A Green Roof Provides Residents of a Senior Housing Complex with an Improved View

The Findlay Teller Apartments provides affordable housing for low-income seniors in the Bronx, N.Y. The complex includes 32 one-bedroom and 131 efficiency units. Its 9,925-square-foot green roof is its most prominent green-building element and gives residents a welcomed view of green space.

Built in 1906, the dilapidated building was revitalized by three local Bronx organizations.

Built in 1906, the dilapidated building was revitalized by three local Bronx organizations.

“Many green roofs are on top of buildings where no one can see and enjoy them. The Findlay Teller green roof, particularly the sections installed on the terrace level and second-floor roofs, has many windows that look out on the [green roof sections],” says Antonio Freda, owner of Bronx-based Freda Design Associates Ltd., the architect for the apartment building’s renovation. “In fact, 90 percent of the apartments have a view of the green roof.”

RESTORING A NEIGHBORHOOD LANDMARK

Located at 1201 Findlay Avenue in the Morrisania neighborhood of the Bronx, the community landmark has a long history. The building was constructed in 1906. The Daughters of Jacob, a non-profit service organization, originally used the building as a hospital and nursery facility. It was renovated in 1920. The east and west wings were added in 1952.

Converted to subsidized senior housing under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Section 202 program in 1978, and known as Findlay Plaza, the building deteriorated over the years. By December 2007, the apartments had a lowly score of 34 out of 100 on HUD’s Housing Quality Standards. Buildings must score at least 86 for their conditions to be rated healthy and safe. Eventually, HUD foreclosed on the property.

In 2009, three local organizations, the Citizens Housing and Planning Council, the Local Initiatives Support Corp. and the Belmont-Arthur Avenue Local Development Corp. (BAALDC), worked together to win the support of the building’s tenants and neighborhood leaders to acquire and rehabilitate the property.

Roofing workers spread the growing media on the roof.

Roofing workers spread the growing media on the roof.

BAALDC, which strives to prevent the deterioration, blight and abandonment of at-risk housing in the Bronx, established the Findlay Teller Housing Development Fund Corp. (Findlay Teller HDFC) to take on the challenge of assembling financing and renovating the building.

“The building was in a very sad state of disrepair,” notes Joe Cicciu, executive director of BAALDC and president of Findlay Teller HDFC. “We put together $20 million in funds from many different sources, including a major grant from JPMorgan Chase, to save and rehabilitate the building.”

GREEN BUILDING AND A GREEN ROOF

Notias Construction Inc., Flushing, N.Y., was the general contractor for the project. The firm managed the renovation according to Enterprise Green Communities Criteria, a program of Columbia, Md.-based Enterprise Community Partners, a non-profit dedicated to creating opportunity for low- and moderate-income people through affordable housing in diverse, thriving communities. Required by the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the criteria define standards for green-building practices applicable to affordable housing. Thus, the renovation included a new structural roof with two layers of insulation, high-efficiency boilers, replacement windows and new energy-efficient lighting. In addition to the green roof, permeable pavement in the parking area reduces stormwater runoff.

PHOTOS: XERO FLOR AMERICA

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Projects: Retail

KOOPMAN LUMBER & HARDWARE, SHARON, MASS.

The FM-Approved AceClamp ML was used to install a 200-kW solar-power system on the facility.

The FM-Approved AceClamp ML was used to install a 200-kW solar-power system on the facility.

TEAM

Solar Installer: Cotuit Solar, Cotuit, Mass.
Roof-clamp Manufacturer: AceClamp/PMC

ROOF MATERIALS

The AceClamp ML is a standing-seam metal roofclamp system that can accommodate almost any application or roof seam. Its two-piece design allows installation at any point on the seam with a tight vibration-tested grip. All mounting holes are top-loaded, providing easy, quick access for the contractor, completing installation in less than half the time of conventional side-mounting systems. The AceClamp ML also does not penetrate or scratch the roof’s surface, preserving manufacturers’ warranties.

The AceClamp ML also does not penetrate or scratch the roof’s surface, preserving manufacturers’ warranties.

The AceClamp ML also does not penetrate or scratch the roof’s surface, preserving manufacturers’ warranties.

ROOF REPORT

Koopman Lumber & Hardware, a Massachusetts retailer of lumber, hardware and other building materials and equipment, recently opened its newest location in Sharon. It offers equipment rental, tools, paint and decorating, a kitchen design center, building materials and more.

PHOTOS: AceClamp/PMC

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Project Profiles: Health Care

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL, BOSTON

TEAM

Roofing contractor: Chapman Waterproofing Co., Boston
Architect/engineer: Cambridge Seven Associates Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
Membrane and waterproofing manufacturer: Kemper System America Inc.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, features a Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane for its green roof.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, features a Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane for its green roof.

ROOF MATERIALS

The Kempertec EP-Primer was used to prepare the substrate surfaces for membrane installation and served as a temporary waterproofing system, allowing the project to be exposed to the harsh New England winter while it was completed in phased stages.

The owners chose the Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane, a two-component with catalyst, high-performance, seamless and self-terminating cold-fluid-applied reinforced unsaturated polyester system. The monolithic edge-to-edge rot- and root-resistant Kemper membrane is engineered to resist degradation from UV exposure and heat intensity and is resistant to most common chemicals.

ROOF REPORT

Founded in 1811, Massachusetts General Hospital is the third oldest general hospital in the U.S. and the oldest and largest in New England. The 900-bed medical center offers sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic care in virtually every specialty and subspecialty of medicine and surgery. When MGH’s owners envisioned constructing a new 9,000-square-foot green roof above the MGH cancer wing, they had two chief concerns: safety and long-term durability.

The landscaped roof design includes four different gardens with extensive shrubbery, trees and grass designed to provide cancer patients with a haven for relaxation and meditation to aid in the healing process.

A key challenge concerning the hospital’s green roof was its hundreds of penetrations, spaced inches apart, for a sprinkler system to irrigate the landscaped roof. A leak-detection system was installed across the entire square footage of the project to detect water before it seeps into the interior of the building. The leak-detection system confirms the project’s seal-tight success. Upon completion, Kemper System provided a 20-year, no-dollar-limit warranty.

PHOTO: KEMPER SYSTEM AMERICA INC.

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An Atlanta Neighborhood Receives Much-needed Health and Community Services All Under One Roof

Fulton County, Ga., administrators believe policy drives the conditions in which people live and work. When socio-economic conditions are poor and there are few public services, administrators believe the physical and mental health of community residents suffer. As such, in 2008, Fulton County’s Health and Human Services departments were charged with identifying opportunities to improve community health through programs and policies.

Adamsville Regional Health Center is a hybrid building that not only provides primary-care, dental and behavioral health clinics, but also offers child-care facilities, housing resources and access to the library system, as well as a workforce development center.

Adamsville Regional Health Center is a hybrid building that not only provides primary-care, dental and behavioral health clinics, but also offers child-care facilities, housing resources and access to the library system, as
well as a workforce development center.

As part of the resulting Common Ground initiative, county administrators now are providing services to underserved areas. Adamsville, a predominantly African-American neighborhood located on the southwest side of Atlanta, was identified as a community in need. Fulton County’s solution was construction of a hybrid building that not only provides primary-care, dental and behavioral health clinics, but also offers child-care facilities, housing resources and access to the library system, as well as a workforce development center. The space also has approximately 500 square feet available for future use. The county hoped the new building would not only provide assistance to residents but also entice additional businesses and housing development in the area.

Although the project was smaller—34,000 square feet—than most completed by the Atlanta offices of architectural firm Stanley Beaman & Sears and general contractor Whiting-Turner Contracting, the design-build team was attracted to the concept. “We thought it was a good story,” says David Deis, project manager with Stanley Beaman & Sears, a firm that specializes in healthcare design. “It’s kind of a community center that taps into all that Fulton County has to offer, and we were both intrigued by that.”

As the team got started, it quickly realized putting all the disparate parts and pieces together into one facility during the 275-day timeframe Fulton County required was going to be challenging. Teamwork and a roof that identifies this “beacon for the community” brought it all together on schedule and within budget.

ROOF AS METAPHOR

As the design-build team began laying out the building’s program requirements, team members realized something had to organize the many services the new Adamsville Regional Health Center would provide. Deis says the team devised an interior “street” visitors can walk down to access the individual departments. “Visitors can see where the dental clinic is, where the primary care and behavioral health are,” he says. “It’s almost like you’re walking down the mall or a street and you’re seeing all these services.”

The roof is like a “quilt”, bringing all the departments and services together in one space. It also is a predominant feature on the site.

The roof is like a “quilt”, bringing all the departments and services together in one space. It also is a predominant feature on the site.

The team immediately knew the roof would be important. Not only would it be like a “quilt” bringing all the departments and services together in one space, but it also would be a predominant feature on the site.

Built along Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, a state highway that leads into downtown Atlanta, the building would be seen by a lot of traffic. The site itself is street level next to Martin Luther King Jr. Drive but dramatically drops farther from the street. The design-build team opted to create a 2-story building in which the second story is level with the roadway. Parking and access to the first level were built in the back where the site plummets. The location of the building and the site’s topography dictated a roof that would capture the attention of passersby.

“Once we set the building and looked at it formally, we didn’t want people driving down the street and looking down onto a typical gable-type roof,” Deis says. “We knew the roof would be very dominant and we wanted to keep it clean and allow it to claim the corner at the intersection.”

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Smart Roofing Selection Helps a New York House Reach Lofty Sustainability Goals

Built in 1932, the once-grand structure, known as The Beach House, was in need of a major overhaul. The bungalow-style home, located on the west shore of Truesdale Lake in South Salem, a hamlet of Lewisboro, N.Y., was falling into disrepair and showed signs of age throughout. Three years ago, the homeowner called Sylvain Côté, owner of Absolute Green Homes Inc., South Salem, to preserve the home and showcase how sustainability can be embraced. Today, the renovated beach house is Energy Star certified by Energy Star, Washington, D.C., and LEED for Homes Platinum certified by the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington, and, with a score of 30, is a Home Energy Rating System (HERS)-certified home.

Top Down

The roof arguably is among the most important elements of a home. It takes a direct beating from the sun, rain, hail, snow and other elements. It reflects or refracts heat and can make the difference between a comfortable, efficient house and a house where the heating and cooling system is fighting the natural inclinations of the building.

The Beach House features a polymer slate roof.

The Beach House features a polymer slate roof.

The reroof took place in 2011, starting in May with the installation of a 3/4-inch plywood roof deck. Côté did not remove the entire existing roof deck. “We only removed what we had to, so we could accommodate the new dormers,” he explains. Then Côté’s crew of two to three installed a peel-and-stick roof underlayment, followed by a foil-faced 1-inch-thick rigid foam board, which Côté opted for because of its UV-reflecting capacity and ability to reduce heat gain in the summer. The insulation board then was covered with another layer of 1/2-inch-thick plywood and a second layer of the peel-and-stick underlayment, for a total R-value of 41. The fascia installation also was completed alongside this step.

The unventilated attic is insulated with closed-cell spray-foam insulation, which prevents condensation and helps the attic serve as a buffer to outside temperature fluctuations affecting the house. This method nearly eliminates the extreme temperatures in the attic area during hot and cold seasons.

By September, Côté had finished installing a new stone chimney, so shingle installation could begin. An impact- and fire-resistant polymer slate product in black was chosen to replace the existing asphalt-shingle roof on The Beach House. Côté specified the new roof type in part because of its durability, aesthetic appeal and warranty. “I chose this roofing product on my own home and knew it’d be a perfect match for this retrofit project since it’s a very realistic-looking material and has a solid thickness to each tile,” Côté says. “Having this polymer roof makes it possible for the homeowner to collect rainwater runoff from the roof that drops down the gutters and chains into rain-collection barrels. Because there are no particles from the tiles, the rainwater is the highest quality and better suited for landscaping applications.” About 18 squares of the 12-inch-exposure polymer shingles took approximately one month to install.

Then, Côté integrated 450 square feet of solar slates into the south roof where sun exposure is greatest. The 5-kilowatt solar photovoltaic installation blends almost seamlessly with the remainder of the roof. No flashing or connecting element is necessary between the polymer and solar shingles because the solar shingles fill the entire roof plane in the areas where they are installed; a natural divider, such as a hip, makes connecting the roofing types unnecessary.

Although the 15-inch solar slates have a slightly different exposure than the polymer slates, Côté notes the solar area has a gentler slope (6:12) than the rest of the roof (8:12), so the naked eye barely notices the size discrepancy. The south side’s roof system also includes thermal components that are concealed under the solar slates and assist in producing some of the domestic hot-water needs.

One of the biggest challenges Côté encountered was adding two new dormers to the roof and enlarging the existing three. The finished home has five tightly spaced dormers, all of which have three windows; Côté exercised creativity so they wouldn’t appear crowded. “The nice thing about the roof is it dramatically changes the curb appeal,” he notes.

The Beach House before its remodel.

The Beach House before its remodel.

Smart Design

Through The Beach House’s retrofit, Côté demonstrates thoughtful design actually can allow a house to be downsized while still feeling spacious. Originally 1,840 square feet, the house at completion measured 1,780 square feet. Design features include an open floor plan with the kitchen, dining and family/ lounge area on the main floor. Floorto- ceiling glass doors open to views of the waterfront, and the outdoor living space is accented with a wide patio and gas fire bowl. The home’s first level also includes a wet bar that expands outside, a mudroom and half bath. Upstairs, a master suite, which also has expansive views of the waterfront, features a twosided gas fireplace and a free-standing Japanese-style soaking tub. Two other bedrooms, one bathroom and laundry facilities complete the second floor.

Côté reused quite a few materials to create visual elements within The Beach House. For example, he crafted kitchen cabinets from reclaimed tongue-and-groove sheathing from the home’s original roof and attic floors. Wood from a recently disassembled 200-year-old local barn was used to make custom, built-in closets and cabinetry, a bar, three bathroom vanities, tub surround and structural exposed beams.

With a HERS rating of 30, The Beach House is more than three times as efficient and costs about one-third as much as a conventional home of similar size to operate. Côté attributes this in part to the well-designed roof system.

PHOTOS: Sylvain Côté, Absolute Green Homes Inc.

Roof Materials

Polymer slate roof: Bellaforte synthetic roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes
Foil-faced rigid board: Tuff-R from Dow Building Solutions
Underlayment: Peel & Seal, MFM Building Products
Solar tiles and thermal components: Sunslates from Atlantis Energy Systems
White board trim fascia: Kleer from The Tapco Group

A Design Firm Trusts Its Regular Roofing Contractor to Install a New-to-him Insulated Metal Panel on its Office

David Miller, owner of Alpine Roofing LLC, Durham, N.C., has been in business since 2008. He specializes in what he calls the “complete roofing package”—making sure that all the areas of a roof are properly installed so the roof system lasts for 30 years or more without any problems. Miller and his crew’s attention to detail has made him the chosen roofing contractor of Durham-based BuildSense Inc., a residential design and construction firm that has a sustainability emphasis.

BuildSense Inc. is a Durham, N.C.-based residential design and construction firm that has a sustainability emphasis. PHOTO: Catherine Wilborne Photography

BuildSense Inc. is a Durham, N.C.-based residential design and construction firm that has a sustainability emphasis. PHOTO: Catherine Wilborne Photography

Miller knew he was doing good work for BuildSense, but he was assured of this fact when BuildSense’s owners—Randall Lanou, LEED AP, MCGP, and Erik Van Mehlman, AIA, CGP—asked him to reroof the existing building that would become the firm’s new office. Not only did they trust Miller enough to reroof their practice’s new home, but they also entrusted him with a roof cover he had never installed before.

“They knew I hadn’t worked with this insulated metal panel product before,” Miller recalls. “But they said I had always done them right and they wanted to give me the opportunity to look at this type of project. It seemed like it was up our alley. We handle things we haven’t done before with attention to detail and an understanding of how water causes problems. We try to do the best job we can.”

Sustainability Focus

BuildSense’s new office at 502 Rigsbee in Durham was built in 1945 as a farm-equipment-maintenance building. The structure had spent its last 30 years as various automotive service centers. The 1-story, 6,000-square-foot solid masonry building had optimal orientation to achieve Lanou and Mehlman’s daylighting and solarpower goals. By adding a second story in which BuildSense and tenants (occupied today by a marketing firm and a yoga studio) could operate, Clear-Vue Glass, BuildSense’s partner in the building’s purchase, could maintain an office, fabrication facility and showroom at pedestrian level.

To create the most energy-efficient building possible, Lanou and Mehlman opted to take the existing structure down to its skeleton, leaving only the masonry shell and primary steel columns and girders. Originally, they planned to maintain the existing roof and build the second story on top. However, the roof sloped from north to south about 3 inches for drainage. The partners decided to remove the wood framing, add more steel and a metal deck, and pour a new level composite concrete slab for the second story.

BuildSense pursued a tight, well-insulated building envelope. For the roof, Lanou and Mehlman specified an insulated metal panel featuring a 6-inch urethane core that boasts an R-value of 42. “It’s also painted white, which significantly helps us reduce our cooling loads in the summer—the predominant loads in a commercial building in our climate,” Lanou explains. “It’s very well air-sealed, very well insulated and it’s reflective.” In addition, the roof cover, insulation and finished ceiling are provided in one component.

Roof Install

A crane was required to lift all panels to the roof from one side of the building because power lines impeded the other sides. “The crane would grab the bundle of panels, which were staged on the high side of the building, and lift them up and over the building to place them on the low side,” Miller says. “It would’ve been so much easier if we had access completely around the building but we had to have a big crane come out there and do that lift.”

The roof cover, insulation and finished ceiling are provided in one component. PHOTO: Barrett Hahn

The roof cover, insulation and finished ceiling are provided in one component. PHOTO: Barrett Hahn

Once the panels were on the building near where they would be installed, manlifts further assisted with situating the panels on the roof. “The larger panel sections were 400 pounds each and 42-inches wide,” Miller explains. “They were awkward to handle. You also had to make sure when you were moving them around on top of the steel trusses that you didn’t scratch the finished paint on the underside of the panels, which would serve as the second-floor ceiling.”

Miller says safety was the biggest challenge on the project. His crew was tied to steel beams or apparatus that bolts onto the standing seam once they were past the leading edge. “We also made sure no one got hurt while we were moving the 400-pound panels. You don’t want a 400-pound panel on one man and he’s trying to hold the thing up without his knowledge. Honestly, a 400-pound panel once it is in motion may end up being 2,000 pounds of live load so we had to work in unison. We had one crew leader who would call out the play, saying ‘1, 2, 3, we’re going down’ or ‘1, 2, 3, we’re moving the panel over’.”

The coordination among the crew helped because the panels weren’t packaged exactly as they would be installed on the roof. “Some of them were upside down and we had to rotate,” Miller notes. “Without a lift there fulltime, it would’ve been even more challenging. Plus, we were working about 35 feet above the ground and 15 feet above the concrete floor of the building. We had to stay safe, stay tied off.”

Once the lifting and maneuvering were handled, Miller says the installation, which took about a week, was similar to any standing-seam roof, except each panel is 8-inches tall. “The top of the lock must be engaged while the panel is rotated so the tongue at the bottom of the panel engages with the lock,” he says. “Once you are engaged at the top and bottom, then you manually seam the locks together at the top. When you’re all finished you take a massive power seamer and run down the seam and it locks that joint together, so you have all kinds of wind-uplift value.” [Read more…]

Projects: Offices/Manufacturing

Accident Fund Holdings Inc. Headquarters, Lansing, Mich.

Team

Roofing Contractor: Bloom Roofing, Brighton, Mich.
Construction Manager: The Christman Co., Lansing
Architect of Record: HOK, St. Louis
Construction Engineer: Ruby + Associates Inc., Farmington Hills, Mich.

Roof Materials

Accident Fund Holdings Headquarters features a white TPO roof. PHOTO: Image Michigan and The Christman Co.

Accident Fund Holdings Headquarters features a white TPO roof. PHOTO: Image Michigan and The Christman Co.


An insulated cool roof minimizes the building and surrounding area’s heat-island effect.
White TPO Roof: Firestone Building Products Co.
Polyurethane-foam Adhesive: OMG Roofing Products
Caged Roof-hatch Grab Bars: LadderPort

Roof Report

Accident Fund Holdings, the nation’s 13th largest workers’ compensation insurer and a subsidiary of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, has been headquartered in Lansing, Mich., for more than 100 years. When it outgrew its office, the firm’s leaders were determined to stay in Lansing.

By revitalizing the iconic Ottawa Street Power Station, which was built along the Grand River in 1939 but had been mostly abandoned since 1992, the company would have 9 stories and 122,000 square feet to grow into. To support Michigan’s economy, 106 of the 118 contracts and suppliers that participated in the project were Michigan-based firms and 54 of those were Lansing-based.

To remove existing building elements, including catwalks, elevator/ stair shafts, framing and platforms, the team cut two 40-foot-long by 20-foot-wide roof hatches so a crane operator could move about 8,900 pieces of steel in and out of the building while the floors were built from the bottom up.

Since Accident Fund moved into its new headquarters, the building has won numerous awards, including the Governor’s Award for Historic Preservation from the state of Michigan and an Excellence in Economic Development Award from the Washington, D.C.-based International Economic Development Council. [Read more…]

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Projects: Hospitality & Entertainment

Refinery Hotel, Manhattan

The lean-to-enclosure features a bi-parting roof measuring 24 feet 4 inches by 40 feet 5 inches with a 40-foot 5-inch- by 12-foot 5 1/2-inch-high front wall.

The lean-to-enclosure features a bi-parting roof measuring 24 feet 4 inches by 40 feet 5 inches with a 40-foot 5-inch- by 12-foot 5 1/2-inch-high front wall.

Team

Retractable roof designer, manufacturer and installer: OpenAire, Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Architect: Stonehill & Taylor Architects and Planners, New York

Roof Materials

The lean-to-enclosure features a bi-parting roof measuring 24 feet 4 inches by 40 feet 5 inches with a 40-foot 5-inch- by 12-foot 5 1/2-inch-high front wall. Installation is along a 7.72-degree slope. The four dividing roof sections each measure 10 feet. Two sections bi-part up to 50 percent from the center, moving outward and “parking” over the fixed end bays.

Roof Report

Located in Manhattan’s Fashion District, Refinery Hotel welcomes guests to its rooftop, which opened in June 2013. The industrial aesthetic of Refinery Hotel extends onto the rooftop, where cocktails can be enjoyed within three distinct lounge spaces: indoor, outdoor and a space “in-between” that features the integrated bi-parting skylight/roof. The retractable glass roof enhances the view of New York’s city sunsets and allows guests to take in the skyline, including the Empire State Building.

“The rooftop has a warm industrial aesthetic for which the skylight was a perfect complement,” says Christina Zimmer, principal at Stonehill & Taylor Architects and Planners. “The massive skylight brings the outside in and vice versa while sheltering guests from the elements.”

The retractable glass roof enhances the view of New York’s city sunsets and allows guests to take in the skyline, including the Empire State Building.

The retractable glass roof enhances the view of New York’s city sunsets and allows guests to take in the skyline, including the Empire State Building.

Pinky Vaid, owner of Refinery Hotel, adds: “The retractable skylight has become a focal point for our guests with evening hours spent enjoying access to the Manhattan skyline. OpenAire enabled us to realize our original vision for the rooftop, from conception to execution of the finest details.”

Photos: OpenAire

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Nashville, Tenn., Begins Revitalization of Its City Center with a New Convention Space that Features a Truly Unique Roof

It isn’t often that a nightmare becomes a pleasant reality. Andy Baker, vice president of Raleigh, N.C.- based Baker Roofing, recalls the year he spent as project manager for the roofing of the new Music City Center in Nashville, Tenn., as one of his most challenging jobs. “The logistics, a tight spot downtown, the size of the project and everything that goes along with that—thousands of people trying to work and everyone needs their material in that area at the same time. Even the unique shape of the building made it hard,” Baker remembers. “We’re glad it’s done and we can look back on it now and say: ‘Wow! We did that.’”

The Music City Center was built to be the catalyst for more development in the SoBro neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. It is intended to create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if flooding occurs, like in May 2010.

The Music City Center was built to be the catalyst for more development in the SoBro neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. It is intended to create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if flooding occurs, like in May 2010.

Baker and his crew of up to 50 roofing workers have much to be proud of. The completed project is the largest capital construction project in Nashville’s history and was designed to bring prosperity to the area known as SoBro, or South of Broadway, which was affected by massive flooding in May 2010. The Music City Center lies outside the flood-prone areas and hopefully will be the catalyst for more development, which will create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if another flood occurs.

In addition to the Music City Center’s imaginative design that resembles various musical instruments, the building boasts a number of features that are ideal for a high-profile project. Many of these features are located in the most opportune of places—the roof. An Energy Star-qualified thermoplastic PVC membrane covers the 643,752-squarefoot roof while a 186,700-square-foot vegetated roof literally mimics the rolling hills of Tennessee’s Highland Rim. The rooftop also hosts a 211-kilowatt solar-power system on the 1-acre area that is over the Grand Ballroom, a rooftop space that resembles an acoustic guitar in shape. Lastly, the roof collects rainwater that is funneled to a 360,000-gallon tank before it is used to irrigate the site and flush hundreds of toilets inside.

Construction Challenges

Baker and his colleagues knew the Music City Center would present many challenges even before work began. “We knew it was going to be a logistical nightmare going in but then you have to live it,” he recalls. “You would think four city blocks would be a large enough area to work from but there were thousands of contractors working and receiving materials at the same time. Trying to keep truck drivers and suppliers happy was difficult. The community was great though; there were a lot of police officers around to direct traffic.”

Baker Roofing's team of up to 50 roofing workers spent one year working on the Music City Center.

Baker Roofing’s team of up to 50 roofing workers spent one year working on the Music City Center.

Installation also proved perplexing because of the roof’s undulating slopes of 1/4:12 to 12:12. Baker likens the rolls to waves and points out in some places they were almost conical in shape. In the areas in which there was no vegetated roof, the crew fastened two layers of 1.7-inch polyisocyanurate insulation followed by 1/4-inch roof board. Then a 60-mil thermoplastic PVC membrane in a light gray color was fully adhered to the assembly. The membrane features a lacquer coating to reduce dirt pickup.

Photos: Keri Baker

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Best Roofing Projects of the Carolinas

We celebrate the best roofs installed in North and South Carolina with our final issue of Carolinas Roofing. From metal to shingles to single ply and coatings, these roof coverings protect newly built and reroofed schools, homes, manufacturing facilities, city-service buildings and more.

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Team

Roofing contractor: Baker Roofing Co., Charlotte, www.bakerroofing.com
Designers: Jenkins-Peer Architects, Charlotte, www.jenkinspeer.com, and DLR Group, www.dlrgroup.com
Construction manager: Rogers PCL Russell, a joint venture of Rodgers Builders Inc., Charlotte, www.rodgersbuilders.com; PCL Constructors Inc., Charlotte, www.pcl.com; and H.J. Russell & Co., Atlanta, www.hjrussell.com
Metal roofing manufacturer: McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La., www.mcelroymetal.com

Roof Materials

New metal roofing matches the campus scheme on many other buildings. It also offers overall longevity, durability and low-maintenance features.

The field house and press box are covered with 11,000 square feet of Maxima 216, 24-gauge Kynar in Slate Gray and 4,000 square feet of 24-gauge flat stock metal roofing and low-slope roofing trim.

Roof Report

2013-14 is the first year for Charlotte 49ers football. This new 15,000-seat stadium was built for the new team and is designed to be expanded to 40,000 seats. The main building, the Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse, located in the south end zone, has been named after the university’s longtime athletic director.

The stadium includes several other buildings, including the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, named in honor of Hugh McColl, former Bank of America CEO, and Jerry Richardson, owner of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers.

Photo courtesy of McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La.

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