MBMA Releases Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released its new Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems, a resource intended for use by individuals who are responsible for contracting, performing, and reporting the inspection tasks related to the construction of a metal building project.
 
This guide is available for online purchase, in print or PDF format, at www.techstreet.com/mbma. The audience consists of general contractors and erectors, design professionals, building officials, owner’s representatives, and others who are involved in project delivery.
 
Input for the guide was provided by MBMA members as well as representatives from the Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association. The result is a publication designed to help eliminate misunderstandings and lead to shorter punch lists, efficient project delivery, and quality construction of metal buildings.
 
Depending on the project and jurisdiction, building code and contractually required inspections may be necessary, as well as other inspections such as owner acceptance and insurance evaluations. The scope of the guide focuses on inspecting newly constructed metal building systems, including primary framing, secondary framing, and metal roof and wall cladding. It also overviews standards on materials common to the building envelope, such as windows, doors, skylights, and insulation materials. 
 
Dustin Cole, PE, serves on MBMA’s Technical Committee and chaired the task group that developed the MBMA handbook. He presented information on this publication at the 2016 METALCON convention. He discussed the different qualities of metal buildings, focusing on the function of components that comprise metal building systems and inspection requirements found in the building code.
 
“As metal building projects and building codes continue to grow more complex, inspection becomes more necessary and expected. Knowing what is required and what to look for when performing an inspection helps reduce delays and decreases costs,” says Dan Walker, PE, associate general manager of MBMA. “The Metal Building Manufacturer Association’s Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems will benefit anyone who is responsible for evaluating new or existing metal building construction.”
 
The guide can be purchased at this website for $60 for non-members and $36 for MBMA members.

SPRI Bulletin Addresses Code Evaluations for Roofing Products

Waltham, Mass.-based SPRI’s latest informational Bulletin (No. 1-15) updates building code officials, specifiers, building owners and others on code evaluations and product approval requirements for roofing products. The bulletin centers on the requirements of the international codes as they relate to membrane roof covering systems. SPRI represents sheet membrane and component suppliers to the commercial roofing industry.

The bulletin is designed to update building code officials and members of the International Code Council (ICC) on the various ways roofing manufacturers can provide evidence of code compliance. The bulletin considers products that are referenced in the code, as well as new and innovative roofing products and assemblies. The SPRI Bulletin zeroes in on some practical options available to the building official or Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

In Bulletin No. 1-15, SPRI points out that Research Reports are not mandatory for single-ply roofing membranes that comply with standards referenced in the codes. Research Reports from approved sources are intended to assist in the approval of materials or assemblies not specifically provided for in the code. Therefore, the AHJ should not insist on a Research Report for a membrane roof system if the manufacturer has data available for the AHJ to review.

“Code officials are increasingly asking for a Research Report from single-ply roofing manufacturers to demonstrate code compliance,” says SPRI member Michael Beaton of Intertek, a global provider of product certification and performance-testing services. “While a research report should not be mandated since these products and systems are described in the code with specific requirements and referenced standards, a Research Report is an easy way for the manufacturer to provide the necessary information to the code official.

“SPRI’s ultimate goal in publishing Bulletin 1-15 is two-fold,” Beaton continues. “First, that code officials understand that a Research Report is a ‘convenience’ for single-ply roofing and should not be required if other relevant data is available. Second, that when the roofing manufacturer does choose to document compliance in a Research Report, code officials should be willing to accept a Research Report from an agency other than ICC Evaluation Service, provided the agency is accredited for this activity.”

SPRI Bulletin No. 1-15 is two-pages long and available for free viewing and download.

Determine Fastener and Clip Patterns to Meet Local Building Codes

Applicad's Zones Technology

Applicad’s Zones Technology

Roof Wizard now employs Zones Technology automatically for ordering extra clips and fasteners for panels and purlins on roofs in high-wind areas.

A 3-D roof model developed in just a few minutes in Roof Wizard shows operator defined zones for corners, edge and field where different fastener and clip patterns are required to be specified to meet your local building codes. Roof Wizard does this entirely automatically, ensuring that you get everything you need to fit your job the first time, every time.

Users also can model in 2-D, which is even easier and quicker, and report fully all 3-D areas and lengths and even apply labor and materials for a detailed client proposal

Model 3-D roof geometry from field data, blueprints or aerial images with NEW enhanced pitch measure tools for gables and hips from oblique images. Reduce roofing material waste costs and improve profitability of every job.

Roof Wizard also:

Provides professional client presentation of roof estimates in MS Word or Excel.
Automatically generates complete roofing material take-offs and labor cost data.
Reduces estimating costs with greater efficiency generating complete bids.
Fast and accurate quotation of all roofing materials and installation costs.

Energy Code: New Language for Roof Repair, Recover and Replacement

When existing roofs (that are part of the building’s thermal envelope) are removed and replaced and when the roof assembly includes above-deck insulation, the energy code now requires that the insulation levels comply with the requirements for new construction, according to a proposal approved by International Code Council at public comment hearings held in October 2013.

As a result of this proposal approval, the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) includes new language that provides unambiguous direction on how the energy code provisions apply to roof repair, roof recover and roof replacement.

Each year about 2.5 billion square feet of roof coverings are installed on existing buildings. The opportunity to upgrade the insulation levels on these roof systems occurs once every several decades when the roof is replaced or even longer when existing roofs are “recovered”. Until recently this requirement was prescribed using vague and confusing language.

“There has been a great deal of confusion given the various terms used to describe roofing projects on existing buildings in both the International Building Code and the International Energy Conservation Code, such as reroofing, roof repair, roof recover and roof replacement,” says Jared O. Blum, president, Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA).

Moving forward the IECC will use the same definitions found in the International Building code:

  • Reroofing. The process of recovering or replacing an existing roof covering. See “Roof recover” and “Roof replacement.”
  • Roof Recover. The process of installing an additional roof covering over a prepared existing roof covering without removing the existing roof covering.
  • Roof Replacement. The process of removing the existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering.
  • Roof Repair. Reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing roof for the purposes of its maintenance.

“A survey of building departments in many states and regions in the United States found that online roofing permit application forms rarely included any information on the energy code and required insulation levels,” Blum adds. “With the changes to the 2015 IECC, it will be easier for building departments to correlate the building- and energy-code requirements for roof replacements.”

The clarification to the 2015 IECC makes the code easier to interpret and enforce. Along the way, it will help ensure the opportunity to save energy when replacing roofs.

“Numerous studies have demonstrated the energy-savings provided by a well-insulated roofing system,” Blum says. “It is critical to minimize energy losses and upgrade insulation levels when roofs are replaced to comply with code requirements for new construction.”

Another benefit of this update is that the exemption for roof repair is now clearly defined, making it easier for building owners and roofing contractors to perform routine maintenance without triggering energy efficiency upgrades, which would add costs.