Porous Pave Wins Gold-level Innovation Award

Porous Pave was judged a Gold-level winner for product design in the 2015 IIDEXCanada Innovation Awards competition.

Porous Pave was judged a Gold-level winner for product design in the 2015 IIDEXCanada Innovation Awards competition.

Porous Pave was judged a Gold-level winner for product design in the 2015 IIDEXCanada Innovation Awards competition. An eco-friendly green building product, Porous Pave is a highly porous, flexible and durable pour-in-place, permeable pavement material. Porous Pave XL consists of 50 percent recycled rubber chips and 50 percent stone aggregate with a proprietary liquid binder. IIDEXCanada, Canada’s National Design + Architecture Exposition & Conference, co-presented by the Interior Designers of Canada (IDC) and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC), was held in Toronto.

“We engineered Porous Pave with greater permeability per square foot than other permeable and pervious paving materials,” says Dave Ouwinga, president, Porous Pave Inc., the product manufacturer. “It can therefore achieve stormwater retention goals with smaller installations, saving money on materials and labor.”

“The recycled rubber in Porous Pave, processed from reclaimed scrap tires, imparts flexibility, so in contrast to concrete and asphalt, Porous Pave withstands freeze-thaw cycles without heaving or cracking,” says Jim Roth, president, Porous Pave Ontario, a Canadian distributor of the product. “The rubber content also makes it slip-resistant.”

Porous Pave Ontario entered the product in the IIDEXCanada Innovation Awards competition. Organized by IDC in 1984, the annual awards celebrate innovation in product design and exhibit creativity.

A panel of IDC members, who are all registered interior designers, judge product entries based on design objectives, design and technical innovation, market application, and sustainability. Entries are scored on a 0-100 scale, with Gold-level awards requiring a score of at least 90. Only five of the 30 product winners, including Porous Pave, attained the Gold standard. Among this year’s winners, Porous Pave was the only outdoor product for landscaping, hardscaping and on-site stormwater management applications.

The IIDEXCanada award is Porous Pave’s second honor this year. BUILDINGS magazine selected Porous Pave as a 2015 Money-Saving Product. Porous Pave was one of the superior building products showcased for commercial building developers, owners and facility managers in the magazine’s June 2015 issue.

A Permeable Pavement Patio Outside a Performance Space Features a Distinctive Musical Note Pattern

Since performing its first concert in 1939, the West Michigan Symphony, a professional orchestra in Muskegon, Mich., has been a vital part of the region’s cultural landscape. In spring 2013, the symphony decided it was time to expand its administrative and ticketing services. It moved into offices in the newly renovated Russell Block Building. Located in downtown Muskegon, a block away from the Frauenthal Theater where the orchestra performs its concerts, the historic Russell Block Building was constructed in 1890.

The porous-paving material had to express the musical note motif the landscape architect envisioned for the patio. It is the quintessential design element for the entire rooftop project.

The porous-paving material had to express the musical note motif the landscape architect envisioned for the patio. It is the quintessential design element for the entire rooftop project.

“With the move, the symphony also realized a long-held dream: establishing a flexible space where we could expand educational offerings and stage smaller fine-arts performances,” explains Carla Hill, the symphony’s president and CEO.

Named The Block, the 1,800-square-foot space offers seating on two levels for up to 150. In addition to providing an intimate venue for a variety of arts performances, The Block is available for meetings and special events. The west-facing windows of The Block look out toward Muskegon Lake. However, there was a problem: Outside the windows, an unimproved and unappealing tar roof marred the view.

“In conversations with the symphony and Port City Construction & Development Services, which planned and managed the building renovation, we started envisioning the transformation of the unadorned roof into a rooftop patio and garden,” says Harry Wierenga, landscape architect, Fleis & VandenBrink Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Wierenga designed a 900-square-foot green roof (including 380 square feet of vegetation and a 520-square-foot patio area) as an accessible and appealing outdoor space. His design invites patrons of The Block to the outdoors onto a landscaped rooftop patio.

First Things First

“The existing roof was a tar roof over a concrete deck. Some holes had been boarded over and patched with tar,” notes Gary Post, manager, Port City Construction & Development Services LLC, Muskegon. “If the rooftop patio and garden had not been incorporated into the project, we would not have replaced it. We had to reroof to support the new rooftop outdoor space.”

The Port City Construction & Development Services roofing crew removed the existing roof down to the concrete deck, which they repaired. Two new roof drains were added to improve drainage. A single-ply membrane was selected for the new roof. The crew fully adhered the new membrane to the deck. The crewmembers then installed a geotextile fabric to protect the membrane and rolled out a geotextile drain sheet atop the protection fabric. The drain sheet facilitates drainage to the existing and two added roof drains.

A new 40-inch-high wall around the perimeter shelters the space and enhances rooftop safety. The porous paving’s gray and black custom-color mix harmonizes with the color of the wall.

A new 40-inch-high wall around the perimeter shelters the space and enhances rooftop safety. The porous paving’s gray and black custom-color mix harmonizes with the color of the wall.

A new 40-inch-high wall around the perimeter was constructed to shelter the space and enhance rooftop safety. Preparations also included widening the opening out to the rooftop from the interior of The Block. Glass double doors would be installed to establish a generous and transparent transition from indoors to outdoors.

Permeable Pavement

The project team applied a multi-faceted set of factors in evaluating options and selecting a pavement material for the patio:

  • To eliminate standing water and allow excess stormwater to flow to the drains, the paving material had to be permeable.
  • The plan called for installing the patio and green-roof elements on top of the geotextile drain sheet. The paving material would have to work with the modular green roof selected for the project.
  • The paving material had to be lightweight. By regulation, the maximum static plus live load for the roof is 100 pounds per square foot.
  • For easy access and safety, the pavement had to be low profile to minimize the threshold at the entry into The Block.
  • To create visual interest within the rectangular shape of the roof, the design emphasizes irregular shapes with angles to break up the space. The paving material would have to be flexible to adapt to the design.
  • The musical-note motif Wierenga envisioned for the patio is the quintessential design element for the entire rooftop project. The paving material had to offer the versatility to express the design.
  • Finally, a green-building product was preferred.

The project team considered composite decking and pavers. However, these linear materials were not flexible enough to adapt to the shape of the patio or sufficiently versatile to convey the musical note design.

PHOTOS: Porous Pave Inc.

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