Prevent Roof Fires During Torch-Down Projects

Torch-Down Safety While driving to work recently, I heard a news story on the radio: An unlicensed roofer was charged with causing a fire at a local apartment complex. When I arrived at the office, I Googled “fires caused by roofers.” The results included stories from across the nation:

  • Roofing crew blamed for a Chicago strip-mall fire.
  • Roofer’s torch likely cause of huge Arizona construction-site blaze.
  • Roofer’s blowtorch sparks a six-alarm fire in Hamilton Township, N.J.
  • Obviously, using an open-flame torch to install torch-down roofing systems can pose a fire risk. Torch-down roofing is a type of roofing that consists of layers of modified bitumen adhered to layers of fiberglass with a flame torch. Torch-down roofing is used only for flat or low-slope roofs. This process is popular with many contractors, mainly because of its ease of installation and its adaptability. With this system, the modified bitumen can bond tightly to metal flashings while the rubbery additives in the asphalt allow the roofing to expand and contract when other roofing systems may crack. In addition, roofers like torch-down roofing because it is easy to apply. Unfortunately, it can also be dangerous!

    It is easy to make a mistake with the torch that could result in disaster. Consider roofers that are torching down a roof and accidentally overheat something in the attic—insulation, for instance. They end their work for the day, not noticing the smoke coming out of soffit vents. Before long, that smoldering material in the attic heats up and starts a fire that quickly spreads throughout the dry, hot attic and, often, to the rest of the structure. 

    Regulations and Best Practices

    OSHA has developed standards that can help prevent these types of fires. Here are some of OSHA’s fire-protection and -prevention rules from the construction and general industry standards:

  • A fire extinguisher must be immediately accessible for all torch-down operations.
  • A fire extinguisher is needed within 50 feet of anywhere where more than 5 gallons of flammable or combustible liquids or 5 pounds of flammable gas are being used on the job site.
  • No one on a job site can be more than 100 feet from a fire extinguisher at all times.
  • There must be at least one fire extinguisher for 3,000 square feet of work area.
  • All flammable or combustible debris must be located well away from flammable liquids or gases.
  • Combustible scrap and debris must be removed regularly during the course of a job.
  • Piles of scrap and debris must be kept at least 10 feet from any building.
  • A fire watch person should be posted to immediately address any possible smolders or flare-ups.
  • The fire watch person should remain on post for 30 minutes after the torch-down job is finished for the day.
  • While the actions spelled out in these construction regulations are mandatory, roofing professionals should be aware that these are minimum requirements. The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) and the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association (MRCA) have developed a roofing torch applicator certification program designed to reduce fire hazards during torch application of modified bitumen products. According to Harry Dietz, Director of Risk Management for NRCA, the Certified Torch Applicator (CERTA) program teaches installers to minimize the exposure of combustible structural materials to the heat and flame of the roofing torch. The program also spells out a number of safe practices that go well beyond OSHA’s regulations in dealing with roofing torch use. Among other program elements, these include:

  • The requirement for two 4A60BC fire extinguishers during torch work (more than 10 times the firefighting capability required under the OSHA rules).
  • A two-hour fire watch performed after the last torch has been extinguished.
  • Following these guidelines for fire prevention can protect roofing professionals and the public. It can also save roofers money and time, as well as protect contractors from lawsuits and other legal charges. 

    “In 2002, a leading insurer of roofing contractors had over $7 million in torch related claims in 33 occurrences prior to requiring CERTA for its insureds,” said Dietz. “In 2015, that same insurance company reported only one torch-related claim with a loss of less than $10,000.”

    Visit this site to learn more about OSHA’s Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, Welding and Cutting, Fire Prevention. To learn more about the Certified Torch Applicator (CERTA) program, click here.

    New Mobile App Provides Aerial Roof Measurement Services

    CoreLogic SkyMeasure AppCoreLogic launched its mobile application for SkyMeasure, a residential and commercial aerial roof measurement service. According to the company, the mobile application uses the same advanced geocoding technology as the desktop version, while also increasing access for roofing and insurance professionals to ParcelPoint, the CoreLogic proprietary property parcel database.

    The mobile extension of SkyMeasure is designed to further enhance the ease and convenience of accessing roofing data on a real-time basis for those in the industry who spend a majority of their time in the field, especially since reports can be generated quickly and on-the-go, delivering results in as little as three hours. In addition to offering property measurement reports and status updates, the mobile application also provides historical property measurement data. The mobile application is free with in-app purchase options, and is available for both Apple and Android devices. 

    “Combining the vast CoreLogic parcel-level data with our precise geocoding technology in this new SkyMeasure mobile app will greatly improve efficiency and convenience for industry professionals who are rarely sitting at a desk,” says Andrew Zickell, senior director of strategic business intelligence for CoreLogic. “With fingertip access, roofing and property measurement data, powered by the largest parcel database in the country, professionals will be able to produce more accurate and timely assessments.” 

    According to the company, connecting parcel boundaries provided by ParcelPoint to aerial-based property measurements like SkyMeasure provides a more comprehensive view of all structures on a given parcel of land, resulting in more accurate assessments for roofing repair and replacement.CoreLogic Roof Report

    NRCA Announces June 4-10 is National Roofing Week

    The roof is an important component of every structure, yet it often is taken for granted until it falls to disrepair. To raise awareness of the significance of roofs to every home and business, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has announced National Roofing Week will take place June 4-10.

    National Roofing Week also promotes the good deeds of the roofing industry and stresses the value of professional roofing contractors and the importance of making informed decisions about maintaining or replacing a roof system. During National Roofing Week, NRCA encourages its members to participate by engaging in their communities and informing the public about the role roofs and professional roofing contractors play in every community.

    NRCA also will be sharing its members’ stories through its various social media outlets, its Roof Scoop blog and “Professional Roofing” magazine. Members throughout the U.S. are encouraged to share their stories of charitable giving, crew and staff appreciation, and roofing projects with NRCA.

    “Professional roofing contractors play a role in every community, and National Roofing Week provides the roofing industry the opportunity to demonstrate the importance of the work we do,” says NRCA Chairman of the Board Dennis Conway. “I look forward to sharing the roofing industry’s stories of professional excellence and charitable giving during National Roofing Week.”

    In addition, NRCA members are encouraged to promote the importance of what a roof does by encouraging children to participate in NRCA’s 2017 Children’s Art Contest sponsored by A.C.T. Metal Deck Supply and the International Roofing Expo (IRE). The contest is open to children in grades 1-8 whose relatives work for NRCA member companies (all NRCA member companies are eligible). Entries will be accepted until April 14.

    HBI Helps Students Build Construction Careers

    HBI’s training process features a unique, hands-on approach that combines technical and employability skills with core academics.

    HBI’s training process features a unique, hands-on approach that combines technical and employability skills with core academics.

    Washington, D.C.-based HBI, a national leader for career training in the building industry, is dedicated to the advancement and enrichment of education and training programs serving the needs of the industry. Through certification programs, HBI provides training, curriculum development and job-placement services for the building industry. Job-placement rates have remained at more than 80 percent for graduates during the last several years.

    For nearly 50 years, HBI and its forerunner, the Manpower Development & Training Department of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), Washington, have trained workers in construction, promoted the building industry as a career and helped address the need for qualified employees. Today, HBI is an independent, national non-profit organization and partner in the NAHB federation. HBI’s relationships with local home-builders associations have helped create opportunities for students.

    HBI training programs are taught in local communities across the country to at-risk youth, veterans, transitioning military members, justice-involved youth and adults, and displaced workers. Preparing students for success in the building industry is at the core of what HBI does across the country. At any given time during the year, HBI touches more than 13,000 students through its programs.

    HBI’s training process, products and services are instrumental in the success of its programs, including Job Corps, Pre-Apprenticeship Certificate Training, Military and Veterans, and Building Careers Programs. Through each program, individuals are trained and ready to pursue careers in the building industry.

    “We want our students to know what it’s like to be in this business,” says HBI President and CEO John Courson. “You can’t learn this business by only studying on a computer, from a textbook or in a classroom. They have to get out in the field and experience what it’s like to perform trades in all kinds of weather. I want the last day of training for our students to be just like the first day on a new job.”

    A Unique Program

    HBI’s Five Steps of Service model focuses on connecting, assessing, certifying, training and placing individuals in high-growth construction careers. The model is a soup-to-nuts process that offers students job readiness, certified training, career connections, hope, confidence and long-term success. HBI’s five steps support students at every stage of the employment continuum. Students are trained and certified in brick masonry, building construction technology, carpentry, electrical wiring, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, landscaping, plumbing, solar installation or weatherization.

    HBI students can earn several industry-recognized credentials and put their skills into practice with contractors on community service projects.

    HBI students can earn several industry-recognized credentials and put their skills into practice with contractors on community service projects.

    Unique to the industry, HBI’s training process uses a hands-on approach that combines technical and employability skills with core academics; students work and learn how to be successful in the industry. Students’ trade skills are put into practice with contractors on community service projects. Students can earn several industry-recognized credentials, including an HBI Pre-Apprentice Certificate, OSHA 10-Hour Safety Training, CPR, First Aid and a National Occupational Testing Institute trade-specific certificate.

    HBI training programs do more than just provide job skills. They build character and self-esteem, offering students the interpersonal skills they also need to succeed. Students learn leadership, a sense of responsibility, time management, team work and how to communicate effectively.

    “As we work to build careers and change lives among the populations we serve, we want to be sure that our students are ready in every way to be successful at every step of the process,” Courson explains.

    HBI’s Five Steps of Service integrates structured education and training with the world of work, including career exploration, job exposure and internships that lead to full-time employment. Each year, HBI recognizes top former students who have graduated from an HBI program and have achieved success in the building industry despite adversity they have encountered through their journey. HBI instructors from across the country nominate former students and the top two are selected.

    Dawit Zengo of Alexandria, Va., and Kristy Stringer of Way Cross, Ga., were recognized for their leadership qualities, achievements and potential in the building industry at the 2017 NAHB International Builders’ Show in Orlando, Fla.

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    Dallas Roofing Contractor Partners with Habitat for Humanity to Repair and Replace Roofs for Deserving Homeowners

    Chris Zazo, CEO of Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, Dallas, established the non-profit Roof Angels, which repairs and/or replaces up to 30 roofs per year through Habitat for Humanity’s A Brush with Kindness program.

    Chris Zazo, CEO of Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, Dallas, established the non-profit Roof Angels, which repairs and/or replaces up to 30 roofs per year through Habitat for Humanity’s A Brush with Kindness program.

    Chris Zazo is a CEO who sees opportunity everywhere. When he needed a corporate gift idea to give to hail-restoration customers of his commercial roofing business, Dallas-based Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, he established Hailstone Vineyards in Napa Valley, Calif., and now makes his own cabernet sauvignon and chardonnay.

    While considering how to differentiate Aspenmark Roofing & Solar from its competitors in a market that has no licensing, Zazo embraced community service. “I wanted to find a way to better our industry and really take the sting off the title of ‘roofing contractor,’” he says. “We were getting asked every year by this charity and that organization to support their causes‚ which we were happy to do. Then we got involved doing the new-build roofs for Dallas Habitat for Humanity and really rallied around that organization.”

    To differentiate his firm’s charitable work from its for-profit work, Zazo officially established the non-profit Roof Angels in 2013, but he couldn’t quiet his entrepreneurial spirit. He wondered how he could involve the entire roofing industry in community service. “I really wanted to put together a program for the industry,” he explains. “I wanted to get the manufacturers and distributors involved, get our employees involved and create a model in which if we took it to a national organization it could be replicated anywhere in the United States. I dug a little further and found out Habitat has a program called A Brush with Kindness, which is perfect for this idea.”

    Although the homes chosen for restoration are usually small, Zazo says they often have extensive damage and four or five layers of shingles.

    Although the homes chosen for restoration are usually small, Zazo says they often have extensive damage and four or five layers of shingles.

    A Brush with Kindness is Habitat for Humanity’s home-repair program for owners who are struggling to maintain their homes. The program seeks $10,000 donations to support one family’s home repairs. “When we found out about this program, we jumped in and asked, ‘What if we [Aspenmark Roofing & Solar] took the roof off of your hands?’” Zazo recalls. “The roof is usually about 50 to 70 percent of the budget for the home repairs, so, without it in the budget, A Brush with Kindness could do much more to a deserving family’s home. I reached out to GAF to see if they’d donate the shingles. I called SRS Distribution to see if they’d donate the accessory items and delivery. Then all we had to do was raise money for the labor. We proposed this model to Habitat and they said, ‘We love it. When can you start?’”

    FUNDRAISING

    A Brush with Kindness’ representatives asked Roof Angels and its partners, Parsippany, N.J.-based GAF and McKinney, Texas-based SRS Distribution, to repair and/or replace up to 30 roofs per year. In the beginning, Zazo hadn’t thought through the fundraising part of Roof Angels, so he was often paying his crews for these roof installations out of his own pocket. He started holding Happy Hours and other small events in which he could quickly raise a few thousand dollars.

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    Roofing Contractor Brings Community Together to Help Homeowners in Need

    Gwen Maechling

    Gwen Maechling of Professional Restoration and APEX Home Solutions rallied members of the greater St. Louis community to help a family in desperate need of a new roof.

    There is an old saying that goes, “A good deed is its own reward.” Sometimes one good deed can lead to another with amazing results. This is one of those stories. In the end, members of the greater St. Louis community came together to achieve something that once looked almost impossible: helping neighbors restore their home.

    The community service project was spearheaded by Gwen Maechling. Maechling has been passionate about construction since her first project, a custom home she helped build in the St. Louis area when she was just 20 years old. “I was out there every single second during construction,” she recalls. “It was so exciting. It was different than any job I’d ever done. It just lit a fire in me. I’d been searching for that passion, and I found it.”

    She later moved to Florida, earned her real-estate license and worked on several residential development projects. When she returned to the St. Louis area, she took a job selling residential roofing, siding and gutters for a company specializing in storm restoration work. She now manages production and sales training for another storm restoration company, Professional Restoration in St. Charles, Mo. She also is the owner and founder of St. Louis-based APEX Home Solutions, which handles residential roofing and remodeling projects.

    A CHANCE ENCOUNTER

    Maechling has overseen so many roofing projects in Glendale, Mo., that one realtor jokingly refers to it as “Gwendale.” In February 2014, she was working on a roofing project there and saw an elderly couple taking advantage of a break in the winter weather to rake leaves. She noticed the gutters were overflowing with leaves and debris, and she brought over a ladder and offered to clean the gutters out.

    AFTER: Professional Restoration donated the labor to install the new roofing and siding.

    AFTER: Professional Restoration donated the labor to install the new roofing and siding.

    As she spoke with the couple, Charles and Jennie Blank, she realized they were both hearing impaired. At first, communicating was a bit difficult, but Maechling realized they could read lips very well, and they indicated they did not want any help. Maechling persisted, and while cleaning the gutters she noticed the home was in need of several repairs. The roof was old and leaking in several places, and the soffits, fascia board and window sills were rotting. The old three-tab shingles and siding showed evidence of extensive hail damage. “It was one of the worst homes I’ve seen,” she remembers.

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    Understand Your State’s Limitations on Non-compete, Non-solicitation and Non-disclosure Agreements

    It is likely that at some point in their careers, laborers will be asked or required to sign an agreement restricting their activities once the working relationship comes to an end. National Public Radio reported in November 2016 that roughly 18 percent of U.S. workers were bound by non-competition agreements alone. This is in spite of the fact that numerous states restrict these agreements, which are prevalent in the construction industry. Many contractors require workers—particularly high-level employees—to sign such agreements as a matter of course. But whether it makes sense to do so—and which type of agreement is the best fit—depends on businesses’ needs and goals, as well as the controlling law.

    NON-COMPETITION AGREEMENTS

    Generally, non-competition agreements or clauses—also known as “non-competes”—prevent workers from engaging in the same business as their employers’ business after the relationship is terminated. This agreement often occurs at the beginning of the labor relationship with employees making this promise in consideration of new employment. These clauses can prohibit workers not only from starting their own businesses in competition with a former employer but also from working for competitors.

    For businesses, the goal of non-competes is to prevent former employees and independent contractors from offering the same services or products as the business. Should the employee or independent contractor choose to violate a non-competition agreement and engage in the same business, typically the employer is then entitled to injunctive relief whereby a court orders the worker to stop engaging in that type of business.

    By their nature, non-competes are contracts that restrain trade or commerce. For this reason, many jurisdictions disfavor these agreements. States vary greatly as to whether non-compete clauses are enforceable and, if so, how agreements must be drafted to be enforceable. For example, most who do business in the state of California are aware of that state’s general ban on non-competes (see Section 16600 of the California Business and Professions Code).

    Other states, such as Florida, allow non-competes to be enforced in particular circumstances set forth by state statute. In Florida, Title XXXIII, Chapter 541.335, requires that non-competes be signed and in writing to be enforceable. The law also sets forth detailed restrictions that depend on the party against whom they are being enforced. The Florida statute places duration and geographic limitations, among other limits, on these agreements.

    In many states, though no statute governs non-competes specifically, court decisions have created com- mon-law restrictions on them. These restrictions tend to be time- and location-based limits similar to the ones codified in Florida. Under Chapter 75 of the North Carolina General Statutes, contracts “in restraint of trade or commerce” are illegal and generally unenforceable. However, in interpreting this ban, North Carolina courts have enforced non-competition clauses in certain, limited circumstances. Under North Carolina case law, to be enforceable, non-competition agreements must be in writing, signed by the employee/in- dependent contractor, and based on valuable consideration. Furthermore, the duration and location in which the worker cannot compete must be “reasonable”. Finally, such agreements must be designed to protect a legitimate business interest, such as investing time and resources toward training employees. (See Young v. Mastrom Inc., a 1990 N.C. Court of Appeals opinion.)

    Provided that the terms of these agreements are reasonable, they are generally enforceable regardless of whether the worker quits or is terminated (as long as the termination is not otherwise in breach of an employment contract).

    Adequate consideration is an essential element of any enforceable contract and of covenants not to compete in particular. In North Carolina and other states, courts have found that mere continued employment is not sufficient consideration to render a non-compete enforceable. In North Carolina, the promise of a bonus, raise in pay, promotion or a new job assignment is generally sufficient consideration. This means that employers who want current workers to sign a non-compete should be prepared to offer them something in addition to continued employment.

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    RCMA Presents Industry Awards, Names Two New Board Members

    The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) hosted more than 100 industry attendees at its 2017 Annual Meeting in Las Vegas. The association recognized a number of its members for their exceptional contributions to the roof coatings industry and elected two new individuals to its board of directors.

    RCMA’s Martin A. Davis Award, the highest honor bestowed by the RCMA, is presented annually to an individual, selected by his or her fellow RCMA members, who has exemplified outstanding service and made significant contributions to the roof coatings industry. The first Martin A. Davis Award was presented in 1985. The award was designed to honor and serve in memory of Davis, a visionary founding member of the RCMA who served both the Association and industry with distinction and exceptional service.

    RCMA awarded Greg Hlavaty, general manager at Western Colloid, the Martin A. Davis Industry Leadership Award for 2016. Hlavaty has been an active member of RCMA, serving on the board of directors and contributing his industry expertise to RCMA’s committees and task forces. The award was presented by fellow RCMA board member Helene Hardy Pierce, GAF, who recognized Hlavaty’s efforts in facilitating RCMA’s merger with the Reflective Roof Coatings Institute (RRCI). “Throughout Greg’s time with the RCMA, he has been a passionate advocate for the Association’s growth and development, and his efforts on behalf of the RCMA-RRCI merger have strengthened the outlook for our industry,” Pierce commented.

    RCMA awarded its James “Tim” Nelligan Industry Statesman Award to Matt Lendzinski, field marketing manager at the Dow Chemical Company. Lendzinski is the 10th recipient of the award, a discretionary distinction only designated when deemed appropriate. Industry Statesman Award recipients are honored for outstanding interest and activism in promoting the roof coatings industry and exemplary efforts to achieve significant advancements through the implementation of new technical programming, regulatory or governmental affairs incentives, research activities, technical publications, and RCMA and industry involvement.

    Lendzinski serves as the co-chair of the RCMA Communications, Membership, and Education Committee, and has been an invaluable resource for numerous activities and projects undertaken by the association. “Matt is a well-deserved honoree, and has been instrumental in the growth of RCMA’s membership and the development of its communications, educational, and outreach programs,” commented Jim Kirby, RCMA Executive Director.

    RCMA presented its Emerging Leader Award to Ryan Blad, national sales manager at 838 Coatings. First awarded in 2016, it serves to recognize an individual, less than 35 years of age or in the industry less than 3 years, who is making strides toward becoming a leader in the roof coatings industry, and who serves as a role model for his or her industry peers. Blad currently serves on the RCMA board of directors and is a co-chair of the RCMA Technical Affairs Committee, and has been consistently active in the development of the association’s technical and research programs.

    RCMA also presented a Special Recognition Award during its meeting to Brock Landry, Venable LLP, in acknowledgment of his exceptional service to the industry. Recently retired, Landry served as RCMA’s general counsel for numerous decades, and was well known as a valued advocate on behalf of the roof coatings industry. “Brock is recognized by his peers for his industry knowledge, expertise, and willingness to move the association forward,” commented Reed Hitchcock, RCMA senior advisor and historian.

    In addition to the awards that were presented, two new members were elected to the RCMA board of directors for the 2017-2020 term. Will Lorenz, General Coatings Manufacturing Corp., and Josh Poole, Tremco Inc., were elected by the RCMA membership to sit on the Board of Directors.

    Finally, Brian Anthony, vice president at the Brewer Company and outgoing RCMA board member, was recognized for his long-term service to the RCMA for his participation on the board of directors over the past 12 years.

    The RCMA will next convene June 19-21, 2017 in Washington, D.C., for the association’s 2017 Summer Meeting and Legislative Day.

    METALCON Achieves Success in Denver

    Early this month, the halls of the Colorado Convention Center in Denver were abuzz as visitors captured ideas for expanding their businesses in the line-up of new products and education sessions at the 2014 METALCON.

    “All of us are surrounded by electronic communication in our business and personal lives. But that is really a supplement to the personal, face-to-face interaction that can only be achieved at a trade show. We’re seeing the trend away from electronics in some areas and this year’s METALCON showed how important a show like this is for building relationships with prospects and clients,” said Claire Kilcoyne, METALCON Show Director.

    Exhibitors agreed. “The emphasis on electronics may work well for marketing, but when it comes to our products, the contractors have to see them and understand how they can use them. It has to be face-to-face, and that’s why we’re at METALCON – to meet and talk with contractors,” said Dale Nelson, president of Roof Hugger Inc., Odessa, Fla.

    Ed Karper, North American Marketing Manager -Coil Coatings for Akzo Nobel Coatings Inc., Columbus, Ohio, added another perspective. “People judge trade shows by different factors. Some qualify a show by numbers of visitors or leads. But the real judge of quality in a show is how it helps you build relationships. By rotating location every year, METALCON keeps drawing a fresh audience and that expands our opportunities to establish new relationships each time.”

    Trilogy Machinery Inc., Belcamp, Md., combined electronics with personal attention to attract people to its booth. It used an interactive touch screen display similar to a game board where visitors could push symbols and draw lines between points while learning about the company, its products and their applications. Trilogy provides metal fabricating equipment for in-house, factory applications. “This is kind of electronic eye candy for visitors and it works. Traffic to our booth has been really good. We’ve had lots of great leads and one sale. So we’re very pleased,” said Matt Weeks, who handle sales for the company.

    For exhibitors with something new to offer, METALCON provided a great forum for introducing visitors to their company and products. Nelson Hershberger, Hershey’s Metal Meister LLC, Variobend USA, Claremont, Ill., had been to METALCON before, but this was the first show where his company exhibited. ”We had quite a number of visitors and were very busy throughout the show. We designed the Variobend equipment with the help of a gentleman who repaired most European-made machines. He heard all of the customer complaints about other equipment so we designed ours to eliminate those issues,” he said.

    For Jane Van Bergen, Marketing Manager of Silvercote Lamination, Greer, S.C., it was a great time to talk business. “METALCON was our ‘coming out’ event as a brand. The response [to corporate changes] was overwhelming from customers and potential customers. We’ve walked METALCON before and this is our first time exhibiting. We had a lot of customers and were able to partner with the metal building industry, which is what we wanted,” she said. The company manufactures and laminates fiberglass insulation for metal buildings.

    METALCON was held in Denver for the first time so it was an opportunity for local companies to bring visitors to their facilities. Denver-based New Tech Machinery hosted an open house before the show and promoted it to local and regional groups. Kristin Peregoy, Marketing Manager noted: “We had lots of positive feedback at our open house and many visitors at our booth. Traffic was excellent. It was a great show for us and the leads we received were high quality. It was also a chance to show more people our products up close and personal. METALCON is the best way to see and sell,” she added.

    Visitors from more than 52 countries came to the 2014 METALCON, held October 1-3, to learn about the top trends in metal from industry experts. A new series of daily programs were held in Learning Zones located in the exhibit hall. The 15-minute sessions focused on technical applications and solutions and offered more intimate question and answer opportunities between visitors and industry experts.

    Another lively, new feature was the Metal Construction Association’s Metal Roofing Championship Games that involved a variety of competitions between volunteers from the audience. They competed for prizes of cash and products and had a chance to show their skills in fastening screws into purlins, seaming standing seam panels, installing rubber roof jacks and placing PV clamps on a metal roof. The games demonstrated that with the right techniques, tools and products, metal roofing can be easily and accurately installed.

    More action took place in Solar Bay Live, an area dedicated to products and demos related to using metal roofing with solar installations.

    These educational forums supplemented the METALCON conference program that included 90-minute classroom sessions focused on what CEOs, presidents and managers need to know to move their companies forward. Topping the list was keynote speaker Steven S. Little, a sought after expert on the subject of long-term business growth, whose opening-day session drew a full house and the complete attention of the audience.

    Experts from the 275 exhibiting companies shared their knowledge of products and field applications with attendees. This included 53 businesses that have not exhibited in METALCON before or are returning after a multi-year absence.

    METALCON is produced by Newton, Mass.-based PSMJ Resources Inc., a leading authority on the effective management of architecture, engineering and construction firms; and sponsored by the Metal Construction Association, an organization of manufacturers and suppliers headquartered in Chicago.

    The 2015 METALCON will be held at the Tampa Convention Center, Tampa, Fla., Oct. 14-16 and will celebrate the event’s 25th year of promoting and increasing the use of metal products, technologies and solutions in construction.

    Shingle Applicator’s Manual Available as a Mobile App

    CertainTeed has released a mobile app for its roofing Shingle Applicator’s Manual (SAM).

    CertainTeed has released a mobile app for its roofing Shingle Applicator’s Manual (SAM).

    CertainTeed has released a mobile app for its roofing Shingle Applicator’s Manual (SAM). Available via the Google Play Store, the iTunes Store and the CertainTeed MyEDGE website, the app is a practical, forward-thinking tool that brings the company’s robust roofing installation guide to roofing professionals’ mobile devices for use whenever, wherever they need it. CertainTeed is the only roofing manufacturer to offer this type of digital service.

    The user-friendly app offers quick reference to detailed installation instructions and helpful product videos the company’s entire shingle product line, including three-tab, Patriot, Landmark, Hatteras, Presidential, Independence, Highland Slate, Grand Manor, and Carriage House. The education-based app is formatted for use on the iPhone, iPad and all Android devices.

    To search for the app, users simply type “CertainTeed” into the Google Play or iTunes search field and look for CertainTeed Roofing Shingle Applicator’s Manual. Once the app is downloaded, it is ready for use, and navigation of the tool is easy. A drop-down menu is prominently displayed on the app’s homepage that allows users to find brief product-specific instructional videos, how-to procedures for fastening shingles on low- and steep-slope roofs, instructions on the preferred methods of installation and much more.

    The Roofing Shingle Applicator’s Manual app is a complementary tool to the popular CertainTeed SAM, which is the industry’s most comprehensive, fully illustrated guide to steep-slope roofing installation. It features application instructions for all CertainTeed shingle products as well as important guidelines for workmanship. Roofing contractors use it as a training tool, reference guide, and sales aid.