Project Profiles: Health Care

Union Printers Home, Colorado Springs, Colo.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Interstate Roofing, Colorado Springs

Roof Materials

Interstate Roofing recommended Valoré Slate in the Villa color blend of medium and dark grays for the reroofing project. Valoré synthetic slate roofing tiles are made using proprietary VariBlend technology to form varying shades from tile to tile, creating an infinite number of color shades. Each single-width synthetic slate roofing tile is crafted using virgin polymer resins to guarantee a sustainable product. Valoré Slate tiles come in 12-inch tile widths with a 1/2-inch tile thickness, making it a lightweight yet realistic slate roofing tile option. (The Valoré Slate product line no longer is available.)
VALORÉ SLATE MANUFACTURER: DaVinci Roofscapes

Interstate Roofing recommended Valoré Slate in the Villa color blend of medium and dark grays for the reroofing project.

Interstate Roofing recommended Valoré Slate in the Villa color blend of medium and dark grays for the reroofing project.

Roof Report

Fondly known in Colorado Springs as the Castle on the Hill, the Union Printers Home has a long history of caring for people. Built in 1892 by members of the International Typographical Union to offer specialized health care to their union members, the facility today serves the general public with a multitude of services, including assisted living, nursing care, rehabilitation and hospice.

In 2012, extreme hail damage made it essential to replace the roof on the structure, which is a State of Colorado Historical Site. Interstate Roofing removed more than 50-year-old asbestos tiles on the roof and recommended polymer roofing tiles that complement the existing architectural style. “Considering the age, condition and historical value of the structure, we needed a roofing product that could work with the building while ensuring longevity to the structure,” says Scott Riopelle, owner of Interstate Roofing in Colorado Springs.

Although Riopelle was confident in the selection of the roofing product, there were many challenges for this project. The 50-man crew first had to complete the safe removal of the existing asbestos-laden tiles.

“We had to erect scaffolding 5-stories high to access the roof,” Riopelle says. “Due to the 12:12 roof pitch and the multiple turrets on the structure, building containment areas and debris removal were extremely dangerous. During the entire process, we performed continuous air-quality testing to ensure the safety of the home’s residents, staff and our crew.”

The team worked through the winter months and experienced continuous rain, wind and snow. Riopelle explains: “This means we had abatement processes, plywood redecking, dry-in and loading crews, heavy-equipment contractors, installers and supply companies all working in extreme-weather conditions. For this project, logistics and coordination went minute-to-minute.”

The temporary removal of the large historic clock on the front of the Union Printers Home created the next challenge. Because of its age, there was concern for the clock’s condition. Staff at the home asked that the hands of the clock not be moved; they were permanently set at 8 o’clock to represent the union’s efforts in the past to encourage an eight-hour workday.

Reroofing the turrets on the project was easier because of the Turret Package from DaVinci Roofscapes. Interstate Roofing provided DaVinci with four dimensions (the distance from the peak to the turret to the edge of the drip cap, the turret pitch, the turret cap length and the coursing exposure). From that information, Turret Packages were created, including the starter tiles, numbered field bundles custom-engineered for each course and a turret map diagram to guide the team through installation.

The three-month project had a gratifying outcome for Riopelle and his team. “This was a once-in-a-lifetime project,” Riopelle says. “Although we’ve completed projects much larger and more complex, this one was special because of the history associated with the Printers Union Home and the importance of the facility to the community.”

Interstate Roofing embraced the challenge of tying the old historic structure in with the new technology of the polymer slate products. “The results are amazing. This historic structure has a new life thanks to this roof,” Riopelle observes. “And since the roofing tiles are impact- and fire-resistant, there’s greater peace-of-mind for the staff and residents at the Union Printers Home.”

PHOTO: DaVinci Roofscapes

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Green Roof Provides Learning Opportunities at the University of Iowa’s Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building

Established just 59 days after Iowa became a state in 1847, the University of Iowa, Iowa City, boasts a number of firsts. In 1855, it became the first U.S. public university to admit men and women; at that time, its enrollment consisted of 124 students—41 of which were women. In 1873, it was the first school to grant a law degree to a woman. In 1895, it became the first university to place an African American on a varsity sports team.

As such, the university’s new Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building was designed and built with sustainability in mind. PHOTO: Roof Top Sedums LLC

The university’s new Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building was designed and built with sustainability in mind. PHOTO: Roof Top Sedums LLC


In more recent years, the university has strived to lead via its environmental efforts. As a Green Power Partner of the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the university pledges to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation through the use of renewables. In 2010, it established its first sustainability plan—2020 Vision UIowa Sustainability Targets, which contains the following goals:

  • Become a Net-negative Energy Consumer
  • Green Our Energy Portfolio
  • Decrease Our Production of Waste
  • Reduce the Carbon Impact of Transportation
  • Increase Student Opportunities to Learn and Practice Principles of Sustainability
  • Support and Grow Interdisciplinary Research in Sustainability-focused and Related Areas
  • Develop Partnerships and Advance Collaborative Initiatives, both Academic and Operational

Among the University of Iowa’s strategies to achieve its sustainability goals is ensuring all new construction and major renovations on campus achieve a minimum LEED Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington.

The 200,000-square-foot, 6-story building, which officially opened in October 2014, boasts many environmentally friendly attributes.

The 200,000-square-foot, 6-story building, which officially opened in October 2014, boasts many environmentally friendly attributes. PHOTO: Scott Nagel


As such, the university’s new Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building was designed and built with sustainability in mind. The 200,000-square-foot, 6-story building, which officially opened in October 2014, boasts many environmentally friendly attributes, including glow-emitting sealants, paints, carpet and other materials; water-efficient landscaping; and recycled content and regional materials. It also achieves an-other university first: three green roofs, one of which provides students the opportunity to grow medicinal plants.

Opting for Trays

Des Moines, Iowa-based landscape architecture firm Confluence has been completing projects at the University of Iowa for many years through its Iowa offices—Des Moines and Cedar Rapids. Confluence was hired by the project’s architect of record, Rohrbach Associates PC Architects, Iowa City, to complete landscaping around and on top of the Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building in the form of three green roofs that total approximately 6,440 square feet. Despite the building’s consider-able roof area, the design team opted to install the green roofs on lower roof areas upon which building occupants would be looking. The rest of the roof cover is a reflective membrane system.

Confluence provided the layout for a modular green roof on the three distinctive roof areas. Patrick Alvord, PLA, RA, LEED AP, a principal in Confluence’s Cedar Rapids office, notes the chosen tray system was off-the-rack, which is what made it appealing to him and his colleagues. “We spent a lot of time talking to the manufacturer and they were just great to work with,” Alvord says. “We had a number of case studies of work they had done in the Chicagoland area that had proven very successful, so we had a very high level of comfort right out of the gate.”

Alvord opted to use the 6-inch-deep tray model because it would provide some flexibility in the plant materials that could be specified. “We were able to specify different plant materials in the plan of the roof to coordinate with shade, densities and location,” he says. “In areas where the roof would be highly visible from floors above, we did some patterning with the plants. In areas where we had the opportunity to go deep, we planted deeper-rooting plants that will grow taller and provide a denser plant palette.”

The plants are a mix of native and adaptive Iowa plants, as well as recommendations from the green-roof supplier. “It’s a mix of perennials, grasses and forbs, ranging from sedums to liatris to a number of different things,” Alvord notes.

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Projects: Office

DPR Construction, Phoenix

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building.

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building.

Team

Roofing contractor: Arithane Foam, Corona, Calif.
Architect/engineer: SmithGroupJJR, Phoenix
Daylighting systems distributor: Norcon Industries, Guadalupe, Ariz.

Roof Materials

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building, formerly an abandoned retail boutique at the corner of 44th Street and Van Buren in Phoenix.

“The use of the Daylighting Systems was an integral part of our sustainability and lighting energy savings plans for the renovated space,” says Dave Elrod, regional manager of DPR Construction, Phoenix. “The products are a cost-efficient solution to provide lighting since they nearly eliminate the need for artificial daytime lighting.”

In addition, the roof is composed of foam with an R-25 insulation value (approximately 4-inches thick) over plywood sheathing.

Daylighting systems manufacturer: Solatube International Inc.
Foam roofing manufacturer: Quik-Shield from SWD Urethane

Roof Report

DPR Construction is a national technical builder specializing in highly complex and sustainable projects. In less than 10 months, the design-build team researched, designed, permit-ted, and built a highly efficient and modern workplace with numerous innovative sustainability features.

In addition to natural daylighting, the office features an 87-foot zinc-clad solar chimney, which releases hot air from the building while drawing cooler air in; shower towers that act as evaporative coolers to regulate building temperatures; 87 operable windows designed to open and close automatically (based on indoor/outdoor temperatures); and two “vampire” shut-off switches to keep electrical devices (radios, cell-phone chargers, microwaves) from using plug energy when no one is in the office.

Access to the building was limited during construction. Spray foam roofing, which took about seven days to complete, had to be done in small quadrants because of the tight schedule as work was progressing in the other sections. The roofing workers were challenged by the barrel-shaped roof, which created footing difficulties, and the many penetrations that had to be flashed, including all PV support legs, Solatubes, skylights and HVAC penetrations. Work was completed in the middle of winter, so additional protections and efficiencies were required.

The circa-1972 building has been officially certified as a Net-Zero Energy Building by the Seattle-based International Living Future Institute through its Living Building Challenge program. It also has received LEED-NC Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington, D.C.

PHOTOS: Ted Van Der Linden, DPR Construction

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A Standing-seam Roof Protects a Bank and Its Offices for the Long Term

Located on a high-traffic, signature intersection in Taylorville, Ill., Palmer Bank sought a timeless design that would visually represent its strength and stability to the community of just more than 11,000 people.

Design for the project was provided by The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis. The design team blended extensive detailing and profiling of the metal roof with a masonry façade to create an attractive prairie-style look.

Design for the project was provided by The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis. The design team blended extensive detailing and profiling of the metal roof with a masonry façade to create an attractive prairie-style look.

Design for the project was provided by The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis. The design team blended extensive detailing and profiling of the metal roof with a masonry façade to create an attractive prairie-style look.

“We clearly wanted to take advantage of the great location with a strong, timeless design,” says Andy Young, The Redmond Co.’s director of project development and construction manager on the project. “We presented two options to the bank regarding the roof … It was pretty unanimous that everyone liked the standing-seam profile look. We also liked the life-cycle cost of the roof since the bank plans to be the owner of this building for the long term.”

Installation of the standing-seam roof was completed by E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill.

Installation of the standing-seam roof was completed by E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill.

Installation of the standing-seam roof was completed by E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill. The crew, which consisted of six tied-off workers, installed fascia, gutters, downspouts and soffit. Flashing components were custom-fabricated in E.L. Pruitt’s shop.

The metal is coated with ENERGY STAR-approved colors and is vented for optimal airflow, which greatly in-creases the roof’s longevity and energy efficiency. The metal was installed over roof-deck protection and a self-adhered underlayment.

The metal is coated with ENERGY STAR-approved colors and is vented for optimal airflow, which greatly in-creases the roof’s longevity and energy efficiency.

The metal is coated with ENERGY STAR-approved colors and is vented for optimal airflow, which greatly in-creases the roof’s longevity and energy efficiency.

According to Dallas Stephenson, E. L. Pruitt’s project manager, the roofing job took about six weeks to complete. He explains: “The most difficult part was doing all the seam layout because the product requires a progressive install, which means you can’t really start in the middle of the roof and work both directions. You have to start in a corner and work out of a corner and then work into a corner and then work back out of the corner.”

The metal was installed over roof-deck protection and a self-adhered underlayment.

The metal was installed over roof-deck protection and a self-adhered underlayment.

Stephenson notes symmetrically lining up seams on the bank’s dormers and then across the roof was challenging. “Once we got all that figured out—took all the measurements on the job site and confirmed them—it went fairly smoothly,” he says.

“We knew the many hips and valleys would be somewhat of an installation challenge, but the installer did a terrific job,” Young notes.

Stephenson is quick to return the compliment: “Scott Brooks, site superintendent, and Andy Young from The Redmond Co. did an excellent job of picking a good team to build Palmer Bank. Everything just worked out great!”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Team

Roofing installer: E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill.
Designer: The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis.

Roof Materials

Approximately 9,000 square feet of 24-gauge, 16-inch Snap-Clad panels and 2,200 square feet of PAC-850 Soffit Panels were utilized to meet the design objectives. The Snap-Clad panels were finished in Charcoal and the 0.032 PAC-850 Panels were finished in Slate Gray.
Panels’ manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Roof deck protection manufacturer: Deck-Armor from GAF
Underlayment manufacturer: Grace Ice and Water Shield

Clay Tile Roofing Protects a Subdivision’s Clubhouse from the Hot Phoenix Sun while Providing an Old World Look

Located in the Sonoran Desert southeast of Phoenix, the Encanterra Country Club subdivision offers upscale living in houses built by Walnut, Calif.-based Shea Homes and surrounding an 18-hole golf course designed by Tom Lehman. The centerpiece of this vibrant community, however, is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

Designed to keep the community’s members active and entertained, La Casa, The Club at Encanterra contains four restaurants, a full-service spa, fitness center and three swimming pools. The club features Mediterranean-style architecture to essentially be an extension of the attractive homes in the subdivision.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings; custom-fabricated ornamental details; and a spray-foam system on the low-slope roof areas. Only a roofing contractor with the experience and capabilities to do all facets would suffice.

Phoenix-based Century Roofing Inc., which has been in business since 1991, has a long history of commercial and custom residential projects. With crews experienced in installing all types of tile, as well as its own metal fabrication shop, the contracting company was chosen to roof the club as it was being built.

Hustling for the Job

Steve Schwoerer, president of Century Roofing, knows what it takes to hustle and land large jobs, like La Casa, the Club at Encanterra. Knowing the project was going to be a landmark building in the valley attracted him to it. “We got it off the permit list, pursued it, bid on it and landed it, although not quite so cut and dry,” he says. “We have a lot of custom-home
experience and in Phoenix that means clay tile roof experience, so it fit in perfectly with our abilities.”

Originally, the club’s designer specified a different type of clay tile than what was actually installed on the roof. However, Schwoerer invited Irvine, Calif.-based Boral Roofing to come up with a color match and submit a quote for its tile to be installed on the project. “Boral had their plant manager fly into Phoenix to look at the roofing on the existing guard house that Shea Homes was trying to match,” Schwoerer recalls. “Boral then formulated a custom-blended tile and shipped the tile to Phoenix so a mock-up could be done for the architect’s approval, which they received.”

In addition to its curb appeal, the tile offered other benefits. Manufactured from naturally occurring geologic material (59 percent of which is recycled content), Boral clay tiles have received Cradle to Cradle Gold certification from the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, San Francisco. The certification program assesses products in five categories: material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship and social fairness. The tile product is wind, hail and fire resistant, as well as considered a cool roof, meaning it reflects heat from the sun, which reduces the need for air conditioning and provides savings on energy bills.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

Working in Phases

The roofing work was completed in phases as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra was being built. “Anytime you do a project of this size, the general contractor has scheduling demands that add to the difficulty, especially when you’re working in stages and
they want you out there as it’s being built rather than all at once,” Schwoerer states. “Their version of what’s roof-ready versus what’s actually roof-ready is one of many things that causes a roofing contractor stress!”

Century Roofing’s five-man crew began by installing the spray-foam roof on the low-slope portions of the building, which compose 130 squares of the total roof area. Although spray-foam roofs in Arizona typically are 1-inch thick, the club’s roof is 2-inches thick to achieve additional R-value. The foam was sprayed directly onto the wood deck and two base coats were applied before the final topcoat, which features a #9 crushed marble cast into the wet topcoat by hand.

PHOTOS: US TILE BY BORAL

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Projects: Hospitality & Entertainment

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

Team

Design Architect: Zehren & Associates, Avon, Colo.
Engineer: Monroe & Newell Engineers Inc., Denver
Owner: Vail Valley Foundation, Vail

Roof Materials

The Vail Valley Foundation envisioned an iconic entrance for the amphitheater that not only would accommodate guests, protect against the elements and provide facilities, but also would recognize and celebrate the Ford family and mirror the amphitheater’s atmosphere.

Under the Vail Valley Foundation, Zehren’s team of architects chose approximately 5,500 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane canopies to make the vision for The Lobby a reality. PTFE, or polytetrafluoroethylene, is a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that is durable and weather resistant. The PTFE fiber coating is chemically inert, capable of withstanding extreme temperatures and immune to UV radiation.

Designer, fabricator and installer of PTFE fiberglass membrane: Birdair

Building Report

The Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater is a remarkable outdoor venue nestled along a hillside with a stunning view of the Rocky Mountains. The Lobby, which is adjacent to the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens and Ford Park, serves not only as an impressive entrance to the amphitheater, but also as a shelter from inclement weather, a social gathering point prior to entering the amphitheater, and a place for ticket and bag check. The Lobby allows for a smooth transition into the venue.

Within the Lobby resides a mini-stage that can accommodate pre-show performances, along with a new stand for concessions and restrooms. Around the perimeter of the space rests informal boulder seating, and alpine landscapes border the surrounding walls. Overall, the aesthetics of the space mirror the pristine landscape and enjoyable outdoor atmosphere.

The Lobby also holds a Ford family tribute: a series of symbolic sculptures and interpretive elements intended to pay homage to President and Mrs. Ford and their family. This tribute is a new landmark in Vail celebrating the family’s commitment to their adopted hometown and the positive changes that they made to the community.

PHOTO: BIRDAIR

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Asphalt Roofing Products Provide a Historic Mansion with Modern Performance Without Sacrificing its Classic Curb Appeal

Historic renovations can pose many challenges to roofing contractors. But when done correctly, a renovation on a classic home maintains the structure’s unique style, provides modern performance and even helps to preserve the rich history of an area. This kind of challenge was presented to Highland, Md.-based Certified Inc. when the roofing company was called upon to install a new roof on a historic mansion in Laurel, Md. By choosing the right roofing materials and utilizing proper techniques, the contractor was able to successfully preserve the home’s Victorian appearance and character using today’s safer, more affordable and reliable products, while also meeting the requirements of the local Historic District Commission.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

A STORIED PAST

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888. The mansion was the home of Edward Phelps, who served as the first mayor of Laurel. Throughout his seven terms in office, Phelps modernized the rural community by overseeing the addition of electric street lights; brick-paved roads; a telephone system; and a railroad that connected Laurel to Washington, D.C.

Jim Lessig, Certified’s project manager, was immediately drawn to the project when it was referred to him by a previous customer. “I was very interested in the project due to the historic nature and elaborate architecture of the home,” he says. “It wasn’t the largest project of the year for us, but definitely the most interesting and intricate.”

The Phelps mansion is located in the Historic District of Laurel, an area that is part of the original town. In the 1970s, a Historic District Commission was established to ensure the preservation of homes and businesses and keep the area’s small-town charm. When it came time to install a new roof on the mansion in June 2013, the homeowners worked with the commission to receive approval on building materials and roofing techniques based on a set of guidelines drafted by the organization.

Sunny Pritchard, coordinator for the Historic District Commission, describes the mansion as a magnificent old home that “sits on a sweeping piece of land and looks grand and proud with its high roof lines, gables and big open porches.” To Pritchard and the rest of the commission, it was imperative that the roof retained the home’s noble, Victorian look.

AN INTRICATE ROOF

Certified was faced with a historic challenge: How could it imitate the look of the home’s original slate roof while providing the safety and durability of today’s products? The answer came in the form of asphalt shingles, which were selected for the renovation and were approved by the historic commission.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

“We chose to use asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability,” Lessig notes. “The commission approved the shingle because in their view it gave an authentic slate look that maintained the house’s turnof- the century appearance.”

The chosen shingles are individually colored using precision color technology which allows a roof to maintain the color, contrast and authentic look of natural slate. Natural slate is expensive and takes a specialized labor force to install because the process is an art form. Natural slate can also be a heavy product and breakage can occur when you install it. Asphalt shingles provided a great value for the project, while mimicking the look and tone of slate from the curb.

Contractors used a combination of low- and steep-slope materials on the roof, and added built-in copper gutters to really make it stand out. The end result was a roof that is beautiful and durable. The home retains its ability to transport passersby back into a time of horse-drawn carriages, top hats and hoop skirts.

A CELEBRATED PRESENT

Since the installation, the Phelps mansion’s new roof has gained national attention. In February, the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award. The annual QARC awards program is run by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), Washington, D.C., and recognizes roofing projects that demonstrate the beauty, durability, reliability and affordability of asphalt-based roofing products.

the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The Bronze Award recognized the contractor’s choice of an asphalt roofing product that was easy to work with and provided a safe working environment while successfully replicating the 19th century look and feel of the home.

Because of Certified’s excellent work and the unique products used for the project, this historic mansion will continue to represent the image of the original Laurel district and help preserve the area’s history for many more years to come.

“I would have loved to be one of the preserved boards in this house so I could have recorded the happenings throughout the years,” Pritchard notes. “That is what old homes have, a history of happenings, and if you let the roofs and boards decay and rot and eventually fall down, all of that history goes with it. We want to preserve both—the boards and the history.”

ROOF MATERIALS
Highland Slate shingles: CertainTeed Corp.

Learn More about Asphalt Shingles
To learn about the color process and how asphalt shingles are made, check out this video from the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association.

Learn about ARMA and the QARC awards program.

PHOTOS: EMERY PHOTOGRAPHY

Projects: Historic Preservation

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT, TOPEKA, KAN.

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

TEAM

SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (DOME): Baker Roofing Co., Raleigh, N.C.
SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (ROOF): MG McGrath Inc., Maplewood, Minn.
SPECIALTY FABRICATION (DOME): Ornametals LLC, Decatur, Ala.
ARCHITECT: Treanor Architects P.A., Topeka
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: J.E. Dunn Construction Co., Topeka

ROOF MATERIALS

The $22 million copper roof and dome replacement, completed in late December 2013, occurred over previously restored, occupied spaces and utilized approximately 127,000 pounds of copper. The east and west wing roofs are covered with 24,700 square feet of 20-ounce copper batten-seam roofing. The central, north and south wing roofs are finished with a hybrid horizontal and standing-seam roof constructed of 20-ounce copper to replicate the historic roof.

ROOF REPORT

The Kansas Statehouse’s copper dome, contrasted by the limestone structure, has captured the attention of citizens and visitors alike for more than 100 years. Built in three distinct phases during a 37-year period, the Kansas Statehouse reflects the changes in construction between the 1860s and the turn of the 20th century.

Planning for the statehouse’s restoration began in 1999 with an overall evaluation of the building and schematic design. For the legislature to continuously occupy the building, the construction was broken into six major phases and 29 separate bid packages. As part of the statehouse preservation and restoration, Treanor Architects completed a study on the existing roof and dome systems between 2007-10 and concluded the entire copper cladding needed to be replaced. Because of its longevity, copper proved to be the best long-term value for the project when other cost factors, such as access, associated repairs and maintenance, were taken into consideration.

TO COMPLY with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, the replacement copper design had to replicate the historic construction as closely as possible. However, areas identified as leak-prone or lacking in provision for thermal expansion were targeted for changes to better protect the building in the future. The design included repairs for substrate damaged by infiltration and alterations to the substrate to accommodate copper detail changes. The original copper installations lacked underlayment. To minimize changes in the manner that the roof envelope behaves, breathable underlayment was used to the greatest extent possible.

Approximately 127,000 pounds of copper were recycled and portions of the copper were salvaged for reuse in the Kansas Statehouse’s new visitor center. MG McGrath performed the fabrication and installation of 65,250 square feet of sheet metal on the roof. Low-slope areas of the central roof, which were originally clad with standing seam, were re-clad with 20-ounce soldered flat-seam copper to provide a more watertight roof. To meet the aggressive schedule, roofs were sequenced to allow for tear off and substrate repairs to occur while sheet-metal installation crews worked on another roof.

DETERIORATED SUBSTRATE required repairing structural framing and the wood and masonry decks. Work on the 21,300 square foot dome was performed by Baker Roofing with custom fabrication of the ornamental trim and windows performed by Ornametals. A 365-foot-tall, free-standing tower crane was used to deliver materials and equipment. Crews worked in a spiraling pattern from the bottom of the dome up to sequence tear-off, substrate repairs and sheet-metal installation.

Standing-seam 20-ounce copper cladding was used for radius components at the base and top of the dome. The distinctive horizontal seamed panels used in the original construction were replicated in 20-ounce copper, and templates were created for each panel to account for differences in the compound curvature and spacing of the attachment points. In total, the dome required 230 linear feet of built-in monumental gutter constructed from 32-ounce copper and 752 linear feet of 24-ounce copper rib moulding.

PHOTOS: ARCHITECTURAL FOTOGRAPHICS/TREANOR ARCHITECTS

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Projects: Education

University of Virginia, Rotunda, Charlottesville

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

TEAM

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: W.A. Lynch Roofing, Charlottesville
ARCHITECT: John G. Waite Associates, Albany, N.Y.
JOINT-VENTURE BUILDER: Christman-Gilbane, Reston, Va., ChristmanCo.com and GilbaneCo.com
LEAD-ABATEMENT CONTRACTOR: Special Renovations Inc., Chesterfield, Va.

ROOF MATERIALS

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper. W.A. Lynch Roofing sheared 4,000 individual tiles to approximate dimensions in its sheet-metal shop, and a makeshift sheet-metal shop was set up on top of the scaffolding to complete the final measurements and exact cuts.

COPPER SUPPLIER: N.B. Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va.
COPPER MANUFACTURER: Hussey Copper, Leetsdale, Pa.

ROOF REPORT

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Jefferson modeled his design—presented to the university board in 1821—after the Pantheon in Rome. Although he died in 1826 while the Rotunda was still under construction, the stunning building housed the university’s library as Jefferson envisioned.

The rotunda renovation is a two-phase project, and roofing work was part of Phase 1. The roofing team believed seven months was adequate to complete the job; the university, however, requested it be complete by April 2013 so scaffolding would be removed in time for the commencement ceremony. That gave the team a four-month timeline.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

Tom McGraw, executive vice president of W.A. Lynch Roofing, explains: “This was just short of impossible even if it wasn’t winter. But as a graduate of UVA, I recognized the basis of the request and agreed to it. So we doubled the manpower and went to a 10-hour day, seven-day a week schedule. We divided the roof into four equal quadrants, each separated by an expansion joint and put a crew in each area working simultaneously with the other three. We also added support personnel in our sheet-metal shop, as well as runners to keep the flow of material to the job site on schedule for the sheet-metal mechanics. In the final analysis, we made the schedule and completed our work within the owner’s request.”

The roofing project was essential because of rust on the previous terne-coated metal roof. It was determined the rust was caused by inadequate roof ventilation that created condensation on the underside of the metal roofing. Ventilation was lacking because of a Guastavino tile dome that was installed in 1895. The condensation was addressed by installing a concealed venting system at the intersections of the treads and risers at the seven steps in the roof, as well as at the top of the dome below the oculus. “Heated air has low density so it will logically rise creating natural convection,” McGraw notes. “This convection creates air movement below the roof and minimizes dead air spaces and the potential for condensation. The key to this is ensuring that you size the ‘intake’ venting similar to the ‘exhaust’ venting so that air will flow in an unrestricted fashion.”

Reroofing a dome can be a challenge, and determining how to keep the interior and its priceless valuables dry required some ingenuity. McGraw invented a tarp that he compares to a hooped skirt to keep the space watertight. The roofing crew cut trapezoidal sections of EPDM membrane and installed them from the bottom to the top of the dome. This skirt-like tarp was configured out of eight pieces at the bottom, six at the midpoint and four at the top. The maximum cut sizes for each level were determined using a computer drawing. Creating the EPDM covering in sections made the tarp easy to handle and remove. “If we seamed it all together or made it in less pieces, the guys wouldn’t have been able to lift it,” McGraw adds.

The tear-off process involved removing the painted metal panels according to lead-abatement standards; the panels were cleaned offsite to maintain the integrity and safety of the job site. A new wood deck was installed on furring over the tiles. This was covered with 30-pound roofing felt and red rosin building paper followed by the new copper roof.

Each piece of copper was tinned and folded before being installed. This process was necessary because of the lack of symmetry on the building. McGraw recalls: “Because this building is almost 200-years old, you have to recognize that not everything is as true and square as one might hope. There are seven steps that circle the base of the dome, and each tread and riser changed in height and width all the way around the building.”

This is the fourth roof for the Rotunda. The first was a tin-plate roof designed by Thomas Jefferson; the second was copper that was a replacement roof after a fire in 1895; the third roof was painted terne-coated steel from 1976; and the current roof is 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper that will be painted white. The decision to select copper was based on cost, durability and historic appearance.

Phase 2 of the project began in May, and the Rotunda will be closed for repairs until 2016. At a price of $42.5 million, utility, fire protection and mechanical upgrades will be made, as well as a Dome Room ceiling replacement and construction of a new underground service vault. The roof also will be painted white, and leaking gutters will be repaired during this phase.

PHOTOS: DAN GROGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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A Bermuda-style Roof Composed of Aluminum Includes Intricate Hips, Ridges, Vents and Gutters

Sometimes the most interesting roofing jobs don’t start out as planned. That was the case for Iain Fergusson, owner of Highland Roofing Co., Wilmington, N.C., when he bid on an asphalt shingle reroof for an 11,000-square-foot ranch-style home located along a coastal creek in Wilmington.

Initially bid as an asphalt-shingle reroof, this 11,000-square-foot ranch-style home located along a coastal creek in Wilmington, N.C., features an aluminum Bermuda-style roof. PHOTO: Chris Fisher

Initially bid as an asphalt-shingle reroof, this 11,000-square-foot ranch-style home located along a coastal creek in Wilmington, N.C., features an aluminum Bermuda-style roof. PHOTO: Chris Fisher

After he submitted his bid, the architect, Michael Kersting of Michael Ross Kersting Architecture, Wilmington, asked for an option for standing-seam metal roofing, which is the specialty with which Fergusson established Highland Roofing in October 2005. Although Fergusson was confident about his crew’s ability to install an exceptional metal roof, he became a little nervous when the next request came from the architect.

“We were asked to price out an option for Bermuda-style metal roofing,” he recalls. “Of course I knew what a Bermuda roof was but I had no experience with it; you don’t get much opportunity to do that here.” However, Fergusson put the price together and won the job.

On the island of Bermuda, roofs are constructed of rectangular slabs of local limestone that are mortared together in a stepped pattern over a hip roof frame. The distinctive beauty of these roofs has begun to enter the U.S. though traditional stick-frame housing doesn’t lend itself to heavy limestone. The Wilmington residence consists of a wood-framed roof and brick veneer walls that would not support the weight of limestone, so Kersting opted for metal—specifically aluminum, ensuring the roof would be fully warranted in the coastal environment.

Once the team began moving forward with the Bermuda-style roof, a final set of plans made Fergusson even more anxious. “The plans had all kinds of details that came out of left field—built-in gutters and EPDM sections of the roof,” he says. “The big curve was that the architect wanted to make a feature out of the hips and ridges, because traditional Bermuda-style roofing is wrapped seamlessly around the hips and looks really neat and clean. Kersting knew that it wouldn’t be possible with sheet metal; it would have to be cut and mitered on the corners, so he had the idea of putting raised 2 by 4s on all the hips and ridges and having us wrap that.”

These details are what make this home’s roof impressive and where most of the work came in for Fergusson, who acted as project manager, and his team, which consisted of Roofing Superintendent Richard Hill, Sheetmetal Fabricator Michael Mai and a four-man install crew led by Foreman Marvin Mungia. After considering different panel sizes to ensure oil canning would be avoided, Kersting and Fergusson settled on 0.032 aluminum in 12-inch panels, and Fergusson’s crew was ready to put its skills to the test.

The architect wanted to make a feature out of the hips and ridges; traditional Bermuda-style roofing is wrapped seamlessly around the hips.

The architect wanted to make a feature out of the hips and ridges; traditional Bermuda-style roofing is wrapped seamlessly around the hips.

PROFILES IN COMMUNICATION

Although Fergusson established Highland Roofing in 2005 with a focus only on residential metal roofing, he expanded into all types of steep-slope products within the first couple years. In 2009, Fergusson began moving into the commercial roofing market; today, 70 percent of his revenues are commercial. In the residential sector he has a good mix of reroofing and custom new construction. It’s the custom side that Fergusson takes most pleasure in. “I really enjoy custom residential so much because it’s challenging and so different and it’s generally the most aesthetically appealing project we get to do,” he says.

Because of the firm’s focus on custom work, Fergusson’s crew already was proficient in good communication with each other. But the complexities of the Wilmington job would put Fergusson in direct communication with Kersting, which is unusual. “A lot of times the architect is insulated from the roofing contractor by the GC on the job,” Fergusson explains. “Communicating directly with the architect was a good thing. We could explain which of his ideas would and wouldn’t work.” In addition, Fergusson brought roofing samples to Kersting’s office where they were tweaked before 1-square mockups were tested onsite to see how the installation would be completed along the hip.

Photos: Chris Fisher, unless otherwise noted

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