Fleet-tracking Software Analyzes Driver Behavior

Teletrac Navman has released Teletrac Navman DIRECTOR, fleet management software that intelligently tracks assets and collects data to meet a range of business needs and drive enhanced productivity for customers.

Teletrac Navman has released Teletrac Navman DIRECTOR, fleet management software that intelligently tracks assets and collects data to meet a range of business needs and drive enhanced productivity for customers.

Teletrac Navman has released Teletrac Navman DIRECTOR, fleet management software that intelligently tracks assets and collects data to meet a range of business needs and drive enhanced productivity for customers. Offering fuel-use tracking, messaging and routing, along with driver behavior analysis tools and concise reporting features, DIRECTOR helps businesses fine tune their strategies and reduce operating costs. Its signature safety module, called Safety Analytics, scores driver performance based on company priorities and replays unsafe driving events to aid driver training. DIRECTOR’s dashboards accumulate information to show trends that would otherwise go unseen, giving companies the insight they need to succeed.

WalletHub Small Business Study: Best and Worst Cities to Work

The personal finance social network WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of 2015’s Best & Worst Cities to Work for a Small Business.

In order to help job seekers consider small businesses as attractive employment prospects, WalletHub examined the small business environment within 100 of the largest U.S. metro areas across 11 key metrics. Our data set includes such metrics as net small business job growth, industry variety and earnings for small business employees.


    Best Metro Areas to Work for a Small Business      Worst Metro Areas to Work for a Small Business 
 
1
 
 
Charlotte, N.C.
 
 
91
 
 
Springfield, Mass.
 
 
2
 
 
Raleigh, N.C.
 
 
92
 
 
Tucson, Ariz.
 
 
3
 
 
Oklahoma City, Okla.
 
 
93
 
 
Augusta, Ga.
 
 
4
 
 
Austin, Texas
 
 
94
 
 
New Haven, Conn.
 
 
5
 
 
Omaha, Neb.
 
 
95
 
 
Bakersfield, Calif.
 
 
6
 
 
Nashville, Tenn.
 
 
96
 
 
Fresno, Calif.
 
 
7
 
 
Salt Lake City
 
 
97
 
 
Scranton, Penn.
 
 
8
 
 
Dallas
 
 
98
 
 
Toledo, Ohio
 
 
9
 
 
Houston
 
 
99
 
 
Stockton, Calif.
 
 
10
 
 
Boston
 
 
100
 
 
Youngstown, Ohio
 


Key stats:

  • The number of small businesses per 1,000 inhabitants is two times higher in the Miami metro area than in the Bakersfield, Calif., metro area.
  • The earnings for small business employees adjusted for cost of living are three times higher in the Houston metro area than in the Honolulu metro area.
  • The median annual income adjusted for cost of living is two times higher in the Ogden, Utah, metro area than in the McAllen, Texas, metro area.
  • The unemployment rate is four times higher in the Fresno, Calif., metro area than in the Provo, Utah, metro area.

By 2042, the Cape Coral, Fla., metro area is projected to experience the highest population increase, at 103.4 percent, and the Youngstown metro area the highest population decrease, at 11.1 percent.

Reinvention from Carolinas Roofing to Roofing

“As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to realize that all of life is reinvention. Sometimes past and future can share the same time period. New just shows up sometimes. In show business it’s easy to understand. You can’t keep coming back with the same show. Unless you get offstage you can’t make another entrance.”

Lorne Michaels, a writer best known for producing Saturday Night Live, wrote this in Vanity Fair’s October issue, which celebrated its 100th year of publishing. Michaels knows a little something about reinvention; for 38 years, SNL has consistently been among the highest-rated late-night television programs. His words jumped out at me not only because they so appropriately explain SNL’s and Vanity Fair’s long and successful histories, but also because they are fitting for this the final issue of Carolinas Roofing.

In 2014, Carolinas Roofing will be reinventing itself as a national publication—Roofing—to remain relevant to the marketplace. Since our first issue mailed in March 2010, we’ve been approached several times to bring this magazine to a broader audience. We’ve been asked to start other regional roofing publications. A couple years ago, we seriously thought about expanding and re-branding Carolinas Roofing as an East Coast roofing magazine. Each time we crunched the numbers and discussed the ideas thoroughly but realized they didn’t make sense. This past summer, we were approached again but, this time, the idea was to make the magazine a national publication. This proposal finally made sense for every aspect of our small business and met our ultimate goal of educating the roofing industry.

In addition to a new name and a broader circulation that will include roofing contractors, architects, roof consultants, building owners and facility managers, Roofing will offer more opportunities for us to keep in touch with you, the reader. We’ll be launching a dynamic website, www.roofingmagazine.com, in January that constantly will be updated with news and product information, as well as a monthly e-newsletter to keep you informed between issues of the magazine, which will continue to mail on a bimonthly schedule.

We plan to remain true to our regional roots by offering a “Regional Report” each issue that will examine climatic challenges related to roofing in various parts of the country, including the Carolinas. And we have lots of other innovative ideas to maintain your loyal readership. We hope you opt to continue receiving the magazine. Please fill out the subscription card for Roofing and scan and email it to Publisher Barrett Hahn at barrett@roofingmagazine.com or mail it to 4711 Hope Valley Road, Box 202, Durham, NC 27707. (Subscriptions will not be duplicated.)

All of us at Carolinas Roofing would like to thank you for the past four years. We credit your engagement with the magazine for its success and, ultimately, taking us to the next level. We hope to see you when the curtain opens for our second act.

Connect to and Motivate Your Staff

A friend of mine recently lost his job because of budget cuts. He was employed at a satellite office and not a single manager who made the decision about his livelihood took the time to commute to the satellite location to share the news. Instead, he was called to a conference room where human resources personnel laid him off via speakerphone. My friend was not surprised he was let go, nor was he surprised by how it was done, considering how disconnected he believes the “worker bees” at his former corporation are from management. He had been disgruntled by the lack of communication and management’s questionable decision-making for some time.

I can attest that managing people is arguably one of the most difficult jobs in any line of work. Being a leader requires a thick skin, excellent communication skills and the ability to make tough decisions, among other talents. However, at a time when budgets are tightened and everyone is doing less with more, becoming too consumed in your own tasks and disconnecting from employees is a fatal mistake. Now is the time to embrace your team, make them feel appreciated, motivate them to take on new roles, and identify and reward their strengths. Employees who feel disconnected from what is occurring within a business will feel unappreciated and will not perform at their best. In addition, without employee buy-in, it will be difficult to enforce new programs and procedures within a company.

In this issue, we feature articles about two safety programs you should seriously consider implementing within your roofing business not only to protect your employees, but also to protect your business as a whole. For example, “Business Sense,” addresses distracted driving. I think you’ll be surprised by the broad interpretation of the law in some of the court cases mentioned within the article: Your roofing business could be liable if a worker has an accident while using a mobile device in his personal vehicle or sightseeing on a business trip. According to the author, state and federal mobile-device laws are not enough; developing and enforcing a reasonable mobile-device safety program is a major step toward minimizing your business’ liability.

In “Safety,” Michael Rich explains the Washington, D.C.-based Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s priority to require all businesses to have a written Injury and Illness Prevention Program probably within the next two years. California employers already have been operating under this requirement since 1991, providing a model you can duplicate within your business before the requirement is mandated across the country.

Establishing these programs within your business offers a wonderful opportunity to connect to and motivate your staff. You can create teams of volunteers to explore and create policies. When the teams meet, buy them lunch. When your staff goes six months without a distracted driving incident or an injury, celebrate with awards or a party. Take the time to show your employees you appreciate their efforts not only to make your business safer, but also to successfully execute their daily tasks.

In addition, consider setting aside some time on a regular basis specifically to reconnect with the “worker bees”. Join a roofing crew for a week, or answer phones in the front office. Your efforts will establish a new level of trust with your employees and, ultimately, create a better workplace. Perhaps most importantly, your staff will feel as though operational changes, like the safety programs mentioned in this issue, are happening “with” them rather than “to” them.