Choose Sustainable, Durable and Geographically Appropriate Roofs

Carlisle SynTec Systems has made available its RoofEd eBook for download through iTunes and Google Play.

Carlisle SynTec Systems has made available its RoofEd eBook for download through iTunes and Google Play.

Carlisle SynTec Systems has made available its RoofEd eBook for download through iTunes and Google Play. The first chapter of RoofEd focuses on EPDM roofing systems and their attributes. RoofEd contains videos, articles, case studies and photos, all of which are designed to give readers a deeper understanding of their commercial roofing system options. RoofEd can also be used as an on-the-road sales tool to help building owners choose the most sustainable, durable and geographically appropriate roof for their buildings.

After Years of Roof Leaks, a Laboratory That Produces Theatrical Equipment and Software Undergoes a Complex Reroofing

Founded in 1910, Rosco Laboratories is a multi-national producer of equipment, software and products for the theatrical, film, and television industries and architectural environment. As with every aging flat roofing system, water leakage was becoming a recurring problem at Rosco’s Stamford, Conn., facility. The severity of the leakage was further exacerbated by the lack of roof drainage (only two roof drains serviced the entire building) and poor deck slope conditions (less than 1/16 inch per foot).

The gypsum decking was cut out within the limits of the entire framing “bay” and infilled with galvanized metal decking. The longitudinal deck panel edge was seated atop the horizontal leg of the bulb-tee section (visible in the center of the photograph) and mechanically fastened using self-tapping screws. The ends were supported by the steel purlins. The underside of the decking was prepainted to match the ceiling finish. Supplemental structural support consisting of strips of 14-gauge galvanized sheet metal were attached to the bottom of each bulb-tee section contiguous to the repair to provide additional support for the adjacent gypsum roof decking segment.

The gypsum decking was cut out within the limits of the entire framing “bay” and infilled with galvanized metal decking. The longitudinal deck panel edge was seated atop the horizontal leg of the bulb-tee section (visible in the center of the photograph) and mechanically fastened using self-tapping screws. The ends were supported by the steel purlins. The underside of the decking was prepainted to match the ceiling finish. Supplemental structural support consisting of strips of 14-gauge galvanized sheet metal were attached to the bottom of each bulb-tee section contiguous to the repair to provide additional support for the adjacent gypsum roof decking segment.


Rosco representatives employed traditional methods to control and/or collect the moisture within the building by use of several water diverters. This technique was effective but Rosco representatives soon recognized this was not a viable long term solution as the physical integrity of the roof structure (deck) became a principal concern to the safety of the building occupants.

The Fisher Group LLC, an Oxford, Conn.-based building envelope consulting firm was retained by Rosco in March 2009 to survey the existing site conditions and determine the need for roofing replacement. The existing roofing construction, which consisted of a conventional two-ply, smooth-surfaced BUR with aluminized coating, exhibited numerous deficiencies (most notably severe alligatoring) and was deemed unserviceable. Construction documents, including drawings and specifications and a project phasing plan were developed by Fisher Group to address the planned roof replacement.

Bid proposals were solicited from prequalified contractors in June 2010, and F.J. Dahill Co. Inc., New Haven, Conn., was awarded the contract on the basis of lowest bid.

Existing Conditions

The building basically consists of a 1-story steel-framed structure constructed in the 1970s. It is a simple “box”-style configuration, which is conducive to manufacturing.

In conjunction with design services, destructive test cuts were made by Fisher Group in several roof sections as necessary to verify the existing roofing composition, insulation substrate, moisture entrapment, and substrate/deck construction. A total of four distinct “layers” of roofing were encountered at each test cut. The existing roofing construction consisted of alternating layers of smooth- and gravel-surfaced, multi-ply felt and bitumen built-up roofing. The bitumen contained throughout the construction was fortunately asphalt-based. Succeeding layers of roofing were spot mopped or fully mopped to the preceding layer (system). The combined weight of the roofing construction was estimated to be upwards of 20 to 22 pounds per square foot when considering the moisture content. This is excessive weight.

The roof insulation panels were set into ribbons of low-rise polyurethane foam insulation adhesive. The adhesive was applied in a continuous serpentine bead, spaced 6 inches on-center throughout the field of the roof.

The roof insulation panels were set into ribbons of low-rise polyurethane foam insulation adhesive. The adhesive was applied in a continuous serpentine bead, spaced 6 inches on-center throughout the field of the roof.


It is interesting to note that a minimal amount of roof insulation was present in the existing construction. Insulation was limited to a single layer of 1/2-inch-thick fiberboard. Additional insulation would need to be provided as part of the replacement roofing construction to increase the roof’s thermal performance and comply with the prescriptive requirements of the Connecticut State Energy Conservation Construction Code.

The structural substrate, or decking, is conventional in nature, comprised of poured gypsum roof decking. The roof decking incorporates 1/2-inch gypsum formboard loose laid between steel bulb-tee supports spaced about 32 inches on-center. The poured gypsum roof decking in this instance was utilized as the structural substrate and for insulating purposes. Poured gypsum roof decking has a minimal insulating value of perhaps R-2 to R-3, which is obviously considered to be minimal by present standards.

A representative number of bulk material samples were obtained by Fisher Group from the existing roofing construction as necessary to determine the material composition. The sampling included field membrane roofing plies, coatings and cements, and associated roof penetration and perimeter flashings. Laboratory analysis revealed that the second, third and, in some instances, fourth roofing “layers” (field membrane plies) contained varying amounts—5 to 10 percent—of asbestos (chrysotile) which would necessitate full abatement of the roofing construction.

PHOTOS: The Fisher Group LLC

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Project Profiles: Hospitality and Entertainment

Hilton Garden Inn, Cleveland

Team

General Contractor: HOBS Roofing, Canton, Ohio
Roofing Consultant: RS&M, St. Petersburg, Fla.

Because of the area’s harsh winter climate, the hotel’s reroofing project required a redundant roofing system that would be strong and durable. The SOPREMA system chosen is typically used in climates like this for that reason.

Because of the area’s harsh winter climate, the hotel’s reroofing project required a redundant roofing system that would be strong and durable. The SOPREMA system chosen is typically used in climates like this for that reason.

Roof Materials

Because of the area’s harsh winter climate, the hotel’s reroofing project required a redundant roofing system that would be strong and durable. The SOPREMA system chosen is typically used in climates like this for that reason.

Although the selection of this particular roofing system was easy, the installation presented a few challenges. The hotel’s roof includes a cell tower, containing a telecommunication terminal for all of Ohio. The installers had to be careful to avoid interference with the terminal when removing the original roof, as well as applying the new system. In addition, the mortar in some of the walls of the penthouse was deteriorating. The installation team had to flash in the ALSAN RS liquid system to keep water from penetrating and getting into the new roof system.

When the reroofing project began, installers first needed to remove the old coal-tar roof from the structural deck of the concrete building. Next, the deck was primed using Elastocol 500 and then a SOPRALENE 180 SP vapor barrier was heat-applied. This particular vapor barrier is commonly used in northern Ohio when reroofing.

Following the vapor barrier, the installation package was ready to be glued down using DUOTACK, SOPREMA’s low-rise foam adhesive. SOPRABOARD cover board was applied, followed by a layer of heat-applied SOPRALENE Flam 180 and then a heat-applied cap sheet of SOPRALENE Flam 180 FR GR. To finish the project, ALSAN RS 230, a PMMA two-part rapid-curing liquid flashing product, was applied over top in a custom color to match the roof to the aesthetic of the building.

Roof System Manufacturer: SOPREMA

Roof Report

Open since 2002, the Hilton Garden Inn stands 11-stories high and has 240 rooms. The hotel is within walking distance to Progressive Field and the CSU Wolstein Center, and is close to other downtown Cleveland entertainment and dining. The hotel features a business center, pool, fitness center and more. The reroofing project took place in summer 2014.

PHOTO: SOPREMA

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Combine Advantages of Single Ply with Aesthetics of Standing-seam Metal

Carlisle SynTec Systems' Sure-Flex PVC Contour Rib Profile

Carlisle SynTec Systems’ Sure-Flex PVC Contour Rib Profile

Carlisle SynTec Systems is pleased to introduce its new Sure-Flex PVC Contour Rib Profile. This innovative product combines the advantages of a single-ply system with the aesthetic appeal of a standing seam metal roof. To achieve this look, Carlisle’s PVC Contour Rib Profile is hot-air welded in a parallel pattern to the exposed surface of FleeceBACK KEE HP FRS or FleeceBACK PVC membrane.

Designed to cast a distinctive shadow that can be seen from the ground or surrounding areas, Carlisle’s PVC Contour Rib Profile provides enhanced aesthetics when compared to other PVC rib profiles. This product is extruded from the same weather-resistant PVC compound as Carlisle’s Sure-Flex PVC roofing membrane, ensuring comparable weathering characteristics and an excellent color match. Carlisle’s durable PVC Contour Rib Profile is dimensionally stabilized and strengthened by a 1/8-inch fiberglass reinforcing cord that runs the length of each section. During installation, the 10’ PVC Contour Rib Profile sections are joined together by a non-corroding, fiberglass pin, ensuring compatibility and continuity throughout the application.

Carlisle’s PVC Contour Rib Profile is available in white, gray, and tan colors and measures 10-feet long, 1¼-inch tall, and 2 1/8-inch wide (including the welding flanges). The vertical profile is a substantial 3/8-inch thick, and each section of PVC Contour Rib Profile has a 1/8-inch alignment hole. This product is packaged 20 pieces per carton, and each carton includes 25 connecting pins.

An Atlanta Neighborhood Receives Much-needed Health and Community Services All Under One Roof

Fulton County, Ga., administrators believe policy drives the conditions in which people live and work. When socio-economic conditions are poor and there are few public services, administrators believe the physical and mental health of community residents suffer. As such, in 2008, Fulton County’s Health and Human Services departments were charged with identifying opportunities to improve community health through programs and policies.

Adamsville Regional Health Center is a hybrid building that not only provides primary-care, dental and behavioral health clinics, but also offers child-care facilities, housing resources and access to the library system, as well as a workforce development center.

Adamsville Regional Health Center is a hybrid building that not only provides primary-care, dental and behavioral health clinics, but also offers child-care facilities, housing resources and access to the library system, as
well as a workforce development center.

As part of the resulting Common Ground initiative, county administrators now are providing services to underserved areas. Adamsville, a predominantly African-American neighborhood located on the southwest side of Atlanta, was identified as a community in need. Fulton County’s solution was construction of a hybrid building that not only provides primary-care, dental and behavioral health clinics, but also offers child-care facilities, housing resources and access to the library system, as well as a workforce development center. The space also has approximately 500 square feet available for future use. The county hoped the new building would not only provide assistance to residents but also entice additional businesses and housing development in the area.

Although the project was smaller—34,000 square feet—than most completed by the Atlanta offices of architectural firm Stanley Beaman & Sears and general contractor Whiting-Turner Contracting, the design-build team was attracted to the concept. “We thought it was a good story,” says David Deis, project manager with Stanley Beaman & Sears, a firm that specializes in healthcare design. “It’s kind of a community center that taps into all that Fulton County has to offer, and we were both intrigued by that.”

As the team got started, it quickly realized putting all the disparate parts and pieces together into one facility during the 275-day timeframe Fulton County required was going to be challenging. Teamwork and a roof that identifies this “beacon for the community” brought it all together on schedule and within budget.

ROOF AS METAPHOR

As the design-build team began laying out the building’s program requirements, team members realized something had to organize the many services the new Adamsville Regional Health Center would provide. Deis says the team devised an interior “street” visitors can walk down to access the individual departments. “Visitors can see where the dental clinic is, where the primary care and behavioral health are,” he says. “It’s almost like you’re walking down the mall or a street and you’re seeing all these services.”

The roof is like a “quilt”, bringing all the departments and services together in one space. It also is a predominant feature on the site.

The roof is like a “quilt”, bringing all the departments and services together in one space. It also is a predominant feature on the site.

The team immediately knew the roof would be important. Not only would it be like a “quilt” bringing all the departments and services together in one space, but it also would be a predominant feature on the site.

Built along Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, a state highway that leads into downtown Atlanta, the building would be seen by a lot of traffic. The site itself is street level next to Martin Luther King Jr. Drive but dramatically drops farther from the street. The design-build team opted to create a 2-story building in which the second story is level with the roadway. Parking and access to the first level were built in the back where the site plummets. The location of the building and the site’s topography dictated a roof that would capture the attention of passersby.

“Once we set the building and looked at it formally, we didn’t want people driving down the street and looking down onto a typical gable-type roof,” Deis says. “We knew the roof would be very dominant and we wanted to keep it clean and allow it to claim the corner at the intersection.”

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Carlisle SynTec Systems Achieves IRE Best New Product

Carlisle SynTec Systems’ Sure-Flex KEE HP PVC was honored with the Best New Product award at the 2014 International Roofing Expo Product Showcase. A panel of industry experts selected Carlisle’s KEE HP PVC as the roofing industry’s Best New Product for its excellent performance characteristics.

Carlisle’s KEE HP PVC membranes contain a solid KEE HP (high-performance) plasticizer with a higher molecular weight than standard KEE. Featuring improved aesthetics, enhanced thermal performance, a wider window of weldability and superior cold temperature flexibility, KEE HP PVC is an ideal roofing membrane for virtually any job. KEE HP membranes also offer a high level of resistance to chemicals, microbial growth and dirt pickup.