Learn to Delegate: Determine Which Tasks You Can Let Go and Concentrate on Your Zone of Genius

You have 168 hours each week to design your life. You use some of the hours for sleeping, some for exercising, some for eating, some for showering, some for work, and some for family—but when you run out of your 168 hours, you are out!

Time is the one commodity you can’t create more of. Once it is gone, it is gone. You can always make more money; you can’t make more time. Or can you?

You are limited in what you can accomplish each week by the mere fact you only have 168 hours. However, there is no limit to what can be accomplished each week if more people pitch in to help.

When you effectively delegate some tasks, it’s like adding 10, 20, 40, 80, 800 hours to your week. It’s almost as if you are creating more time each week.

When I work with clients, one of the first things they share with me is they just aren’t sure what they can delegate. They admit that delegating, in theory, makes sense. However, they aren’t sure how to apply it to their business.

There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution to the delegation challenge. However, there is a process you can follow to find a solution that works for you.

Use the Acronym A.W.E.

You can determine which tasks to delegate by following a three-step process represented by the acronym A.W.E.

  • A—Awareness. What are some of the tasks currently on your plate?
  • W–Work. How do you decide which tasks to delegate?
  • E–Evaluation. What worked and how do you do more of it?

Get ready to delegate! The following exercise will take about 20 minutes to complete–and the payoff is you’ll gain a minimum of three hours of you do it effectively. That’s pretty good ROI on 20 minutes, wouldn’t you agree?

Awareness: The exercise begins by defining what is important and determining what is on your plate.

Step #1: List your top 3 goals.

Step #2: What is your Zone of Genius? That is, list the things in your life and your business that only you can do. (Hint: If you are honest, this list should be pretty short.)

Step #3: Next, list all the things that you “don’t have time to do.” What are the tasks you put off because you don’t like doing them? What are the tasks you are waiting to start until the “timing is right”?

Step #4: Pull out to-do list out from the last week and your to-do list for next week.

Work: At the next stage, you can start to narrow down the tasks you can delegate.

Step #5: Look at your to-do list and your “I don’t have time to do this” list, and for each task, ask yourself, “What goal does this task support?” Write the corresponding goal next to the task. (Hint: Writing the goal down ensures you don’t just skip this part.)

Step #6: You are almost finished with the exercise now! Put a smiley face next to all the tasks that line up directly with your Zone of Genius.

Step #7: Circle the items that relate to a goal, but do not have a smiley face. These are the tasks in your business or life that can be delegated. They support a goal and they are not in your Zone of Genius. They don’t need to be done by you to be done effectively. (Bonus tip: If a task doesn’t directly support a goal, why are you doing it?)

Step #8: Delegate at least three of these tasks.

Evaluation: Determine how effectively each task you delegated was completed and how much time it saved you. Do more of what works! When you can do more of what works and less of what doesn’t, life becomes much easier. Yet many people forget to slow down long enough to think through what is working. Take 10 minutes to check back at the end of the week and ask yourself these questions: Who was a great delegating resource? What tasks were easy to let go of? What tasks do you want to outsource next? Where were the struggles? How can you fine-tune the process?

Congratulations! You have at least three tasks circled. Start delegating and start increasing the number of hours you have available each week to accomplish your goals.

Remember, this process is not a one-and-done kind of thing. To be effective, as your tasks and goals change, the evaluation process becomes more important. Regular process improvement means you are always on task for your Zone of Genius!

NAWIC Will Celebrate Women In Construction Week in March

The National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) will celebrate Women in Construction (WIC) Week March 5-11, 2017. WIC Week is an important date on the NAWIC calendar. This week helps NAWIC advance its mission to enhance the success of women in the construction industry.

“NAWIC has enhanced the success of women in the industry for more than 62 years. We are proud to highlight contributions of women to the industry during Women in Construction Week,” says NAWIC president Connie M. Leipard, CIT.

The focus of WIC Week is to highlight women as a visible component of the construction industry. It is also a time for local chapters to give back to their communities. WIC Week provides an occasion for NAWIC’s members across the country to raise awareness of the opportunities available for women in the construction industry and to emphasize the growing role of women in the industry.

“Women work in every facet of construction in important roles,” states Leipard. “NAWIC’s goal during WIC week is to raise awareness and visibility of the women in these roles. This increased visibility will promote the recruitment of more women and encourage others to start careers in construction. This will ultimately ease the workforce shortage in the industry.”

NAWIC chapters across the nation will celebrate WIC Week with a variety of activities. Community service projects, jobsite tours, membership drives, children’s activities, hands-on workshops, fundraisers and school programs are some of the ways local chapters will observe WIC Week. Local chapters are also appealing to their local, state and national representatives to issue official WIC Week proclamations. Visit the website to locate a NAWIC chapter near you.

CFMA Spreads Suicide Prevention Awareness

According to a recent report released by the CDC, the construction industry has the second-highest rate of suicide (per 100,000 population). Given the male-dominated workforce and other indicators prevalent in construction, it’s imperative to bring suicide prevention to the forefront of safety, risk management, and HR discussions in construction companies.

On September 10, the Construction Financial Management Association (CFMA) joined the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) and others around the world to help spread awareness and resources around the goal of preventing suicide.

CFMA’s journey to spread awareness and resources surrounding suicide prevention has covered much ground in little more than a year’s time. April 2016 saw CFMA’s Valley of the Sun Chapter hosting the first regional summit on the topic; CFMA’s Chicago, Charlotte, Grand Rapids, and Portland Chapters have similar events scheduled in 2016 and 2017. After their collaboration on a late 2015 issue of CFMA Building Profits article, longtime CFMA member, Cal Beyer, director of risk management at Lakeside Industries and executive committee member of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas, CEO and co-founder of the Carson J. Spencer Foundation, mental health advocate, and survivor of her brother’s suicide, have gone on to author more than a dozen articles and spearhead just as many presentations throughout the construction industry. Their most recent work Construction + Suicide Prevention addresses why prevention is imperative in the construction industry and provides 10 action steps companies can take to save lives.

Stuart Binstock, CFMA president & CEO, further details, “CFMA is dedicating resources toward suicide prevention for one reason: If one accepts the premise that our members are responsible for the financial resources of a company and that the health and safety of human capital is an important financial resource, then how could we not get involved in educating the construction industry about this topic?”

The First Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention Association Member

CFMA formed the Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention to gather and disseminate information and resources, share education and programming for CFMA’s 94 chapters across North America, and promote initiatives to support suicide prevention. Most recently, the National Association of Surety Bond Producers (NASBP) has shown its support of creating a zero suicide industry by becoming the first association member of the Alliance.

NASBP CEO Mark McCallum affirms, “The conversation around suicide prevention in the construction industry has taken a leap forward with the formation of CFMA’s Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention. On behalf of our membership of surety bond producers and allied professionals, I’m proud of NASBP’s decision to commit to this cause, as demonstrated by joining the Alliance and supporting and participating in efforts to raise awareness of this critical issue. The health of the construction industry workforce is important to the well-being and competitiveness of this country, and suicide prevention among construction workers now is being made a focal point.”