MBMA Elects Board of Directors at Annual Meeting

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has elected the 2017 Board of Directors at its Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. The 2017 Board members are:
 
Brad Curtis, chairman, Tyler Building Systems
Bill Coleman, vice chairman, NCI Building Systems
Tom Gilligan, ex-officio, Butler Manufacturing
Steve Campbell, CBC Building Systems
Ron Fox, Nucor Building Systems
Chuck Haslebacher, Varco Pruden Buildings
Fred Koetting, Schulte Building Systems
Craig Oberg, CO Building Systems
Tim Kessel, Bay Insulation Co.
Kathleen Tell, Tell Manufacturing
 
“I am pleased to continue as chairman of the Metal Building Manufacturers Association,” says Brad Curtis of Tyler Building Systems, located in Tyler, Texas. “The new year will mark our 61st year in providing research, education and leadership to the metal building systems industry, an achievement realized through the dedication and accomplishments of our members.”
 
According to Dan Walker, associate general manager of MBMA, “2016 will be remembered as a productive year, filled with new initiatives and resources to enhance the reputation of metal buildings in the low-rise, non-residential commercial construction market. In 2017, MBMA will continue its efforts to further strengthen the industry.”
 
MBMA members contribute hours of service each year to help make metal building systems the choice for low-rise commercial buildings. MBMA’s established committees lead this effort and ensure quality and excellence in a variety of areas, including technical, energy, fire protection, safety and sustainability. MBMA is also a partner with the International Accreditation Service (IAS) on the industry’s AC472 quality assurance program.  

Incorporate Daylighting into Existing Buildings

The RetroLite daylighting system from Butler Manufacturing

The RetroLite daylighting system from Butler Manufacturing

Building owners can now incorporate daylighting into existing buildings to minimize lighting-related electricity costs, with the introduction of the RetroLite daylighting system from Butler Manufacturing.

Implementing daylighting technology can provide significant savings, as lighting-related electricity is often the highest operating expense in a building — frequently exceeding heating and cooling costs. In fact, a building equipped with a RetroLite daylighting system and lighting controls can reduce lighting-related electricity expenses by up to 70 percent.

The RetroLite daylighting system, specially designed to replace the Lite*Panl panel system, is available for retrofit applications to an MR-24 or CMR-24 roof system. Product benefits include the ability to:

    Add weathertight protection — Rigorous testing at the Butler® Research and Development Center proves the self-curbing RetroLite daylighting system is effective at preventing water penetration, an inherent risk for other curb-mounted daylighting systems.

    Harness the power of prismatics — The RetroLite daylighting system provides 100 percent diffused light without glares or hot spots, even in overcast conditions. Its unique acrylic dome design pulls in more light earlier and later in the day, with a visible light transmittance value of 0.68.

    Simplify installation — For simplified installation, the diverter of the RetroLite daylighting system can be tied into the splice of a Lite*Panl panel system. In addition, its curbless design reduces the number of fasteners required — which decreases the field labor needed for installation.

From Screw-down to Standing-seam Metal Roofing

Time to reroof an old screw-down metal roof? Are you thinking about upgrading to a new standing-seam roof? Great idea! Today’s new standing-seam roofs are truly state-of-the-art; available in many profiles and finishes; and, more importantly, address many of the issues encountered in older generation screw-down metal roofs.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

The screw-down metal roof and wall panel has been the backbone of the metal building industry since its inception and still represents a significant part of the total market. Screw-down panels are lightweight, durable, inexpensive and strong enough to span up to 5 feet between structural supports. Screw-down roofs and walls also have a wonderful physical property: The panels can and frequently are used as “diaphragm bracing,” securely holding the building’s roof purlins and wall girts in position, adding rigidity to the structure in much the same way drywall strengthens stud walls. This is a huge material—and labor—cost saver!

The early systems were not without problems, however; much of the technology we take for granted today did not exist in the early years of pre-engineered buildings. Many roofs during the late ’60s thru early ’80s were installed using 10-year life fasteners to secure a 30-plus-year life roof.

The fastener issue seems crazy today given the numerous inexpensive, long-life, weathertight, self-drilling screws available. Back when I started in the metal building industry, you could have the newly developed “self-drilling” cadmium fasteners or “self-tapping” stainless. Self-tapping meant you had to pre-drill a hole in the panel and purlin to install it—a much slower and more expensive process. Most of us used the less expensive but (unknown to us at the time) fairly short-life cadmium-coated fasteners and often never provided the option of a stainless upgrade to our customers.

Another shortcoming with screw-down roof panels is that, generally speaking, screw-down panels on metal buildings should be a maximum length of about 80 feet. Longer roof-panel runs frequently suffered rips or slots in the metal caused by expansion and contraction. Metal panels expand and contract at a rate of about 1 inch per 100 feet of panel run. This is normally absorbed by the back and forth rolling of the roof purlin and some panel bowing, but after 80 feet or so they can no longer absorb the movement resulting in trauma to the panels and trim. I have frequently seen this 80-foot limit exceeded.

a rusted fastener has caused the surrounding metal to corrode and fail.

A rusted fastener has caused the surrounding
metal to corrode and fail.

Standing-seam panels eliminate both of these shortcomings. The panels are attached to “sliding clips”. These clips are screwed to the purlins and seamed into the side laps of the panels securing them and thus the panels have very few, if any, exposed fasteners. The clips maintain a solid connection with the structure of the building while still allowing the panels, which can be 150 feet or longer, to move with expansion and contraction forces without damage.

This is great news for the building owner: You’re providing a more watertight roof, few if any penetrations, and expansion and contraction ability. It does come with a catch, however; standing-seam panels, because they move, do not provide diaphragm strength. The building’s roof purlins must have significantly more bridging and bracing to keep them in their correct and upright position. This is automatically taken care of in new building design but when it comes time to reroof an older building, removing the existing screw-down roof could remove the diaphragm bracing it once provided and make the building structurally unsound. Yes, that’s bad!

PHOTOS: ROOF HUGGER INC.

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