ASTM Test Method Prevents Air Leakage, Supports Liquid-applied Polymers

A new ASTM International test method aims to prevent air leakage in and around roofs, helping improve energy efficiency, reduce moisture problems and prevent pollutants from entering a building.

“It is critical that each assembly of the building envelope be investigated for air-leakage performance with appropriate standards,” says ASTM Member Sudhakar Molleti. “What cannot be captured in the material and full envelope air leakage testing—the structural strength and continuity of the air barrier assembly—can be quantified in the assembly testing. To achieve energy efficiency of building and to adapt for climate change, comprehensive data of material, assembly, and full envelope air leakage testing are needed. By quantifying air leakage in roof assemblies, this new standard can serve as a platform for supporting code compliance and for constructing energy-efficient and sustainable roof assemblies.”

Molleti, a research officer with more than 10 years of roof assembly testing at the National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, notes roofing membranes are air impermeable but can be compromised by factors, such as lack of continuity of the membrane seams, improper detailing around rooftop preparations, improper selection of flashing materials and improper connection of roof membranes to the exterior wall barrier.

Specifically, this new test method is a laboratory technique to determine air leakage in low-slope membrane roof assemblies and accounts for the wind fatigue expected during the life span of a roof by simulating negative air-pressure differences.

The new standard (soon to be published as D8052/D0852M, “Test Method for Quantification of Air Leakage in Low Sloped Membrane Roof Assemblies”) was developed by ASTM’s committee on roofing and waterproofing (D08).

In other news, a set of proposed ASTM International test methods will help support the growing number of roofing projects that use liquid-applied polymers. The proposed standard (WK40123, “Test Methods for Sampling and Testing Liquid Applied Polymeric Roofing and Waterproofing Membranes that Are Directly Exposed to Weather”) will help manufacturers; testing labs; and the construction industry as they sample, test and compare products. It is being developed by ASTM’s committee on roofing and waterproofing (D08).

The proposed standard includes ways to test liquid-applied polymeric materials that are cured to form roofing and waterproofing membranes that are directly exposed to all kinds of weather. By their nature, these materials are seamless. They are also useful when working with complex surfaces and custom-fit projects.

ASTM Member Philip Moser notes these membranes have been traditionally used for waterproofing of elevated parking decks, but their use for applications like roofing is quickly rising. Moser, a senior project manager specializing in building technology at Boston-based Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., says, “Delivery to the exact point of application in relatively small containers makes these products particularly attractive for small rooftop terraces, congested urban areas and roofs that are not accessible by crane where delivery of larger containers would create logistical problems.”

The test methods would be used by manufacturers and testing labs, as well as the people who write specifications that indicate which test methods should be used to evaluate physical properties.

To purchase standards, visit ASTM. org and search by the standard designation, or contact ASTM Customer Relations at (877) 909-ASTM or Sales@ASTM.org. ASTM welcomes participation in the development of its standards. Become a member at ASTM. org/JOIN.

Court Ruling Allows Continued Development of Public Health and Safety Standards

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia (Hon. Tanya S. Chutkan) has issued a ruling that will support federal, state and local governments’ efforts to support public health and safety through the use of voluntary consensus codes and standards. The court granted a motion for summary judgment filed by a number of standard development organizations (SDOs), including the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), ASTM International and ASHRAE. The court’s ruling permanently enjoins Public.Resource.org from its previous systematic infringement of numerous SDO copyrighted codes and standards. The ruling vindicates the longstanding public-private partnership pursuant to which government entities may, if they choose, incorporate by reference high quality safety codes and standards.

“We are pleased with the court’s decision, which recognizes the importance of a time-tested process that serves governments and individuals well and is vital to public health and safety,” says Jim Pauley, president of NFPA.

The history of not-for-profit SDOs developing voluntary consensus standards goes back more than a century. Governments, businesses, and individuals across the country rely on a variety of works, from product specifications and installation methods to safety codes and standards.  SDOs, not governmental agencies, underwrite the costs of developing standards.
 
“The court’s ruling means federal, state and local agencies can continue to rely on not-for-profit SDOs to develop voluntary consensus standards at a high level of excellence and at minimal cost to government,” says Kathie Morgan, president, ASTM International.

SDOs pay for the standard development process and invest in new standards with the money earned selling and licensing their copyrighted works.  This model allows SDOs to remain independent of special interests and to develop up-to-date standards.  It also allows the U.S. government, and governments at all levels, the freedom to decide whether to incorporate these standards by reference without a drain on their resources.
 
“We and many other SDOs already provide free online access to many standards as part of our commitment to safety,” says Timothy G. Wentz, ASHRAE president. “And, preventing the infringement of copyrighted material will allow not-for-profit SDOs to continue meeting the needs of the people and jurisdictions we serve.”
 
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Katharine Morgan Is Serving as President of ASTM International

Katharine “Kathie” Morgan has begun serving as president of ASTM International. Morgan will lead a team that supports thousands of members, customers, partners, and other stakeholders worldwide. She succeeds James A. Thomas, who served in the role for 25 years.
 
“I am thrilled and humbled to serve as president of an organization that has played such a foundational role in meeting societal needs for over a century,” Morgan states at the organization’s first meeting of 2017 in Norfolk, Va.  “We will build on the legacy of Jim Thomas, attracting more of the world’s top technical experts to our committees while also serving people and organizations that rely on our standards and services.”
 
A brief new video featuring Morgan and her first presidential message has been released.
 
Morgan was joined at the event by Thomas Marsh, CEO of Centrotrade and ASTM International’s 2017 chairman of the board. “Kathie brings leadership skills, an understanding of the global standards community, a passion for ASTM International’s mission, and much more,” Marsh says. “ASTM International will continue to grow and thrive under her leadership.”
 
Morgan also visited the Virginia Beach Fire Department Training Facility to see demonstrations of emergency response robots and drones.  Manufacturers, first responders, and others tested robot capabilities and operator proficiency using 50 test methods, many of which have been developed through ASTM International’s Committee on Homeland Security Applications (E54).
 
Morgan is a 33-year veteran of ASTM International. She served as executive vice president for the past two years. Prior to that, she was vice president of Technical Committee Operations, leading a 50-member team that supports the volunteer work of ASTM International’s 30,000 members worldwide.
 
Morgan is a prominent voice on standardization-related issues. She is a board member of the American National Standards Institute’s Board of Directors, the Council of Engineering and Scientific Executives, the International Consumer Product Health and Safety Organization, the Society for Standards Professionals (SES), the American Society of Association Executives, and a former member of the Standards Council of Canada’s Standards Development Organization Advisory Committee.
 
Morgan holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., and a master’s degree in business administration from Widener University in Chester, Pa.

ASTM Standard Seeks to Reduce Roofing Materials in Landfills

A new ASTM International standard will help reduce the amount of used roofing materials that go to landfills. ASTM’s Committee on Roofing and Waterproofing (D08) developed the standard, which is available as D8013-16, “Standard Guide for Establishing a Recycle Program for Roof Coverings Roofing Membrane and Shingle Materials”.

According to ASTM member Joseph Schwetz of Canton, Mass.-based Sika Sarnafil Inc., the new guide will help building owners who want to minimize their environmental impact by eliminating waste during roof replacement. The standard will help them and their contractors compare the costs for disposal versus recycling.

In addition, manufacturers will use the standard to determine whether recycled roofing materials could be a cost-effective ingredient in creating new roofing products.

To purchase standards, visit the ASTM website and search by the standard designation, or contact ASTM Customer Relations at (877)909-ASTM or sales@astm.org. ASTM welcomes participation in the development of its standards. Become a member here.

Program Operator Consortium Welcomes Two New Affiliate Members

The green building industry’s consortium of program operators has announced the addition of two new affiliate members: NRMCA (National Ready Mixed Concrete Association), a concrete advocate organization, and Sustainable Solutions Corp., an environmental consulting firm.
 
The Program Operator Consortium launched last year to provide standardized, and more useful environmental-product transparency solutions and to reduce complexity in the marketplace. The consortium serves as a resource and advocate for creating product category rules (PCRs), reviewing life cycle assessment reports (LCA), and verifying and publishing environmental product declarations (EPDs).
 
“As one of the leading EPD operators in the construction materials industry, we must consider opportunities to deliver value to our membership,” states James Bogdan, senior director of sustainability initiatives with NRMCA. “Joining the POC allows our industry access to a network of practitioners and experts, and insight to evolving environmental disclosure reporting.”
 
“Sustainable Solutions Corp. is excited to join the Program Operator Consortium as an affiliate member because of our commitment to product transparency and to help ensure the production of transparency documents,” says Tad Radzinski, president of Sustainable Solutions Corp. “We bring to the consortium our years of experience completing LCAs and EPDs, a team of certified LCA practitioners, and our objective of using LCA data to drive sustainability, product innovation and continuous improvement.”
 
These two affiliate members join thinkstep, a software, data and environmental consulting services company, which was the consortium’s first affiliate member. Regular members of the Consortium include: ASTM International, CSA Group, ICC-Evaluation Service, NSF Sustainability, SCS Global Services, and Sustainable Minds.
 
The Affiliate Member Program was created for industry associations, government agencies, standards developers, consultants, and data providers to have access to expertise from a like-minded community. The free program also provides education, discounted rates, and a seat at the table to contribute to creating uniformity across environmental reporting formats, data requirements, and communication.
 
Each consortium member is represented in the group’s Technical Advisory Board. These LCA experts oversee the implementation of the consortium’s North American two-part PCR framework, which consortium members have aligned to use and maintain over the past year. Today, PCRs created by any member will produce standardized environmental declarations, helping both manufacturers as well as decision-makers who specify green building materials and products. The first catalog of North American PCRs and an aggregated catalog of EPDs from members’ programs are available at here.
 
The consortium holds both in-person meetings and webinars with global manufacturers, LCA providers, and industry trade associations. Those interested in joining or learning more about the consortium are encouraged to contact info@programoperators.org.

ARMA Helps Update Wind-resistance Standard for Asphalt Shingles

DURING THE past year, the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has led the process to update the ASTM International wind-resistance standard for asphalt shingles to help ensure that it complies with the latest methods to determine design loads for roofs and cladding used on buildings. ASTM standards are consensus standards that are used around the world to improve product quality and build consumer confidence.

The 2016 version of ASTM D7158 is now coordinated with the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE 7-10, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”, which is the document that the International Building Code relies on for its structural provisions. The ASCE 7-10 standard had significant revisions in wind design. ARMA worked with recognized structural engineers who are leaders in the wind-engineering field and industry stakeholders who provided specific updates to D7158 that ensure consistency with ASCE 7-10. Although the building code includes conversion factors to account for differences between versions of ASCE 7, ARMA and other industry stakeholders recognized the value of correlating D7158 with the latest version of ASCE 7. The updates were balloted and approved via the ASTM consensus process.

“ARMA has always been a leader of progress and innovation in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Spearheading the revision of the test standard that determines wind resistance of asphalt shingles shows ARMA’s commitment to the roofing community, building owners and home-owners alike. We continue to strive to make asphalt the leading roofing technology.”

ASTM D7158-16, “Standard Test Method for Wind Resistance of Asphalt Singles (Uplift Forces/Uplift Resistance Method),” is now available for purchase on the ASTM website. Learn more about ARMA at AsphaltRoofing.org.

Green Building Consortium Welcomes New Members

The green building industry’s consortium of program operators announced at Greenbuild the addition of two new members and an enhanced technical advisory board. CSA Group is now a member, while thinkstep is the group’s affiliate member.
 
This marks the first anniversary of the Program Operator Consortium, which launched last year to provide environmental-product transparency solutions and to reduce complexity in the marketplace. The consortium serves as a resource and advocate for creating product category rules (PCRs), reviewing life cycle assessment reports (LCA), and verifying and publishing environmental product declarations (EPDs).
 
CSA Group, a Canadian standards development organization, joins existing members of the consortium: ASTM International, ICC-Evaluation Service, NSF Sustainability, SCS Global Services and Sustainable Minds. “CSA Group is pleased to be joining the Program Operator Consortium and working together to ensure EPDs and PCRs are developed in a consistent fashion, following ISO standards and industry best practice, in order to showcase a product’s environmental impact,” said Michael Leering, the organization’s director of sustainability.
 
The first affiliate member of the consortium is thinkstep, a software, data, and environmental-consulting services company that works with 40 percent of the Fortune 500. “Standardizing the PCR and EPD creation process will contribute to lowering costs and increasing the use of products that reduce environmental impact,” said Nuno da Silva, thinkstep’s director of product sustainability. “We’re delighted to contribute to this effort.”
 
The Affiliate Member Program was created for industry associations, government agencies, standards developers, consultants, and data providers to have access to expertise from a like-minded community.  The program also provides education, discounted rates, and the ability to contribute to creating uniformity across environmental reporting formats, data requirements, and communication.
 
Each consortium member is represented in the group’s Technical Advisory Board:

These LCA experts oversee the implementation of the consortium’s North American two-part PCR framework, which consortium members have aligned to use and maintain over the past year. PCRs created by any member will produce standardized environmental declarations, helping both manufacturers as well as decision-makers who specify green building materials and products. A catalog of North American PCRs and an aggregated catalog of EPDs from members’ programs are available at www.programoperators.org.
 
The consortium holds both in-person meetings and webinars with global manufacturers, LCA providers, and industry trade associations. Those interested in joining or learning more about the consortium are encouraged to contact info@programoperators.org.

Roofing and Waterproofing Committee Presents Award of Merit

ASTM International’s Committee on Roofing and Waterproofing (D08) presents its annual award – the Award of Merit – to Aaron Phillips of TAMKO Building Products Inc. in Joplin, Missouri. The Award of Merit is ASTM’s highest recognition for individual contributions to developing standards.

The committee honors Phillips for outstanding leadership, personal commitment, and participation in many subcommittees and task groups with dedication to developing standards. He has been a member of ASTM since 1991, serving as the D08 committee chairman from 2007 to 2013. He received the Distinguished Leadership Award in 2012 and the Award of Appreciation in both 2008 and 2014.

Phillips is the corporate director of technical systems at TAMKO Building Products Inc. and has been with the company since 2009, having previously served as a research assistant and technical systems specialist.

In addition to ASTM, Phillips is a member of the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, Composite Lumber Manufacturers Association, the Metal Construction Association, the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association, Canadian Standards Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

ASTM International and Sustainable Roofing

ASTM International is a well-known standard-writing organization for the construction industry and other industries. As the building design and construction industries have moved toward more sustainable methods and products, it follows that more standardization of sustainability is necessary. This is certainly true for the roofing and waterproofing industry. ASTM now has a group devoted to developing standards for sustainable roofing.

Organizationally, ASTM is divided into numerous committees, each having a specific focus. The ASTM D08 committee is responsible for roofing and waterproofing standards. Within the D08 committee, there are multiple subcommittees that focus on a segment of the roofing/waterproofing industry—from asphalt shingles to spray polyurethane foam to modified-bitumen membranes to single-ply membranes and more. D08.24 is the subcommittee that is developing standards specifically related to sustainable roofing.

Further division of each subcommittee into Task Groups allows narrowly focused groups to develop standards for very specific topics. There are currently four Task Groups within D08.24:

  • D08.24.01 Guidelines for Sustainable Design
  • D08.24.03 Recycling Practices and Reporting Methodology
  • D08.24.04 Durability
  • D08.24.05 Selection Criteria Vegetative Roof Membranes

Process

Standards are developed by Task Groups with active participation by attendees at the semi-annual meetings. Typically, a draft standard (called a work item until it is an approved standard) is initially sent out for ballot to the Task Group to obtain comments that will improve the draft standard. After balloting to the Task Group, the draft standard is balloted to the full D08 membership. At times, a standard is simultaneously balloted to the Task Group and the full membership. During the balloting process, comments and negative votes are reviewed and dealt with according to ASTM protocols. Standards development is a very linear process that works well to achieve a consensus in the D08 committee. Once a consensus is reached, the standard is published for use.

The background on the process is necessary to understand the activities of the D08.24 subcommittee. Because the subcommittee was only recently established, all standards are still in the development stage.

Task Group Specifics

The D08.24.01 Task Group is developing a new standard, work item WK26599, which is currently titled “New Guide for Design of Sustainable, Low-Slope Roofing Systems”. The current scope is:

  • This Standard provides guidance for designing sustainable low-sloped roofing systems, including exposed membrane roofs, membranes covered with vegetative (green) overburden systems, ballasted roofs and protected membrane roofing assemblies. A sustainable roofing system minimizes environmental impact, conserves energy, and has maximized service life.

The scope recognizes the roof’s primary function is to weatherproof the building’s top surface.

The document provides a sequential process for designing sustainable roof systems. The document does not provide a prescriptive approach, but “attempts to help the user define and consider roofing system demands and environmental life cycle impacts, and integrate these with features that contribute environmental, energy conservation, or other benefit in service” through a number of considerations, which include roofing demands, functional expectations, end-user requirements and site restraints. The document is big-picture, technology-neutral and process-based.

The D08.24.03 Task Group is developing a new standard, work item 24614, currently titled “New Guide for Recycling Practices & Reporting Methodology”. The intent of the document is to unify common practices and develop an industry-accepted reporting format for recycling common roofing materials, such as asphalt shingles. The document is in its infancy and has not been balloted to date.

The D08.24.04 task group is developing a new standard, work item 26595, currently titled “New Guide for Roof System Durability”. The task group is still evaluating the specific scope but will focus on PVC and EPDM membranes in two separate documents. The intent is to provide methodology to evaluate the variables that lead to increased durability of PVC and EPDM roof systems. Neither document has been balloted yet.

The D08.24.05 Task Group is developing a new standard, work item 29304, currently titled “New Guide for Selection of Roofing/Waterproofing Membrane Systems for Vegetative (Green) Roof Systems”. The document will provide technology-neutral considerations for selection of appropriate membranes for vegetative roofs. The Task Group is expected to begin the balloting process soon.

Liaisons

The ASTM D08.24 group works with other groups, like E60 on Sustainability and the Built Environment Advisory Committee, to ensure continuity of ideas with all ASTM committees. Specifically, E60.01 on Buildings and Construction and E60.80 on General Sustainability Standards are in the focus of the D08.24 liaison efforts.

The ASTM sustainability standards are intended to be used by the roofing, construction and design industries to formalize the efforts toward more sustainable roofs and roofing. It is hoped that other roofing groups, such as ARMA, CEIR, ERA, NRCA and SPRI, will reference ASTM’s sustainability standards in their documents.

I encourage everyone in the roofing industry to not only join ASTM, but to participate in the development of the standards our industry uses each and every day. ASTM D08.24 needs your input as the roofing industry moves further toward sustainable products and activities.