SPF Roof System Solves Problems for Renovated Office Complex

Historic Pier 70 in San Francisco was a steel mill and a shipyard before it was converted into a modern mixed-use office complex. Central Coating Company applied an SPF roof system from Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings on 88,000 square feet of the original corrugated metal roof. Photos: Central Coating Company

For more than 100 years, Pier 70 in San Francisco had a storied history, serving as a steel mill and a shipyard that produced destroyers during World War II. The site is a historic landmark, but it sat idle for some two decades before an ambitious restoration project brought it back to life as a mixed-use office complex. The facility now is home to companies including Uber Advanced Technology Group, which set up new offices in 82,000 square feet of the project’s first phase.

When the new tenants found interior temperatures became uncomfortably warm in the summer, Luke Nolan, president of Central Coating Company, was called in to consult on the roof system. With locations in San Jose and Madera, California, Central Coating specializes in spray polyurethane foam (SPF) roofing. The vast majority of its work consists of commercial and industrial re-roofing.

Two inches of SPF added a layer of R-13 continuous insulation, eliminated existing leaks and minimized heat gain from the uninsulated metal roof.

“California’s Title 24 doesn’t apply to historic buildings, so modern energy codes did not apply, and the renovation was completed without thermal insulation,” notes Nolan. “Modern office space was set up in a building where they used to forge steel and used natural ventilation. There was no air conditioning. With the uninsulated roof system, even in moderate San Francisco, radiant heat could cause interior temps to rise to 85 degrees on summer days.”

Nolan used infrared imaging to document the radiant heat entering the building from the roof. Temperatures on the underside of the metal roof topped 135 degrees. He recommended applying an SPF system as the only viable solution to minimize radiant heat, prevent recurring leaks, and preserve the building’s historic status.

Central Coating put together some budgets and commissioned a study by a roofing consultant to quantify the possible reduction in radiant heat. Roger Morrison of Deer Ridge consulting calculated the reduction in radiant heat from various thicknesses of spray foam. The recommendation was for at least 2 inches of SPF, which would add a layer of R-13 continuous insulation.

The next hurdle was making sure the system would meet the standards for the historic building. “The historic architect wanted to make sure that we were able to maintain the look of the corrugated metal on the existing roof,” Nolan says. “That helped us make the decision to go with a 2-inch system instead of going up to 3 inches, because at 3 inches the foam would self-level, and you’d lose the print-through of the corrugations.”

Central Coating was required to do a prototype installation on the building before the project was approved. “We basically did two 200-square-foot areas,” Nolan notes. “Talk about pressure. We knew we had to get it right.’”

After the test areas were finished and approved, the project got the green light.

Completing the Installation

The existing corrugated metal roof was comprised of multiple peaks, many featuring monitors — raised structures that housed rows of clerestory windows for daylighting.

The building was occupied and in use at the time, adding to the complexities of the safety planning. Central Coating had to erect scaffolding and pedestrian canopies to protect passers-by on sidewalks and at building entrances. Safety equipment for Central Coating’s crew members included horizontal lifeline systems on all of the ridges and temporary guardrails along all exposed edges.

The next step was substrate preparation. Crews power-washed the surface, capturing the water, which had to be filtered before it could be returned to the sewer system. The team then installed custom-designed metal flashings at the perimeter and masked the windows before the spraying began.

Working in sections, crews applied a spray foam system manufactured by Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings. Crews covered approximately 5,000 square feet a day. The total project consisted of more than 88,000 square feet.

Carlisle GP Primer was applied with a sprayer to help increase adhesion of the spray foam. According to Nolan, it dries very quickly, usually within an hour, and the Carlisle PremiSEAL 70 SPF was then sprayed in place.

As part of the goal of maintaining the look of the corrugated metal, the SPF was applied in one application. “You can spray 2 inches in two lifts, but you are more prone to leveling out the surface,” Nolan explains. “We also sprayed the foam a little bit colder than you normally would, which somewhat negatively affected our yield, but we needed to maintain that corrugated look. It’s funny — usually we’re trying to get the foam as flat as possible, but that wasn’t the case here. However, it really worked out well. The sprayers did an excellent job. It was like an art project.”

The Carlisle SeamlessSEAL FR acrylic coating was applied in multiple passes. “The first base coat goes on the same day as the foam is sprayed,” Nolan notes. “Once we covered a certain area, we fell back to apply the mid coat and top coat.”

The top coat was produced in a custom color, Battleship Gray, to match the existing building. Granules were broadcast into the top coat.

Well-Executed Plan

The new SPF system qualified for a 20-year system warranty and achieved its goals, including minimizing heat gain. “The benefit to building comfort was absolutely huge,” Nolan says. “We reduced the temperature of the underside of the metal roof by almost 40 degrees on warm days.”

It was a challenging project, but everything went smoothly, notes Nolan. He credits detailed planning for the project’s success. “This took a tremendous amount of work just to get through the proposal and submittal process — and get the approval of the tenant, the owner, the Port of San Francisco, and the State Historic Preservation Office. And then we just had a really good plan in place for safety and logistics,” he says. “Everyone was very pleased with our process as well as the final result.”

Since the building was occupied, communicating with the tenant was crucial. “There was a lot of coordination with the people working downstairs,” notes Nolan. “The noisier steps, such as installing our metal or installing our safety equipment, we began very early — starting at 5:30 and finishing at 8:30 — so we were not bothering people in the offices during the workday. It’s one of those things that goes to show the importance of having a good plan, communicating that plan, and then executing it.”

The experience stands out for Nolan for many reasons. The project received a 2020 SPFA Annual Excellence Award from the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance. The Historic Pier 70 project was named the winner in the in the category of “SPF roof over 40,000 square feet.”

It was also a bit unusual. “For us as a foam roofing contractor, we typically do roofing projects that have the benefit of adding insulation to the building,” Nolan says. “What I mean by that is someone is usually calling us up because their existing roof is at the end of its useful life, and foam will have the added benefits of cutting down their energy bill and making their building more comfortable — but we’re doing it primarily because they need a new roof. This one was different in that we were doing a foam roofing project that was really an insulation job.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Central Coating Company, San Jose and Madera, California, www.centralcoatingcompany.com

MATERIALS

SPF System: PremiSEAL 70, Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings, www.carlislerfc.com

Acrylic Coating: SeamlessSEAL FR, Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings

Outfitter’s New Roof Is Designed to Look Great, Withstand the Elements

When the owners of the Bass Pro location in Pearl, Mississippi, looked for a new roof, they initially considered the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, but the existing fascia boards inspired them to choose Colonial Red from Petersen’s palette of stock colors. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Bass Pro Shops brands itself as a supplier of performance products designed to endure the great outdoors, but at its Pearl, Mississippi, store, the roof was falling short of that standard. The roof’s mix of membrane and metal roof systems was damaged during a severe weather event, which prompted a re-roofing initiative.

“They had a hailstorm come through and they wanted to upgrade,” says Roman Malone, president of the installing firm, E. Cornell Malone Corp., based in nearby Jackson, Mississippi. In addition to installing a new membrane roof, the project including replacing the existing bare Galvalume steel panels with 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red. The panels form the highly visible sloped portions of the roof, along with a canopy overhang over the building’s storefront walkway and entrance.

After the metal roof system was installed, crews completed Firestone TPO roof on the low-slope section.

The 100,000-square-foot store was a founding anchor retailer in the 150-acre-plus Bloomfield Development. It shares the title with Trustmark Park, home of the Atlanta Braves’ minor-league baseball team, the Mississippi Braves. People visit the retailer for more than just shopping — the facility includes a large aquarium, shooting gallery and 3-D archery range along with a bar and restaurant. Since its 2005 opening, the surrounding development has grown to include The Outlets of Mississippi, the state’s largest outlet center, which welcomes almost 4.5 million visitors every year.

The metal portion of the re-roofing effort included removing the existing panels along with the ice and water shield below, while the existing plywood decking and insulation remained in good shape. For the roofing pros from E. Cornell Malone, the heavily trafficked surroundings proved a greater challenge than the roof itself. “We had to keep the front door open,” Malone recalls. “The flagpole and the tallest part of the standing seam roof are right over the main entrance. There was a period of time when we had to work there, and we had to use the exit door as an entrance and block off that area for safety reasons. We had to move as fast as we could to minimize the disruption. We also had to use cranes to get the material up to the roof and the demolished material off the roof.”

Eye-Catching Color

While the profile of the standing-seam roof remained similar to its original appearance, the Colonial Red finish certainly creates a major pop for the building. Malone says store managers initially were considering the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, when they happened upon Colonial Red in Petersen’s palette of stock colors. “The fascia boards just happened to be the same color as the roof — so, when they saw the Colonial Red, it was an obvious color choice for them,” Malone says. “We didn’t paint that fascia, and it just matched perfectly. I believe this is the first Bass Pro Shop in the country to use this color on their roof. It looks really good.”

E. Cornell Malone Corp. installed approximately 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels on the project.

Crews installed the metal roof system first, and then completed the installation of the single-ply roof on the low-slope section. “We had to use the flat roof as a work platform to reach the high part of the metal roof. We protected what was there, and then came back and put the TPO roof on. That way, we wouldn’t damage it during the installation of the metal roof.”

Crews mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil TPO system over 1/4-inch DensDeck cover board. “The TPO portion of the project was pretty straightforward,” Malone says. “The highlight of this project is really the metal roof. You can’t see the TPO roof from the ground, but it complemented everything else, brought everything under warranty and got them up to date.”

An interesting detail on the project involved the large flagpole on the metal roof over the entrance. The safety system incorporates shock absorbing anchors, S-5! clamps, and a 100 feet of stainless steel line with hands-fee Unigrab Travelers and dedicated lanyards. “We worked with a safety company, Rooftop Anchor, to engineer a safety system so people could manage the flag and be safe,” Malone says. “Before that, the owners used to hire us to come out and raise and lower their flag. Now that they have a safety system in place, they can manage the flag themselves.”

Feedback on the new roof has been very positive, notes Malone. “The customers are ecstatic about the roof. It has totally transformed the building — it’s definitely an upgrade.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: E. Cornell Malone Corp., Jackson, Mississippi, www.ecmalone.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Low-Slope Roof: 60-mil TPO, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Flagpole Safety System: Rooftop Anchor, Heber City, Utah, www.rooftopanchor.com

Standing Seam Clamps: S-5!, www.s-5.com

New Roof Systems Make Shopping Center a Showplace Once Again

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

LK Construction tackles many composite shingle roofing projects each year. On an average, they’ve been known to knock out 20 or more commercial and residential composite roofs annually. And, while each project is special, nothing compares to their 2018 mega-project: the re-roofing of South Lake Village Shopping Center in Reston, Virginia.

With almost two dozen retailers and businesses, the shopping center has 109,527 square feet of space. And every building in the connected community center had a failing cedar roof.

Built in 1984, South Lake Village had a natural cedar roof complementing a low-slope membrane roof system. Fast forward to 2018. Functionally, the roof was failing badly. Stores complained of water leaks. Shingles were cracked and had moss growth, degrading the look of the entire shopping center. That’s when the management company decided to invest in a new roof system featuring Bellaforté Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“We knew this project was a winner the moment we started the installation,” says Scott Kim, vice president at LK Construction in Annandale, Virginia. “Both store residents and shoppers were astonished by the transformation. Everyone expressed their excitement at the look of the new synthetic shakes. We immediately got calls from people wanting the Bellaforté Shake on their homes. Within several months, 10 houses in the area had composite shake roofing. And now there are many other homeowners inquiring about the DaVinci product on a regular basis.”

Safety First

The process of re-roofing South Lake Village came with a unique set of challenges for the team at LK Construction. While shoppers were going in and out of Safeway, Starbucks, CVS Pharmacy and other stores, the team had to take great care.

The roof replacement project at South Lake Village Shopping included a new TPO roof system on the low-slope section and synthetic shake on the steep-slope sections.

“This is the largest DaVinci project we’ve ever done,” says Kim. “There were a lot of moving pieces. From ordering, receiving and storing the composite shakes to staging onsite. In addition, when it came to assuring pedestrian safety during the roofing process, the challenges were enormous. We focused a great deal on safety measures throughout the entire two-week project.”

LK Construction brought in traffic controllers and road guards to help control the active environment. “Our goal was to safely install the composite roofing without disturbing the businesses,” says Kim. “Safety was our top priority. And, we were able to achieve that goal.”

The shops at South Lake Village now feature Bellaforté Shake composite shingles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

As shoppers moved smoothly in and out of stores, the LK Construction team replaced the flat roofing with a new thermoplastic membrane. Approximately 52,000 square feet of Sure-Weld TPO from Carlisle SynTec was installed on this project.

Crews then installed the Bellaforté Shake tiles. Made to withstand fire, impact and severe weather, the synthetic shakes are ideal for the shopping center location.

“There’s no other synthetic product in the market that can mimic natural hand-split cedar as perfectly as Bellaforté Shake,” says Kim. “These tiles are designed to simulate a multi-width look. They’re extremely realistic and cost-effective.”

Mission Accomplished

With their beautiful new roofs overhead, the shops at South Lake Village now stand out again as a showplace in the Reston community. From banks to restaurants to retailers, each structure can count on their DaVinci roofs to provide long-term beauty and durability.

“The high visibility of this project opened the door for us even more in this marketplace,” says Kim. “We’re now busy replacing old cedar roofs throughout the area with synthetic shake.”

“People are embracing the look of Bellaforté,” he continues. “They love the many advantages of the product. At this point, we’re forecasting a great number of homeowners throughout Reston will switch to DaVinci products in the near future.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: LK Construction, Annandale, Virginia, www.lkconstructionusa.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Sure-Weld TPO, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

A Durable Solution

Photo: IKO

Located the heart of Halifax’s Spring Garden Road district, City Centre Atlantic features a mix of urban retail, office and residential space totaling 31,600 square feet. The site has 194 underground parking spaces servicing the office and retail components of the property.

Multiple challenges came with the City Centre Atlantic project for installing roofing contractor IC Roofing and Sheet Metal of Bedford, Nova Scotia. I.C. Roofing and Sheet Metal Limited is a Maritime-based company servicing Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Southwestern Ontario. The site offered limited street access and rooftop storage space was limited, necessitating extra movement of materials up on the roof.

The building owner was looking for a durable system with a proven track record, so a heat-welded modified bitumen system manufactured by IKO was selected. After the concrete deck on the 2,936-square-foot City Centre Atlantic roof was covered with Modiflex MP-95-FS vapor barrier, IKOTherm and IKOTherm Tapered insulation were installed using Millennium adhesive. After the cover board was installed. I.C. Roofing crews then heat welded the Torchflex TP-180-FF base sheet and light gray Torchflex TP-250 cap sheet. They also fabricated and installed the edge metal on the project.

Everything on the job went smoothly, according to Mike Croft, Atlantic Regional Manager, I.C. Roofing. The key to success on projects like this? “It’s experience,” Croft says. “I.C. Roofing ensures a quality installation through project management and employing journeyman roofers that are great tradesmen. The guys we have undertake these jobs are great journeyman roofers who do two things: they understand the tasks they are doing, and they take a lot of pride in what they are doing. You can have journeyman roofers that can install most things, but it takes a special journeyman roofer to make it look worthy. That’s stuff you can’t teach. A guy has to have that. Our guys take personal pride in their work.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: I.C. Roofing and Sheet Metal Limited, Bedford, Nova Scotia, www.icroofing.ca

MATERIALS

Vapor Barrier: Modiflex MP-95-FS, IKO, www.iko.com

Insulation: IKOTherm and IKOTherm Tapered, IKO

Cover Board: Protectoboard, IKO

Base Sheet: Torchflex TP-180-FF-Base

Cap Sheet: Torchflex TP-250-Cap

Restoring Multiple Roof Systems on Historic Structure Is a Labor of Love

The Evans family restored the mill’s main roof as well as the flat roof over a retail space. Crews also re-roofed the large covered porch on the side of the mill and the one-story log cabin residence added to the back of the mill. Photo: Evans Candy

The first thing longtime roofer Dave Fisher will do is correct your pronunciation of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania — it’s traditionally pronounced “Lang-kiss-ter” for anyone wondering. And tradition is important where Fisher’s from.

Founded in 1729, Lancaster County is one of the oldest communities in America. The area is the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country and has a strong farming and milling history. At the height of the milling industry, the area had more than 300 various types of mills operating.

The list of historical buildings in Lancaster County is long, so working on old structures is nothing new to Fisher, who runs I & D Contracting Ltd. in Lancaster. But re-roofing a 130-year-old mill to protect the interior while preserving its key historic characteristics presents unique challenges. Throw in local attachment to the building and a personal relationship with the owner and the stakes for doing the project right get even higher.

The mill had many names and many owners over its history before the Evans family purchased it in 1983. Photo: Evans Candy

This was the challenge presented to Fisher’s crew in re-roofing the Evans Candy Store in Lancaster County, done in stages over the last several years, with the most recent project being completed in 2018. The candy store is located inside a flour mill that serves as a recognizable piece of Lancaster’s history. The structure was originally built in the 1700s, but dust from grinding flour was a perpetual fire risk, and the mill burned twice over its history. The existing structure has been in place since 1889.

The mill has had many names and many owners over its history, but the Evans family purchased the mill in 1983 and has worked to bring it back to its former glory. Coming from a line of Lancaster milling families themselves, the Evans have used the historic structure to create a destination retail location that keeps people coming back for more — more chocolate, that is — oftentimes long after they have moved out of the area.

The flour mill is an iconic structure in Lancaster County. The existing structure dates back to 1889. Photo: Lancaster Historical Society, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

“I refer to us as a very large mom-and-pop store. We still get most of our business from word of mouth and know many of our customers by name or what they order, but we’ve grown and branched out into grocery stores and specialty shops,” says Steve Evans, second-generation owner of the Evans Candy Store located in the old mill. “Still, about half of the people who order through our website are people who moved out of the area, but still want their Evans chocolate.”

Fisher is no stranger to the area, the old mill or the Evans family either. “I was born and raised in Lancaster County, so I’ve been familiar with this building since I was a kid,” Fisher says. “I’ve been doing work for the Evans family for 20 years now — sisters, brothers, parents. I’ve been glad to get to work on it and be a part of its story.”

Franken-Roof

Affectionately referred to as “Franken-roof” by both Fisher and Evans, the roof on the 10,000-square-foot Evans Candy Store consists of four separate roofs — a three-story, steep-slope roof; a two-story, flat roof over a retail space; a large covered porch attached to the side of the mill; and a long, one-story log cabin residence attached to the back of the mill. Each of these roofs has a different type and color of roofing installed for various reasons, and each presented its own challenges.

At one point, an owner of the mill covered the siding with red asphalt shingles, visible in this photo at the upper right. Photo: Evans Candy

The “Franken-roof” extended to nearly every part of the mill’s exterior as a previous owner nailed red-colored asphalt shingles over all of the building’s original 1889 wood siding in an effort to protect the historic structure.

“I’ve lived in this area my whole life and I’ve never seen anything quite like it,” Evans says of the shingle-covered exterior. “When my family started restoring the mill — I was like 10 or 11 years old — I can’t tell you how many dumb asphalt shingles I picked up. That was my job. My brothers knocked them off the house and I picked them up and put them in the trash.”

Since then, the entire bottom floor of the building has been retrofitted to house to the candy store, while the upper floors have been converted into 3,000 square feet of residential space that a number of Evans family members have called home over the years.

The Steep-Slope Roof

It’s difficult to know for certain, but Fisher thinks the original roof over the main portion of the mill was slate. By the time the Evans bought the mill in 1983, the roof had been replaced with asphalt shingles. Evans hired Fisher and the I & D Contracting crew to re-roof this largest portion of the building — a 2,400-square-foot steep-slope roof — 10 years ago. To protect the historic building, Fisher wanted to start from scratch and make sure the job was done right. When he tore off the old roof, he found no real roof decking, just old barn wood in random sizes fitted together.

To preserve as much of the historical nature of the building, Fisher kept the original board decking, shoring it up where needed, and applied TAMKO Moisture Guard Ice and Rain Underlayment. To help create a more uniform surface for the shingles, Fisher chose a thick felt paper — TAMKO No. 30 Underlayment — to cover the barn wood roof deck and started laying the Heritage Premium asphalt shingles.

The shingle application required some extra care and an attentive ear due to the old barn wood deck. “There were gaps between the old barn wood pieces, so we had to listen to the sound each nail made as it went in — you could hear the difference when the nail hit one of the gaps and didn’t get any wood,” Fisher says. “In those cases, we had to move the nail and try again, because we wanted to know that it was really solid.”

Evans chose the very light-colored Olde English Pewter shingle in an attempt to reduce the heat coming in to the third story. Energy efficiency is always a concern in buildings of this age. When the Evans family purchased the building, it had no drywall or insulation, just open studded walls. Over the years, the family added spray foam insulation, insulation batting and roof vents to help address heat flow in and out of the massive historic building.

Fisher notes his crew took extra care around the 130-year-old brick chimney, which had been re-pointed in the past but needed some additional work. Fisher fabricated aluminum flashing and counter flashing out of coil stock on an aluminum brake to further protect the historic structure from potential damage.

The Flat Roof

Before Evans befriended Fisher and the two started their working relationship, Evans hired another roofer friend, Josh Miller of Miller’s Roofing in Wellsville, Pennsylvania, to update the flat roof portion of the old mill. The existing asphalt roll roofing installed in the early 1980s had reached the end of its life and Evans and Miller worked together to add foam sheeting over top of the existing rolled roofing and finished it by installing a Versico EPDM roofing system in the late 1990s.

The original roof deck over the flat roof portion of the mill was tongue and groove, and the men worked carefully to preserve the integrity of the original decking as they modernized the covering.

The Covered Porch

Fast-forward to 2018, and Evans contacted Fisher to replace and repair the roof over a large covered porch connected to the side of the building. The 450-square-foot cedar shake roof was added in an effort to blend with the rest of the historical structure, but after several decades, the moss-covered shakes succumbed to water damage and began to fail.

Fisher and his crew removed the cedar shakes and found part of the reason for the roof’s failure — zero flashing connecting the shake to the side of the building, just some old caulk. As part of the re-roofing project, Fisher added new flashing where the porch roof connected to the side of the mill.

“We had to get creative — flashing underneath the existing siding to try and prevent the same problems from recurring,” Fisher says.

Evans loved the old cedar shake roof and felt torn when choosing a replacement shingle. He ended up going with Heritage Premium asphalt shingles for their durability and selected the Rustic Slate color to differentiate the covered porch from the rest of the structure.

“It was a toss-up — would I match the new shingles to the other parts of the building?” Evans recalls. “But then I realized, I kind of liked the covered porch being a separate entity unto itself. It had always had a different shade of roofing, signifying a separate area of the building, and I liked that. I chose the Rustic Slate color because it still gave that rustic, historic feel that I loved about the cedar shake.”

The Log Cabin Residence

The other roof Fisher’s crew updated on the old mill in 2018 was on the long, log-cabin residence attached to the side of the three-story structure. Despite looking like an original part of the mill’s construction, the log cabin was added to the building in 1992, as a retirement home for Evans’ aging parents.

The log cabin addition was constructed in 1992. The roof was recently replaced with TAMKO Heritage Premium asphalt shingles in Rustic Cedar to help it blend in with the rest of the historic structure. Photo: Evans Candy

By the time Fisher got a good look at the log cabin roof in 2018, he realized the existing asphalt shingles were at the end of their service life, and one particular section of the roof had been patched multiple times and had additional layers of shingles stacked on the roof in an attempt to repel water.

Fisher took the 1,600-square-foot roof down to the decking, installed ice and water shield, new felt paper and installed TAMKO Heritage Premium asphalt shingles. Evans chose the Rustic Cedar color for the new roof as it was similar to the previous shingle color that added to the rustic, historic look that Evans hoped the log cabin would have in an effort to have it meld with the rest of the 130-year-old mill structure.

“I liked that Rustic Cedar look, pairing it with the log front,” Evans notes. “I think back to olden times with the cedar shake and wanted to emulate that. And I think we accomplished it. It is fun — it makes us smile when people ask us, ‘How old is that log home?’ and we get to tell them it’s only 26 years old.”

Fisher has grown to appreciate what he calls the “hodge-podge” of roof styles and colors on the old mill, and says the most important thing is that the building’s owner got exactly what he wanted and is a happy customer.

“Sometimes if people want to see installed examples of different colors of TAMKO shingles, I just send them to the mill because they can see a variety there,” Fisher says, laughing. “I jokingly asked Steve the other day if he had a shed that we could roof for him … just to see how many different colors we could do.”

About the author: Melissa Dunson is an award-winning journalist with more than a decade of experience writing about a wide variety of business sectors, including the construction industry, and as a technical and creative writer for TAMKO Building Products.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: I & D Contracting Ltd., Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Roofing Contractor: Miller’s Roofing, Wellsville, Pennsylvania

MATERIALS

Underlayment: No. 30 Asphalt Saturated Organic Felt, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

Waterproofing: Moisture Guard Ice and Rain Underlayment, TAMKO

Asphalt Shingles: TAMKO Heritage Premium Laminated Asphalt Shingles in Olde English Pewter, Rustic Slate and Rustic Cedar

Low-Slope Roof: Versico EPDM Roofing System, www.versico.com

Silicone Coating Restores the Roof, Reduces Utility Costs at Mixed-Use Complex

At the Shoppes of Johnson’s Landing in Angier, North Carolina, ACC applied a high-solids silicone roof coating on the 20-year-old metal roof to seal penetrations, restore the roof, and provide a white reflective coating. Photos: All-County Contracting (ACC)

Glenn Wujcik, the owner of All-County Contracting (ACC), headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina, has been fascinated with spray rigs since he and his brother first used one in 1979 to insulate a van with spray polyurethane foam (SPF). His company specializes in applying SPF and roof coatings on existing buildings. Lately, he’s found silicone roof coatings are making up an increasing share of his company’s workload.

“The coatings industry in general is booming right now,” Wujcik says. “A lot of the TPO and EPDM roofs are nearing the end of their service life, and instead of tearing them off, if you catch them in time, you can go over it with the silicone coating and get a new 10-year warranty. Silicones have a proven track record. When you put it on properly, it weathers really well. It has excellent elongation.”

Wujcik characterizes himself as a hands-on owner who strives to be on the site for every job. He believes there is an art as well as a science to operating a spray rig properly, and experience is crucial. “I love doing this,” he says. “I’ve been doing it for more than 30 years, my business partner’s been doing it more than 30 years, and our best sprayer has sprayed more than both of us combined. We know what we have to do, we know how long it’s going to take, and we have the right equipment. We are really good about the preparation and the application.”

Coatings and spray foam are excellent products, but only in the right situations, notes Wujcik. They should only be used on the proper substrates and applied in the right conditions. “In spraying, the most important thing is knowing when not to spray,” he says. “Right now, I’m working on a job, and for the last two days, there have been 10-20 mph winds, and I haven’t finished it yet. I told the owner, ‘I haven’t oversprayed anything yet, and I don’t want to.’ I’d rather do it right and not have any problems.”

Wujcik points to a recent project on a mixed-use building in Angier, North Carolina, to illustrate some of the benefits of a silicone roof coating. “It’s a U-shaped building with about 14,000 square feet of roof space,” Wujcik notes. “There’s a bakery, a restaurant, a pharmacy, and a doctor’s office, and there are a lot of penetrations on the roof.”

The penetrations were the site of multiple leaks. Wujcik decided to use a high-solids silicone coating, GE Enduris 3502, to prevent leaks and extend the life of the roof. The monolithic coating will seal the penetrations, and the white reflective surface will provide an additional benefit: reduced cooling bills in the summer. “Putting a white coating on it is going to reduce their energy load in the summer pretty substantially,” he says.

Applying the Coating

On this project, the first step was to pressure wash the existing roof. “That’s where most coating jobs fail — surface preparation,” Wujcik states. “Washing the roof properly is one of the most important steps.”

The high-solids silicone coating was applied to the existing standing seam metal roof. Care had to be taken to ensure all sides of the metal ribs were properly covered with the material. Photos: All-County Contracting (ACC)

The company uses 4,000 psi belt-drive power washers, so care has to be taken not to damage the roof or skylights, which are covered and marked for safety reasons. The company follows all OSHA regulations, which in most cases means setting up safety lines 6 feet from the edge, with stanchions 10 feet apart, to establish a safety perimeter.

“Safety is my number one thing,” Wujcik says, “I’ve been doing this a long time and I’ve never had a lost-time accident. I preach safety. That is absolutely the most important — and accidents are expensive.”

The next step is to apply the GE Seam Sealer at the penetrations. “When this roof was originally installed 20 years ago, they did it textbook perfect,” Wujcik notes. “Each 4-inch pipe coming though had at least 20 fasteners holding it down.”

However, over time, the rubber grommets on the fasteners can degrade, and expansion and contraction can take their toll. “We have really hot summers here, we’ve seen roofs where literally thousands of fasteners have backed out,” he says.

The seam sealer is typically applied with a brush. “Any horizontal seams, any termination bars, any penetration that goes through the roof that has a screw, we apply the seam sealer,” he says. “It goes on quite thick — at about 80 linear feet per gallon.”

After the seam sealer cures for one day, the coating is applied. Spraying flat roofs with EPDM, TPO, and PVC membranes is a fairly straightforward process, according to Wujcik. “You basically spray it just like you would spray paint a wall,” he says. “You overlap your spray pattern 50 percent. I’ve been doing it for so many years, and you get a feeling for how fast you can go.”

After the roof was power washed, the seam sealer as applied to the seams and penetrations. After it cured, two coats of the high-solids silicone product were sprayed on the roof. Photos: All-County Contracting (ACC)

A wet mil gauge is used to ensure the proper thickness. Wujcik notes the high-solids silicone formulation has very little shrinkage as it dries.  “As we’re spraying, we insert the gauge into the wet coating and it tells you how many mils you have sprayed down. In this case, we were applying to achieve 21 dry mils.”

The spray rig is set up on the ground and operated by one man, while the sprayer and the hose man are working on the roof. “It’s a minimum of a three-man crew per coating rig,” he notes. “You’re dealing with about 6,000-7,000 psi of pressure, so you need special hoses rated for at least 7,000 psi. You never want to kink them. If you busted a hose, by the time someone came down from the roof to the machine, you could pump out 20 gallons on the ground. That’s why you need a ground man.”

Flat roofs are sprayed perpendicular to the roof, but the standing seam metal roof on this project called for a different technique. “On metal roofs with high ridges, if you don’t angle your gun you’ll miss the sides of the ribs,” Wujcik points out. “You have to do it from one direction, working one way, and then turn around and do it from the other direction, working the other way. If you try to spray straight down on the roof, you’re going to miss the nooks and crannies in all of those ribs.”

The surface area of the ribs also has to be taken into account when calculating the amount of liquid that will be applied, notes Wujcik.

The final step in the process is to touch up the applications at the penetrations to ensure a clean look. On vertical surfaces including parapet walls, crews ensure the coating is applied to a uniform height. “On the last day, we take up brushes and rollers and cut in straight lines,” he says. “That really finishes the job. The detailing gives it that final touch.”

Open for Business

The active and open jobsite posed some challenges. “There were a lot of cars around the building, so we had to be very careful not to hit them with overspray,” Wujcik notes. “When you’re working on a plant, you might be able to move all of the cars to a different location, but at doctor’s offices and restaurants, you have traffic in and out of the parking lot all of the time. We can use car covers if there are a few cars there, but when they are in and out like that, it’s not practical, so you have to be very careful when you do the job.”

The job was completed in the winter, and bad weather resulted in some delays. “A job like this in the summertime would have been a weeklong project at most,” Wujcik notes. “This project took almost a month because we had an exceptionally cold winter with a lot of high winds. It took extra time, but that’s my philosophy: If it’s not the right conditions, I just won’t do it.”

The project qualified for a 10-year warranty, and when it expires ACC plans to be there to pressure wash and recoat the roof for another 10-year warranty.

“We inspect our jobs every year,” Wujcik says. He notes that annual roof inspections and routine maintenance are the simplest and most cost-effective ways to ensure the roof’s life span. Yet these steps are often neglected.

“It’s amazing that some of these multi-million-dollar companies don’t send their maintenance guys up on the roof for 10 minutes to check the drains,” he says. “If a roof has 2 inches of pine needles around the drain, the whole roof has to have 2 inches of water on it before it begins to drain. That puts tremendous, tremendous stress on a roof. Keeping your drains clear is really important.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All-County Contracting (ACC), Raleigh, North Carolina

MATERIALS

Roof Coating: Enduris by GE 3502, GE Performance Coatings, www.GE.com/silicones
Seam Sealer: GE Seam Sealer, GE Performance Coatings

SBS System Delivers Roof Design for the Brewery District

Brewery District Building 3, New Westminster, B.C., Canada

Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories.

Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories.

The Brewery District is a dynamic, progressive area in in Metro Vancouver offering a mix of residential high-rises, shops and office buildings. The Brewery District provides quick access to the area and is connected via a SkyTrain to public
plazas, greenways, view decks, cycling paths, and a central community green gathering place. This master-planned community includes groceries, pharmacies, restaurants and other mixed-use retail outlets.

Roof Report

The project included roof areas of varying heights totaling approximately 21,320 square feet. Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories. IKO was able to meet their expectations with an SBS system using IKO TP 180 Granular Cap in a pattern of multiple colors. The IKO SBS Roofing System was recommended by GRC Columbia Roofing Inc., based on the specific client requirements to create a colorful rooftop pattern.

Team

Client/Owner: Wesgroup Properties
Architect/Designer:
Henrizquez & Partners Architects
Roofing Contractor: GRC Columbia Roofing Inc.
The Roof System:
IKO MVP Vapour Barrier
IKO MF 95 SF (Poly/Sand) Vapour
Barrier
IKO Therm III Insulation
IKO 3/16-inch Protectoboard
IKO TP 180 FF Base Sheet
IKO TP 180 SF Base Sheet
IKO TP 180 Granular Cap Sheet

Flagship Store Is Topped with Metal Roofing Panels

Made In America Store: Elma, N.Y.

Dutch Seam, continuous standing seam metal roof panels, eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

Dutch Seam, continuous standing seam metal roof panels, eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

Mark Andol is the owner and founder of General Welding and Fabricating, with locations in Elma and Rochester, N.Y. That business, which manufactured structural and decorative steel components for this store, has been operating since 1989. When the recession hit almost 10 years ago, Andol lost much of his business to companies located overseas, forcing him to cut his workforce to half its size. At that point, he began envisioning a store that would only carry products that are 100 percent American made, to help grow manufacturing within the United States. Andol’s vision became a reality in 2010 when he opened the doors to the first Made in America store in Elma.

Roof Report

The mission of the Made in America Store is to create and save jobs in the United States by increasing American manufacturing. By installing ATAS’ Dutch Seam metal roofing panels, which are made in America, on this new flagship store, it only further reinforced this mission. Dutch Seam, a continuous standing seam metal roof panel, features an integral lock and seam which prevents “blow-off” or “creeping” of the seam. It also eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

When ATAS International announced the company’s 2016 Project of the Year winners at an awards banquet on May 8, the Made In America flagship store project took first place in the commercial roofs category.

Team

Architect: Lydon Architectural Services, Buffalo, N.Y.
General Contractor: Kulback’s Construction Inc., Lancaster, N.Y.
Installing Contractor: Bayford Construction, Lancaster, N.Y.
Roof System Manufacturer: ATAS International, Allentown, Pa.

Planning and Teamwork Are Essential in Tackling Retail Project

Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system over the existing modified bitumen roof system on two buildings totaling approximately 75,400 square feet.

Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system over the existing modified bitumen roof system on two buildings totaling approximately 75,400 square feet.

Headquartered in Atlanta, Peach State Roofing Inc. has 15 branches and covers clients across the nation. The company specializes in commercial and industrial roofing, and excels at large-scale single-ply jobs. The goal of every branch is to provide the same level of service for clients no matter where they are in the country, as exemplified by a recent project at a large retail mall in South Carolina.

Peach State’s Charlotte branch is located in Rock Hill, S.C. The company has re-roofed three of the five roofs at Gaffney Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C., including two roofs completed this year in just two weeks. Anthony Wilkerson, the branch manager, and Blake Wideman, strategic accounts, shared their insights on the project.

Peach State’s Charlotte branch focuses primarily on re-roofing, service and maintenance work for existing customers and property managers. Most of the company’s work involves TPO, EPDM and PVC, but crews have to be able to handle almost every type of system on the market. “If there is a hotel with some shingles or metal on it, we want to be able to complete every facet of the job, but most of our work revolves around single-ply roofing,” Wilkerson states. “We are certified with every major single-ply manufacturer.”

Anthony Wilkerson (left) and Blake Wideman of Peach State Roofing’s Charlotte branch inspect the completed project at Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C.

Anthony Wilkerson (left) and Blake Wideman of Peach State Roofing’s Charlotte branch inspect the completed project at Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C.

According to Wilkerson and Wideman, Peach State’s strength lies in building relationships with its clients by providing quality workmanship and excellent customer service. “We do that through our project management, our expertise and our training,” says Wilkerson. “We put a lot into training our employees so that they know how to do the technical details that the manufacturers are asking for.”

Wilkerson believes Peach State offers the best of both worlds—flexibility at each branch and the depth of knowledge from the large corporate organization. “We’re independent, but I work with the corporate office every day,” says Wilkerson. “We have local representation around the country, but at the same time we have that teamwork, so you’re still getting the same quality from each office that you’re getting from the corporate office. We try to be as close to the way Atlanta does things—the Peach State Way—all across board, all over the country.”

Landing a Big One

In the case of the recent project at Gaffney Premium Outlets, the work was an outgrowth of the company’s previous successful projects, including a re-roofing job at the same complex last year. “Our bid was what they were looking for,” Wideman says. “We gave them the price they were looking for and the quality they wanted. That’s how we were awarded this project.”

This aerial view shows the five buildings of the Gaffney Premium Outlets mall. Peach State Roofing re-roofed the two buildings on the left this year, after completing work on the building at the far right last year.

This aerial view shows the five buildings of the Gaffney Premium Outlets mall. Peach State Roofing re-roofed the two buildings on the left this year, after completing work on the building at the far right last year.

The mall is made up of five buildings, and the company re-roofed two this year totaling approximately 75,400 square feet. Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system from Firestone over the existing modified bitumen roof system. “We came up with a plan to cover the old roof with a half-inch high-density cover board,” Wilkerson says. “Then we mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil white TPO system over the cover board.”

The system was chosen for its durability, according to Wilkerson. “They were looking for a long-term solution,” he says. “We went with a re-cover because it was more cost-effective for their budget, but we could still offer them the same warranty and the same guarantee that the system would be just as effective if they had torn the old system off and started from scratch.”

The company used 8-foot rolls of TPO on the project for several reasons. “We went with 8-foot rolls on this project because it was easier to apply the rolls,” notes Wilkerson. “They are not as heavy as the 10-foot rolls. It’s easier to let the rolls relax when you roll them out and easier to keep them tight when you are securing them to the deck.”

Fasteners were installed every 12 inches on center at the edge of the TPO sheets, and the next sheet was heat welded over the top of the screws and plates, and then mechanically fastened at the other end.
Extra care had to be taken with the details, especially walls and curbs. “We tore all of the old membrane off the curbs and off the walls, and we used bonding adhesive to go up the walls,” Wilkerson explains.

At the walls, the field sheets were run up the wall 12 inches and mechanically attached. “We adhere a sheet to the wall, and we heat weld that to the field sheet,” explains Wilkerson, “At the top of that, we use a water cutoff behind the sheet, and we use a termination bar. The termination bar is installed 12 inches on center, and then we use a sealant at the top of the termination bar. We came back with a surface-mount counterflashing, which basically just goes over the top of the termination bar. It has a little kick-out on it, so once that’s attached, it gives you double protection where your membrane is terminated.”

Curbs were handled in a similar fashion. “With the curbs, you run the field sheet right up to the curb, and then you mechanically attach it 12 inches on center,” Wilkerson notes. “Then we use bonding adhesive to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. We don’t do one piece and wrap it all the way around. We use four separate pieces, and we adhere them to the curb. Then we heat weld those pieces to the field sheet. For the curbs, we use a flashing that goes underneath the curb itself, and we attach that 12 inches on center all the way around. That lets the water shed over the HVAC unit and then down onto the membrane past the flashing, so there’s nowhere for the water to penetrate.”

Meeting the Challenges

The sheer size of the project was a challenge, but Peach State is used to handling large-scale projects. Logistics and scheduling were also demanding due to customer activity at the mall. “It was a good project for us, but I’d say one of the biggest challenges was that the mall remained open the whole time we were doing the roof,” Wilkerson says. “We had to check in with each tenant in every building to make sure everything was OK from the night before.”

Extra care had to be taken with the details at walls and curbs. Bonding adhesive was used to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. Then those pieces were heat welded to the field sheet.

Extra care had to be taken with the details at walls and curbs. Bonding adhesive was used to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. Then those pieces were heat welded to the field sheet.

The project called for roofing specific sections each day to make sure the roof stayed watertight at all times. “We sealed the roof up every night 100 percent, so if it rained in the evening, it had to be like we had never been up there,” Wilkerson recalls. “If we took three air conditioners apart in a section that we did one day, at night before those guys went home the air conditioners were wrapped back up, the flashing was put back around the air conditioner and all of the edges of the roof were sealed to the old roof so everything was watertight.”

Safety was also a concern, especially with pedestrian traffic below. “We had to make sure all of our safety procedures were in place for our crews and for the members of the public going in and out of the doors,” Wilkerson says.

The crews used safety lines at the perimeter, and anyone outside the safety lines had to be tied off at all times. “We had to make sure we had a man strictly watching out for the safety of the crews. You have to make sure any little pieces of membrane don’t blow off the roof. You have to make sure all of that is being cleaned up steadily as the job is going on. You don’t want the public to see anything except the flag stands on the roof.”

Staging was complicated, but luckily the jobsite offered ample space for trucks and cranes to be moved between the buildings. The key was to tackle high-traffic areas early in the morning and move to less busy spots as the day wore on.

Proper staging is crucial to jobsite efficiency, notes Wilkerson. “We like to stage the material as we put it on so we’re not dragging it across the roof,” he says. “It’s all right there for them, laid out as they go.”

Support and teamwork are essential up and down the line. “We work really well as a team, so if anyone has any small questions, they can ask the superintendent and call me, so we can make sure we take care of it the Peach State Way.”

Flexing Their Muscles

The project went off without a hitch, says Wilkerson. The mall traffic was never disrupted. “Not one leak, not one complaint on this project,” he says. “Our project management on this project was spot on. Our superintendents held their own out there. And our guys—it’s the attention to quality and all the time we put into training our guys that allows them to do this and make it look almost seamless. It’s one of those situations where you want it to look easy while you’re doing it, but when you’re in the mix of it and you’re trying to get it all done, it’s not as easy as it looks.”

Customer service was crucial. It wasn’t just the property management company that had to be kept informed—it was each individual retailer in the building. “There were so many people to deal with,” notes Wideman. “Every manager of each of those units had to be kept informed of the process. Roofing is not as hard as people think, but keeping up with the owners, keeping people happy, letting people know ahead of time what’s going on is a big challenge. We had to make friends with everyone ahead of time and let them know where to call with any questions.”

“The project, as far as roofing goes, was pretty straightforward,” concludes Wilkerson. “The key is to keep up with everyone on a daily basis and let them know what’s going on so if there is a small problem, it doesn’t keep brewing until it’s a big problem.”

Photos: Peach State Roofing Inc.

Re-Roofing of Shopping Center Poses Logistical Challenges

Southgate Shopping Center: Sebring, Florida

The re-roofing project of the shopping center totaled 79,556 square feet.

The re-roofing project of the shopping center totaled 79,556 square feet.

Roofing contractors often find themselves tackling re-roofs at shopping centers in piece-meal fashion, doing sections over the years as the budget allows. When property manager Southern Management and Development decided to remodel the entire Southgate Shopping Center in Sebring, Fla., in conjunction with Publix Markets’ replacement of their existing store at the location, they looked to Advanced Roofing to get the job done.

The scope of work included re-roofing three large sections of the retail plaza and a drugstore on the property. The roofing portions totaled 79,556 square feet.

Roof System

The roof specified was a two-ply modified bitumen system from Johns Manville. In the three large sections of the plaza, the existing built-up roof was completely torn off, while the drugstore was a re-cover project, notes Andrew Vik, estimator and project manager with Advanced Roofing’s Tampa branch, which operates under branch manager Michael Landolfi.

Roofing work started in November 2016 and was completed in February 2017. After the existing roof was removed, crews installed 2-inch polyiso to the steel deck. “We mechanically fastened that with a half-inch USG SecuRock cover board through the steel deck,” notes Vik. “The two plies of modified bitumen were then torch applied, a smooth base sheet and a white granulated cap sheet.”

On the drugstore, the roof was vacuumed, and the cover board and two plies were installed over the top of the old roof system.

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork. “We had our own HVAC people working with our roofing crews, so it was easy to coordinate everything,” notes Vik. “We had HVAC installations on three of the buildings, and we remounted existing units on two of the buildings. There was also a lot of demolition on the south building, as there were several derelict units that
had been sitting there for quite some time. Those had to be hoisted off there and taken out.”

A Challenging Project

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork.

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork.


Logistics are often a challenge with a shopping center that remains open to the public, notes Vik. “You have to load and unload multiple levels of the roof at different times,” he says. “Customer relations is also a challenge; you have to keep everyone happy and ask a lot of questions. The construction manager has to do a lot of P.R. when he’s there.”

Demolition portions of the project were done at night and application during the day, so business at the mall was never disrupted. Traffic in the parking area was also a key concern.

“Setup areas had to be barricaded and marked off while we were loading and unloading,” Vik says. “There was even a drive under bridge connecting two buildings that had to be re-roofed, so we always had to be mindful of people below.”

Parapet walls did not surround all portions of the roof, so safety precautions included a safety perimeter; employees outside the perimeter had to be harnessed and tied off to a portable fall protection anchor system by Raptor.

The project went off without a hitch, according to Vik. “The mall was 100 percent open during the entire project,” he says. “Things went very smoothly— especially for everything that was involved. One of our mottoes is, ‘The harder the job, the better.’ We like a challenge. We take on a lot of projects other companies shy away from.”

The keys to his company’s success are coordination and versatility, states Vik. “We do it all,” he says. “We didn’t have to get anybody from outside the company to work on the project. We did all the roofing, all of the HVAC, and all of the hoisting was done in-house. We’ve also got lightning protection inhouse, and we have a solar division. We have a great team. Everyone does their part to get the bids out and get the jobs done. It’s the best team I’ve ever worked with.”

Team

Roofing Contractor: Advanced Roofing Inc., Tampa, Fla.
Consultant: CBA Roof Consulting LLC, Lake Worth, Fla.
Roof System Manufacturer and Technical Support: Johns Manville, Denver