Learn How to Address Roof Algae with ARMA’s New Video

Many homes and steep-slope buildings have dark streaks or discoloration on their roofs, but it can be difficult for an owner to know what it is and what to do about it.

The Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has produced a new, short, step-by-step animated video about roof algae for homeowners and building owners alike.

This video explains:

  • What are those dark streaks on my roof?
  • What is algae discoloration?
  • Will it damage my roof?
  • How do I lighten it?
  • Can I prevent it from growing?

ARMA Helps Update Wind-resistance Standard for Asphalt Shingles

DURING THE past year, the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has led the process to update the ASTM International wind-resistance standard for asphalt shingles to help ensure that it complies with the latest methods to determine design loads for roofs and cladding used on buildings. ASTM standards are consensus standards that are used around the world to improve product quality and build consumer confidence.

The 2016 version of ASTM D7158 is now coordinated with the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE 7-10, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”, which is the document that the International Building Code relies on for its structural provisions. The ASCE 7-10 standard had significant revisions in wind design. ARMA worked with recognized structural engineers who are leaders in the wind-engineering field and industry stakeholders who provided specific updates to D7158 that ensure consistency with ASCE 7-10. Although the building code includes conversion factors to account for differences between versions of ASCE 7, ARMA and other industry stakeholders recognized the value of correlating D7158 with the latest version of ASCE 7. The updates were balloted and approved via the ASTM consensus process.

“ARMA has always been a leader of progress and innovation in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Spearheading the revision of the test standard that determines wind resistance of asphalt shingles shows ARMA’s commitment to the roofing community, building owners and home-owners alike. We continue to strive to make asphalt the leading roofing technology.”

ASTM D7158-16, “Standard Test Method for Wind Resistance of Asphalt Singles (Uplift Forces/Uplift Resistance Method),” is now available for purchase on the ASTM website. Learn more about ARMA at AsphaltRoofing.org.

Enter ARMA’s Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-study Awards Program

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) is searching for the top asphalt roofing projects in North America. Roofing contractors, architects, consultants and specifiers are invited to submit commercial and residential roofing projects to the association’s Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-study (QARC) Awards program, now and through the end of the year.

Each year a Gold, Silver and Bronze winner are chosen. These roofing professionals receive cash prizes and gain national recognition. Winners and their projects receive media coverage and are featured in top trade publications. This year, ARMA has redesigned its submission process to make it easier than ever. Simply upload photos of your project along with a description and details about why asphalt roofing materials were chosen. High-resolution photos of the completed project are strongly encouraged for submission. Both new construction and renovation projects are eligible for the program.

Submissions for the 2016 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-study Awards Program are currently being accepted through Saturday, Dec. 31. Roofing professionals can submit as many projects as they want without any cost to enter.

“The QARC program helps ARMA recognize the most beautiful and innovative asphalt roofing projects being built or restored today,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “By celebrating the use of asphalt materials in these low- and steep-slope projects, we shine a light on skilled roofing contractors who demonstrate the benefits of asphalt roofing.”

For more information on the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study Awards Program, visit ARMA’s website.

Asphalt Roofing Technical Bulletins Are Available in Spanish

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association now offers eight of its educational Technical Bulletins in Spanish.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association now offers eight of its educational Technical Bulletins in Spanish.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association now offers eight of its educational Technical Bulletins in Spanish. The new Spanish-language documents cover steep-slope issues, like algae and moss prevention, asphalt shingle recycling tips and the prevention of ice dams on asphalt shingle roofs. Low-slope and commercial roofing topics, including cold-weather installation techniques and the damaging effects of ponding water, also are covered. ARMA plans to convert more of its educational resources and roofing publications into Spanish in the future. Download the free bulletins.

ARMA Updates Its Laminated Asphalt Shingles Technical Manual

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has updated its technical manual <em>Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide</em>.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has updated its technical manual Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has updated its technical manual Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide. The 38-page manual outlines installation methods for laminated asphalt shingles and is now available as a print-on-demand book and an eBook. Updates include the latest industry best practices to instruct the roofing professional and DIY enthusiast about installation methods that help to maximize shingle life and weather protection. Readers will be able to purchase and access the eBook instantly from any e-reader device and can customize their reading experience by adjusting font sizes, zooming in on images and diagrams, and bookmarking key chapters. For more information or to purchase the guide, visit ARMA’s website.

Learn about Advances in Asphalt Roofing Systems

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has developed two Fast Facts documents to educate the industry about advances in asphalt roofing systems.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has developed two Fast Facts documents to educate the industry about advances in asphalt roofing systems.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has developed two Fast Facts documents to educate the industry about advances in asphalt roofing systems. From shingle technology and durability to installation methods and environmental options, these advances have improved quality for the contractor, installer, building owner and homeowner. Download the residential document and the commercial document from ARMA’s website.

ARMA Selects Top Installations in North America

The Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association selected the winners of its Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study (QARC) Awards, an annual program that recognizes exceptional roofing projects in the U.S. and Canada.

The Gold Award honored John Foster, a general contractor in Esparto, Calif., for his company’s installation on a star-shaped home. The homeowners required a roofing system with a style that wouldn’t get lost in the bold architecture. PABCO Roofing Products Premier Advantage Granite shingles provided the necessary aesthetic to complement the home while protecting it from the windy, damp coastal environment to which it is subjected.

The Silver Award was given to Advanced Roofing Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., which was called upon to install a new low-slope asphalt roofing system on two buildings at the PGA National Resort and Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. The contractor chose a SOPREMA three-ply SBS-modified bitumen roofing system with a base sheet and cap sheet that delivered a pristine appearance while protecting the roof from harsh weather and heavy foot traffic.

Precision Roofing, Hialeah, Fla., received the Bronze Award for the roof it installed on Northeast Regional Library, Aventura, Fla. A GAF hybrid built-up/SBS-modified bitumen roofing system using three plies of GAFGLAS Ply 4 Ply Sheet and a Ruberoid EnergyCap 30 Granule FR membrane was chosen because the contracting company knew the system would meet the project’s durability requirements and budget restrictions.

“Each of the submissions we received this year illustrated the beauty and curb appeal that asphalt roofing can provide,” says Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “These winning projects were singled out for successfully using the unique qualities of their roofing materials to deliver superior protection for a building, whether from salty storms, high winds, or other wear and tear.”

The following received Honorable Mentions:

  • Rust Road Project, Grace Construction, New Boston, Mich.
  • Anacortes Home, Old School Roofing, Anacortes, Wash.
  • Mukilteo House, Chris Howard Roofing LLC, Mukilteo, Wash.
  • Mukilteo House, Chris Howard Roofing LLC, Mukilteo, Wash.

The 2016 awards were judged by a panel of roofing industry experts, including leaders from trade associations, architects and members of the media. The judges look for projects that use asphalt roofing technology to provide durability, value and curb appeal.

PIMA Names Chairman of the Organization

During its annual meeting, the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA) announced that Helene Pierce, vice president of Technical Services, Codes and Industry Relations at GAF, assumed the chairmanship of the organization on Jan. 1, 2016. She succeeds Jim Whitton of Hunter Panels, who has served as the PIMA chairman for the last two years.

“Helene has extensive and deep technical understanding of the polyiso insulation industry and has served the association on numerous task groups and initiatives—she is the perfect choice to lead PIMA,” says Jared Blum, PIMA president. “We look forward to her leadership as the building, architecture and specifying communities continues to embrace and reiterate the value of building thermal performance.”

Pierce has spent more than 34 years in the roofing industry and has been very active in many of the industry’s organizations. She received the ASTM Award of Merit and title of Fellow from ASTM Committee D08, the James Q. McCawley award from the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association and the title of Fellow of the Institute from the Roof Consultants Institute.

Among the many groups in which she has been active include ARMA; ASTM International; CSI; the RCI Foundation; CEIR; SPRI; RCMA; PIMA; and the CRRC. Pierce has also authored and presented numerous papers for the roofing industry and is a frequent contributor to industry publications.

“PIMA represents North America’s insulation of choice and its diverse membership provides a truly collaborative environment for all of our members,” says Pierce. “Given the importance of energy efficiency in the building envelope, the demand for continuous high-performance insulation for the roof and walls continues to grow. As the voice for polyiso insulation used in the building envelope and through its many initiatives in education, building codes and standards, technical resources, and QualityMark, PIMA’s support of the polyiso industry will certainly continue to grow.”

Attended by more than 100 members—polyiso manufacturers and suppliers to the industry—PIMA’s two-day annual meeting featured an educational session, which presented perspectives on energy infrastructure issues impacting the industry. During the annual meeting, members heard from:

  • Lisa Jacobson, president, Business Counsel for Sustainable Energy
  • Brad Markell, executive director, AFL-CIO Industrial Union Council
  • Amy L. Duvall, senior director, Federal Affairs, American Chemistry Council
  • Sarah Brozena, senior director Regulatory and Technical Affairs, American Chemistry Council

“Energy efficiency remains a critical issue as illustrated during the recent COP21 meeting, where there was a palpable shift in the attitude of the business community towards energy-efficiency practices and policies,” adds Blum. “Our industry stands ready to support any agreement stemming from the COP21 meeting and our role as a trade association is to ensure our members have access to the resources they need.”

ARMA Is Looking for Asphalt Roofing Projects to Showcase

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) is looking for the top commercial and residential asphalt roofing projects to showcase in its 2016 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study (QARC) Awards Program.

The QARC Awards are open to contractors, consultants, architects and specifiers working with asphalt roofing products. The top three projects that best demonstrate the beauty, affordability and reliability of asphalt roofing will take the prize.

Submissions for the 2016 QARC Awards Program are currently being accepted through Thursday, Dec. 31. Roofing professionals can submit as many projects as they want without any cost to enter.

Industry professionals can enter their project online through the QARC Awards page of ARMA’s website by providing a description of the project and explaining why and how asphalt products were used. High-resolution photos of the completed project are also required for submission. Both new construction and renovation projects are eligible for the program.

“The gold, silver and bronze winners of the QARC Awards Program are selected by leaders in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Previous recipients have been chosen for the beauty that their project displays, as well as how it demonstrates the benefits of asphalt roofing systems. From weather protection and energy efficiency to fire and wind resistance, QARC winners demonstrate the breadth of performance that asphalt roofing systems provide.”

ARMA awards cash prizes to the top three roofing projects, and the winners are featured in national roofing trade publications. For more information on the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study Awards Program, please visit ARMA’s website.

Asphalt-based Low-slope Roof Systems Provide Long-term Service Life

Asphalt-based roof systems have a long-standing track record of success in the roofing industry. In fact, asphalt-based roof systems have more than a century of use in the U.S. Building owners, roofing specifiers and contractors should not lose sight of this fact. It is important to understand why asphalt roofing has been successful for so long. Asphalt roofs demonstrate characteristics, such as durability and longevity of materials and components, redundancy of waterproofing, ease and understanding of installation, excellent tensile strength and impact resistance. Each of these characteristics helps ensure long-term performance.

Using a composite built-up/ modified bitumen roof system provides redundancy helping ensure durability and longevity. Surface reflectivity and a multilayer insulation layer provide excellent thermal resistance. Quality details and regular maintenance will provide long-term performance. PHOTO: Advanced Roofing

Using a composite built-up/
modified bitumen roof system provides redundancy helping ensure durability and longevity. Surface reflectivity and a multilayer insulation layer provide excellent thermal resistance. Quality details
and regular maintenance will provide long-term performance. PHOTO: Advanced Roofing

There are two types of asphalt-based low-slope roof systems: modified bitumen (MB) roof systems and builtup roof (BUR) systems. MB sheets are composed primarily of polymer-modified bitumen reinforced with one or more plies of fabric, such as polyester, glass fiber or a combination of both. Assembled in factories using optimal quality-control standards, modified bitumen sheets are manufactured to have uniform thickness and consistent physical properties throughout the sheet. Modified bitumen roof systems are further divided into atactic polypropylene (APP) and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS) modified systems. APP and SBS modifiers create a uniform matrix that enhances the physical properties of the asphalt. APP is a thermoplastic polymer that forms a uniform matrix within the bitumen. This matrix increases the bitumen’s resistance to ultraviolet light, its flexibility at high and low temperatures, and its ability to resist water penetration. SBS membranes resist water penetration while exhibiting excellent elongation and recovery properties over a wide range of temperature extremes. This high-performance benefit makes SBS membranes durable and particularly appropriate where there may be movement or deflection of the underlying deck.

BUR systems consist of multiple layers of bitumen alternated with ply sheets (felts) applied over the roof deck, vapor retarder, and most often insulation or coverboard. BUR systems are particularly advantageous for lowslope applications. The strength of the system comes from the membrane, which includes the layers of hot-applied bitumen and the reinforcing plies of roofing felt.

FACTORS FOR LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE AND SERVICE LIFE

It is important for building owners and roof system designers to recognize the principles of long-lasting, high-performance roof systems. Roof longevity and performance are determined by factors that include building and roof system design, job specifications, materials quality and suitability, application procedures and maintenance. The level of quality in the workmanship during the application process is critical.

Longevity and performance start with proper design of the asphalt-based roof system. Proper roof system design includes several components: the roof deck, a base layer supporting a vapor retarder or air barrier when necessary, multi-layer insulation and a coverboard, the asphaltic membrane, appropriate surfacing material or coating, and the attachment methods for all layers. Roof consultants, architects and roof manufacturers understand proper design. Roof design needs to follow applicable code requirements for wind, fire and impact resistance, as well as site-specific issues, such as enhanced wind resistance design, positive drainage and rooftop traffic protection. Roof designers can provide or assist with the development of written specifications and construction details that are specific to a roofing project for new construction or reroofing.

Low-slope asphalt-based roof systems are redundant; they are multi-layered systems. BUR systems include a base sheet, three or four reinforcing ply sheets and a surfacing, either aggregate (rock) or a cap sheet. MB sheets include one and sometimes two reinforcing layers and are commonly installed over a substantial asphaltic base sheet. Modified bitumen roofs can be granule surfaced, finished with reflective options or coated after installation. Aggregate, granules, films and coatings add UV protection, assist with fire resistance, provide durability to the roof system and can improve roof aesthetics.

An asphaltic cap sheet with a factory-applied reflective roof coating is installed over three glass-fiber ply sheets and a venting base sheet. The reflective coating reduces heat gain, and insulating concrete provides a stable substrate and high R-value. PHOTO: Aerial Photography Inc.

An asphaltic cap sheet with a factory-applied reflective roof coating is installed over three glass-fiber ply sheets and a venting base sheet. The reflective coating reduces heat gain, and insulating concrete provides a stable substrate and high R-value. PHOTO: Aerial Photography Inc.

Coverboards provide a durable layer immediately below the membrane, are resistant to foot traffic and separate the membrane from the thermal insulation layer. Protecting the thermal insulation helps maintain the insulation R-value as specified and installed.

Asphalt is a durable and long-lasting material for roof membranes and flashings. Asphalt is stable under significant temperature swings and can be highly impact resistant. Various reinforcements can be used to increase an asphaltic membrane’s durability. All asphaltic membranes are reinforced, during installation (BUR) or the manufacturing process (MB membranes). Polyester reinforcement has excellent elongation, tensile strength and recovery. It provides good puncture resistance and stands up well to foot traffic. Glass fiber reinforcement resists flame penetration and provides excellent tensile strength and dimensional stability.

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