Boral Finalizes Acquisition of Headwaters Inc.

Boral Limited announced that it has completed its acquisition of Headwaters Inc., a building products manufacturer and fly ash marketer in North America. The closing of the transaction follows approval by Headwaters’ shareholders and receipt of all required regulatory approvals.

With the closing of the acquisition, effective May 8 in the United States, Headwaters becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of Boral Limited and no longer a publicly traded company. Boral’s CEO and managing director, Mike Kane, said the acquisition was a transformative step for Boral, its employees, customers and for shareholders, positioning the Group to deliver more sustainable growth through the market cycles.

“To ensure that we seamlessly realize the benefits of this strategic acquisition for all of our stakeholders, teams from Boral and Headwaters are coming together to implement integration plans that leverage the talents and expertise of both companies,” said Kane.

“I would like to recognize the hard work undertaken over the past year or so by so many people from both Boral and Headwaters and our advisers. Reaching this significant milestone demonstrates the commitment and belief we all have in this value-creating merger of two great businesses.  We are ready and well-positioned to deliver on our promises.”

Boral USA and Headwaters combined will form a new division to be named Boral North America — a $1.8 billion revenue business — which will be headquartered in Atlanta, the location of Boral’s current US headquarters. Boral Limited is an international building and construction materials group headquartered in Sydney, Australia.

Concrete Tile Roofing Protects Canadian Hotel from the Elements

The Moose Hotel & Suites is located in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The resort sits at an elevation of 4,600 to 5,300 feet in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, about 80 miles west of Calgary.

The Moose Hotel & Suites is located in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The resort sits at an elevation of 4,600 to 5,300 feet in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, about 80 miles west of Calgary.

Banff, Alberta, Canada, sits at an elevation of 4,600 to 5,300 feet in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, about 80 miles west of Calgary. The small community (around 8,000 permanent residents) was established as a resort town almost immediately after its hot springs were discovered by Canadian Pacific Railway workers in 1883. The town, which is built in a valley surrounded by mountains, has been a popular tourist destination for more than a century and is known for skiing and, of course, the Banff Upper Hot Springs.

Because of its history of tourism, Banff offers comfortable lodging at every price point. Among the town’s options for accommodations are nine hotels owned and operated by Banff Lodging Co.; the company also has seven restaurants, two spas, and a ski school and rental shop. The Moose Hotel & Suites is the lodging company’s newest four-star property, having opened in July 2016.

Because Banff is a national park, the Moose Hotel & Suites project is significant because it is one of the largest hotel developments (174 rooms) since the Canadian federal government’s 1998 commercial growth cap, which has prevented many hospitality developments from being built. Despite being approved, the Moose Hotel & Suites still was required to adhere to Banff’s design guidelines. The guidelines state they were enacted “to prevent any monstrosities being put there to destroy the general beauty of the park.”

In fact, the guidelines require that all developments, particularly hotels, enhance views to the mountains surrounding Banff. “They want visitors to realize they’re really in the mountains and not just anywhere in a hotel room,” explains Ted Darch, owner of Calgary-based E.J. Darch Architect Ltd., the architect on the Moose Hotel & Suites project. “We wanted to take advantage of the views, so designing the hotel to resemble a village with a courtyard in the middle allowed us to capture the drama of the mountains. You’ll see the reviews on TripAdvisor mention this.”

Darch has been working on Banff Lodging’s projects since the mid-1980s. The concept for the Moose Hotel & Suites evolved over a number of years as Banff Lodging acquired the property for the hotel and Darch worked on other projects for the company. Similarly, Banff Lodging chose the Moose Hotel & Suites’ roofing contractor because of a long-standing relationship.

“We’ve done work with Banff Lodging for about 10 years on most all its other facilities,” explains Brock Hanson, president and CEO of Banff-based Rocky Mountain Sundeck & Roof. “This was a pinnacle Banff job that doesn’t occur often due to the building guidelines. Having this project in our backyard was just fantastic to be a part of.”

Constructed to Withstand the Elements

The new hotel had to meet Banff’s strict design guidelines. It also had to withstand the subarctic climate (winters as cold as -40 F and short and cool summers, as well as 15 to 40 inches of precipitation, typically snow, per year). The Moose Hotel & Suites features spray foam at R-20 in the walls and R-40 in the roof. The spray-foam insulation not only keeps guests and staff warm during Banff ’s long winters, but also protects the building against air and moisture infiltration.

The Moose Hotel & Suites was required to adhere to Banff’s design guidelines, which were developed “to prevent any monstrosities being put there to destroy the general beauty of the park.”

The Moose Hotel & Suites was required to adhere to Banff’s design guidelines, which were developed “to prevent any monstrosities being put there to destroy the general beauty of the park.”


Darch had specified concrete tile roofing on a Banff Lodging hotel previously, but Hanson recommended a new supplier with whom he had previously worked. Darch met with a salesperson from the roofing manufacturer to discuss its concrete tile product. After he checked some samples, Darch was convinced this was the right product for the project.

The distinctive concrete tile was chosen for its energy efficiency and durability. It resembles natural slate to complement the design of the rustic mountain lodge. Because it is concrete, the tile is able to withstand the subarctic region’s extreme weather and withstands flying embers in case of forest fires. “We learned a big lesson about fire recently in Fort McMurray, north of Edmonton, Alberta,” Darch notes. “They had a terrible fire last summer that destroyed something like 2,000 houses. They’re in the forest and Banff is in the forest, so fire resistance was important.”

Concrete Tile Roofing

The tiles’ aesthetic also appealed to Darch; he especially liked that he was able to choose a bright red (Mission Red) for the roof. “From the architectural perspective, what is really nice is the color possibilities and to make the roof color part of the overall scheme of things is great,” he says. “Other roofing options were nice but they didn’t have the snap that the red tile does.”

Photos courtesy of Boral Roofing.

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Technology Love-Hate

My husband is addicted to social media. Bart’s not posting; he’s just a voyeur, constantly ob- serving what others are doing and talking about. I don’t think he feels like he’s missing out on
anything. Instead, I think during quiet moments, Facebook and Snapchat help him fill the silence. Apparently, Bart is not the only one. We just celebrated the holidays with our families and, at one point on Christmas, I looked up and saw my father, my two brothers and my husband with their noses buried in their phones. Meanwhile, my two- and six-year-old nieces were squealing with glee over gifts they had opened. I couldn’t help but wonder whether the men in my family were enjoying their moment or someone else’s.

I know my family isn’t the only group of individuals addicted to social media, so this issue is packed full of selfie-worthy venues. If you’ve ever wanted to visit Banff, Alberta, Canada, the Moose Hotel & Suites, our “Cover Story” is Banff’s latest destination hotel. It was designed so visitors wouldn’t feel like they’re in any hotel room anywhere. Ted Darch, owner of Calgary, Alberta-based E.J. Darch Architect Ltd., designed the hotel to resemble a village with a courtyard in the middle. Visitors can experience the drama of the mountains surrounding Banff from nearly any vantage point within the hotel. (They’re already posting about it on TripAdvisor!) And when guests are outside, the hotel itself is photo-worthy with its bright red concrete tile roof. “Other roofing options were nice but they didn’t have the snap that the red tile does,” Darch said when he explained his choice to me. There are many more captivating hospitality and entertainment projects with beautiful, innovative roofs throughout the issue.

A colleague once told me he thought I was afraid of technology. Maybe that’s true when it comes to social media (I rarely personally Facebook or Tweet and all my Pinterest boards are “secret”), but I definitely embrace technology that makes life and work easier. In “On My Mind”, Brian Schaible, operations general manager at Indianapolis-based Hoosier Contractors LLC, explains new technology that provided a more efficient way for him to order materials for different jobs. His building materials supplier offered Schaible an online program that connects with the software he already was using. Learn about Schaible’s experience and then read our “Online Exclusive” that explains more about the program.

In every issue of Roofing, we provide interactive content. On page 8, we show you how to download a free app that will bring our magazine to life. In this issue, open the app with your smartphone or tablet over page 16 and watch the Washington, D.C.- based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association’s short video about roof algae. In our digital edition, the video will automatically play when you land on page 16. Our Roofing team is pretty proud of this capability. We’d love to hear what you think!

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure for the Florida region.

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure for the Florida region.

Boral Roofing introduces its Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections brochure. The brochure provides an overview of products designed for the Florida region, including color graphics of its premium and standard profiles and colors.

Boral Roofing has been serving the Florida market for over 30 years. By focusing on innovations in manufacturing, Boral offers durability. The two Boral facilities in Florida provide pre-blended tile colors creating traditional, transitional, and contemporary looks for architectural styles.

Aesthetic value is not the only thing Boral offers. The company also offers an energy efficient roof system. The Boral Cool Roof System uses five components to reduce attic temperatures providing up to a 22% reduction in heating and cooling costs.

Boral Roofing Launches “Color Guide for Lightweight Concrete Roof Tile Collections”

Boral Roofing LLC has launched its “Color Guide for Lightweight Concrete Roof Tile Collections”.

Boral Roofing LLC has launched its “Color Guide for Lightweight Concrete Roof Tile Collections”.

Boral Roofing LLC has launched its “Color Guide for Lightweight Concrete Roof Tile Collections”. The guide provides a “recipe book” for homeowners looking to remodel, including inspirational color harmonies for three dominant architectural styles—traditional, transitional and contemporary. The guide simplifies complex color decisions through three easy-to-use starting points: roof aesthetics, siding colors and architectural styles. For additional information, visit Boral Roofing’s website.

Clay and Concrete Roof Tiles Offered in More ‘Cool’ Colors

Boral Roofing LLC now offers a complete listing of 50 colors on ENERGY STAR and 150 tile colors on the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Boral Roofing LLC now offers a complete listing of 50 colors on ENERGY STAR and 150 tile colors on the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Boral Roofing LLC now offers a complete listing of 50 colors on ENERGY STAR and 150 tile colors on the Cool Roof Rating Council. Boral Roofing Cool Roof Colors are available across multiple profiles to complement a spectrum of architectural styles. According to CRRC, Boral Roofing Clay and Concrete Cool Roof Tiles reflect up to 75 percent of the sun’s solar energy. Boral Roofing Cool Roof Colors are covered under an exclusive and limited product warranty, offering peace-of-mind to homeowners in a long roof lifespan.

Concrete Roof Tiles Are Available in Six Color Blends Inspired by the Southwest

Boral Roofing launched its Gemstone Collection derived from earthy southwestern hues in six unique concrete roof tile blends.

Boral Roofing launched its Gemstone Collection derived from earthy southwestern hues in six unique concrete roof tile blends.

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of sustainable clay and concrete roof tile systems, launched its Gemstone Collection. Boral Roofing is introducing these pallets derived from earthy southwestern hues in six unique concrete roof tile blends. The Gemstone Collection is now available for sale in California.

Designed with subtle shifts of rich color that converge into elegant configurations, these sophisticated blends incorporate hues originating from, and inspired by, the Southwest. All of the Gemstone Collection selections share the same benefits as the full Boral Roofing concrete tile solutions product line, including durability, protection from inclement weather and energy efficiency.

The collection includes six new blends: Sea Pearl, Garnet, Smokey Topaz, Bronze Pearl, Ocean Jasper and Sahara Quartz Blend. All Gemstone colors meet the new California Title 24 compliance requirements and are listed by the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Sea Pearl Blend emulates the iridescence of pearls with a subtle balance of hues. Warm, gray tones shimmer with lustrous patina, reflecting sophistication and grace. Garnet Blend, an amalgam of deep, earthy reds is reminiscent of the majestic sandstone structures that Sedona, Arizona is famous for. Rustic and awe-inspiring, Garnet Blend conveys a sense of enduring strength and ancient grandeur. Smokey Topaz Blend mixes calming shades of honey and brown to evoke a sense of security and tranquillity. Bronze Pearl Blend emulates the rich, shimmery patina that forms naturally on the surface of bronze and embodies the uniquely rich color qualities of the metal itself. Ocean Jasper Blend was created to emulate a rare and beautiful rock found only on the coast of Madagascar. The multiple colors unite into a single vivacious platform that attracts the eye. Sahara Quartz Blend evokes the ethereal beauty of the desert at sunrise.

With the Gemstone theme, Boral Roofing adds the Saxony 900 Country Slate profile. This sleek design features unique bevelled edges precisely defining each roof tile for a staggered appearance. Other profiles featured with the color collection are the Spanish Barcelona “S” tile, the Mediterranean Villa 900 and the rustic Saxony 900 Shake to complement any architectural style.

Boral Roofing’s Design Center Showcases Sustainable Concrete and Clay Roofing Systems

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of sustainable clay and concrete roof tile solutions, opened its Design Center in Phoenix, Ariz. A facility for the showcase of Boral Roofing’s durable, earth-friendly roof tile product line, the Design Center will also facilitate American Institute of Architects (AIA) CEU courses and product training learning sessions for professionals in the building industry.

Boral Roofing’s Design Center offers visitors the opportunity to explore and learn about the company’s sustainable roof tile products. The facility showcases a range of options, including concrete and clay solutions across a range of profiles and colors, offering a range of options to complement any architectural style along with superb curb appeal. Boral Roofing’s tile systems are recognized for their durability, low maintenance, and long-life benefits, as well as their earth-friendly qualities including natural geologic materials content, green manufacturing processes, recyclability and energy efficiency.

The Design Center will also offer AIA CEU courses for the continuing education of industry professionals such as builders, architects and contractors. One course—“Sustainable Green Building with Clay and Concrete Roof Tile”—will be offered regularly at the Design Center. Participants will earn credit in the “Sustainable Design” and the “Health, Safety and Human Welfare” categories, while learning about clay and concrete roof tile solutions.

The Benefits of Above-sheathing Ventilation

We know proper ventilation of the attic space is an important part of construction. But what is “above-sheathing ventilation”?

Most roofing materials lay directly on the sheathing. Heat from solar radiation and interior heat loss from the conditioned space are easily transferred through the deck and roof system. This can increase energy costs and cause ice damming. The build-up of heat and extreme temperatures wings can also reduce the life of underlayment and other system components.

Tile roofs have an air space between installed roof tiles and the roof sheathing. This space reduces heat transfer and allows heat buildup to dissipate from the sheathing and roofing materials. This above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV, inherent to tile roof installations can be enhanced using counter battens, shims or manufactured systems to raise the horizontal battens above the roof deck. The system design will vary with the environmental challenge and goals. Specific examples are described below.

The Elevated Batten System by Boral Roofing uses treated 1 by 2s with high-grade plastic pads, a vented eave riser flashing and vented weather blocking at the ridge. With these components in place, heat transfer is minimized and heat buildup is dissipated, which reduces energy costs.

The Elevated Batten System by Boral Roofing uses treated 1 by 2s with high-grade plastic pads, a vented eave riser flashing and vented weather blocking at the ridge. With these components in place, heat transfer is minimized and heat buildup is dissipated, which reduces energy costs.

Energy Conservation in Hot Climates

In hot and dry climates, the natural ASV and thermal mass of the tile provide a layer of insulation when exterior daytime temperatures are greater than the conditioned space in the home. Vertical counter battens or shims that raise the horizontal battens increase this space and the corresponding benefit. The addition of vented eave riser flashing and ridge ventilation completes an energy-saving ASV system. The system shown below is the Elevated Batten System made by Boral Roofing, which uses treated 1 by 2s with high-grade plastic pads, a vented eave riser flashing and vented weather blocking at the ridge. With these components in place, heat transfer is minimized and heat buildup is dissipated, which reduces energy costs. The upgraded ASV reduces temperature extremes that shorten the life of the underlayment and other roofing components. These benefits are achieved with no mechanical or moving parts.

Cool and Humid Climates

The same installation can provide a different benefit in cool and humid regions. The Tile Roofing Institute and Western States Roofing Contractors Association’s Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual for Moderate Climate Regions says that in areas designated “Cool/Humid” zones, “Batten systems that provide drainage/air-flow (shims, counter battens or other approved systems) are required.” The area designated “Cool/Humid” in the current manual runs from approximately Eureka, Calif., to the Pacific Northwest, west of the Cascade Mountains. In this climate, moisture-laden air can migrate under the tile and condense in the space between the tile and roof deck. The underlayment is there to protect the sheathing but if the battens are raised above the deck, condensation will be reduced. Raised battens also allow moisture under the tile to escape to the eave. When roof tiles are fastened to a raised batten, underlayment penetrations are minimized.

Cold and Snowy Regions

Ice dams are one of the most damaging phenomena roofing contractors face. Snow movement on roof surfaces can cause damage to people and property. The goal in cold and snowy environments is to prevent ice dams by enhancing the ASV under the tile roof. Typically, a more substantial air space is created using larger vertical battens. A well-designed “cold roof” system that includes proper snow retention is the solution.

The TRI/WSRCA Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual for Moderate Climate Regions refers installers to the TRI/WSRCA Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Design Criteria Installation Manual for Cold and Snow. Regions “in locations where the January mean temperature is 25 deg. F or less or where ice damming often occurs”.

For more information and to download the Tile Roofing Institute’s installation manuals, visit the Tile Roofing Institute at TileRoofing.org.

ILLUSTRATION: Boral Roofing

Clay Tile Roofing Protects a Subdivision’s Clubhouse from the Hot Phoenix Sun while Providing an Old World Look

Located in the Sonoran Desert southeast of Phoenix, the Encanterra Country Club subdivision offers upscale living in houses built by Walnut, Calif.-based Shea Homes and surrounding an 18-hole golf course designed by Tom Lehman. The centerpiece of this vibrant community, however, is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

Designed to keep the community’s members active and entertained, La Casa, The Club at Encanterra contains four restaurants, a full-service spa, fitness center and three swimming pools. The club features Mediterranean-style architecture to essentially be an extension of the attractive homes in the subdivision.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings; custom-fabricated ornamental details; and a spray-foam system on the low-slope roof areas. Only a roofing contractor with the experience and capabilities to do all facets would suffice.

Phoenix-based Century Roofing Inc., which has been in business since 1991, has a long history of commercial and custom residential projects. With crews experienced in installing all types of tile, as well as its own metal fabrication shop, the contracting company was chosen to roof the club as it was being built.

Hustling for the Job

Steve Schwoerer, president of Century Roofing, knows what it takes to hustle and land large jobs, like La Casa, the Club at Encanterra. Knowing the project was going to be a landmark building in the valley attracted him to it. “We got it off the permit list, pursued it, bid on it and landed it, although not quite so cut and dry,” he says. “We have a lot of custom-home
experience and in Phoenix that means clay tile roof experience, so it fit in perfectly with our abilities.”

Originally, the club’s designer specified a different type of clay tile than what was actually installed on the roof. However, Schwoerer invited Irvine, Calif.-based Boral Roofing to come up with a color match and submit a quote for its tile to be installed on the project. “Boral had their plant manager fly into Phoenix to look at the roofing on the existing guard house that Shea Homes was trying to match,” Schwoerer recalls. “Boral then formulated a custom-blended tile and shipped the tile to Phoenix so a mock-up could be done for the architect’s approval, which they received.”

In addition to its curb appeal, the tile offered other benefits. Manufactured from naturally occurring geologic material (59 percent of which is recycled content), Boral clay tiles have received Cradle to Cradle Gold certification from the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, San Francisco. The certification program assesses products in five categories: material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship and social fairness. The tile product is wind, hail and fire resistant, as well as considered a cool roof, meaning it reflects heat from the sun, which reduces the need for air conditioning and provides savings on energy bills.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

Working in Phases

The roofing work was completed in phases as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra was being built. “Anytime you do a project of this size, the general contractor has scheduling demands that add to the difficulty, especially when you’re working in stages and
they want you out there as it’s being built rather than all at once,” Schwoerer states. “Their version of what’s roof-ready versus what’s actually roof-ready is one of many things that causes a roofing contractor stress!”

Century Roofing’s five-man crew began by installing the spray-foam roof on the low-slope portions of the building, which compose 130 squares of the total roof area. Although spray-foam roofs in Arizona typically are 1-inch thick, the club’s roof is 2-inches thick to achieve additional R-value. The foam was sprayed directly onto the wood deck and two base coats were applied before the final topcoat, which features a #9 crushed marble cast into the wet topcoat by hand.

PHOTOS: US TILE BY BORAL

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