Malarkey Roofing Products’ Legacy XL and Windsor XL Shingles Offer More Pronounced Design on the Roof

Malarkey Roofing Products' Windsor XL in Weathered

Malarkey Roofing Products’ Windsor XL in Weathered

Malarkey Roofing Products released the Legacy XL and Windsor XL high-profile shingles in June. The new heavyweight shingles offer a more pronounced design on the roof while maintaining the fortified durability of their original shingle lines.

The Legacy shingle was introduced in 1997 as a laminate shingle in North America to utilize durable SBS polymer modified asphalt, now known as Flexor. The Legacy XL high-profile design continues that tradition of Flexor durability to promote granule adhesion and Class 4 impact resistance. It also features Scotchgard Protector from 3M for added protection against black streaks caused by algae. The Windsor shingle was introduced in 2014 as the first designer shingle line from Malarkey.

Malarkey Roofing Products' Legacy XL in Storm Grey

Malarkey Roofing Products’ Legacy XL in Storm Grey

The Windsor was created in a joint effort with contractors to offer the look of a traditional cedar shake roof with easy installation. The new Windsor XL carries those features into a high-profile design. As with the original shingle design, the Windsor XL includes durable Flexor polymer modified asphalt to promote granule adhesion and Class 4 impact resistance, as well as Scotchgard Protector from 3M for added protection against black streaks caused by algae.

NRCA Releases 2015-16 Market Survey

NRCA has released its 2015-16 market survey, providing information about overall sales-volume trends in the roofing industry, roofing experiences, material usage and regional breakdowns. It is an important tool to measure the scope of the U.S. roofing industry, and the data provides a glimpse into which roof systems are trending in the low- and steep-slope roofing markets.

This year’s survey reports sales volumes for 2015 and 2016 projections averaged between $8 million and almost $9 million, respectively, and revealed a near-steady ratio of low- to steep-slope sales of 74 percent to 26 percent.

For low-slope roofs, TPO remains the market leader with a 40 percent share of the new construction market and 30 percent of the reroofing market for 2015. Asphalt shingles continue to dominate the steep-slope roofing market with a 47 percent market share for new construction and a 59 percent share for reroofing.

Polyisocyanurate insulation continues to lead its sector of the market with 80 percent of new construction and 73 percent of reroofing work. In addition, roof cover board installation for 2015 was reported as 22 percent in new construction, 42 percent in reroofing tear-offs and 36 percent in re-cover projects.

NRCA’s market survey enables roofing contractors to compare their material usage with contractors in other regions and provides manufacturers and distributors with data to analyze, which can affect future business decisions.

NRCA members may download a free electronic copy of the 2016 survey.

ARMA Helps Update Wind-resistance Standard for Asphalt Shingles

DURING THE past year, the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has led the process to update the ASTM International wind-resistance standard for asphalt shingles to help ensure that it complies with the latest methods to determine design loads for roofs and cladding used on buildings. ASTM standards are consensus standards that are used around the world to improve product quality and build consumer confidence.

The 2016 version of ASTM D7158 is now coordinated with the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE 7-10, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”, which is the document that the International Building Code relies on for its structural provisions. The ASCE 7-10 standard had significant revisions in wind design. ARMA worked with recognized structural engineers who are leaders in the wind-engineering field and industry stakeholders who provided specific updates to D7158 that ensure consistency with ASCE 7-10. Although the building code includes conversion factors to account for differences between versions of ASCE 7, ARMA and other industry stakeholders recognized the value of correlating D7158 with the latest version of ASCE 7. The updates were balloted and approved via the ASTM consensus process.

“ARMA has always been a leader of progress and innovation in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Spearheading the revision of the test standard that determines wind resistance of asphalt shingles shows ARMA’s commitment to the roofing community, building owners and home-owners alike. We continue to strive to make asphalt the leading roofing technology.”

ASTM D7158-16, “Standard Test Method for Wind Resistance of Asphalt Singles (Uplift Forces/Uplift Resistance Method),” is now available for purchase on the ASTM website. Learn more about ARMA at AsphaltRoofing.org.

Malarkey Roofing Products’ Solar-reflective Shingles Offered in More Options

Malarkey Roofing Products has expanded its solar reflective shingle offerings with the Windsor Ecoasis and additional Highlander solar-reflective shingle colors.

Malarkey Roofing Products has expanded its solar reflective shingle offerings with the Windsor Ecoasis and additional Highlander solar-reflective shingle colors.

Malarkey Roofing Products has expanded its solar reflective shingle offerings with the Windsor Ecoasis and additional Highlander solar-reflective shingle colors. The Windsor Ecoasis combines the energy-conservation benefits of the solar-reflective Ecoasis shingle line with the designer style of the Windsor. Windsor Ecoasis features Flexor polymer modified asphalt to promote superior granule adhesion and extreme weather protection, including Class 4 impact resistance. The product also features Scotchgard Protector from 3M for protection against black streaks caused by algae. The Highlander shingles, featuring Scotchgard Protector, now include the solar-reflective colors Dove White and Golden Amber. Both colors are listed with the Cool Roof Rating Council and meet California Energy Code Title 24, Part 6, requirements. Dove White also has earned ENERGY STAR certification.

CertainTeed Roofing Product Data is Available on ARCOM Software Platforms for Roofing Professionals

CertainTeed and ARCOM are pleased to announce that CertainTeed’s roofing product data and customized specifications are now available through ARCOM’s software platforms to architects, engineers and design professionals.
 
ARCOM and CertainTeed have worked together to create customized versions of the MasterSpec sections to accurately specify CertainTeed’s roofing product portfolio. Along with these specification sections, CertainTeed’s entire roofing product catalog and data sheets are accessible to specifiers when working on their projects.
 
“We are proud to partner with ARCOM in providing customized roofing specifications for both our Flintlastic Modified Bitumen roof systems and our complete collection of asphalt roofing shingle products,” said Tom Smith, president of CertainTeed Roofing. “These editable, 3-part specifications enable the roof designer to easily produce complete and accurate specifications for both low-slope and steep-slope roofing systems.”
 
ARCOM and CertainTeed believe this relationship will benefit design professionals as they select and specify roofing products.

High-profile Shingles Are Durable

Malarkey Roofing Products has released its Legacy XL and Windsor XL high-profile shingles.

Malarkey Roofing Products has released its Legacy XL and Windsor XL high-profile shingles.

Malarkey Roofing Products has released its Legacy XL and Windsor XL high-profile shingles. The heavyweight shingles offer a more pronounced design on the roof while maintaining the fortified durability of their original shingle lines. The Legacy XL high-profile design utilizes durable SBS polymer modified asphalt, now known as Flexor, to promote granule adhesion and Class 4 impact resistance, as well as Scotchgard Protector from 3M for added protection against black streaks caused by algae. The Windsor XL features durable Flexor polymer-modified asphalt to promote granule adhesion and Class 4 impact resistance, as well as 3M Scotchgard Protector for protection against black streaks caused by algae.

ARMA Updates Its Laminated Asphalt Shingles Technical Manual

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has updated its technical manual <em>Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide</em>.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has updated its technical manual Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has updated its technical manual Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide. The 38-page manual outlines installation methods for laminated asphalt shingles and is now available as a print-on-demand book and an eBook. Updates include the latest industry best practices to instruct the roofing professional and DIY enthusiast about installation methods that help to maximize shingle life and weather protection. Readers will be able to purchase and access the eBook instantly from any e-reader device and can customize their reading experience by adjusting font sizes, zooming in on images and diagrams, and bookmarking key chapters. For more information or to purchase the guide, visit ARMA’s website.

Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association Celebrates 100 Years of Commitment to the Roofing Industry

Since its early days in 1915—a year when women couldn’t vote, President Woodrow Wilson was in office and Babe Ruth hit his first career home run—the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has had a momentous impact on the roofing industry.

The trade association has brought the majority of North American manufacturers together under the common goal of championing asphalt roofing and promoting the industry. This year, the association celebrates its 100th anniversary with a new logo and looks back on a century of commitment to asphalt roofing excellence.

ARMA celebrates its 100th anniversary with a new logo and looks back on a century of commitment to asphalt roofing excellence.

ARMA celebrates its 100th anniversary with a new logo and looks back on a century of commitment to asphalt roofing excellence.

Asphalt has been used as a roofing product since roll roofing hit the market in 1893—three years before Henry Ford built his first automobile engine. Since then, it has become the standard in roofing, with four out of five homes in the U.S. choosing asphalt for its beauty, affordability and reliability. Through continuous innovation, asphalt roofing manufacturers have developed high-quality, high-value products.

Since its humble beginnings in New York City as the Asphalt Roofing Industry Bureau 100 years ago, ARMA has served as an industry leader for asphalt roofing and has dedicated its services to the long-term vibrancy and sustainability of the roofing community. Over the years, ARMA’s location has changed from New York City, to Garland, Texas, to its current headquarters in the nation’s capital, but its purpose has remained the same. ARMA represents the majority of North America’s asphalt roofing manufacturing companies and their raw material suppliers and includes almost 95 percent of U.S. manufacturers of bituminous-based roofing products.

When first introduced, all asphalt shingles were organic, with mica, dolomite and even oyster shell granules added to the shingle surface to make it more durable. Now there are many different asphalt roofing systems available, from traditional residential roofing shingles to Built-Up Roofing (BUR), Atactic Polyproylene (APP) and Styrene Butadiene Styrene (SBS) modified systems. Asphalt roofing comes in a variety of colors, styles and textures and continues to be the preferred roofing material based on its durability, long-life expectancy and low maintenance.

ARMA is kicking off its 100th year by unveiling a new association logo with a sleek, modern design that represents steep- and low-slope roofing systems. Throughout 2015, ARMA will promote its centennial celebration with an anniversary banner that reads “ARMA: Celebrating a Century of Roofing Excellence.”

The new ARMA logo reflects the association’s commitment to innovation and advancements in the roofing industry. In recent years, ARMA has redesigned its website to improve the user experience and enhance the mobile application of its industry news, technical information and educational resources. The association is also streamlining its bookstore by offering technical manuals and other important publications as eBooks this year.

As ARMA positions itself as a technologically savvy and contemporary organization, it will look back at its century-long history throughout 2015. Check ARMA’s website for historical asphalt roofing information, vintage collateral and fun facts.

Malarkey Roofing Products Eases Access to Product Resources with New Website Design

Malarkey Roofing Products unveiled a new website design the beginning of November that focuses on ease of use paired with icon based navigation. The new look comes on the heels of multiple product additions from the company this summer, including the new Windsor heavyweight designer shingle as well as an expanded low slope roll roofing product line. These new product additions are now seamlessly integrated into the web design with easy access to product resources.

Among the updates to the Malarkey website are the incorporation of icon images with familiar features from the previous website, including areas tailored to both homeowners and roofing professionals. Quick navigation buttons on the homepage allow users one-click access to the shingle design center and purchase locations, as well as recent news and events. Industry professionals will notice low slope product information can be found as both individual product listings as well as system requirements, to allow for easy access to information to fit individual workflows. The warranty center has also seen an update with a streamlined submission process.

“The new website updates are a springboard for our continued growth of the Malarkey online presence in 2015,” says Katherine McConnell, Marketing Manager at Malarkey Roofing Products. “We are excited to offer these updates and look forward to continuing to build our communications with our customers in the year to come.”

Asphalt Roofing Products Provide a Historic Mansion with Modern Performance Without Sacrificing its Classic Curb Appeal

Historic renovations can pose many challenges to roofing contractors. But when done correctly, a renovation on a classic home maintains the structure’s unique style, provides modern performance and even helps to preserve the rich history of an area. This kind of challenge was presented to Highland, Md.-based Certified Inc. when the roofing company was called upon to install a new roof on a historic mansion in Laurel, Md. By choosing the right roofing materials and utilizing proper techniques, the contractor was able to successfully preserve the home’s Victorian appearance and character using today’s safer, more affordable and reliable products, while also meeting the requirements of the local Historic District Commission.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

A STORIED PAST

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888. The mansion was the home of Edward Phelps, who served as the first mayor of Laurel. Throughout his seven terms in office, Phelps modernized the rural community by overseeing the addition of electric street lights; brick-paved roads; a telephone system; and a railroad that connected Laurel to Washington, D.C.

Jim Lessig, Certified’s project manager, was immediately drawn to the project when it was referred to him by a previous customer. “I was very interested in the project due to the historic nature and elaborate architecture of the home,” he says. “It wasn’t the largest project of the year for us, but definitely the most interesting and intricate.”

The Phelps mansion is located in the Historic District of Laurel, an area that is part of the original town. In the 1970s, a Historic District Commission was established to ensure the preservation of homes and businesses and keep the area’s small-town charm. When it came time to install a new roof on the mansion in June 2013, the homeowners worked with the commission to receive approval on building materials and roofing techniques based on a set of guidelines drafted by the organization.

Sunny Pritchard, coordinator for the Historic District Commission, describes the mansion as a magnificent old home that “sits on a sweeping piece of land and looks grand and proud with its high roof lines, gables and big open porches.” To Pritchard and the rest of the commission, it was imperative that the roof retained the home’s noble, Victorian look.

AN INTRICATE ROOF

Certified was faced with a historic challenge: How could it imitate the look of the home’s original slate roof while providing the safety and durability of today’s products? The answer came in the form of asphalt shingles, which were selected for the renovation and were approved by the historic commission.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

“We chose to use asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability,” Lessig notes. “The commission approved the shingle because in their view it gave an authentic slate look that maintained the house’s turnof- the century appearance.”

The chosen shingles are individually colored using precision color technology which allows a roof to maintain the color, contrast and authentic look of natural slate. Natural slate is expensive and takes a specialized labor force to install because the process is an art form. Natural slate can also be a heavy product and breakage can occur when you install it. Asphalt shingles provided a great value for the project, while mimicking the look and tone of slate from the curb.

Contractors used a combination of low- and steep-slope materials on the roof, and added built-in copper gutters to really make it stand out. The end result was a roof that is beautiful and durable. The home retains its ability to transport passersby back into a time of horse-drawn carriages, top hats and hoop skirts.

A CELEBRATED PRESENT

Since the installation, the Phelps mansion’s new roof has gained national attention. In February, the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award. The annual QARC awards program is run by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), Washington, D.C., and recognizes roofing projects that demonstrate the beauty, durability, reliability and affordability of asphalt-based roofing products.

the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The Bronze Award recognized the contractor’s choice of an asphalt roofing product that was easy to work with and provided a safe working environment while successfully replicating the 19th century look and feel of the home.

Because of Certified’s excellent work and the unique products used for the project, this historic mansion will continue to represent the image of the original Laurel district and help preserve the area’s history for many more years to come.

“I would have loved to be one of the preserved boards in this house so I could have recorded the happenings throughout the years,” Pritchard notes. “That is what old homes have, a history of happenings, and if you let the roofs and boards decay and rot and eventually fall down, all of that history goes with it. We want to preserve both—the boards and the history.”

ROOF MATERIALS
Highland Slate shingles: CertainTeed Corp.

Learn More about Asphalt Shingles
To learn about the color process and how asphalt shingles are made, check out this video from the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association.

Learn about ARMA and the QARC awards program.

PHOTOS: EMERY PHOTOGRAPHY