Communication Is Crucial When You’re Working on Top of the Village Hall

Lincolnshire Village Hall houses city offices and a police station. The structure’s roof and gutter systems were recently replaced by All American Exterior Solutions. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The Lincolnshire Village Hall, located in Lincolnshire, Illinois, houses city departments and the offices of elected officials, as well as the Lincolnshire Police Station. When its natural cedar shake roof and inlaid gutter system began to fail, city officials looked for a solution that would provide the desired aesthetics but last longer and require less maintenance.

Dale Pole of All American Exterior Solutions, a full-service union roofing contractor headquartered in Lake Zurich, Illinois, thought he had the answer. Pole, a 32-year industry veteran who is now the company’s vice president of operations, dropped off samples of a synthetic shake roofing tile manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes and asked if city officials wanted to give it a try.

All American was awarded the job in 2016. The scope of work consisted of a complete re-roof of the complex, including the steep-slope roof system on the hall and tower. The project also included five sections of flat roofing and replacement of the copper gutter system. The job was complex, but All American was up to the challenge. The company worked in conjunction with Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, located in McHenry, Illinois.

The Steep-Slope System

The building’s signature feature is the observatory tower over the main entrance, which extends approximately 45 feet in the air. The main roof features a pitch change at the rear of the building, where the roof goes from 4:12 to 12:12. All

The complex is located right next to a large pond and bordered by mature trees, so the jobsite limited access to sections of the roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

American installed approximately 23,000 square feet of the DaVinci product, Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, a blend of four colors. The company also fabricated the new gutter system out of 20-ounce lead-coated copper with soldered seams. Approximately 600 feet of new gutters were installed.

Work began in late spring, and the 23-year-old existing roof was torn off in sections. GAF Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield was applied as a leak barrier, followed by Proof Synthetic Underlayment from ABC Supply. “We couldn’t install the tiles until the inlaid gutter was in place, so we used a synthetic underlayment to keep everything watertight during the tear-off process,” says Pole.

Gutters were installed in an 8-inch-by-8-inch trough. “There was a course or two of the DaVinci, and then the inlaid gutters were set into the roof, and the roof starts again,” notes Pole. “The trough area was also layered with ice and water shield before the copper gutters were put in.”

Transitions and flashings were also made of copper. “Everything on this job was 20-ounce lead-coated copper,” notes Pole. “All of the valleys, transition flashing, and the gutters were all lead-coated copper.”

The DaVinci synthetic shake tiles were easy to install, according to Pole. “They are nailed in place,” he says. “You can use stainless steel nails or hot-dip galvanized nails. In this case, we used 1-1/2-inch stainless steel ring shank nails.”

Low-Slope Areas

The low-slope roofs were covered with a GAF two-ply modified bitumen system. Michael McCory, project manager, headed up the crews on the five low-slope sections, which totaled approximately 2,700 square feet.

The observatory tower over the main entrance features a walk-out area with a modified bitumen roof system. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The low-slope sections had different substrates. Two balconies had concrete decks, while two canopies and an area over the garage had wooden decks. Some of the flat roofs had paver systems, which had to be removed and replaced after the new system was installed.

Half-inch DensDeck Prime cover board from Georgia-Pacific was installed over the wood and concrete decks. The GAF mod bit system consisted of a Ruberoid 20 base sheet and Ruberoid Granular FR cap sheet in white. “It was applied in a cold-process adhesive,” says McCory. “No torches were used. A manufacturer’s inspection was part of the process for a 20-year warranty.”

The upper level of the tower features a small walk-out balcony. “That was probably the most difficult area,” notes McCory. “It was covered with pavers and difficult to reach. We had to remove the pavers and store them in the stairwell during the installation.”

A Challenging Jobsite

Logistics at the jobsite posed a few problems. “The hardest part was the observatory tower by the front entry,” Pole recalls, noting an 80-foot man lift was used to remove the existing cedar and install the synthetic shake. “On the tower, it was all lift work. For other parts of the project, workers on both the steep-slope and the low-slope portions of the roof were tied off at all times.”

Crews installed 23,000 square feet of Bellaforte Shake by DaVinci Roofscapes on the building’s main roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The building is bordered by mature trees and a large pond, limiting roof access. “On the west side of the structure, the pond comes right up against the building,” Pole says. “We had to use a lift that could stretch over that pond to get that end of the roof.”

An Equipter mechanized debris hauler was used to get around narrow grassy areas near the building. “We used an Equipter, which is like a gas-powered, mobile dumpster, to drive around the building and enter the courtyard for our debris,” Pole says. “We have two of those pieces of equipment, which we use on a lot of our jobs to get the shingles out. They don’t damage lawns and help protect the landscaping.”

The building was occupied during the installation, so care had to be taken to ensure business was not disrupted and passers-by would be safe. “The village offices were open for business while we were working, and the police station was open as well,” notes McCory. “The tower and front entryway had to be completed on the weekend, as that was the only walkway for the public to get in.”

The police station had several doors, so crews had to coordinate with officers while replacing the roof on that section and let them know where they were setting up the crane. The courtyard area was also restricted at times.

“We obviously had to keep everything neat and organized and make sure we cleaned up every day to make sure nothing would bother the people working in the building and the residents who came in to the village hall to get permits or whatever the case may be,” McCory says. “You don’t want police cars getting flat tires.”

Communication is the key to meeting customers’ needs, especially with an occupied building. “Whoever the building owner is, I give him my cell number and make sure I have his,” Pole notes. “I try to stay in contact with them and let them know if anything is changing. I ask them if they have any questions or issues, or if their schedule is changing. On this project, they said it was like we were never even there, and that’s what we like to hear.”

Feedback from the city has been positive, according to Pole. “They are very happy with it,” he says. “The system has the look they wanted. It looks like shake, they had a lot of colors to choose from, and they won’t have the maintenance issues that they did with the cedar. And it will last a lot longer. They will save a whole roof replacement phase in the life of the DaVinci product.”

Pole believes his company’s diverse portfolio gives it an edge. “We’re one of very few union companies that have their own shinglers, flat roofing crews, and sheet metal workers in house. We also do waterproofing, metal wall panels and insulation,” he says.

“This project shows our strength — we can do it all.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com
Roof Consultant: Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, McHenry, Illinois, www.irca.com

MATERIALS

Steep-Slope Roof System
Synthetic Shake: Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.DaVinciRoofscapes.com
Underlayment: Proof Synthetic Underlayment, ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.ABCsupply.com
Leak Barrier: Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield, GAF, www.GAF.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Base Sheet: Ruberoid 20, GAF
Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet: Ruberoid Granular FR, GAF
Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.DensDeck.com

ABC Supply Opens Branch in Fairfield, California

ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced the company has opened a new branch in California serving professional contractors in Solano County and the surrounding areas. The new ABC Supply branch is located at 237 Lopes Road in Fairfield, California.

The new Fairfield branch will be managed by John Laurence. Laurence, who has been in the industry for nearly two decades, will use his extensive sales and management experience to lead the team of associates in Fairfield as they ensure that their customers have the products and support they need to succeed.

ABC Supply has now opened five branches in California over the last eight months. According to the company, this continued commitment to the state aligns with the company’s mission of being the easiest building products distributor for contractors to do business with.

“We’re confident that contractors in the Fairfield area will find our products and expertise second to none,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “I know John and his team are looking forward to building relationships with them as well as the larger Fairfield community.”

Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday. The phone number is (707) 864-1000.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

Three Sioux City Community School District Projects Are Part of Long-Term Plan

In 2017, Winkler Roofing crews re-roofed portions of two high schools and one elementary school. Shown here is an aerial photo of East High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

For the Sioux City Community School District (SCCSD) in Sioux City, Iowa, the final dismissal bell of the school year marks more than the start of summer break for students and staff. It also signals the beginning of roofing season.

In addition to routine maintenance and repairs, each summer brings at least one major roofing project for the district and its 24 facilities. Existing roofs that have fallen out of warranty coverage are replaced. The district also has completed a steady stream of construction projects over the past 16 years, replacing aging schools to meet evolving needs.

District enrollment has increased by several hundred students over that timeframe and now stands at more than 14,500. SCCSD also has expanded its programming, creating specialty elementary schools focusing on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), computer programming, environmental sciences, the arts, and dual-language education in English and Spanish. These specialties continue with middle school exploratory classes and eventually lead to the Sioux City Career Academy, which offers numerous education pathways to help students prepare for postsecondary education and careers.

Aerial view of West High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

“Our facilities need to keep up with the curriculum and new technologies so we can provide the best possible learning environments for our students,” says SCCSD Director of Operations and Maintenance Brian Fahrendholz, adding that the facilities plan emphasizes both supporting student achievement and maintaining fiscal responsibility.

Winkler Roofing Inc. of Sioux City has been one of the district’s key partners in this process for more than 20 years, installing new or partial roofing systems on nearly every building in the district. The summer of 2017 saw its crews re-roof portions of two high schools and one elementary school, installing 335 squares of new TPO roof systems and removing 170 tons of ballast.

A crew of between six and nine professionals was on a jobsite at any given time. The three projects were completed in less than a month, beginning in late June and wrapping up in late July. And there was nothing on the punch list following the warranty inspections.

A Systematic Approach

In recent years, SCCSD has adopted a systematic, long-range-planning approach to roof system management, working with local architects to evaluate its facilities, identify and plan work that needs to be completed the following summer, and map out future projects. The three roofs replaced in 2017 were indicative of this approach.

TPO Bonding Adhesive is applied on the substrate and the back of TPO membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Each of the roofs was between 15 and 20 years old and had begun to show signs of age. Their manufacturers’ warranties had also expired in recent years, making their replacement next up on the district’s roofing project schedule.

“We typically replace roofing systems within five years of the warranty expiration,” Fahrendholz explains. “It enables us to stay ahead of the maintenance issues that can begin cropping up.”

All three existing roofs had ballasted EPDM roofing systems. The re-roofing projects continued the district’s move toward TPO systems and, where possible, eliminating ballast. The three new roofing systems have 20-year, no-dollar-limit labor and material warranties.

SCCSD has several reasons for moving away from ballasted systems, according to Winkler Roofing President Jeff Winkler, P.E. In addition to reducing the roof’s weight and eliminating the cost of the ballast, unballasted roofs have a neater appearance and it is easier to monitor the membrane’s condition and find and repair any leaks. And, of course, when the time for re-roofing comes, there are no truckloads of ballast to remove and replace.

According to Winkler, SCCSD likes the durability of TPO membranes. “They like that the membrane is reinforced and that the seams are heat-welded, rather than seamed with primer and tape,” Winkler notes.

East High School Project

Re-roofing a 5,356-square-foot section at East High School entailed a complete tear-off of the existing ballasted EPDM roofing system and insulation down to the steel roof deck. The Winkler Roofing team then installed a new system topped with Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. It was the first time Winkler Roofing had installed the prodcut.

At East High School, polyisocyanurate insulation is installed using 3-inch galvalume plates and drill point fasteners. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Three layers of polyisocyanurate insulation were mechanically fastened with screws and plates to enhance the building’s energy efficiency. The 60-mil TPO membrane was then fully adhered using TPO Bonding Adhesive from Mule-Hide Products.

The last step in any well-done TPO project is removing the dirt and scuffs that are inevitably left behind during installation, notes Winkler. That step is eliminated with this product; the crew simply removes the protective film covering the membrane to reveal a clean roof that is ready for inspection.

“The material is more expensive than regular TPO membranes, but there is the potential to make up for that in reduced labor costs,” Winkler notes.

The biggest benefit would be seen on roofs that have fewer penetrations, according to Winkler. Installing the membrane around penetrations requires removing a portion of the protective film, he explains. Because those areas are then exposed to scuffs and dirt, crews must go back and clean them by hand.

West High School Project

Meticulous detail work was key to the successful replacement of a 18,056-square-foot section of the roof at West High School. There were nearly four dozen penetrations in the roof, from 4-inch pipes to HVAC equipment measuring 8 feet by 12 feet. Many of the chimney stacks also were in spots that were awkward for the crew to work around.

Winkler Roofing crew members prepare to install a TPO walkway pad. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

It was all in a day’s work for the Winkler Roofing team. “The quality of our detail work is one of the things we take pride in,” Winkler says. “The keys are good leadership, both on and off the roof, and a well-seasoned crew. My foreman, Absalon Quezada, is a master of solving the toughest of details and coordinating a well-orchestrated crew.”

The roof’s existing concrete deck made a mechanically attached system uneconomical, so a new ballasted system was specified. The existing ballast had deteriorated to the point that, if reused, it could puncture the new roofing membrane. So, all 100 tons of it, along with the existing EPDM membrane, were removed and disposed of. The pieces of stainless steel cap metal along the perimeter were removed and numbered in sequence for reinstallation later. Sections of water-damaged insulation were removed and replaced.

An additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation was loose-layered over the entire roof to improve energy efficiency, followed by a new loose-layered 60-mil white TPO membrane. New ballast was then installed.

Details such as this pipe boot were installed using a hot-air welder. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

The crew navigated a challenging site while depositing the new ballast on the roof of the one-story building. The site offered only one feasible parking spot for the seven dump trucks that would deliver the rock, and that was on a lawn, just on the other side of two large trees. Crews carefully noted the location of sprinklers for the in-ground irrigation system to avoid driving over them, and shut the system down for several days in advance of the delivery to minimize ruts caused by the trucks’ tires. The trees’ trunks were spaced less than 20 feet apart and the canopies have grown together, leaving only small tunnel to feed the conveyor through. Crews kept the conveyor low as they extended it through the branches, then brought it to roof height by repeatedly raising it and the backing the truck up.

Riverside Elementary School Project

At Riverside Elementary School, a 7,314-square-foot section of roof was replaced with a 60-mil, fully attached TPO system.

The existing EPDM membrane, ballast and edge metal flashings were removed and disposed of. Crews removed and replaced any water-damaged insulation, added an additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation throughout to increase the building’s energy efficiency, and mechanically attached the insulation to the steel roof deck using screws and plates. The white TPO membrane was then installed using bonding adhesive, and new edge metal flashings were added.

Straight A’s on the Report Card

The new roofs received top grades on their inspection report cards.

At East High School, crews installed Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. The last step in the installation process is removing the protective film covering the membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

When Mule-Hide Products Co. Territory Manager Jake Rowell inspected the roofs, there were no items on his, or the district’s, punch list. The only remaining task — which was completed during the inspection — was covering the seams on the West High School roof with ballast; they had intentionally been left exposed for easy inspection. In fact, that was the only “to-do list” item Rowell noted during inspections of 11 Winkler Roofing projects that week.

“The quality of their work is phenomenal,” Rowell says. “The crews take pride in their work. They don’t just throw a project together and move on. They check their work to make sure it’s done right before I see it and before the customer sees it.”

THE TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Winkler Roofing Inc., Sioux City, Iowa
Architect: FEH DESIGN, Sioux City, Iowa, www.fehdesign.com
Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com
Decorative Sheet Metal: Interstate Mechanical Corp., Sioux City, Iowa, www.interstatemechanicalcorp.com

MATERIALS

TPO Membrane Roof Systems: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc., www.mulehide.com

Fans and Community Rally to Replace Barrel Roof at Roadside America

Crews from Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling battled winter weather to install a new fully adhered EPDM roofing system from Mule-Hide Products Co.

Crews from Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling battled winter weather to install a new fully adhered EPDM roofing system from Mule-Hide Products Co. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Lovingly and meticulously crafted over a period of more than 60 years, the 6,000-square-foot display of miniature villages at Roadside America in Shartlesville, Pennsylvania, has been featured on the HISTORY channel and in such books as “1,000 Places to See in the USA & Canada Before You Die” by Patricia Schultz and “Weird Pennsylvania” by Matt Lake. To area families, however, the museum is more than just a funky tourist attraction. It is a treasure that has been shared by four generations—one that must be passed on to future generations.

So, when the building’s nearly 65-year-old barrel roof began to fail, threatening to shutter the museum and put its gems in storage for good, the community and fans far and wide rallied. Nearly $80,000 was raised, roofing crews worked in between winter storms, and a new EPDM roofing system was installed to protect the masterpiece below.

A Life’s Work

Dubbed “The World’s Greatest Indoor Miniature Village,” the display at Roadside America is the life’s work of its sole creator, Laurence Gieringer. Fascinated by miniatures from an early age, he made the first piece in 1902 and continued expanding the collection until his death in 1963. The result is a breathtaking snapshot of American rural life spanning more than 200 years, from a frontier town with saloons and horse-drawn wagons and carriages to a 1950s Main Street with a movie theater and tail-finned Chevys. The collection includes 300 hand-built structures, 600 miniature light bulbs, 4,000 tiny figurines, 10,000 hand-made trees, working model railroads and trolleys, moving waterways, wall paintings, and replicas of such landmarks as Mount Rushmore, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, and Henry Ford’s original shop in Dearborn, Mich. The twice-hourly patriotic “Night Pageant” features an illuminated Statue of Liberty and the playing of America’s national anthem and Kate Smith’s rendition of “God Bless America.”

Originally housed in the basement of Gieringer’s childhood home and later in the carousel building of an abandoned amusement park, Roadside America moved to its current home in 1953. Still a family business, it is now owned by Gieringer’s granddaughter Dolores Heinsohn, and operated by his great-granddaughter Bettina Heinsohn and her husband Brian Hilbert.

A Preservation Mission

A carpenter by trade, Gieringer fabricated the rafters for the museum’s 80-square-foot-by-123-square-foot barrel roof

Years of water penetration had damaged the existing roof, and a complete tear-off and replacement was in order. The original rafters and roof deck were sound.

Years of water penetration had damaged the existing roof, and a complete tear-off and replacement was in order. The original rafters and roof deck were sound. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

himself. In 2016—63 years later—they and the original wood plank deck were still in place. According to Carl Rost, general manager of contractor Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling Inc. of Wernersville, Pennsylvania, the hot-mop-down tar roof had been coated “20 times more than it should have been.” Time and weather had taken their toll. A severe snowstorm in January 2016 brought wind and tree damage. Consistent rain would cause leaks into the attic, with water sometimes dripping to the show floor below.

An elaborate water collection and removal system was created to protect the priceless miniatures. Buckets were placed in the exhibit and items moved whenever water started dripping to the show floor. Tarps—22-feet-by-22-feet—were hung in the attic, zig-zagging through the space to catch water and funnel it into 55-gallon barrels, which were then emptied by pumps.

Supporters Rally

While the patches and stopgap measures had done their job, they clearly were not a permanent solution. A new roof—and a major fundraising effort to pay for it—were needed.

Even with Bachman’s Roofing and the teams at roofing system manufacturer Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. and the Reading, Pennsylvania, branch of building materials distributor ABC Supply working to keep costs as low as possible, the new roof would cost $80,000. Roadside America launched a GoFundMe.com campaign, raising nearly $19,000. Two anonymous donors contributed the remaining $60,000.

For many supporters, including Bachman’s Roofing Owner and President Eric Bachman and ABC Supply Branch Manager Jeff Smith, helping Roadside America was a matter of ensuring that a family tradition spanning four generations lives on. Their parents had brought them to the museum as children. They, in turn, took their kids, who are now sharing it with their families.

There was no question about helping Roadside America, Rost says. “Eric met with Brian and, within minutes, told him ‘We have to make this work.’”

EPDM Roofing System Selected

A 60-mil EPDM roofing system was chosen for its ease of installation on a barrel roof, its durability and its cost-effectiveness.

After the original roof system was removed, fiberboard insulation boards were fastened to the existing deck with screws and plates. The EPDM membrane was fully adhered using a fast-drying, freeze-resistant, low-VOC bonding adhesive. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

The original plan was to recover the existing roof, reducing costs and, with winter weather at hand, allowing the crew to get the job done as quickly as possible. Once work began, however, the damage caused by years of water penetration was evident and the job switched to a complete tear-off and replacement.

EPDM roofing systems are common in Berks County, where Shartlesville is located. The membrane’s ease of installation on a barrel roof reinforced the choice to use it on Roadside America’s building.

“We’ve done quite a few barrel roofs and have found that EPDM works best,” Rost says.

Roofing membranes have “memories,” he explains. Rolled tightly for shipping, they want to snap back to that state when laid out on the jobsite. They must be given sufficient time to flatten out prior to installation, or wrinkling can occur. EPDM membranes “relax” much more quickly than other membranes do, particularly in the cold temperatures that the Bachman’s Roofing crew would be working in. The membrane also remains flexible in hot and cold temperatures, enabling it to be easily curved over the barrel roof’s rafters.

“We knew that EPDM would give us a fast, wrinkle-free installation,” Rost says.

EPDM also is less slippery than other membranes, points out Rob Keating, territory manager with Mule-Hide Products, helping ensure that snow will not slide off the curved roof, potentially injuring a museum guest or employee walking below. A snow rail manufactured by Alpine Snow Guards was specified and installed to alleviate previous issues with snow and ice sliding down the roof and damaging an air conditioning compressor.

A black membrane was chosen for its lower cost and because, with eastern Pennsylvania having more heating days than cooling days, it could help the museum manage its heating costs, Rost says. A 60-mil membrane was selected for its durability and long expected lifecycle, he adds, helping the museum reduce its ongoing maintenance costs and prolong the day when re-roofing would again be required.

The rafters—made of one-by-twos, one-by-fours, one-by-sixes, one-by-eights, one-by-tens and one-by-twelves to create the roof’s barrel shape—were still sound.

Fiberboard insulation boards were fastened to the existing deck boards with screws and plates. To accommodate the roof’s irregular shape and the cold temperatures, the EPDM membrane was fully adhered using a fast-drying, freeze-resistant, low-VOC bonding adhesive.

In addition to the barrel roof, the crew replaced an existing 625-square-foot low-slope section of EPDM roofing on one side of the building’s front.

Working Around Winter Weather

January and February bring snow, sleet, ice and wind to Shartlesville—certainly not ideal conditions in which to undertake a re-roofing project. Despite unfavorable weather forecasts, the Bachman’s Roofing crew began work as soon as the necessary funds had been raised and Roadside America gave the green light.

Roadside America is dubbed “The World’s Greatest Indoor Miniature Village.” On display at the museum are more than 300 hand-built structures, 600 miniature light bulbs, 4,000 tiny figurines, and 10,000 hand-made trees, as well as working model railroads and trolleys. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

“The displays inside are priceless, and if they were damaged by water they couldn’t be replaced,” Rost says. “So, we said we’d work through the bad weather, taking time off as necessary.”

Work began on January 9, 2017. Thanks to some interference by Mother Nature, what normally would have been a one- or two-week job took six weeks. A crew of 10 completed the tear-off and eight professionals installed the new roofing system.

“Our crew endured,” Rost says. “One morning they called to tell me that they wouldn’t be able to work that day. I said ‘The storm went through last night. What’s the deal?’ They said that the parking lot was a sheet of ice. I had to see for myself, so I drove out there. The moment I got out of the car, I fell onto the completely iced-over parking lot.”

Given the roof’s slope, extra attention was paid to safety. Crew members worked carefully, without rushing—particularly when working along the roof’s steep edges. Everyone was harnessed while on the roof and followed all other relevant safety regulations. Rost and the firm’s safety inspector spent extra time monitoring the jobsite.

Mission Accomplished

With the re-roofing project complete, the buckets, tarps, barrels and pumps that once kept Roadside America’s miniature villages dry have been put away. A spring, a summer and an early fall have come and gone, with no leaks. The museum has been saved.

Hilbert extended thanks to those who made it possible. “Without the generous support of so many donors, this project wouldn’t have happened,” he says. “Where do you find that these days?”

Rost adds, “Now future generations can come and enjoy what four generations of our families have already enjoyed.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Bachman’s Roofing, Building & Remodeling Inc., Wernersville, Pennsylvania, Bachmansroofing.com
Local Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., Reading, Pennsylvania, ABCsupply.com

ROOFING MATERIALS

EPDM Membrane: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc., Mulehide.com
Low-VOC Bonding Adhesive: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.
Fiberboard Insulation: Continental Materials Inc., Continentalmaterials.com
Snow Guard: Alpine Snow Guards, Alpinesnowguards.com

ABC Supply Opens New Branch in California

ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced that the company has opened a branch in Antioch, Calif. Tom Hennigan will lead the team of associates at this new ABC Supply branch. According to the company, Hennigan joined ABC Supply’s Oakland, Calif., location in 2016 as an outside sales associate. Prior to joining ABC Supply, Hennigan gained extensive experience with exterior building products as a contractor and salesperson, and he will use the industry knowledge he gained to help local contractors find solutions for their business challenges and achieve their goals.

The branch is ABC Supply’s first location in Antioch and one of more than 30 locations in California. “We’re excited to be part of the Antioch community and to build trusting, professional relationships with the area’s contractors,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for contractors to have access to the products and expertise they need to tackle their projects.”

The Antioch branch is located at 2701 Verne Roberts. Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PDT, Monday through Friday, and 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. PDT on Saturday. The phone number is (925) 779-1437. 

ABC Supply Offers Building Products to Contractors at the Bowling Green Branch

ABC Supply Co. Inc. has opened a branch in Bowling Green, Ky., located at 125 Hunter Court. The location will offer steep-slope and low-slope roofing and other select building products that contractors need to run their businesses.

Jason Swigart will manage the branch. Prior to joining ABC Supply, Swigart worked for other building products distributors in the Louisville area in positions ranging from inside and outside sales to operations manager. In March 2016, he started at the Louisville branch located at 619 Industry Road as an outside sales associate. He graduated from the University of Louisville with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and marketing.

This is ABC Supply’s sixth location in Kentucky. “Our new location in Bowling Green will help contractors in south-central Kentucky have access to the products and services that they rely on for their businesses every day,” says Tom Kuchan, vice president of ABC Supply’s Northeast Region. “Whether it’s working with new or existing customers, Jason and his team look forward to continuing to build relationships with the area’s contractors.” 

Branch hours are 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CDT, Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. CDT on Saturday. The phone number is (270) 782-8787. 

ABC Supply Names 25 Managing Partners in 2017

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. has promoted 25 branch managers to managing partner status. The honor is the highest level of achievement among the company’s branch managers and gives them a more prominent leadership role within the company. As managing partners, they join ABC Supply’s National Branch Advisory Board, which advises senior management on a variety of topics. 

To be selected as a managing partner, managers must meet rigorous requirements in the areas of customer satisfaction, associate development, branch performance, safety compliance and excellence in overall business practices.

“We are proud to recognize these 25 managers as outstanding leaders who demonstrate dedication to their teams, customers and communities,” said Keith Rozolis, ABC Supply’s president and chief executive officer. “We encourage our branch managers to be innovative and entrepreneurial. Those who rise to the level of managing partner play an important part in shaping initiatives that help us improve our customers’ experiences and provide more opportunities for our associates.”

ABC Supply’s 2017 Managing Partner program inductees are: Darren Brennan of Topeka, Kan.; Patrick Bryan of Nolanville, Texas; Dan Carpenter of Kalamazoo, Mich.; Jeremy Crawford of Cheverly, Md.; Danny Duncan of Pineville, N.C.; Ken Dunn of Raleigh, N.C.; Paul Fields of Coal Valley, Ill.; Kyle Fisher of Huntington, W.V.; Bill Fleming of Fenton, Mo.; Gary Jenkins of Buffalo, N.Y.; Matt Kenney of Florence, S.C.; Eric Kuchan of Portland, Maine; Josh Landrum of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Holly Lockey of Fort Myers, Fla.; Jason McCulley of Syracuse, N.Y.; Martin Mejia of Houston; Matt Noury of Keene, N.H.; Donnie O’Sullivan of Pembroke Park, Fla.; Robert Olson of Hudson, Fla.; Scott Prentiss of Lewiston, Maine Scott Smith of Mansfield, Ohio; Ryan Stanton of St. Cloud, Minn.; Brad Stinson of Cincinnati; Paula Stumbo of Lexington, Ky.; and Rocky Yasko of Erie, Pa.

The new managing partners continue to oversee their respective branches while taking on the additional responsibilities that come with achieving managing partner status.

ABC Supply Opens New Branch in Illinois 

ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced that the company will open a new location in Elgin, Ill. The branch will be managed by Rocco Ranallo. Ranallo began his career in the industry as a contractor in 2001. In 2013, he joined ABC Supply as an outside sales associate at the company’s Crystal Lake, Ill., location. After excelling in that position, Ranallo was promoted to manager of the Niles, Ill., branch. 

With his construction background, Ranallo has experienced firsthand the challenges that contractors face each day, and he aims to provide the product and industry knowledge they need to build thriving businesses and achieve their goals, noted the company. 

“Elgin is one of the largest cities in Illinois and continues to grow,” said Jim Welch, vice president of ABC Supply’s Midwest Region. “By opening this location, we are bringing the ABC Supply brand of superior service to contractors northwest of Chicago and making it easier for them to access the high-quality products and professional expertise they need to tackle their projects.” 

The address for the new location is 1147 Timber Drive, Elgin, IL. The phone number is (847) 628-6048. For more information, visit the company’s website.

Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress Announces MVP Award Winners

The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress has announced the winners of its 17th annual Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, recognizing roofing workers from Irvine, Calif.; Commerce City, Colo.; Lakeland, Fla.; Cumming, Ga.; Charlotte, N.C.; LaGrange, Ohio; and Houston.

The MVP Awards program honors roofing professionals based on their contributions in one or more of the following areas: on-the-job performance; on-the-job safety performance, contributions to a team effort; community service and volunteerism; and other noteworthy contributions.

The 2017 MVP Award winners are:

  • Narciso Alarcon, superintendent at Antis Roofing & Waterproofing, Irvine, Calif., for community service and volunteerism and other noteworthy contributions and activities.
  • Justin Cooper, foreman at Flynn, Commerce City, Colo., for outstanding on-the- job performance.
  • Manuel Cortez, foreman at Antis Roofing & Waterproofing, Irvine, Calif., for contributions to a team effort.
  • Robert Detweiler, foreman at Centimark Corp., Lakeland, Fla., for community service and volunteerism.
  • Don Gautier, superintendent at Chamberlain Roofing & Waterproofing, Houston, for outstanding on the job performance and on-the-job safety performance.
  • Roy Jones, superintendent at Rike Roofing Services Inc., Charlotte, N.C., for other noteworthy contributions and activities.
  • Mearl Kline, foreman at West Roofing Services Inc., LaGrange, Ohio, for on-the- job safety performance.
  • Clifton Mead, field worker at Tecta America Southeast LLC, Atlanta, for contributions to a team effort.

Additionally, the Alliance named the following MVP Award finalists:

The Alliance also named Alarcon as a finalist for on-the-job performance and contributions to a team effort, Cooper for other contributions and activities, Gautier for contributions to a team effort, and Kline for contributions to a team effort.

For more information about the MVP Awards program or next year’s nominations, contact Bennett Judson, the Alliance’s executive director, at (800) 323-9545, ext. 7513 or bjudson@roofingindustryalliance.net.

Offices & Warehouses

Workforce Essentials, Clarksville, Tenn.

Team

Roofing and Wall Panel Installer: Modern Heating Cooling Roofing, Clarksville, (931) 647-0815
Architect: Lyle Cook Martin Architects, Clarksville
Metal Panel Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties Inc., Nashville, Tenn.

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area.

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area.

Roof Materials

To meet design objectives, four different PAC-CLAD products were selected. The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels. The façade features 7,800 square feet of Precision Series wall panels finished in Sierra Tan and installed vertically. Complementing the façade is 4,000 square feet of 12-inch Almond Flush panels installed as soffit. In addition, 4,520 square feet of 24-gauge Medium Bronze flat sheet was used for fascia and trim.

“The Tite-Loc Plus panels were long—85 feet—and were rollformed onsite,” says Bill Kimbrough Jr., estimator and project manager for Modern Heating Cooling Roofing. “Getting them up to the high roof was a challenge. All other profiles were fabricated and delivered by Petersen. Currently, PAC-CLAD is about the only product we use.”

Metal Panel Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels.

The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels.

Roof Report

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area in the middle of the state. Located on a highly visible urban-infill site, the new Workforce Essentials headquarters and career training center is situated at a “gateway entry” intersection to the downtown district. The new 40,000-squarefoot facility consolidates services that had been provided at agency offices previously scattered around the city. After initially considering renovation of an aging building on the site, the organization’s board of directors determined that construction of a new, energy-efficient headquarters was a better course of action. Good visibility and an easily identifiable aesthetic were important to site selection and building design criteria.

Different departments within the building are visually and strategically defined in separate wings and entrances. The administrative office wing to the south is defined by a vertical brick corner tower and sloping metal roof planes and cladding. The larger career training center portion of the building is introduced by metal wall panels in a calming color palette of Sierra Tan. Thematic entry canopies, protruding aluminum sunshades and aligned horizontal fenestration tie together the architectural composition. The overriding idea is for the building to serve as a machine with different parts working together for a common purpose.

Brad Martin, principal/designer at Lyle Cook Martin Architects, explains: “Workforce Essentials has a variety of regional offices throughout the area it serves. All are different and very few are freestanding. The organization has never really had a corporate look or identity. Now, with this new building, we can incorporate its design features and architectural aesthetics into future new buildings and renovations and begin to develop an iconic look.”

Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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