Atlas to Host Webinar on Exit and Succession Planning June 18

Atlas Roofing is hosting a free webinar on exit, succession and contingency planning Monday, June 18 at 10 a.m. Eastern. Learn why roofing contractors need an exit or succession plan, as well as common mistakes made during the process and the best strategies for success.

Hear from business-planning experts Kevin Kennedy and Joe Bazzano about how to get all of the proper financial and legal arrangements in place to preserve your business legacy and secure your financial future.

Kennedy, CEO of Beacon Exit Planning, specializes in exit and success planning for private business owners. He uses the experience of selling his 63-year-old roofing business — including the mistakes he made — to help others navigate the process more smoothly.

Bazzano, COO of Beacon, is a certified public accountant, certified valuation analyst and certified business exit consultant with more than 25 years of experience. He shows business owners how to increase the value of their companies and save on taxes.

With their knowledge and expertise, these professionals can guide contractors around the potential pitfalls of leaving a roofing business — either by choice or circumstance.

To register, visit https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8050003304757158147

New Designer Shingle Line Offers Scotchgard Protector

Atlas LegendAtlas Roofing Corporation announces the launch of its newest product, Legend Designer Fiberglass Shingles. With bold cuts and high-contrast color, these three-tab designer shingles provide the high style of an architectural look at an attractive price for homeowners, according to the manufacturer. In addition to its striking character, the new Legend shingle is loaded with features and benefits that offer homeowners the performance they expect from quality roof shingles.

“We’re thrilled to add Legend Designer Fiberglass Shingles to our family of products,” said Kirk Villar, vice president of Atlas Roofing. “Not only do these new shingles provide homeowners with a beautiful-looking roof, but they also include the algae-fighting power of Scotchgard Protector at an affordable price.”

According to the company, Legend is the industry’s first three-tab shingle that features the power of Scotchgard Protector, which helps prevent ugly black streaks caused by algae. Atlas shingles are built to withstand the harshest weather conditions. Legend shingles come with a 40-year Limited Warranty against manufacturing defects and have a 110 mph Wind Limited Warranty.

Legend shingles are eligible for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System, which offers increased protection and peace of mind. The Atlas system also increases warranty protection for homeowners. Atlas Signature Select Roofing System components include Atlas WeatherMaster Ice & Water Underlayment; Atlas Premium Underlayment; Atlas Pro-Cut Starter Shingles; Atlas Roof Shingles; and Atlas Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles

“Atlas is resetting the expectations for a three-tab shingle,” said Stan Bastek, director of marketing and sales development for Atlas Roofing. “The Legend shingle is a designer three-tab shingle that offers aesthetics, value, quality and performance that you can’t find from other manufacturers.”

The Legend shingle is suitable for single- and multi-family homes and available in five popular colors: Black Shadow, Desert Shake, Hearthstone Gray, Heatherblend and Weathered Wood.

For more information, visit www.AtlasRoofing.com.

Atlas Roofing Employee and Products Featured on HGTV Show

Atlas shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector by 3M – installed on the home of an Atlas Roofing Corp. employee – were featured on an episode of the HGTV home renovation series “Home Town.” The show, based in Laurel, Mississippi, is hosted by Ben and Erin Napier and focuses on renovating historical houses in their small town.

Titled “A Little Rough, A Little Refined,” the show aired Feb. 26. It showcased the renovation of the home of Cory Burks and his family. Burks, who lives in Laurel, is the quality control manager for the web technologies division at the Atlas manufacturing plant in Meridian.

Part of “Home Town’s” second season, the Burks’ renovation included installing a new roof, for which Atlas Roofing supplied its Signature Select Roofing System. Products included 38 squares of its HP42″ format shingles in StormMaster Shake Majestic Shake, featuring Scotchgard Protector by 3M, and Summit 60 underlayment.

For more information, a about Atlas Roofing products, visit www.AtlasRoofing.com.

For additional information about the show, visit www.HGTV.com/HomeTown.

Atlas Roofing Announces Schedule for 2018 Roadshow and Truck Giveaway

Atlas Roofing announces the launch of its 2018 Asphalt Life Roadshow season, which kicked off January 17 in Omaha, Nebraska, and travels to nine major cities across the country, along with 15 mini events in targeted markets.

Highlights of this year’s Roadshow, themed “All Roads Lead To Atlas,” include the company’s newest product innovation — shingles built with HP42” Technology. Atlas invites roofing professionls to come to the show and learn how HP42” Technology saves contractors time and money, and makes installation more efficient. In addition, attendees can learn about the difference Atlas shingles featuring Scotchgard™ Protector can make for a company’s close rate, margins, and differentiation in the market.

“We’re excited to meet new contractors and show them how they can outshine their competition and close more sales with our great products and marketing partnerships,” said Stan Bastek, Director of Marketing and Sales Development for Atlas Roofing. “Come on out and experience one of our Roadshows for yourself!”

Roadshow events also feature these breakout sessions:

  • GreenSky Financing
  • Handling Nature’s Worst — Hail/Wind
  • Boost Your Website and Social Media Presence

At each event, Atlas is giving away more than $5,000 worth of prizes, including Yeti coolers, nail guns, Costa sunglasses, HD action cameras, Apple watches and Duckett rod and reel combos.

To top it off, Atlas Roofing is hosting a yearlong contest with a 1951 Chevrolet 3100 pickup truck as the grand prize. This classic beauty is painted in factory Swift Red and features a five-window cab, whitewall tires with a side-mount spare, all of the optional chrome and stainless trim, and a solid steel frame — and its fully rebuilt engine purrs like new.

The contest, which is open exclusively to Atlas Pro Plus contractors, begins February 6 at the International Roofing Expo (IRE) in New Orleans and continues throughout 2018. To qualify for a chance to win the truck, Atlas Pro Plus contractors will earn points through a variety of ways including utilizing the tools available through the Atlas Pro Plus control panel and installing Atlas Signature Select Roofing Systems. As part of the promotion, 10 contractors will receive an all-expenses paid trip to the 2019 IRE in Nashville, where one lucky winner will drive off in style in the Asphalt Life truck.

Confirmed cities for the 2018 Asphalt Life Roadshow are:

  • Omaha, Nebraska
  • Dallas, Texas
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • New York, New York
  • Denver, Colorado
  • Kansas City, Missouri
  • Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Memphis, Tennessee
  • Orlando, Florida

Dates and additional cities will be announced soon.

For more information, visit AtlasRoofing.com/Roadshow and AtlasRoofing.com/Pro.

 

Steep-Slope Projects: Risks, Considerations and Best Practices for Contractors

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Many contractors treat residential roofing as routine. However, whether a re-roof or new construction, each project can be infinitely complex and should be addressed as such by always accounting for weather and safety issues, as well as proper installation and customer service.

One of the most prominent and popular elements of residential architecture is a steep-slope roof. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), steep-slope roofs have slopes greater than 4:12 and range from 18.5 degrees to 45 degrees or more. While the process of installing a roof with these angles isn’t necessarily much different from a low-slope roof, it can pose more risks and considerations for workers.

Weather Woes

Weather plays an important role in every roofing project, but staying on top of potential issues from Mother Nature is especially crucial during steep-slope jobs.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

In high temperatures, workers may fall victim to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heatstroke or worse. The best way to beat the heat is to start early and get as much done as possible before the temperature peaks. Starting early in the summer—specifically in the South—can allow work to be completed before daily rain showers roll in. Proper hydration and attire are also important.

Cold temperatures can create even more complications because some manufacturers advise against installing their products in weather below 45 degrees Fahrenheit and certain equipment is susceptible to freezing. Furthermore, workers have to pay extra attention to the grip of their shoes to avoid slipping and falling. Not to mention, freezing-cold hands and feet may cause an otherwise adept worker to become clumsy. Wearing the proper clothing is key during cold-weather jobs, and workers should be advised to keep an eye out for the first signs of frostbite, including cold skin, redness, tingling and numbness.

Safety Considerations

In 2015, falls were the leading cause of private-sector work deaths in the construction industry, accounting for nearly 40 percent of worker fatalities, according to OSHA. In addition, OSHA reports nearly 90 percent of fatal falls happen due to the lack of a fall-protection system.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

When working on a roof slope greater than 4/12, OSHA requires additional safety measures, which include either a guardrail system with toeboards, safety net systems or personal fall arrest systems. Yet, many contractors—especially residential roofers—choose to forgo protective devices because they feel they are not feasible or create a greater hazard. In such cases, OSHA does allow the use of alternative fall-protection methods in residential construction, as long as contractors develop a written, job-specific fall-protection plan that complies with OSHA regulations.

Proper Installation

During the installation process, roofers should keep a few things in mind whether they’re applying shingles to a steep-slope or low-slope structure.

  • Valleys
Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Valleys are a critical part of proper roof installation because they experience the most water flow during rainstorms and can be potential leak points.

In an open valley, a piece of aluminum, copper or other type of metal is used to help keep rainwater flowing off the roof. Open valleys are often used when a homeowner wants a showier look, such as on a Colonial-style home.

Closed valleys—the most common valley installation method—use asphalt shingles and offer a more traditional look. When properly installed, they keep water from getting trapped in the valley and allow for proper drainage.

In addition to open and closed valleys, contractors also have the option to create a weave valley, which alternates shingles through the valley from both sides, creating a braid-like effect.

Laminate/architectural shingles should not be used for weave valleys. Because laminate shingles aren’t one-dimensional, they do not create the flat surface needed for a weave valley, which should only be used with three-tab shingles.

When using laminate shingles, be sure to follow instructions on the wrapper for either an open or closed application.

Contractors also need to be extremely careful around obstacles such as chimneys and skylights, which require their own flashing and water divergence methods. For instance, more flashing may be needed in these areas to divert water and prevent leaks.

  • Starter Shingles

Starter shingles allow the first course of shingles to properly seal down, protecting the edge of the roof and providing anchoring power for high-wind resistance at the critical eave and rake areas. They further protect the roof by filling in spaces under the cutouts and edges for the first course of exposed shingles, preventing wind uplift.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

The most common mistake when installing starter shingles or modifying traditional three-tab shingles is putting them on backward or upside-down.

Additionally, the overhang should be no more than three-quarters of an inch to prevent wind from penetrating beneath shingles, as well as to keep shingles from curling or cracking.

In addition, many manufacturers caution against double-stacking pallets of starter shingles, which can cause the bottom shingles to warp. Be sure to read all storage and handling instructions prior to installation.

  • Underlayment

Underlayment is an important part of the roofing process and is required by code for residential properties to meet Class A fire requirements. Serving as a secondary barrier, underlayment protects rakes, eaves and critical flashings from water infiltration. Most warranties also require underlayment for the roof to be ASTM compliant. However, some contractors still opt not to use it because they want to save time on a project or their customer balks at the cost.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Another frequent error during underlayment installation is incorrect overlaps. On low-slope roofs (slopes between 2:12 and 4:12), underlayment should have double coverage. And while traditional installation is fine on steep-slope roofs, always follow manufacturer instructions for overlaps from course to course.

Last but not least, be sure to keep underlayment from wrinkling, which can cause ripples in the shingles. While trying to keep underlayment as flat as possible, avoid pulling it too tight because it has a natural expansion and contraction. If underlayment gets wet, be sure it adequately dries out before continuing the installation process.

  • Shingles and Nails

Shingles should be installed with the manufacturer’s recommended offset, which will help prevent leak points and also properly align the shingles across the roof. Once all of the shingles are aligned, only the shingles themselves should be exposed—not the nails.

Because the common bond area is the strongest part of a shingle, manufacturers require nails be placed there to achieve the advertised wind performance. Nails should not be too high or too low, or unevenly spaced. If nails aren’t positioned correctly, the manufacturer’s wind warranty may not be valid.

Customer Service Follow-Up

Providing excellent customer service is key to every roofing job. Homeowners who have a good experience are more likely to share positive reviews and opinions.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Before starting a steep-slope project, be sure to discuss the entire process with homeowners to ensure that they know what to expect, as well as the types of warranties they will receive with their new roof. In addition, prepare the surrounding property, such as windows and landscaping, to prevent damage during the installation process.

During the job, be sure workers are vigilant about not dropping nails anywhere on the jobsite. After the job, walk the property with the homeowners to ensure all debris and materials were cleaned up; magnets can be used to double-check for stray nails. If the homeowners are happy with the finished product and their experience, don’t be afraid to ask them to write a nice review on the company website, Angie’s List, Yelp or other customer referral app.

Most of the best practices for steep-slope roofing can be applied to any type of roofing project. However, steep-slope work can pose additional challenges that other projects may not. Always follow manufacturer’s instructions and OSHA guidelines on all roofing jobs, but especially on steep-slope projects, when one minor slip could turn into major consequences for all involved.

About the Author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corp., www.atlasroofing.com. He is responsible for all areas of product management, including product initiation, feasibility, design, development and testing. He is a graduate of Penn State University with more than 20 years of experience in the building products industry.

 

Atlas Roofing Appoints New Director of Private Label and Tapered Services

Atlas Roofing Corporation has promoted Shaun Kerschen to Director of Private Label and Tapered Services, within the Roof and Wall Insulation division. According to the company, Kerschen has worked for Atlas since 2002, where he started as a Design Engineer for the Atlas EPS division. Shortly after, he transitioned over to the polyiso roof insulation side of the business to become a Tapered Specialist and eventually relocated to Atlanta in 2006. Since beginning his career with Atlas Corporation, Kerschen has acquired more than 15 years of experience in the roofing and insulation industry.

“As a company, we’re proud to have leading industry talent like Shaun, who choose to build their careers with Atlas Corporation,” said Steve Heaton, Vice President Sales and Marketing of Atlas Roof and Wall Insulation Division. “Shaun first made his mark as a tapered specialist for our best-in-class tapered roof insulation systems, which set him on the path to ultimately lead our Tapered Department. We look forward to continued departmental and private label growth under Shaun’s leadership as the Director.”

In his new role, Kerschen will work closely with Tim Milroy, who was also recently promoted to take over as Director of Sales – Roof Insulation within the Roof and Wall Insulation Division.

For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

Atlas Roofing Names New Director of Sales 

Atlas Roofing Corporation promoted Tim Milroy to Director of Sales—Roof Insulation, within the Roof & Wall Insulation division. Milroy has worked with Atlas since 2006, when he started as a Sales Representative for the Atlas EPS division. He has more than 25 years of experience in the roofing and insulation industry.

“Atlas has a long tradition of developing talent from within,” said Steve Heaton, Vice President, Sales & Marketing of Atlas Roof and Wall Insulation Division. “Tim is a great example of a talented leader who has grown as a professional as Atlas has grown. We’re proud to see him take on this leadership role and excited to see his continued contributions to the company.”

According to the company, Milroy started his career as a roofing laborer, and within five years, he was leading roofing teams as a project foreman before transitioning into sales in 1996. After working at several roofing companies, and serving in various sales roles, Milroy landed at Atlas. In his new role at Atlas, he will manage the installation of national sales initiatives and meet with key customers. He will also support new product development and work with private label teams to grow the category.

An athlete growing up, Milroy is a member of his high school’s Athletic Hall of Fame and he continues to enjoy sports and an active lifestyle. He is married with two adult children, and is an active member of the Chicago Contractors Association and Roof Consultants Institute.

For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

Atlas EPS Division Purchases Versa-Tech

Atlas EPS, a division of Atlas Roofing Corporation, is pleased to announce the acquisition of Versa-Tech Inc., located in Fredericktown, Mo. Versa-Tech has been operating in Fredericktown for more than 17 years, providing expanded polystyrene foam products for customers in the Midwest region.

From inception in 2000, Versa-Tech’s business foundation has been built upon listening to customers’ needs and providing quality products, and becoming part of Atlas EPS will provide customers and employees the platform to continue this focus on a larger scale. Patrick Rosener, current owner/partner of Versa-Tech, stated that he couldn’t be more pleased to see Versa-Tech become a part of Atlas EPS.

“Atlas Roofing Corporation is excited to add the Versa-Tech facility and capacity to the Atlas EPS network of plants,” commented Atlas EPS General Manager Bob Butkus. Atlas EPS specializes in developing, manufacturing, and marketing quality, HCFC-free expanded polystyrene insulation for roofs, walls, and many other interior and exterior construction applications, as well as for use in packaging products, recreational vehicles, garage and pedestrian doors, and sunroom panels.

Craig Woodson, Atlas EPS Director of Sales, added, “We look to integrate our Integrity® Component Solutions, Elevation Geofoam and ThermalStar Rigid Insulation product lines into this facility almost immediately.” Current and future customers will certainly benefit from the increased product offering as well as the increase in geographic serviceability.

Architectural Shingle Roofing System on New Field House Helps St. David’s Prepare for the Future

St. David’s Episcopal School’s new field house features an architectural shingle roof designed to provide long life and protection from algae growth. Photo: Atlas Roofing.

St. David’s Episcopal School’s new field house features an architectural shingle roof designed to provide long life and protection from algae growth. Photo: Atlas Roofing.

Originally founded in 1972 as a high school, St. David’s Episcopal School now serves students in pre-K programs all the way through graduation. Located on a wooded campus in suburban Raleigh, N.C., the school now attracts students from Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Wake Forest and Cary. And as the student body grows, so does the campus of St. David’s.

The school’s facilities are being built with the future in mind, and when the decision was made to add a new athletic field house, durability and longevity were key factors in the decision-making process.

For the roof on the new complex, the school turned to Baker Roofing and Executive Vice President John Matthews, a parent of two St. David’s students who has worked with the school for the past decade. To ensure that the campus itself was built for longevity, Matthews selected 60 squares of Atlas Pinnacle Pristine shingles in Pristine Desert. Other products installed on the project include ProCut Hip & Ridge Shingles, ProCut Starter Shingles, and Summit 180 Synthetic Underlayment.

The architectural shingles feature Scotchgard Protector, which will help the field house maintain its appearance by resisting ugly black streaks caused by algae. In fact, more than 80 percent of the roofs in the U.S. are prone to algae invasion, so protection is the key to a long-lasting roof. “Having the Pinnacle Pristine shingles means the school will have the best protection and appearance,” Matthews says.

His personal relationship with St. David’s and his commitment to the donors who made the new construction possible meant that this project was especially important to Matthews. “The quality education provided by St. David’s is critical to shaping young lives,” he says. “With that in mind, it was essential I feel confident in the products we installed. Knowing that Atlas stands by its products made me sure of the roof the school would be receiving. The extended premium protection period on the Signature Select Roofing System gave everyone a lot of confidence in the decision to go with Atlas.”

When St. David’s Episcopal School in suburban Raleigh, N.C., decided to add a new athletic field house, durability and longevity were key factors in the decision-making process. Photo: Atlas Roofing.

When St. David’s Episcopal School in suburban Raleigh, N.C., decided to add a new athletic field house, durability and longevity were key factors in the decision-making process. Photo: Atlas Roofing.


On a campus where everything they do is geared toward the future, building a facility with longevity in mind is key. “Knowing my own children attend St. David’s and our family is a part of this community made it extremely important that the work we do and the materials we chose be of superior quality,” Matthews notes. “The Atlas system is a product that will ensure the building offers lasting protection and a beautiful appearance for years to come.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Baker Roofing Company, Raleigh, N.C., Bakerroofing.com
Roof System Manufacturer: Atlas Roofing, Atlasroofing.com

Atlas Roofing Introduces Shingles That Are 42 Inches Wide

Atlas HP 42Atlas Roofing introduces its new HP42” shingle format. Larger than any other shingle currently manufactured in the United States, the HP42” format offers roofing contractors a faster installation process as well as big time and labor savings, according to the manufacturer.

The HP42” format launched in July and will be the new standard for the Atlas StormMaster Shake and Pinnacle Pristine shingle lines.

Features of the Atlas shingles with HP42” technology include:

  • A larger size: the shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high.
  • An enhanced 1½-inch “sweet spot” nailing area that helps the crew stay accurate when aiming for the shingle common bond.
  • A 7-Course, Zero-waste shingle offset, providing up to 5 percent material savings versus other leading shingles brands.
  • A larger 6-inch exposure.
  • A high performance 130-mph wind limited warranty with a four-nail installation.
  • The HP42” format lets crews cover more roof area with fewer shingles and fewer nails. The 1.5-inch enhanced Sweet Spot nailing area with a FASTAC® double sealant line also helps crews hit their mark every time. And because crews can work more efficiently, they will be on and off the roof more quickly, and on to the next job.

    Based on an average 40-square job, savings versus other leading shingle brands include:

  • 320 fewer shingles to install.
  • Up to 6,000 fewer nails and penetrations, totaling up to $40 in savings on a 130 mph wind limited warranty installation.
  • Savings of two to four hours of labor time on the roof.
  • “Designed with the owner and installer in mind, these new high-performance shingles are larger and better engineered,” said Stan Bastek, Director of Marketing and Sales Development, Atlas Shingles and Underlayment Division. “As a result, they are faster and easier to install, which drastically improves the installation experience for contractors and their crews. They also help contractors save materials and labor.”

    “Working smarter saves time, labor and materials,” Bastek said, “and the savings really add up for a contractor’s bottom line. There isn’t a more contractor-friendly shingle design on the market today than Atlas shingles featuring HP42” technology.”

    Atlas offers a convenient and simple calculator that can determine the potential material, labor and time savings, both annually and per job, if using Atlas shingles with HP42” technology. The savings calculator is available at AtlasRoofing.com/pro.
    Atlas Roofing