The Benefits of Above-sheathing Ventilation

We know proper ventilation of the attic space is an important part of construction. But what is “above-sheathing ventilation”?

Most roofing materials lay directly on the sheathing. Heat from solar radiation and interior heat loss from the conditioned space are easily transferred through the deck and roof system. This can increase energy costs and cause ice damming. The build-up of heat and extreme temperatures wings can also reduce the life of underlayment and other system components.

Tile roofs have an air space between installed roof tiles and the roof sheathing. This space reduces heat transfer and allows heat buildup to dissipate from the sheathing and roofing materials. This above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV, inherent to tile roof installations can be enhanced using counter battens, shims or manufactured systems to raise the horizontal battens above the roof deck. The system design will vary with the environmental challenge and goals. Specific examples are described below.

The Elevated Batten System by Boral Roofing uses treated 1 by 2s with high-grade plastic pads, a vented eave riser flashing and vented weather blocking at the ridge. With these components in place, heat transfer is minimized and heat buildup is dissipated, which reduces energy costs.

The Elevated Batten System by Boral Roofing uses treated 1 by 2s with high-grade plastic pads, a vented eave riser flashing and vented weather blocking at the ridge. With these components in place, heat transfer is minimized and heat buildup is dissipated, which reduces energy costs.

Energy Conservation in Hot Climates

In hot and dry climates, the natural ASV and thermal mass of the tile provide a layer of insulation when exterior daytime temperatures are greater than the conditioned space in the home. Vertical counter battens or shims that raise the horizontal battens increase this space and the corresponding benefit. The addition of vented eave riser flashing and ridge ventilation completes an energy-saving ASV system. The system shown below is the Elevated Batten System made by Boral Roofing, which uses treated 1 by 2s with high-grade plastic pads, a vented eave riser flashing and vented weather blocking at the ridge. With these components in place, heat transfer is minimized and heat buildup is dissipated, which reduces energy costs. The upgraded ASV reduces temperature extremes that shorten the life of the underlayment and other roofing components. These benefits are achieved with no mechanical or moving parts.

Cool and Humid Climates

The same installation can provide a different benefit in cool and humid regions. The Tile Roofing Institute and Western States Roofing Contractors Association’s Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual for Moderate Climate Regions says that in areas designated “Cool/Humid” zones, “Batten systems that provide drainage/air-flow (shims, counter battens or other approved systems) are required.” The area designated “Cool/Humid” in the current manual runs from approximately Eureka, Calif., to the Pacific Northwest, west of the Cascade Mountains. In this climate, moisture-laden air can migrate under the tile and condense in the space between the tile and roof deck. The underlayment is there to protect the sheathing but if the battens are raised above the deck, condensation will be reduced. Raised battens also allow moisture under the tile to escape to the eave. When roof tiles are fastened to a raised batten, underlayment penetrations are minimized.

Cold and Snowy Regions

Ice dams are one of the most damaging phenomena roofing contractors face. Snow movement on roof surfaces can cause damage to people and property. The goal in cold and snowy environments is to prevent ice dams by enhancing the ASV under the tile roof. Typically, a more substantial air space is created using larger vertical battens. A well-designed “cold roof” system that includes proper snow retention is the solution.

The TRI/WSRCA Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual for Moderate Climate Regions refers installers to the TRI/WSRCA Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Design Criteria Installation Manual for Cold and Snow. Regions “in locations where the January mean temperature is 25 deg. F or less or where ice damming often occurs”.

For more information and to download the Tile Roofing Institute’s installation manuals, visit the Tile Roofing Institute at TileRoofing.org.

ILLUSTRATION: Boral Roofing

Clay Tile Roofing Protects a Subdivision’s Clubhouse from the Hot Phoenix Sun while Providing an Old World Look

Located in the Sonoran Desert southeast of Phoenix, the Encanterra Country Club subdivision offers upscale living in houses built by Walnut, Calif.-based Shea Homes and surrounding an 18-hole golf course designed by Tom Lehman. The centerpiece of this vibrant community, however, is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

Designed to keep the community’s members active and entertained, La Casa, The Club at Encanterra contains four restaurants, a full-service spa, fitness center and three swimming pools. The club features Mediterranean-style architecture to essentially be an extension of the attractive homes in the subdivision.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings; custom-fabricated ornamental details; and a spray-foam system on the low-slope roof areas. Only a roofing contractor with the experience and capabilities to do all facets would suffice.

Phoenix-based Century Roofing Inc., which has been in business since 1991, has a long history of commercial and custom residential projects. With crews experienced in installing all types of tile, as well as its own metal fabrication shop, the contracting company was chosen to roof the club as it was being built.

Hustling for the Job

Steve Schwoerer, president of Century Roofing, knows what it takes to hustle and land large jobs, like La Casa, the Club at Encanterra. Knowing the project was going to be a landmark building in the valley attracted him to it. “We got it off the permit list, pursued it, bid on it and landed it, although not quite so cut and dry,” he says. “We have a lot of custom-home
experience and in Phoenix that means clay tile roof experience, so it fit in perfectly with our abilities.”

Originally, the club’s designer specified a different type of clay tile than what was actually installed on the roof. However, Schwoerer invited Irvine, Calif.-based Boral Roofing to come up with a color match and submit a quote for its tile to be installed on the project. “Boral had their plant manager fly into Phoenix to look at the roofing on the existing guard house that Shea Homes was trying to match,” Schwoerer recalls. “Boral then formulated a custom-blended tile and shipped the tile to Phoenix so a mock-up could be done for the architect’s approval, which they received.”

In addition to its curb appeal, the tile offered other benefits. Manufactured from naturally occurring geologic material (59 percent of which is recycled content), Boral clay tiles have received Cradle to Cradle Gold certification from the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, San Francisco. The certification program assesses products in five categories: material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship and social fairness. The tile product is wind, hail and fire resistant, as well as considered a cool roof, meaning it reflects heat from the sun, which reduces the need for air conditioning and provides savings on energy bills.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

Working in Phases

The roofing work was completed in phases as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra was being built. “Anytime you do a project of this size, the general contractor has scheduling demands that add to the difficulty, especially when you’re working in stages and
they want you out there as it’s being built rather than all at once,” Schwoerer states. “Their version of what’s roof-ready versus what’s actually roof-ready is one of many things that causes a roofing contractor stress!”

Century Roofing’s five-man crew began by installing the spray-foam roof on the low-slope portions of the building, which compose 130 squares of the total roof area. Although spray-foam roofs in Arizona typically are 1-inch thick, the club’s roof is 2-inches thick to achieve additional R-value. The foam was sprayed directly onto the wood deck and two base coats were applied before the final topcoat, which features a #9 crushed marble cast into the wet topcoat by hand.

PHOTOS: US TILE BY BORAL

Pages: 1 2

Boral Roofing Supports Charitable Organizations

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of clay and concrete roof tile, is proud to support three charitable organizations in the expansion of the William Fry Drop-in Center, which serves homeless and at-risk youth in Southern Nevada. Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth (NPHY), HomeAid Southern Nevada (HASN) and Nevada Women’s Philanthropy (NWP) have joined forces to complete a 2,600-square-foot facility expansion that broke ground Aug. 13. Boral Roofing has donated concrete roof tile for the facility through the company’s participation in HomeAid Southern Nevada, whose mission is to help build new lives for Southern Nevada’s homeless through housing and community outreach.

The expansion of the William Fry Drop-in Center, which served 5,000 cases in 2013, will increase the Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth’s capacity for annual visits by 40%. The organization seeks to eliminate homelessness among Nevada’s youth population and to provide those it serves with opportunities for a quality future. NPHY is the only youth service provider in the state with a continuum of care extending from street outreach and 24-hour crisis intervention services to a full-time drop-in center and independent living program.

“Boral Roofing is proud to participate in such an important community project with HomeAid Southern Nevada,” said Stephenie Ireland, Boral Roofing’s Nevada Area Sales Manager and Board Member of HomeAid Southern Nevada. “The Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth provides a vital service for the betterment of this community and deserves the support of the building industry.”

The tile donated to the project is Saxony Split Shake tile, which recreates the aesthetic of hand-hewn shakes whose benefits include superb performance and durability, low maintenance, energy efficiency and fire resistance. Cooper Roofing & Solar, a HomeAid Southern Nevada building partner, will complete the roof tile installation. Construction of the facility expansion is anticipated to be complete in October.

“We have had the great fortune to have Boral Roofing not only as a national HomeAid America sponsor, but as a generous, active member of our local Board of Directors,” said Caitlin Shea, executive director of HomeAid Southern Nevada. “We are so grateful for the Boral Roofing donation to this project. Because of this generosity and support, we are able to help Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth double their facility space and help 40% more homeless and at-risk youth in our community.”

The 2,600-square-foot expansion brings the facility to a total of 4,000 square feet and includes the conversion of the facility’s existing administrative offices into youth service areas and a new kitchen, designed not only to serve the daily nutritional needs of the youth, but also allowing room for group learning lessons. The expansion will more than double the size of the existing center, and will also include a computer lab and staff office space, basketball court, gym, art and music rooms, and additional private areas for in-taking clients and tutoring.

Class 4 Hail-rated Tiles Expand to Texas

Boral Roofing's Barcelona Impact concrete roof tile

Boral Roofing’s Barcelona Impact concrete roof tile

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of clay and concrete roof tile, is expanding its line of Class 4 hail rated tiles with the introduction of the high-profile Barcelona Impact concrete roof tile in the Texas market.

Barcelona Impact is a hail-resistant concrete tile that passed severe impact resistance testing in accordance with the FM 4473 standard. The tile is proven to withstand sequential 2-inch ice ball impacts at speeds up to 70 mph, fired from within five feet. Barcelona Impact roof tile is certified through the Roof Covering Impact Certification Program sponsored by Architectural Testing.

The addition of high barrel Barcelona Impact provides a complete Class 4 hail rated roof tile offering to the Texas market to complement our flat profile Country Slate Impact Class 4 product. Boral Roofing has been serving the great state of Texas with American-made tile products since 1974, and the expansion of the Class 4 hail rated tile offering further shows this long-standing commitment to the market.

With this performance certification and recognition, Texas homeowners can have even greater peace of mind in their homes and may obtain potential insurance cost savings by selecting a participating insurance company and requesting that their roofing contractor verify that Boral Roofing¹s Class 4 concrete tile was installed. All Boral Roofing tile is covered by a Limited Lifetime, Fully Transferable, Non-Prorated Concrete Product Warranty.

A specialized color portfolio of the new high barrel Barcelona Impact Class 4 tile is based on extensive market feedback from Texas customers. The new colors include a range of beautiful earth tone blends with Buckskin, Charcoal Brown Blend, Lexington Blend and Salerno Clay Blend.

Tile Roofing’s Cool Colors Meet California’s Title 24

Boral Roofing LLC is launching more than 30 new cool colors in California

Boral Roofing LLC is launching more than 30 new cool colors in California.

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of clay and concrete roof tile, is launching more than 30 new cool colors in California, ideal for new construction and reroof applications. Boral Roofing is partnering with leading designers and colorists to introduce trending exterior color palettes.

Boral Roofing’s cool color range is available at no added cost to the consumer. Consumers can choose from a range of colors at a standard price. Boral Roofing leads the nation with the largest Cool Roof Rating Council tile listing and offers choice ENERGY STAR-rated colors.

With the inherent beauty and energy benefits of concrete tile, cool roof colors do not have to be white. Boral Roofing offers a vibrant selection of earth tones, terra cottas and cool greys that meet or exceed cool roof standards. These beautiful cool colors are available in a wide range of styles and textures to fit any architectural design.

Boral Roofing has been continually expanding cool roof colors to fit new trends. Cool roofing is paramount in states such as California pursuing a net zero energy building code by 2020. California Title 24 building codes are requiring increased cool roof performance in select regions that take effect on July 1, 2014.

The California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards were established to reduce California’s energy consumption. Cool roofs are highly reflective, highly emissive roofing materials that stay cooler than a normal roof under a hot summer sun, offering homeowners considerable energy cost savings.