New Shingles Speed Up Installation Process in First Test in the Field

This residence in the Atlanta area

This residence in the Atlanta area is the first house in the country to have Atlas shingles with HP42” technology installed on its roof. Photos: Atlas Roofing

Atlas shingles with HP42” technology, a new format introduced in July, were recently installed on a home in the Atlanta area. It is the first roof in the country to be installed with the new shingles, and the homeowner, contractor and manufacturer are all pleased with the results.

Larger than any shingle currently made in the United States, the HP42” shingle format results in a faster installation, as well as significant savings in labor and materials for contractors, according to the manufacturer. HP42” format shingles are the new standard for the Atlas StormMaster Shake, Pinnacle Pristine and ProLam shingle lines.

“These new high-performance HP42” format shingles are larger and better engineered, which makes them easier and faster to install,” says Paul Casseri, product manager of Atlas Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division. “As a result, contractors and crew can expect a drastically improved installation experience.”

Faster on The Roof

Contractor Dirk Gowder of Ryno Roof in Atlanta says the HP42” shingle format made the project a breeze. “The larger shingle sped up installation time by about 10 percent because there’s less waste, more courses per run, and there’s less cutting of the shingles,” Gowder explains.

With the benefit of using fewer shingles and experiencing less waste, this particular job was easily completed in one day, giving Gowder’s guys plenty of time to do the finishing touches and clean up around the home.

The Ryno Roof crew also installed Summit 60 Synthetic Underlayment, Atlas Pro-Cut 10X Starter Shingles and Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector, which helps a home maintain its appearance by resisting ugly black streaks caused by algae. The project used Atlas Pinnacle Pristine shingles in Pristine Hearthstone, seamlessly mixing both HP and HP42” format shingles on the roof.

Mix and Match

“The install process, even with the mixed shingles, couldn’t have been simpler,” Gowder says. “It was an easy transition from the standard-sized shingles to the 42-inch shingles. The new HP42” format shingle fits the pallet perfectly, so all of the shingles were nice and straight and flat when we opened every single bundle. My guys moved through the install just like they would have if this were a standard roof job with only one type of shingle. The Atlas quick start guide had clear, easy-to-follow instructions that made the job go smoothly.”

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high, with a 6-inch exposure. It features an enhanced 1½-inch nailing area. Photos: Atlas Roofing

The old format of the Atlas HP shingles and new HP42” format shingles both have the same 6-inch exposure, which allows them to be mixed on a roof—as long as the products come from the same plant. Shingles made in different plant locations may contain a different granule blend and can vary in color.

For any roof installation, contractors should follow the manufacturer’s printed installation instructions, which include keeping the shingle seams outside 5 inches of each other in relation to the shingles in the previous and proceeding course when mixing the shingle sizes.

“After using HP42” format shingles on the test house, I’m going to start using them on all of my jobs because they make installation easier and faster and save me money because I don’t have to order as many bundles since they produce less waste,” Gowder states.

The roof qualifies for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System warranty, which comes with a built-in extended protection period.

“The quality Atlas products, backed up by the Signature Select coverage, will protect this home for a long time,” Gowder says.

Stone-coated Shingles Borrow Bold Appearance of Asphalt Shingles

The Roser Piano Shingle is resistant to color fading, fire, hail and wind damage.

The Roser Piano Shingle is resistant to color fading, fire, hail and wind damage.

The Roser Piano Shingle borrows the finely detailed and bold appearance of heavyweight asphalt shingles and leaves their disadvantages behind. Resistant to color fading, fire, hail and wind damage, the Piano Shingle profile will provide your home with the protection of stone-coated, interlocking steel.

The roofing system includes:

  • Clear acrylic over-glaze protective coating
  • Roofing granule coating
  • Adhesive basecoat
  • Protective surface coating
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Commercial-grade steel core
  • Protective surface coating

The Stone Coated Steel Roofing System, manufactured by Roser, offers the advantage of high-strength steel with a look a variety of traditional and innovative architectural styles. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1,000 pounds per square, the Roser Stone Coated Roofing System, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane. While the standard shingle and shake roofs naturally deteriorate over time, the Roser Roofing System will continue to maintain its beautiful appearance and requires the least amount of maintenance in the roofing industry. An eco-friendly Roser roof will increase the resale value of your home not only with its elegance, but also with its proven durability.

About Roser Roofing System:

  • Installs direct to deck or over battens.
  • Stone surface resists fading and provides for a quiet roof.
  • Fastener design features a confirmed and a locking profile.
  • Low-maintenance roof system with water-shedding performance.
  • Storm driven engineering design is proven throughout the world.
  • Includes the stringent Miami-Dade Approval.

The Qualities of a Top-performing Shingle

Shingle product development has generally been slow compared to technology evolution in other industries. The most important performance requirements of asphalt shingles, like shedding water, fire and wind resistance, durability and code compliance, have been established for decades. Within the past 35 years, though, there has been a push to develop additional performance standards for asphalt shingles.

The current (and long-standing) product standard for fiberglass asphalt shingles is ASTM D3462. This standard focuses on the physical performance measures of shingles at the time of manufacturing. A number of areas tested include the “recipe” of the shingle (glass mat, adhesive, finished weight, etc.) and performance requirements, such as tear strength, behavior on heating, fastener pull-through resistance (the force needed to pull a nail through the shingle at high and low temperatures), and penetration and softening point of the asphalt.

However, some manufacturers have fought to raise the performance requirements that shingles must meet. Rather than focusing on performance at the time of manufacture, these manufacturers want to establish a standard that would reflect how shingles perform over time. In 2011, the ICC Evaluation Service, Brea, Calif., approved a new alternative acceptance criterion for asphalt shingles, AC438. Instead of dictating how to make an asphalt shingle (what raw materials to use), it requires additional physical property and performance testing beyond ASTM D3462.

AC438 contains stringent performance testing requirements, which are meant to evaluate the performance of a shingle over time. “When thinking about shingle performance, it’s imperative we, as an industry, are looking not just at performance at the time of manufacture. AC438 helps test in these extreme environments to give us better insight,” says Emily Videtto, vice president of shingles and new product development at GAF, Parsippany, N.J. The shingles are put through three critical, demanding tests to evaluate durability in a variety of temperatures and weather situations:

  • Temperature cycling. This looks at long-term extreme-temperature resistance—how shingles can withstand winter cold or summer heat. The tests occur in 12- to 24-hour cycles, so it takes 12 days to put the shingle through extreme high and extreme low temperatures. The low temperature is done after soaking in water. Under five times magnification, the shingles are inspected for signs of tearing or cracking that show the glass mat, butt joints in the first course and no separations greater than 1/4 inch, and no evidence of tearing around fasteners or pull through. If any of these conditions exist, the material fails the test.
  • Weather resistance. This test looks at how shingles perform after long-term exposure to the sun. Using ASTM G155, a Xenon Arc weatherometer that tests for accelerated weathering, shingles are subjected to 2,000 hours of light and water in cycles for 83 days. After that’s complete, there is a visual examination for evidence of surfacing loss, erosion or exposed reinforcement. Shingle samples must have a minimum of 80 percent of their original breaking strength to pass this stringent test.
  • Wind-driven rain. This determines how shingles stand up to heavy, driving rain. The shingles are tested under Florida Building Code Test Protocol TAS-100 with the minimum slope specified by the manufacturer. No water should infiltrate through the sheathing and there should be no blow-off, tear-off or release of the shingle (or any portion of it). The test subjects the shingles to 15 minutes of wind and water, then 10 minutes off, then back on again with wind speeds going to 35, 70, 90 and 110 mph. This results in 8 inches per hour of rain to test the shingle’s performance. A camera is mounted on the underside to look for any water intrusion during the test.

AC438 also looks at the weight of the displaced surfacing over the asphalt coating. With ASTM D3462, the requirement is one gram of granule loss. AC438 requires less displaced surfacing, so more granules need to be kept on the surface of the shingle to better protect it.

These additional tests challenge shingle manufacturers to make a better-quality product to meet the requirements found in AC438. GAF was the first shingle manufacturer to provide independent verification to the requirements of AC438 and additional manufacturers have since followed. These tests are a big step forward in evaluating performance and choosing a shingle that has the qualities to stand the test of weather and time. This type of testing ultimately helps roofing contractors because they want to know that the shingles they are installing will pass these stringent tests and provide stronger protection against the elements. For homeowners, they can feel comfortable they are installing a top-performing shingle that will help protect their most valuable asset.

Today, all GAF shingles comply with ASTM D3462 and AC438, as well as pass the industry’s two toughest wind-resistance tests: ASTM D3161, Class F (110 mph), and ASTM D7158, Class H (150 mph). These code advancements and stronger tests have helped to change the manufacturing of roofing shingles from an art to a science. This science comes through years of research, lab testing, and development to find the right mix of materials and production processes to produce a technologically advanced shingle. In fact, GAF created its own shingle science with Advanced Protection Shingle Technology, aimed at pushing the envelope to deliver shingles with the most advanced design, manufacturing, and testing techniques for quality and longevity in an asphalt shingle.

Install Standing Seam over Shingles

McElroy Metal has introduced a method for installing standing-seam metal roofing directly over asphalt shingles without a tear-off.

McElroy Metal has introduced a method for installing standing-seam metal roofing directly over asphalt shingles without a tear-off.

McElroy Metal has introduced a method for installing standing-seam metal roofing directly over asphalt shingles without a tear-off. The system is designed around the patent-pending 138T Shingle Recover Clip and 138T symmetrical standing-seam panel. The main challenges when installing a metal roof directly over shingles with no underlayment are clip alignment and abrasion on the underside of panels. The 138T Shingle Recover Clip is long enough to sit on two shingles, aligning the clip into the plane of the roof. The clip has eight holes so the installer can align the fasteners through the ends of the shingle tabs. The clip’s 3/4-inch height holds the panel up so it does not touch the surface below but allows a contractor to walk on the roof without damaging the clips or panels.

SBS-modified Asphalt Shingle Offers Enhanced Weatherability

NorthGate, a designer asphalt roofing shingle offering manufactured by CertainTeed, boasts an SBS-polymer modifier for enhanced weatherability.

NorthGate, a designer asphalt roofing shingle offering manufactured by CertainTeed, boasts an SBS-polymer modifier for enhanced weatherability.

NorthGate, a designer asphalt roofing shingle offering manufactured by CertainTeed, boasts an SBS-polymer modifier for enhanced weatherability and a rich mixture of surface granules for added aesthetic depth and dimension.

Currently available in the Northwest region of the U.S., NorthGate is designed to endure harsh, cold-weather elements affronting the roof. The shingle’s SBS composition allows it to remain flexible at temperatures as low as 0 F, making it easier to install in cold climates. Plus, the two-piece laminated fiberglass-based shingle meets the requirements of UL 2218 Class 4 for impact resistance.

When tested against a standard asphalt shingle, NorthGate demonstrates a 40 percent improvement in tear strength, a 40 percent improvement in nail pull-through resistance and a 15 percent increase in granule retention.

In addition to its exceptional strength, NorthGate features a rich mixture of surface granules that deliver vibrant, maximum-definition curb appeal and create a dimensional appearance similar to that of natural wood. NorthGate is available in six classic Max Def colors: Burnt Sienna, Granite Gray, Heather Blend, Moire Black, Resawn Shake and Weathered Wood.

The 270 pound-per-square NorthGate comes with a comprehensive lifetime warranty, including a 15-year StreakFighter warranty, 10-year SureStart protection, and 15-year 110 mph wind-resistance warranty. A wind warranty upgrade to 130 mph is available when NorthGate is installed with its companion hip and ridge accessory, NorthGate Ridge and CertainTeed starter shingles.

Asphalt Shingle Offered in Pearl Color

Atlas Roofing has introduced its Pinnacle Pristine shingle in a Pearl color.

Atlas Roofing has introduced its Pinnacle Pristine shingle in a Pearl color.


Atlas Roofing has introduced its Pinnacle Pristine shingle in a Pearl color. A white asphalt shingle, the Pinnacle Pristine Pearl, featuring Scotchgard Protector, is rated at a 0.25 SRI, helping to reject solar heat and reduce energy costs for homeowners. To see how it would look on a project, download Atlas Roofing’s Shingle Visualizer application on your iPad.

Roofing Manufacturers and Contractors Embrace Recycling

In the early 2000s, as the green-building movement reached its tipping point, the roofing industry’s contributions to sustainability focused on increasing energy efficiency, improving long-term durability and addressing the heat-island effect. In the years since, significant strides have been made in all three of these areas for commercial and residential buildings.

In recent years, increasing attention has been given to the benefits and challenges of recycling roofing materials at the end of their useful life. This is no trivial task: Owens Corning estimates asphalt shingles alone comprise up to 5 percent of building-related landfill waste. This doesn’t take into account other roofing materials, including EPDM, thermoplastic PVC and metal.

Not surprisingly, rising removal costs, coupled with the growing demand in some areas of the country to legislate landfill content, are putting pressure on contractors and building owners to seek alternatives to traditional roof construction scrap and tear-off disposal methods.

In response, greater numbers of roofing manufacturers and contractors are driving strategies to avoid the landfill. A general review of emerging trends across the roofing industry suggests manufacturers and contractors increasingly are turning to recycling to steer these materials from the waste stream.

Steel is the most recycled material in building construction today. PHOTO: STEEL RECYCLING INSTITUTE

Steel is the most recycled material in building construction today. PHOTO: STEEL RECYCLING INSTITUTE

METAL

Metal roofing’s sustainable attributes are significant. Industry experts cite its ability to improve a building’s energy efficiency, and metal today contains anywhere from 25 to 95 percent recycled material.

On its website, the Chicago-based Metal Construction Association (MCA) encourages installing metal roofing directly over an existing roof, thus eliminating the need to dispose of the original materials. But when an older metal roof or new-construction debris must be removed from a site, contractors and owners in most regions of the country can quickly identify scrap yards that take metal.

“Steel is the most recycled material in building construction today,” says MCA Technical Director Scott Kriner. “There’s an infrastructure that supports it, and metal in general is virtually 100 percent recyclable.” Kriner notes MCA supports recycling as part of the metal industry’s overall commitment to environmental sustainability and transparency in business.

PVC

PVC has been used in roofing systems since the 1960s, and the post-consumer recycling of roof membranes began in North America in 1999—a nice symmetry when one considers roofs in terms of 30-year life cycles.

In general terms, the recycling of PVC roofing is a relatively straightforward process. The material is sliced into long strips, rolled up, lifted off the roof and transported to a recycling center. Recyclers run the PVC through a conveyor system, where fasteners and other metal objects are removed.

Initially, the recovered membrane was ground into powder for reuse in molded roof walkway pads. More recently, some manufacturers have been incorporating a granulated form into new PVC roofing membranes, exclusively on the backside to avoid aesthetic issues with color variations. The first installations of membrane produced with post-consumer recycled composition occurred in the mid-1990s. So far, its field performance has matched that of PVC roofing produced with virgin raw materials.

The Vinyl Institute, Alexandria, Va., says close to 1 billion pounds of vinyl are recycled at the postindustrial level yearly. “The vinyl industry has a history of supporting recycling,” the institute reports on its website, “and this effort continues as companies, alone and through their trade associations, expand existing programs and explore new opportunities to recover vinyl products at the end of their useful life.”

EPDM

Ethylene propylene diene terpolymer is used extensively on low-slope commercial buildings. Yet even this durable synthetic rubber membrane must eventually be replaced, and today recycling is a viable option.

The removal process generally involves power-vacuuming off the stone ballast, where present, to expose the EPDM membrane below. The membrane can then be cut into manageable squares, which are folded and stacked on pallets, loaded onto a truck and transported for recycling. The recycler grinds it into crumbs or powder, depending on the end use. A growing number of recycling centers nationwide now handles EPDM.

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GAF Plant Achieves ‘Waste Diversion from Landfill’ Certification

GAF‘s Myerstown, Pa., plant is the first asphalt shingle plant in North America to achieve the Waste Diversion from Landfill certification. The industry-first certification was awarded by GreenCircle Certified LLC, the leading certifier of sustainability claims in products and operations. The Waste Diversion from Landfill certification demonstrates an organization’s commitment to the responsible management of end-of-life materials. Operating at a high rate of efficiency, GAF’s Myerstown shingle plant generates low levels of waste and makes an effort to recycle its waste streams.

GreenCircle’s Waste Diversion Certification is based on a comprehensive review of all the plant’s material flows and downstream waste management. GAF is pleased to have achieved a waste diversion rate of 83%, meaning that 83% of the plant’s waste material is recycled. The certification provides a meaningful benchmark that will be used to drive continuous improvement. It is expected that GAF’s waste diversion rate will increase as it identifies additional recycling opportunities for challenging materials, such as non-woven glass mat.

As concerns over end-of-life material management increase, manufacturers are being called upon to lead the way and find innovative solutions. “Waste Diversion from Landfill is becoming a critical sustainable performance measure for many organizations,” says Tad Radzinski, certification officer at GreenCircle. “GAF’s industry-first certification signifies its dedication to sustainability and continuous improvement.”

The growth in the green building market is fueling a demand for honesty and integrity from building product suppliers like GAF. Third-party certification of sustainability claims is essential in establishing credibility and gaining consumer confidence. “At GAF, we are committed to sustainability and transparency,” says Tim Machelski, GAF’s senior vice president of manufacturing operations. “Having our waste diversion rates reviewed and certified by a third party is a crucial part of our program, ensuring accuracy and reinforcing trust in our sustainability claims.”

Contractors Help with the Development of Designer Shingle

Malarkey Roofing Products' Windsor Heavyweight Shingle

Malarkey Roofing Products’ Windsor Heavyweight Shingle

Malarkey Roofing Products has made available its elegant Windsor Heavyweight Shingle, which was created by contractors and the Malarkey Technical, Research and Development teams. Six individual shingle styles with 18 tab size variations are specially engineered to allow for easy book-style application using any order of shingles. The tabs were also elongated to 5 3/4 inches to offer large coverage area. The Windsor shingle features Scotchgard Algae Resistant Protection, UL 2218 Class 4 impact resistance, rain seal protection and cold weather flexibility to 0 F.

Center PV Taskforce Seeking Comments on PV Racking and Attachment Criteria for Effective Asphalt Shingle Roof System Integration

The Center PV Taskforce is releasing the second public draft of PV Racking and Attachment Criteria for Effective Asphalt Shingle Roof System Integration for a final round of public comment.

The Center PV Taskforce will accept public comments until 5 p.m. ET on Friday, May 30, 2014. Directions for submitting comments can be found below.

The document is intended to enhance collaboration between key stakeholders from the solar and roofing industries and accelerate the deployment of rooftop integrated solar. Members of the solar industry and other interested parties are encouraged to submit comments and engage the Taskforce in future stakeholder discussions. Taskforce members also will accept comments from the at-large community and consider those comments within internal stakeholder discussions.

Directions for submitting public comments:

    Download a copy of PV Racking and Attachment Criteria for Effective Asphalt Shingle Roof System Integration.
    All comments must be submitted no later than 5 p.m. ET on Friday, May 30, 2014.
    All comments must be submitted using the Center PV Taskforce online survey form. Access the survey form.
    Additional details can be found on the first page of the criteria document.

    If you have questions, please contact Jim Kirby at JKirby@RoofingCenter.org.

    The Taskforce looks forward to working with you to achieve higher quality combined solar energy roofing systems.