Roofing Companies Form Asphalt Underlayment Council

Four roofing companies—Carlisle, Gardner-Gibson, Maryland Paper and Mid-States Asphalt—have formed the Asphalt Underlayment Council (AUC), a new industry association developed to cultivate the long-term success of underlayment products for building envelope applications for both residential and commercial structures.

This new group’s Interim Executive Council was instrumental in identifying the need for an industry council that supports the standardization of underlayment product quality, performance and integrity. Current AUC members include Owens Corning, Polyglass USA, Mule-Hide Manufacturing, GMC Roofing & Building Paper, GAP Roofing, Warrior Roofing Manufacturing and GAF

“With the introduction of new types of roofing underlayment products, it was felt that an industry group was needed to monitor, administer and contribute to product standards,” noted AUC Executive Director Michelle Miller.

Because standards and requirements for roof repair, reroofing, roof recovering and replacement often lack clarification within the definition of underlayment, AUC’s inaugural technical committee will focus on code classifications and industry regulations.

“The pathways to code compliance vary depending on the product type,” said John Woestman, AUC’s technical director. “The continuous influx of newly designed products and ever-evolving regulations requires a strong knowledge base with deep understanding of the codes prevalent in this industry.”

Bringing regulatory issues to light through educational initiatives and industry outreach will be accomplished through raising awareness and advocacy. AUC will actively assist in the development of building codes to ensure the high performance of roofing systems in the future.

“We will work directly with installers and contractors who may not be aware of the various product categories that are occurring in the underlayment industry,” said Robert Almon, AUC Interim Executive Council member. “Understanding the nuances of underlayment as well as discerning codes and comprehending code compliance are vital. With our combined historical experience, AUC is in a prime position to ensure all the issues surrounding underlayment are addressed through a range of resources from an engaged council, committees and membership to a vibrant website that will be launched soon, growing media outreach, literature development and ongoing educational opportunities.”

The group welcomes roofing underlayment firms to join AUC to work to make these important initiatives viable and sustainable. To learn more about the Asphalt Underlayment Council or to ask about membership, email info@aucunderlaymentcouncil.org or call (847) 686-2243.

Carlisle Acquires Drexel Metals

Carlisle Companies Inc. announced the acquisition of Drexel Metals Inc., a provider of architectural standing seam metal roofing systems for commercial, institutional and residential applications.
With annual sales of approximately $50 million and 65 employees, Drexel Metals is headquartered in Louisville, Ky., and has facilities in Maryland, Pa., Colorado and Florida from which it serves more than 700 customers. Drexel designs and fabricates metal roofing systems for both residential and non-residential applications. Drexel both fabricates its products in its facilities and offers distributors and installers a field fabrication program backed by the company’s premium brand, marketing support, training, testing and warranties.
The business will operate as a unit within Carlisle Construction Materials (CCM), a manufacturer of a complete range of roofing and waterproofing products for commercial and industrial buildings, including single-ply roofing, rigid foam insulations, below-grade waterproofing and air/vapor barrier systems.
“Drexel Metals provides Carlisle Construction Materials a complementary addition to its range of roofing products and systems as well as access to new end markets and sales channels, said D. Christian “Chris” Koch, Carlisle’s president and chief executive officer. “Drexel provides an excellent foundation for additional growth investment in a growing roofing products sector. This acquisition is consistent with CCM’s strategy of expanding into premium products for the building envelope in attractive growth sectors. We are very pleased to welcome the Drexel Metals team to Carlisle.”

Choose Sustainable, Durable and Geographically Appropriate Roofs

Carlisle SynTec Systems has made available its RoofEd eBook for download through iTunes and Google Play.

Carlisle SynTec Systems has made available its RoofEd eBook for download through iTunes and Google Play.

Carlisle SynTec Systems has made available its RoofEd eBook for download through iTunes and Google Play. The first chapter of RoofEd focuses on EPDM roofing systems and their attributes. RoofEd contains videos, articles, case studies and photos, all of which are designed to give readers a deeper understanding of their commercial roofing system options. RoofEd can also be used as an on-the-road sales tool to help building owners choose the most sustainable, durable and geographically appropriate roof for their buildings.

After Years of Roof Leaks, a Laboratory That Produces Theatrical Equipment and Software Undergoes a Complex Reroofing

Founded in 1910, Rosco Laboratories is a multi-national producer of equipment, software and products for the theatrical, film, and television industries and architectural environment. As with every aging flat roofing system, water leakage was becoming a recurring problem at Rosco’s Stamford, Conn., facility. The severity of the leakage was further exacerbated by the lack of roof drainage (only two roof drains serviced the entire building) and poor deck slope conditions (less than 1/16 inch per foot).

The gypsum decking was cut out within the limits of the entire framing “bay” and infilled with galvanized metal decking. The longitudinal deck panel edge was seated atop the horizontal leg of the bulb-tee section (visible in the center of the photograph) and mechanically fastened using self-tapping screws. The ends were supported by the steel purlins. The underside of the decking was prepainted to match the ceiling finish. Supplemental structural support consisting of strips of 14-gauge galvanized sheet metal were attached to the bottom of each bulb-tee section contiguous to the repair to provide additional support for the adjacent gypsum roof decking segment.

The gypsum decking was cut out within the limits of the entire framing “bay” and infilled with galvanized metal decking. The longitudinal deck panel edge was seated atop the horizontal leg of the bulb-tee section (visible in the center of the photograph) and mechanically fastened using self-tapping screws. The ends were supported by the steel purlins. The underside of the decking was prepainted to match the ceiling finish. Supplemental structural support consisting of strips of 14-gauge galvanized sheet metal were attached to the bottom of each bulb-tee section contiguous to the repair to provide additional support for the adjacent gypsum roof decking segment.


Rosco representatives employed traditional methods to control and/or collect the moisture within the building by use of several water diverters. This technique was effective but Rosco representatives soon recognized this was not a viable long term solution as the physical integrity of the roof structure (deck) became a principal concern to the safety of the building occupants.

The Fisher Group LLC, an Oxford, Conn.-based building envelope consulting firm was retained by Rosco in March 2009 to survey the existing site conditions and determine the need for roofing replacement. The existing roofing construction, which consisted of a conventional two-ply, smooth-surfaced BUR with aluminized coating, exhibited numerous deficiencies (most notably severe alligatoring) and was deemed unserviceable. Construction documents, including drawings and specifications and a project phasing plan were developed by Fisher Group to address the planned roof replacement.

Bid proposals were solicited from prequalified contractors in June 2010, and F.J. Dahill Co. Inc., New Haven, Conn., was awarded the contract on the basis of lowest bid.

Existing Conditions

The building basically consists of a 1-story steel-framed structure constructed in the 1970s. It is a simple “box”-style configuration, which is conducive to manufacturing.

In conjunction with design services, destructive test cuts were made by Fisher Group in several roof sections as necessary to verify the existing roofing composition, insulation substrate, moisture entrapment, and substrate/deck construction. A total of four distinct “layers” of roofing were encountered at each test cut. The existing roofing construction consisted of alternating layers of smooth- and gravel-surfaced, multi-ply felt and bitumen built-up roofing. The bitumen contained throughout the construction was fortunately asphalt-based. Succeeding layers of roofing were spot mopped or fully mopped to the preceding layer (system). The combined weight of the roofing construction was estimated to be upwards of 20 to 22 pounds per square foot when considering the moisture content. This is excessive weight.

The roof insulation panels were set into ribbons of low-rise polyurethane foam insulation adhesive. The adhesive was applied in a continuous serpentine bead, spaced 6 inches on-center throughout the field of the roof.

The roof insulation panels were set into ribbons of low-rise polyurethane foam insulation adhesive. The adhesive was applied in a continuous serpentine bead, spaced 6 inches on-center throughout the field of the roof.


It is interesting to note that a minimal amount of roof insulation was present in the existing construction. Insulation was limited to a single layer of 1/2-inch-thick fiberboard. Additional insulation would need to be provided as part of the replacement roofing construction to increase the roof’s thermal performance and comply with the prescriptive requirements of the Connecticut State Energy Conservation Construction Code.

The structural substrate, or decking, is conventional in nature, comprised of poured gypsum roof decking. The roof decking incorporates 1/2-inch gypsum formboard loose laid between steel bulb-tee supports spaced about 32 inches on-center. The poured gypsum roof decking in this instance was utilized as the structural substrate and for insulating purposes. Poured gypsum roof decking has a minimal insulating value of perhaps R-2 to R-3, which is obviously considered to be minimal by present standards.

A representative number of bulk material samples were obtained by Fisher Group from the existing roofing construction as necessary to determine the material composition. The sampling included field membrane roofing plies, coatings and cements, and associated roof penetration and perimeter flashings. Laboratory analysis revealed that the second, third and, in some instances, fourth roofing “layers” (field membrane plies) contained varying amounts—5 to 10 percent—of asbestos (chrysotile) which would necessitate full abatement of the roofing construction.

PHOTOS: The Fisher Group LLC

Pages: 1 2 3

Project Profiles: Government

Richland County Landfill Columbia, S.C.

Petersen Aluminum roofing

Team

Roofing contractor: Aqua Seal Manufacturing and Roofing Inc., West Columbia, S.C.
Metal roof, soffit and wall manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill.

Roof Materials

The following materials were used on the roof:

  • 6,903 square feet of 24-gauge Tite-Loc in the Cityscape color
  • 1,216 square feet of 24-gauge HWP 16-inch Panel in the Cityscape color
  • 1,673 square feet of 0.032 PAC-850 Full Vent in the Cityscape color

Roof Report

Petersen Aluminum roofing
This new construction project began in early October 2012 and was completed in April 2013. Petersen Aluminum provided a complete metal system: roof, soffit and wall.

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Pages: 1 2