ABC Supply Co. Inc. Honored as One of the Best Places to Work in 2019

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced it has been awarded the Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Award. The prestigious award recognizes the best places to work in 2019, based solely on input from employees.

Glassdoor, one of the world’s largest job and recruiting websites, uses company reviews shared by current and former employees to determine which companies will be included on the Employees’ Choice Award list. Employees are asked to rate their overall satisfaction with the company and key workplace factors such as career opportunities, compensation and benefits, culture and values, and work/life balance. In addition, employees are asked to describe the best reasons to work at their companies as well as any downsides.

“It is an honor to have ABC Supply recognized as one of the best workplaces in the nation,” said President and CEO Keith Rozolis. “We focus on putting our associates first, and it makes us proud that they know how much we value them.”

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Opens Branch in Alpharetta Georgia

ABC Supply Co. Inc., opened a branch at 6180 Shiloh Crossing, Suite B in Alpharetta, Georgia. In addition to the roofing and siding products and tools available, the branch offers services including customizable marketing materials, covered ground drops and warranty claims assistance to contractors.

Grant Truex will manage the branch. Truex joined ABC Supply in 2009. He was named manager of the Johnson City, Tennessee, location in 2011 and went on to manage the Conley, Georgia, branch in 2015.

ABC Supply now has 15 locations throughout Georgia with the opening of the Alpharetta branch.

“Grant is an experienced leader who will work hard to make sure his team has the support and knowledge they need to serve local contractors,” said Jim Kaufmann, vice president of ABC Supply’s Southeast Region. “At every ABC Supply location our goal is to provide solutions that make our customers’ jobs easier.”

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

 

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Acquires the Assets of CSC Home & Hardware

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. has acquired the assets of CSC Home & Hardware, a distributor of drywall, roofing and hardware products. ABC will continue to serve customers from the former CSC Home & Hardware location at 1580 Earl L. Core Road in Morgantown, West Virginia.

The acquisition adds a new market for ABC Supply, allowing the company to build relationships with the area’s contractors and provide the products and support they need for their businesses. Current CSC Home & Hardware associates will continue to work at the branch, making sure customers receive the consistent service they’re accustomed to.

“CSC Home & Hardware associates share our same values and commitment to contractors, so we couldn’t be more pleased to have them join our family,” said Tom Kuchan, vice president of ABC Supply’s Northeast Region. “Contractors will continue to have the personalized assistance they need at every step of their projects.”

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Acquires the Assets of DRI Supply Co.

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. has acquired the assets of DRI Supply Co., a distributor of drywall, roofing and insulation products. ABC will continue to serve customers from the three former DRI locations: 746 Church Hill Road in San Andreas, California; 2300 Cooper Ave. in Merced, California; and 5831 Highway 50 East in Carson City, Nevada.

The acquisition allows ABC Supply to enhance its service in both existing and new markets and strengthen relationships with professional contractors. Current DRI Supply associates will continue to work at the locations, ensuring customers receive seamless access to the products and services they need to run and grow their businesses.

“We’re happy to welcome the DRI Supply team to our ABC family,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “Contractors will continue to work with the knowledgeable people they’ve come to know, trust and rely on while enjoying access to a wider selection of product options and delivery capabilities.”

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Opens Branch in Northern California

ABC Supply Co. Inc. announces the opening of its newest branch located at 901 S. State St. in Ukiah, California. ABC Supply is the nation’s largest distributor of roofing, siding, windows and other exterior building products and tools that contractors need to tackle their construction projects and build their businesses.

Kris Mason will be the manager of the new branch. Mason joined ABC Supply in 2015 as a driver at the Hudson, Florida, branch and moved to Santa Rosa, California, in 2016 for a delivery services manager role. Prior to joining ABC Supply, Mason dedicated 13 years to the U.S. Army, with two deployments to Iraq. Mason is excited to partner with area contractors in this new region, providing them with the solutions they need to make their projects successful.

ABC Supply now has 41 locations throughout California with the opening of the Ukiah branch.

“This latest branch addition in Northern California allows our professional contractor customers to have access to the materials they need, while having a strong partner alongside them,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “Kris brings strong leadership skills to his team, and they will do a great job of working with area contractors to make their jobs easier and businesses successful.”

Branch hours are 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PDT, Monday through Friday. The phone number is (707) 462-1059.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Opens Branch in Milton, Delaware

ABC Supply Co. Inc. has opened its second location in Delaware. The new branch is located at 25414 Primehook Road, Suite 300, in Milton. ABC Supply’s other Delaware branch is located in Stanton.

D’Mitri Copeland, the new branch manager, began his career with ABC Supply in 2005 as a customer financial services account executive. In 2016, he transitioned to an outside sales position at the company’s Stanton, Delaware, branch. Copeland will oversee daily operations, and guarantee area contractors receive the superior customer service that contractors have come to expect from ABC Supply. The Milton branch will offer steep- and low-slope roofing, siding, windows, roofing insulation, and other exterior building products and tools.

“We’re confident this branch will make it easier for contractors in the area to have access to the high-quality building products, services and expertise they need,” said Tom Kuchan, vice president of ABC Supply’s Northeast Region. “I know D’Mitri and his team are also looking forward to building great relationships with local contractors and the Milton community.”

Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EDT, Monday through Friday. The phone number is (302) 684-3902.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Names Chief Operating Officer

ABC Supply Co. Inc. has appointed Mike Jost, vice president of operations as chief operating officer. In his new role, Jost will be responsible for the performance of ABC Supply branches across the country. His operations teams will also support L&W Supply branches, which were acquired by ABC Supply in 2016.

Jost will continue to oversee ABC Supply’s marketing and merchandising groups, as well as its real estate, education, fleet and safety, and national business development teams.

Jost started in the industry in 1998 as a salesperson for Washington Roofing Products in Alexandria, Virginia. He joined ABC Supply in 2002, when it purchased Washington Roofing as part of the Cameron Ashley acquisition. Jost spent several years as a branch manager and managing partner, three years on ABC’s northeast regional team and was the district manager for ABC’s Mid-Atlantic District prior to his promotion to vice president of operations in November of 2013.

“Mike has been an integral part of ABC’s growth over the last several years. He and his teams have worked on initiatives that have further strengthened our position as the distributor of choice in our industry,” said CEO Keith Rozolis. “Mike’s field perspective, marketing and merchandising acumen, and passion for our business, combined with his high energy and ‘people first’ focus, will serve him well in his new role.”

Jost has a master’s degree from the George Washington University School of Business and earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

Communication Is Crucial When You’re Working on Top of the Village Hall

Lincolnshire Village Hall houses city offices and a police station. The structure’s roof and gutter systems were recently replaced by All American Exterior Solutions. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The Lincolnshire Village Hall, located in Lincolnshire, Illinois, houses city departments and the offices of elected officials, as well as the Lincolnshire Police Station. When its natural cedar shake roof and inlaid gutter system began to fail, city officials looked for a solution that would provide the desired aesthetics but last longer and require less maintenance.

Dale Pole of All American Exterior Solutions, a full-service union roofing contractor headquartered in Lake Zurich, Illinois, thought he had the answer. Pole, a 32-year industry veteran who is now the company’s vice president of operations, dropped off samples of a synthetic shake roofing tile manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes and asked if city officials wanted to give it a try.

All American was awarded the job in 2016. The scope of work consisted of a complete re-roof of the complex, including the steep-slope roof system on the hall and tower. The project also included five sections of flat roofing and replacement of the copper gutter system. The job was complex, but All American was up to the challenge. The company worked in conjunction with Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, located in McHenry, Illinois.

The Steep-Slope System

The building’s signature feature is the observatory tower over the main entrance, which extends approximately 45 feet in the air. The main roof features a pitch change at the rear of the building, where the roof goes from 4:12 to 12:12. All

The complex is located right next to a large pond and bordered by mature trees, so the jobsite limited access to sections of the roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

American installed approximately 23,000 square feet of the DaVinci product, Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, a blend of four colors. The company also fabricated the new gutter system out of 20-ounce lead-coated copper with soldered seams. Approximately 600 feet of new gutters were installed.

Work began in late spring, and the 23-year-old existing roof was torn off in sections. GAF Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield was applied as a leak barrier, followed by Proof Synthetic Underlayment from ABC Supply. “We couldn’t install the tiles until the inlaid gutter was in place, so we used a synthetic underlayment to keep everything watertight during the tear-off process,” says Pole.

Gutters were installed in an 8-inch-by-8-inch trough. “There was a course or two of the DaVinci, and then the inlaid gutters were set into the roof, and the roof starts again,” notes Pole. “The trough area was also layered with ice and water shield before the copper gutters were put in.”

Transitions and flashings were also made of copper. “Everything on this job was 20-ounce lead-coated copper,” notes Pole. “All of the valleys, transition flashing, and the gutters were all lead-coated copper.”

The DaVinci synthetic shake tiles were easy to install, according to Pole. “They are nailed in place,” he says. “You can use stainless steel nails or hot-dip galvanized nails. In this case, we used 1-1/2-inch stainless steel ring shank nails.”

Low-Slope Areas

The low-slope roofs were covered with a GAF two-ply modified bitumen system. Michael McCory, project manager, headed up the crews on the five low-slope sections, which totaled approximately 2,700 square feet.

The observatory tower over the main entrance features a walk-out area with a modified bitumen roof system. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The low-slope sections had different substrates. Two balconies had concrete decks, while two canopies and an area over the garage had wooden decks. Some of the flat roofs had paver systems, which had to be removed and replaced after the new system was installed.

Half-inch DensDeck Prime cover board from Georgia-Pacific was installed over the wood and concrete decks. The GAF mod bit system consisted of a Ruberoid 20 base sheet and Ruberoid Granular FR cap sheet in white. “It was applied in a cold-process adhesive,” says McCory. “No torches were used. A manufacturer’s inspection was part of the process for a 20-year warranty.”

The upper level of the tower features a small walk-out balcony. “That was probably the most difficult area,” notes McCory. “It was covered with pavers and difficult to reach. We had to remove the pavers and store them in the stairwell during the installation.”

A Challenging Jobsite

Logistics at the jobsite posed a few problems. “The hardest part was the observatory tower by the front entry,” Pole recalls, noting an 80-foot man lift was used to remove the existing cedar and install the synthetic shake. “On the tower, it was all lift work. For other parts of the project, workers on both the steep-slope and the low-slope portions of the roof were tied off at all times.”

Crews installed 23,000 square feet of Bellaforte Shake by DaVinci Roofscapes on the building’s main roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The building is bordered by mature trees and a large pond, limiting roof access. “On the west side of the structure, the pond comes right up against the building,” Pole says. “We had to use a lift that could stretch over that pond to get that end of the roof.”

An Equipter mechanized debris hauler was used to get around narrow grassy areas near the building. “We used an Equipter, which is like a gas-powered, mobile dumpster, to drive around the building and enter the courtyard for our debris,” Pole says. “We have two of those pieces of equipment, which we use on a lot of our jobs to get the shingles out. They don’t damage lawns and help protect the landscaping.”

The building was occupied during the installation, so care had to be taken to ensure business was not disrupted and passers-by would be safe. “The village offices were open for business while we were working, and the police station was open as well,” notes McCory. “The tower and front entryway had to be completed on the weekend, as that was the only walkway for the public to get in.”

The police station had several doors, so crews had to coordinate with officers while replacing the roof on that section and let them know where they were setting up the crane. The courtyard area was also restricted at times.

“We obviously had to keep everything neat and organized and make sure we cleaned up every day to make sure nothing would bother the people working in the building and the residents who came in to the village hall to get permits or whatever the case may be,” McCory says. “You don’t want police cars getting flat tires.”

Communication is the key to meeting customers’ needs, especially with an occupied building. “Whoever the building owner is, I give him my cell number and make sure I have his,” Pole notes. “I try to stay in contact with them and let them know if anything is changing. I ask them if they have any questions or issues, or if their schedule is changing. On this project, they said it was like we were never even there, and that’s what we like to hear.”

Feedback from the city has been positive, according to Pole. “They are very happy with it,” he says. “The system has the look they wanted. It looks like shake, they had a lot of colors to choose from, and they won’t have the maintenance issues that they did with the cedar. And it will last a lot longer. They will save a whole roof replacement phase in the life of the DaVinci product.”

Pole believes his company’s diverse portfolio gives it an edge. “We’re one of very few union companies that have their own shinglers, flat roofing crews, and sheet metal workers in house. We also do waterproofing, metal wall panels and insulation,” he says.

“This project shows our strength — we can do it all.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com
Roof Consultant: Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, McHenry, Illinois, www.irca.com

MATERIALS

Steep-Slope Roof System
Synthetic Shake: Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.DaVinciRoofscapes.com
Underlayment: Proof Synthetic Underlayment, ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.ABCsupply.com
Leak Barrier: Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield, GAF, www.GAF.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Base Sheet: Ruberoid 20, GAF
Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet: Ruberoid Granular FR, GAF
Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.DensDeck.com

ABC Supply Opens Branch in Fairfield, California

ABC Supply Co. Inc. announced the company has opened a new branch in California serving professional contractors in Solano County and the surrounding areas. The new ABC Supply branch is located at 237 Lopes Road in Fairfield, California.

The new Fairfield branch will be managed by John Laurence. Laurence, who has been in the industry for nearly two decades, will use his extensive sales and management experience to lead the team of associates in Fairfield as they ensure that their customers have the products and support they need to succeed.

ABC Supply has now opened five branches in California over the last eight months. According to the company, this continued commitment to the state aligns with the company’s mission of being the easiest building products distributor for contractors to do business with.

“We’re confident that contractors in the Fairfield area will find our products and expertise second to none,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “I know John and his team are looking forward to building relationships with them as well as the larger Fairfield community.”

Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday. The phone number is (707) 864-1000.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

Three Sioux City Community School District Projects Are Part of Long-Term Plan

In 2017, Winkler Roofing crews re-roofed portions of two high schools and one elementary school. Shown here is an aerial photo of East High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

For the Sioux City Community School District (SCCSD) in Sioux City, Iowa, the final dismissal bell of the school year marks more than the start of summer break for students and staff. It also signals the beginning of roofing season.

In addition to routine maintenance and repairs, each summer brings at least one major roofing project for the district and its 24 facilities. Existing roofs that have fallen out of warranty coverage are replaced. The district also has completed a steady stream of construction projects over the past 16 years, replacing aging schools to meet evolving needs.

District enrollment has increased by several hundred students over that timeframe and now stands at more than 14,500. SCCSD also has expanded its programming, creating specialty elementary schools focusing on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), computer programming, environmental sciences, the arts, and dual-language education in English and Spanish. These specialties continue with middle school exploratory classes and eventually lead to the Sioux City Career Academy, which offers numerous education pathways to help students prepare for postsecondary education and careers.

Aerial view of West High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

“Our facilities need to keep up with the curriculum and new technologies so we can provide the best possible learning environments for our students,” says SCCSD Director of Operations and Maintenance Brian Fahrendholz, adding that the facilities plan emphasizes both supporting student achievement and maintaining fiscal responsibility.

Winkler Roofing Inc. of Sioux City has been one of the district’s key partners in this process for more than 20 years, installing new or partial roofing systems on nearly every building in the district. The summer of 2017 saw its crews re-roof portions of two high schools and one elementary school, installing 335 squares of new TPO roof systems and removing 170 tons of ballast.

A crew of between six and nine professionals was on a jobsite at any given time. The three projects were completed in less than a month, beginning in late June and wrapping up in late July. And there was nothing on the punch list following the warranty inspections.

A Systematic Approach

In recent years, SCCSD has adopted a systematic, long-range-planning approach to roof system management, working with local architects to evaluate its facilities, identify and plan work that needs to be completed the following summer, and map out future projects. The three roofs replaced in 2017 were indicative of this approach.

TPO Bonding Adhesive is applied on the substrate and the back of TPO membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Each of the roofs was between 15 and 20 years old and had begun to show signs of age. Their manufacturers’ warranties had also expired in recent years, making their replacement next up on the district’s roofing project schedule.

“We typically replace roofing systems within five years of the warranty expiration,” Fahrendholz explains. “It enables us to stay ahead of the maintenance issues that can begin cropping up.”

All three existing roofs had ballasted EPDM roofing systems. The re-roofing projects continued the district’s move toward TPO systems and, where possible, eliminating ballast. The three new roofing systems have 20-year, no-dollar-limit labor and material warranties.

SCCSD has several reasons for moving away from ballasted systems, according to Winkler Roofing President Jeff Winkler, P.E. In addition to reducing the roof’s weight and eliminating the cost of the ballast, unballasted roofs have a neater appearance and it is easier to monitor the membrane’s condition and find and repair any leaks. And, of course, when the time for re-roofing comes, there are no truckloads of ballast to remove and replace.

According to Winkler, SCCSD likes the durability of TPO membranes. “They like that the membrane is reinforced and that the seams are heat-welded, rather than seamed with primer and tape,” Winkler notes.

East High School Project

Re-roofing a 5,356-square-foot section at East High School entailed a complete tear-off of the existing ballasted EPDM roofing system and insulation down to the steel roof deck. The Winkler Roofing team then installed a new system topped with Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. It was the first time Winkler Roofing had installed the prodcut.

At East High School, polyisocyanurate insulation is installed using 3-inch galvalume plates and drill point fasteners. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Three layers of polyisocyanurate insulation were mechanically fastened with screws and plates to enhance the building’s energy efficiency. The 60-mil TPO membrane was then fully adhered using TPO Bonding Adhesive from Mule-Hide Products.

The last step in any well-done TPO project is removing the dirt and scuffs that are inevitably left behind during installation, notes Winkler. That step is eliminated with this product; the crew simply removes the protective film covering the membrane to reveal a clean roof that is ready for inspection.

“The material is more expensive than regular TPO membranes, but there is the potential to make up for that in reduced labor costs,” Winkler notes.

The biggest benefit would be seen on roofs that have fewer penetrations, according to Winkler. Installing the membrane around penetrations requires removing a portion of the protective film, he explains. Because those areas are then exposed to scuffs and dirt, crews must go back and clean them by hand.

West High School Project

Meticulous detail work was key to the successful replacement of a 18,056-square-foot section of the roof at West High School. There were nearly four dozen penetrations in the roof, from 4-inch pipes to HVAC equipment measuring 8 feet by 12 feet. Many of the chimney stacks also were in spots that were awkward for the crew to work around.

Winkler Roofing crew members prepare to install a TPO walkway pad. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

It was all in a day’s work for the Winkler Roofing team. “The quality of our detail work is one of the things we take pride in,” Winkler says. “The keys are good leadership, both on and off the roof, and a well-seasoned crew. My foreman, Absalon Quezada, is a master of solving the toughest of details and coordinating a well-orchestrated crew.”

The roof’s existing concrete deck made a mechanically attached system uneconomical, so a new ballasted system was specified. The existing ballast had deteriorated to the point that, if reused, it could puncture the new roofing membrane. So, all 100 tons of it, along with the existing EPDM membrane, were removed and disposed of. The pieces of stainless steel cap metal along the perimeter were removed and numbered in sequence for reinstallation later. Sections of water-damaged insulation were removed and replaced.

An additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation was loose-layered over the entire roof to improve energy efficiency, followed by a new loose-layered 60-mil white TPO membrane. New ballast was then installed.

Details such as this pipe boot were installed using a hot-air welder. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

The crew navigated a challenging site while depositing the new ballast on the roof of the one-story building. The site offered only one feasible parking spot for the seven dump trucks that would deliver the rock, and that was on a lawn, just on the other side of two large trees. Crews carefully noted the location of sprinklers for the in-ground irrigation system to avoid driving over them, and shut the system down for several days in advance of the delivery to minimize ruts caused by the trucks’ tires. The trees’ trunks were spaced less than 20 feet apart and the canopies have grown together, leaving only small tunnel to feed the conveyor through. Crews kept the conveyor low as they extended it through the branches, then brought it to roof height by repeatedly raising it and the backing the truck up.

Riverside Elementary School Project

At Riverside Elementary School, a 7,314-square-foot section of roof was replaced with a 60-mil, fully attached TPO system.

The existing EPDM membrane, ballast and edge metal flashings were removed and disposed of. Crews removed and replaced any water-damaged insulation, added an additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation throughout to increase the building’s energy efficiency, and mechanically attached the insulation to the steel roof deck using screws and plates. The white TPO membrane was then installed using bonding adhesive, and new edge metal flashings were added.

Straight A’s on the Report Card

The new roofs received top grades on their inspection report cards.

At East High School, crews installed Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. The last step in the installation process is removing the protective film covering the membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

When Mule-Hide Products Co. Territory Manager Jake Rowell inspected the roofs, there were no items on his, or the district’s, punch list. The only remaining task — which was completed during the inspection — was covering the seams on the West High School roof with ballast; they had intentionally been left exposed for easy inspection. In fact, that was the only “to-do list” item Rowell noted during inspections of 11 Winkler Roofing projects that week.

“The quality of their work is phenomenal,” Rowell says. “The crews take pride in their work. They don’t just throw a project together and move on. They check their work to make sure it’s done right before I see it and before the customer sees it.”

THE TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Winkler Roofing Inc., Sioux City, Iowa
Architect: FEH DESIGN, Sioux City, Iowa, www.fehdesign.com
Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com
Decorative Sheet Metal: Interstate Mechanical Corp., Sioux City, Iowa, www.interstatemechanicalcorp.com

MATERIALS

TPO Membrane Roof Systems: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc., www.mulehide.com