-inch Snaplock 450 Panels in Ash Grey. Approximately 4,000 square feet of roof panels were installed over two layers of 2.2-inch polyiso insulation, which was mechanically attached. The underlayment used was Viking Armor from Viking Barriers.

The 6,000-square-foot low-slope roof was topped with a 60-mil TPO system manufactured by GAF. First, two layers of 2.2-inch polysio were mechanically attached to reach R-25. A tapered insulation system was then fully adhered across the entire roof to ensure proper drainage.

The safety plan utilized a Raptor safety cart, which was lifted to the roof with a SkyTrak. “The Raptor system was either on the left or right side of the roof, depending what side we were working on,” Pickel says. “Any time workers were on the roof, they were tied off.”

After the roofs were completed, the focus shifted to the wall panels. Berridge Vee Panels in Charcoal Grey were installed using a man lift. “We put Z-purlins down horizontally over the vapor barrier,” notes Pickel. “Then we installed the 1-inch, four-by-four mineral wool insulation, and attached our panels over that.”

Metal crews also installed 11-inch fascia across the entire edge of the roof, including both the metal and TPO sections. “There are some tricks involved with that because it was a fully tapered TPO system, so your height differences can vary,” Pickel explains. “Making sure the fascia wrapped smooth and properly, and was the proper height, was a little tricky.”

Gutters were not originally specified, but they were added at the suggestion of Texas Traditions. “We talked to the G.C. about talking to the owner because we felt they were going to want gutters,” Pickel recalls. “They came back to us and said they wanted gutters, so we issued a change order for it.”

The company installed 6-inch box gutters and four-by-four downspouts matching the metal roof.

A Challenging Schedule

The jobsite was relatively open, accessible and easy to navigate, so some typical problems that can crop up with new construction projects weren’t a big issue. The HVAC units were installed on a pad within a fenced-in area on the ground, minimizing roof penetrations as well as foot traffic on the roof. Crews were able to focus on doing the job right — and doing it safely. “Installation-wise, it wasn’t too tricky,” Pickel notes. “We just had to ensure that everything was installed to the manufacturer’s requirements.”

Manpower and scheduling posed the toughest hurdles, notes Pickel, but the general contractor, Lott Brothers of Austin, Texas, did a great job of keeping everyone on the same page. “We had weekly mandatory meetings that were set up by the G.C., and it was very helpful for us and other trades as well,” Pickel says. “Having to coordinate multiple trips is very common with new construction, unfortunately, but it’s great that we are able to do so much work. We did everything down to the gutters and downspouts — the full system — but it takes a lot of coordination and scheduling of the crews, especially when you have other jobs as well.”

One advantage of the multiple scopes of work was that Texas Traditions crews didn’t have to worry about coordinating transition details with crews from other companies. “It’s also nice for the owner,” Pickel adds. “If they have any issues or if they have any questions, they know the roofer did every bit of the metal on this job, and all of the TPO roof, and they know who to contact.”

Versatility is one of the company’s strengths, and for that Pickel credits the experience of the company’s owners, including his father, co-owner Mike Pickel, who has more than 30 years of experience in the construction industry, including 20 years working for a general contractor.

“He understands the complexity of coordinating multiple trades because he did it for so long from a G.C. perspective,” Pickel says. “His ability to know what needs to be done when allows us to be more effective and more efficient with our time. It allows us to be the expert in front of a general contractor because he was a general contractor. He worked with superintendents. He worked with multiple trades. His ability, knowledge and expertise within our company allows us to be the roofing expert.”

Texas Traditions strives to make the best use of that wealth of knowledge. “Each job is treated with care,” Pickel says. “It’s treated with expertise because it’s not just another job — it’s someone’s home, it’s someone’s office. We do apartment complexes, we do office buildings, we do residential homes, we do churches. Mike treats it with care, and it trickles down to everyone else to treat it with care as well.”

TEAM

Architect: Tim Brown Architecture, Austin, Texas, www.timbrownarch.com

General Contractor: Lott Brothers Construction, Austin, Texas, www.lottbrothers.com

Roofing Contractor: Texas Traditions Roofing, Georgetown, Texas, www.texastraditionsroofing.com

MATERIALS

Low-Slope Roof: 60-mil TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com

Metal Roof Panels: Snaplock 450 Panels, Sheffield Metals, www.sheffieldmetals.com

Underlayment: Viking Armor High-Temp, Viking Barriers, www.vikingbarriers.com

Metal Soffit Panels: FWP non-vented Soffit Panels, Sheffield Metals

Metal Wall Panels: Berridge Vee Panels, www.berridge.com

Colorful Exterior for Veterinary Hospital Comes Together Without a Hitch

The Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, features a colorful exterior constructed of metal roof and wall panels. Photos: Petersen

Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, is designed to provide top-notch care for its furry patients. The building includes surgical suites, treatment areas, and an in-house lab, as well as boarding and grooming facilities.

The state-of-the-art facility is housed in a striking complex highlighted by colorful metal roof and wall panels. It was a complicated new construction project on a tight jobsite, but experience and planning made for a smooth, textbook execution.

Complicated projects are nothing new for Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal. Headquartered in Longview, Texas, the company has been in business for 33 years and does a variety of commercial, industrial and residential work, including modified bitumen, built-up, single-ply and shingle roofs, as well as metal roofing and sheet metal fabrication. “We did all the metal on the project,” says Anthony McKinley, vice president of Curtis-McKinley. “We did the roof, the walls and soffit.”

McKinley was confident his crews could execute the project smoothly, and his confidence was bolstered by his experience working on other projects with the general contractor, Transet Company, and the manufacturer of the roof and wall panels, Petersen.

“We have a good relationship with Transet Company and we’ve done so much work with Petersen that they know our company and our guys,” McKinley says. “If there are any technical questions, they are very quick to help and get us answers, and inspections go great.”

The Roof and Walls

The roof and wall panels were manufactured from 24-gauge steel. The roof was covered with approximately 18,000 square feet of 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. The exterior also incorporates 4,400 square feet of 16-inch HWP panels in Slate Gray and 5,250 square feet of 12-inch Flush Panels in three colors: Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue.

The roof is comprised of Petersen’s 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. Photos: Petersen

Crews from Curtis-McKinley dried the roof in with TAMKO’s TW Metal and Tile self-adhered underlayment and tackled different phases of the project as the building came together. “We kind of did it all at one time,” McKinley recalls. “First, we had a roofing crew come out and put the peel-and-stick on the roof, and we measured for the roof panels. Then we started installing all of the trim and had a few guys start installing the wall panels.”

Petersen fabricated and delivered the wall panels, which were installed over plywood and cinder block walls using a man lift. On the cinder block walls, hat channels were installed to receive the clips. At two entrances, the Flush Panels were installed vertically. “We also installed regular flush soffit panels,” notes McKinley.

A representative from Petersen roll-formed the roof panels on the site. Some of the panels were more than 50 feet long, and this posed some logistical problems. “It was a very tight construction site,” McKinley explains. “We ran the panels on site and we had to lift them up with a crane. We couldn’t use a lift because there was no way to turn the lift around when the panels were loaded. There was one long driveway down one side, and we had to stack all of the panels in one direction and lift them straight up.”

Panels were lifted using a spreader bar as a cradle. “We strapped the panels to the spreader bar,” McKinley notes. “We only lifted about 10 panels at a time and our guys would receive them and stack them at points along the roof. We had about six or seven guys on the roof and the rest of the crew on the ground to strap down the panels.”

The walls feature Petersen’s 24-gauge HWP and Flush Panels in multiple colors, including Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue. Photos: Petersen

The crew started installing panels on the main roof and finished roof sections alongside the structure as the job progressed. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time, using temporary anchor points screwed into in the deck. “We started off on the main roof area and worked our way from the back to the front,” McKinley recalls. “The shed roofs were incorporated as we worked our way forward.”

While the main crew worked on the roof, a smaller group sometimes split off to install the wall panels. “We had a crew with a few extra sheet metal guys on it, and we moved them around as needed,” McKinley notes. “That way they could start on the walls as the roof progressed and the job wouldn’t lag on.”

Planning Ahead

The main challenge on the project was the tight jobsite, according to McKinley. “It was a very limited site,” McKinley says. “Once we got the roof panels on, we could breathe a little easier.”

Despite the cramped conditions, communication between the crews kept conflicts to a minimum. “Working with other trades went fine,” McKinley says. “The superintendent on the site was easy to work with. We worked with other subcontractors in Longview we’ve worked with plenty of times. Our guys knew their guys, basically, and they just coordinate well and work around each other as needed.”

The project moved along smoothly and stayed on schedule. “We were blessed not to have any big weather delays,” McKinley says. “When they were ready for us, we were able to get right out there and move things along in a timely manner.”

McKinley also credits the manufacturer for help executing the project. “There are four or five different colors on it,” he says. “Each entrance was a different color, and the walls and roof. That was pretty interesting. Keeping it all straight with the guys was a challenge.”

Again, planning ahead was essential. “It just took a little more communication,” McKinley says. “When we were making our trim, we just had to make sure it was the right color. It’s very easy to work with Petersen. On a job like this one, the technical aspect of it was really very simple, but seeing all of the different colors on this project come together was pretty cool.”

Curtis-McKinley crew members were able to execute all of the transition details themselves as they installed the roof and wall panels. “They were all standard details, really,” McKinley says. “Almost all of the transitions were something the guys have done hundreds of times.”

Exceptions included the large, irregularly shaped windows at the entryways, which were trimmed in red. “There were two entrances with windows that were a little different,” McKinley says. “One set had a sort of triangular shape, which was pretty straightforward to flash. The other had a circular window, and that took a lot of time and coordination with the window people to ensure that we got it watertight with the flashing. Getting the trim for that wall custom made and fitting perfectly was a bit of a challenge.”

Taking a complicated project and making it look easy is one of the strengths of Curtis-McKinley Roofing. “The key is having the right guys,” McKinley says. “We are blessed to have very experienced professional roofers and sheet metal installers. Our sheet metal guys have done this for years. That’s getting harder to find these days, and we still have some older guys that know how to do it. They’ve done so much of it that I often rely on them to tell me, ‘This is how it needs to be done,’ or ‘This is a better way to do it.’ Then we just make sure everything conforms to the plans and specifications, and we ensure the installation integrity. Obviously the most important thing is to keep the water out.”

TEAM

Architect: Ron Mabry Architects, Tyler, Texas, www.ronmabryarchitects.com

General Contractor: Transet Co., Longview, Texas, www.transetco.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: 18-inch, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad in Charcoal, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Wall Panels: 16-inch, 24-gauge HWP, Slate Gray and 12-inch, 24-gauge Flush Panel in Slate Gray, Teal, and Berkshire Blue, Petersen

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

New Roof Provides Security at Senior Living Complex

Photo: Johns Mansville

The Preserve At Palm-Aire is a landmark senior living community in Pompano Beach situated on 13 acres of lush, beautiful grounds in South Florida. Offering both independent living and assisted living programs, the health care facility’s primary focus is on preserving residents’ quality of life in every way possible.

The independent senior lifestyle at The Preserve At Palm-Aire is all about maintenance-free living, and that philosophy influenced the choice of a new roofing system for the facility.

The re-roofing of The Preserve At Palm-Aire was complicated by Mansard-style roofs and 5-foot to 6-foot high parapet walls that greatly restricted access to the existing roofing system, which was installed on a lightweight structural concrete deck. The use of trash chutes was impossible, so a large crane and dumpster were used to remove the roofing debris.

“What concerned us most was using such a large crane around an immaculately landscaped property fully occupied by tenants especially sensitive to excess noise and vibration,” says Geo Madruga, commercial project coordinator for A-1 Property Services Inc., the Miami-based roofing contractor on the project. Another important concern was that the low-slope roof had numerous penetrations, including those for 30 large HVAC units and various pipes and stack vents.

Finding a Solution

A-1 Property Services Inc. competed with several other contractors on an open spec bid. With the help of JM Sales Representative Lewis Buckner, A-1 advised the property owner that a 60-mil fleece-backed PVC membrane with DuPont Elvaloy KEE would provide the longevity, energy efficiency and chemical resistance required for the project. “We really pushed the PVC fleece backed as the superior roofing system and a unique solution for this building,” says Madruga. “We also felt more comfortable with JM’s PVC membrane due to our long track record with the product.”

Adhered directly to the concrete deck with a water-based adhesive, the fleece-backed PVC exceeded Broward County’s 175-mph wind resistance requirement. The PVC membrane’s high reflectivity also earned an energy efficiency rebate from Florida Power & Light Company. The product was also easy to install, depite the numerous penetrations, notes Madruga. “While there were definitely many unique penetrations, our 10-man crew had no problems with the heat-weldable PVC membrane,” he says.

Madruga’s concerns — and his company’s name — both reflect A-1’s desire to create long-term relationships with clients that include expert maintenance services. “We met the expectations of the owner’s roof consultant, but with offices in Washington D.C., the client placed a tremendous amount of trust in the roofing manufacturer and contractor,” adds Madruga. “We are specialists, and we don’t just walk away from any roofs that we install.”

TEAM

Building Representative: CRP Preserve Palm-Aire LLC, Washington, D.C.
Roofing Contractor: A-1 Property Services Inc., Miami, Florida

MATERIALS

Roofing System: 60-mil Fully Adhered Fleece-Backed PVC, Johns Manville, www.JM.com

The New Parkland Hospital Is Already a Dallas Landmark

Parkland Memorial Hospital is located on a 64-acre health care campus in Dallas. The 2.1 million-square-foot complex includes an 862-bed, full-service acute-care facility. Photos: Aerial Photography Inc.

When it was time to replace the Parkland Memorial Hospital — a Dallas, Texas, landmark constructed in 1954 that served as a safety-net facility for Dallas County for over half a century, and which held notoriety as the location where President Kennedy was rushed after being shot in 1963 — everyone recognized they would be undertaking a high-profile project. This became even more apparent when the plans for a new Parkland hospital were unveiled: a 2.1-million-square-foot, 17-story, state-of-the-art, 862-bed, full-service acute-care facility located on a 64-acre health care campus in the Southwest Medical District. The $1.33 billion project resulted in one of the largest health care facilities ever constructed as a single project.

Because of the scale of the new Parkland hospital project and the fact it was being funded with public dollars, a conservative and careful approach to the planning was paramount. A planning and construction team was assembled to tackle the mammoth project, which included two architecture firms — HDR Inc. and Corgan Inc. — and four large contracting firms — Balfour Beatty, Austin Commercial, H.J. Russell & Company and Azteca — that formed a joint partnership called BARA for the job. A “collaborative project delivery” model was adopted to keep all the stakeholders on the same page, which included the designation of a central “co-location” office where members of various involved firms could meet, collaborate and concur on direction. Numerous consultants were brought in, and through a careful planning process over a period of two years, designs, material specifications and additional partners were analyzed and selected.

At a cost of $1.33 billion, Parkland Memorial Hospital is one of the largest health care facilities ever constructed as a single project. A two-ply SBS-modified bitumen roofing system was chosen for its durability and longevity. Photos: Aerial Photography Inc.

Early in the planning process, SOPREMA’s local sales partner, Conner-Legrand Inc., was brought into material specifications discussions with the architects and contractors planning the project. The planning team recognized the importance of finding the “best roof they could put in place” for this critical environment that was designed to last for decades. After numerous rounds of careful vetting, a final qualified roofing system was chosen that fit that criteria: a SOPREMA-manufactured, high-performance, two-ply, SBS-modified bitumen roofing system.

“Consistency and reliability in the marketplace don’t develop overnight, and in the case of a project like the new Parkland hospital, everyone accounts for that,” says Luke Legrand of Conner-Legrand Inc. “You’re dealing with the most discerning audience you can imagine, and while it takes time to make decisions, the final choice of materials speaks volumes. The decision-makers wanted one reputable manufacturer that could provide everything from the primer to the cap sheet and offered a strong warranty, and not every manufacturer has the horizontal and vertical breadth to provide that. In this case, however, the planning team found what they were looking for in SOPREMA.”

Raising the Roof

The new hospital featured flat rooftops at multiple levels that all needed to be made watertight for decades to come. The roofing system needed to be designed in a way that accounted for a helipad, consistent rooftop traffic, extensive rooftop equipment, lightwells and various utility platforms. A lot stood in the way of Anchor Roofing, the installer, but the meticulous planning for the project meant that all contingencies had been considered by the time application of the waterproofing system began.

After installing insulation, a vapor barrier and SOPRABOARD, the Anchor Roofing team started on the two-ply roofing application. They first put down a layer of SOPRALENE Flam 180 SBS-modified bitumen base-ply membrane to provide waterproofing protection for the building. The various other tradespeople who needed to work on the rooftop could then go about their business, and any necessary repairs were made to the waterproofing base layer before a SOPRASTAR Flam SBS-modified bitumen reflective cap ply layer was installed on top. The chosen cap layer was not only functionally strong and long-lasting, but also white and highly reflective, providing energy savings and ultimately contributing to the hospital’s achievement of LEED Gold status from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The two-ply SBS-modified bitumen roofing construction was also chosen because the waterproofing system can be easily refreshed 25–30 years down the road to extend the roof’s lifecycle without a full tear-off. The foundation of the system can stay intact while the top layer is rejuvenated, giving the option for an additional warranty and ensuring the building is protected against the elements for another 20–30 years. This not only helps the health system to save money in the long run and avoid contributing unnecessary waste to landfills, but also helps the hospital avoid disruption to operations in a sensitive environment where recovering patients must be protected from invasive construction processes.

A Dallas Landmark

Throughout the course of construction, 162 professional staff members and 1,400 on-site workers collaborated to construct the new Parkland hospital. It was officially dedicated in March 2015, and patients and staff had all moved in by August. The facility now averages more than 1 million patient visits per year, with roughly 30,000 people traveling through its doors each day. The roof has performed well, and all stakeholders in the project have felt confident that the right waterproofing system for the job was chosen. Given the careful planning, beautiful design and strong material choices that went into the project, it has already received a number of awards and is well positioned to remain a Dallas icon for decades to come.

TEAM

Architects: HDR Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.HDRinc.com, and Corgan Inc., Dallas, www.corgan.com
General Contractor: BARA, a joint venture partnership formed by Balfour Beatty, Austin Commercial, H.J. Russell & Company and Azteca
Roofing Contractor: Anchor Roofing, Fort Worth, Texas, www.anchor-roofs.com

MATERIALS

Modified Bitumen Base Ply: SOPRALENE Flam 180 SBS, SOPREMA, www.soprema.us
Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet: SOPRASTAR Flam SBS, SOPREMA
Cover Board: SOPRABOARD, SOPREMA