New Synthetic Slate Roof Tops Historic Owatonna City Hall

The city offices in Owatonna, Minnesota, are housed in a historic building that underwent a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

The massive brick complex in Owatonna, Minnesota, that currently serves as its city hall has an interesting past. According to Aaron Fitzloff, facility manager for the City of Owatonna, the structure was originally built in 1886 as the Minnesota Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children. The facility closed in 1945 and later became the Owatonna State School. “The state closed it in 1970, and the city of Owatonna took it over in 1974,” notes Fitzloff. “In 1975, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.”

The complex now houses administrative offices for the city and the Minnesota State Public School Orphanage Museum. Asphalt shingles had been installed on the roof at some point in the 1990s, but leaks developed over the years, and the city budgeted for a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. “The intent was to get the building back to its original state,” says Fitzloff.

Specifying a New Roof

The city consulted with Adsit Architecture and Planning, a full service architectural and interior design firm located in Minneapolis. When the firm completed a condition assessment for another historic building in Owatonna— the Firemen’s Hall —that project led to a request from Fitzloff to look at the city’s administration building.

Crews from Schwickert’s Tecta America installed more than 29,000 square feet of DaVinci synthetic slate. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

“Aaron realized that all of the roof systems were in need of replacement at this point,” says Gunstad. “He wanted to make sure, first and foremost, that we mitigated any moisture problems that were occurring up in the attic space. The project was about insulation as well as roofing.”

Finding the right roof system was crucial. Evidence suggested that the original roof was comprised of slate, but that couldn’t be confirmed due to a fire that had destroyed the main building in 1904. “Even before we did our research, we knew from our first look at the building that an asphalt roof on a building of this mass and scale did not look right,” Gunstad says.

Adsit Architecture specified a synthetic slate roof system manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes. “Right off the bat we felt that given the scale of the building that slate would have been prohibitively expensive for them, and they agreed,” Gunstad recalls. “We knew with the cost, ease of installation, the warranty, the weight — all of that — the synthetic slate would be a really good fit, and DaVinci had an enormous amount of color choices for the blends we needed.”

DaVinci’s Color Visualizer Tool was used to help determine the colors. A European blend of gray shades and purple was installed. As the project got under way, the hunch that the original roof was slate was confirmed. “When we got into reconstruction and were up digging around in the attic, we did find some old slate pieces,” Gunstad recalls. “Oddly enough, they were a perfect match for the colors we had chosen.”

Installing the Roof Systems

The installer on the project was Schwickert’s Tecta America, headquartered in Mankato, Minnesota. “We ended up being the only bidder on it, which of course you don’t know at the time,” notes Scott Haefner, Schwickert’s steep slope project manager.

The scope of work on the project included 60-mil Carlisle EPDM, new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim. Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

According to Haefner, the difficulty of the project is what made it appealing for the company, which thrives on projects others turn away from. “Those are the ones we look for — the ones that have some complexity to it,” says Haefner. “That’s where we can shine. We have our own metal shop, we can do all our own metal fabrication, and we can do the types of things that can really set us apart. It gives us an advantage because we don’t have to farm some of that work out, and we have complete control over the whole process.”

The scope of work included installing more than 29,000 square feet of the DaVinci synthetic slate. The roof also included low-slope areas, and for these a 60-mil EPDM from Carlisle was installed. Sheet metal work included new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim.

The safety plan was crucial, as the building would be open during the construction process. “You start with the safety plan,” says Haefner. “With staff and members of the public walking in and out, it is critically important in your pre-construction meetings to address those issues with overhead protection in certain areas, and blocking off certain areas when you’re working above them for the day.”

The safety plan incorporated scaffolding and personal fall arrest systems, as well as overhead protection for pedestrians. Photo: Schwickert’s Tecta America

Coordination with the city staff was critical. “Aaron Fitzloff helped us tremendously in that area,” says Haefner. “We had a standing meeting every Tuesday morning at 9, and that was always a big part of the conversation — safety and the sequence of what we were going to do that day. Aaron and I would also see each other every day also, typically. He was a great attribute to the whole project, for sure.”

Safety equipment included scaffolding and PFAS. “The vast majority of the building was scaffolded,” Haener says. “Fall arrest was anchored to the roof in areas we didn’t have scaffolding, and even where we did, the roof pitch was steep enough that everyone was always tied off with anchors and fall arrest systems.”

Work began in the late fall and progressed in sections. “That’s part of the beauty and charm of the building — its different additions and roof sections,” notes Haefner. “That also allowed us to focus on one area at a time. That’s typically what you do — you start and do a section that’s kind of an easy one to just get your feet underneath you and get a feel for how it’s going to go. There were some big, long planes of roof that we were able to get a start on and get a feel for the whole sequence.”

Schwickert’s steep-slope division handled the composite slate roof installation, while its flat roof division tackled the EPDM roofs.

Tying in flat and steep-slope roof systems was critical. Steep slope-crews completed most of their work first, using a Grace Ice & Water Shield product that is compatible with EPDM. “Let’s say you know the EPDM is going to go let’s say two feet up the slope of the roof, from flat to transition up the steep slope,” Haefner explains. “We’d leave off the bottom two or four courses of shingles, and leave the ice and water shield exposed, but not adhered.”

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Low-slope crew members would just flip up the ice and water shield and install the EPDM. Steep-slope crews would then install the metal flashing, adhere the ice and water shield, and add the final courses of shingles.

A snow retention system from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards was installed in several sections of the roof.

Re-roofing the large turret was made easier by DaVinci’s turret package, which supplies pre-cut tiles. “You give them some basic information, including the circumference and the pitch,” Haefner says.

It worked well on the project, with one minor hitch that was quickly remedied. “This one was a little different because it has a sort of witch’s hat appearance to it, where the pitch changes at the bottom,” Haefner says. “It’s not a typical cone shape. When I sent in the request for the package, I didn’t take that into account, and we needed to order some more shingles to finish the turret.”

The large finial on the turret was taken down, painted and replaced.

A heat mesh system was installed in certain areas that had been subject to ice dams in the past. The Warmquest Zmesh system consists of woven copper mesh, which was installed below the tile, sandwiched between layers of ice and water shield. “That was a tricky part of the installation,” says Haefner. “We had to run big transformers, electrical panels, and run conduit to these areas from the old attic.”

The Minnesota weather brought things to a halt in the mid-winter, and work concluded this spring.

Mission Accomplished

Haefner points to this project as proof of his company’s ability to complete projects with multiple scopes of work. “With steep slope, flat roof, sheet metal work, new gutters, insulation, and the electrical portion involved with installing the heat mesh system — it shows perfectly how we can install multiple complex systems that have to go together in a certain way,” he says. “That type of complexity is where we shine.”

The city and its residents have been pleased with the result, according to Fitzloff. “Feedback has been nothing but positive,” he says. “We cleaned all of the limestone around the whole building as well, and it looks fabulous.”

Gunstad notes that the project fulfilled its design goals: making the building sound and restoring it to its former glory. “Performance and maintenance of the project were our primary concerns, but design-wise, looking at this building, which is rather grand, we knew it lacked something — and that something was a substantial roof,” says Gunstad. “We wanted to give that visual prominence back to that building, which is a hallmark of the city.”

TEAM

Architect: Adsit Architecture and Planning, Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.adsitap.com

Roofing Contractor: Schwickert’s Tecta America, Mankato, Minnesota, www.schwickerts.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Slate: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Carlisle 60-mil EPDM

Leak Barrier: Grace Ice & Water Shield

Underlayment: Titanium UDL

Snow Retention: Rocky Mountain Snow Guards

PVC and KEE Membranes With Protective Film

Carlisle SynTec Systems introduces Sure-Flex PVC and KEE HP membranes with APEEL Protective Film. APEEL guards the membrane’s surface from scuffs and dirt accumulation during installation, eliminating the need to clean the roof upon project completion. 

Patented Sure-Flex PVC and KEE HP membranes with APEEL Protective Film are ideal for re-roofing, re-cover, and new construction projects; and can be used on the whole roof or only in areas that are subject to heavy soiling, such as loading areas. 

Durable, recyclable, and easy to remove, APEEL Protective Film helps to save time and labor, improves aesthetics and long-term reflectivity, and increases customer satisfaction, according to the company. The film is designed to withstand the most intense heat and UV exposure for up to 90 days and its gray color reduces glare, helps any accumulated moisture to dry more quickly, and warms the membrane. 

For more information, visit www.carlislesyntec.com.

Carlisle Construction Materials Changes Name of Its Coatings, Adhesives, Sealants, and Elastomers (CASE) Business

Carlisle Construction Materials, an operating segment of Carlisle Companies Incorporated, announced that it is changing the name of its CASE business from Accella Polyurethane Systems to Carlisle Polyurethane Systems (CPS). Carlisle acquired the Accella Performance Materials family of companies in November 2017, which included spray foam insulation, tire fill, and CASE businesses. In 2019, the spray foam insulation business was rebranded to Carlisle Spray Foam Insulation and tire fill into Carlisle TyrFil. This name change to Carlisle Polyurethane Systems will complete the evolutionary process to incorporate the CASE business into the Carlisle family of companies.

Carlisle Polyurethane Systems brings to the industry a premier level of product innovation, technology, and above all else; customer service. According to the company, CPS is driven to answer your unmet needs. Whether delivering project-based solutions or creating economic value through differentiated technology, it is the goal of CPS to deliver a polyurethane solution to help solve your problems with the speed and scale to meet your most challenging demands. Carlisle Polyurethane Systems will continue to focus on foams, surface and specialty coatings, binders, casting resins, adhesives, sealants, and elastomers. 

A unique combination of service, the premium Carlisle Experience customers have come to expect, technical support, and customized solutions differentiates Carlisle Polyurethane Systems. For most every spray, pour, and cast application customers might require; CPS has advanced problem-solving solutions to ensure that its material will match specific application needs. By partnering with customers, CPS can fully support various polyurethane system needs and provide the right solution at the right time. According to the company, this degree of tailored customization – and a commitment to not only meet, but also exceed, the expectations of a diverse base of customers in multi-disciplinary industries – sets Carlisle Polyurethane Systemsapart from nearly every other polyurethane chemistry space player. 

“The Carlisle brand represents industry-leading innovation, supply chain excellence, and customer problem-solving and we are thrilled to leverage those attributes; as well as the storied history of our parent company; in our new name,” stated Bill Brengel, Vice President and General Manager for Carlisle Polyurethane Systems. “This name change completes the evolutionary process to incorporate our CASE polyurethane business into the Carlisle family of companies.”

Carlisle noted no changes in product formulations or credentials are planned with this name change.

For more information, visit www.carlisleps.com.

Premium Shingle Underlayment Features Slip-Resistant Top Film

Carlisle WIP Products’ WIP GRIP Premium Shingle Underlayment features a slip-resistant top film that improves roofers’ safety on wet and dry installations. WIP GRIP Premium Shingle Underlayment is a flexible, 55-mil-thick, rubberized asphalt, fiberglass-reinforced membrane. It can be used on critical roof areas such as eaves, ridges, valleys, dormers, and skylights; it may also be used as covering for the entire roof to prevent moisture or water entry. 

According to the manufacturer, once installed WIP GRIP protects the roof structure and interior spaces from water seepage caused by ice dams and wind-driven rain. Additionally, at the time of eventual re-roof, WIP GRIP’s top film has a proprietary embossment that helps to prevent the embedding of shingles to the underlayment, providing for easier tear-off. 

For more information, visit www.carlislewipproducts.com

Carlisle’s WIP GRIP Wins Best New Residential Product at the 2020 International Roofing Expo

Carlisle WIP Products’ WIP GRIP Premium Shingle Underlayment was recently named Best New Residential Product at the 2020 International Roofing Expo in Dallas, Texas. WIP GRIP features a slip-resistant top film that improves roofers’ safety on wet and dry installations. 

According to the manufacturer, WIP GRIP Premium Shingle Underlayment is a flexible, 55-mil-thick, rubberized asphalt, fiberglass-reinforced membrane. It can be used on critical roof areas such as eaves, ridges, valleys, dormers, and skylights; it may also be used as covering for the entire roof to prevent moisture or water entry. Once installed, WIP GRIP protects the roof structure and interior spaces from water seepage caused by ice dams and wind-driven rain. Additionally, at the time of eventual re-roof, WIP GRIP’s top film has a proprietary embossment that helps to prevent the embedding of shingles to the underlayment, providing for easier tear-off. 

Attendees at the 2020 International Roofing Expo voted online for their favorite new products on the show floor in three categories: residential roofing, commercial roofing, and tools and equipment. 

For more information, visit www.carlislewipproducts.com.

Carlisle Coatings & Waterproofing Adds Territory Sales Specialist in New York Metro Area

Carlisle Coatings & Waterproofing (CCW) announced Steven Cortazzo has joined the company as a Territory Sales Specialist to keep the design community in the New York City metro area informed about key waterproofing solutions, including those for exterior walls and foundations on new construction projects. 

Before joining CCW, Cortazzo spent 20 years with Kemper System America and served as Managing Director. Since 2012, he has promoted performance-based waterproofing and restoration products in the New York metro area, and conducted numerous seminars and workshops for architects, engineers and other specifiers. 

“Steve is well respected in the architectural community and understands the special needs of the New York construction market, so we are very pleased to have him join the Carlisle team,” said CCW General Manager Brett Steinberg.

Cortazzo is based in northern New Jersey. 

For more information, visit www.carlisleccw.com.

Carlisle Coatings & Waterproofing Names New General Manager

Brett Steinberg was promoted to General Manager of Carlisle Coatings & Waterproofing Inc. (CCW). He is responsible for the CCW brand strategy as well as the development of sales and marketing channels for CCW’s traditional waterproofing products, including the rapidly expanding below-grade market, along with both air & vapor barriers and other Building Envelope solutions. In his new position, Steinberg also oversees sales, marketing, technical services and customer service. 

Based in Wylie, Texas, Steinberg joined CCW as Eastern States Sales Manager in July 2018, managing CCW’s Northeast and Southeast regions. Previously, he was with Kemper System America for 10 years, where he served as National Sales Manager since 2012. 

“Brett’s leadership and experience in the high-end waterproofing market in North America and Europe will be invaluable to our growth as we move ahead,” said Mike McAuley, Carlisle Construction Materials, Executive Vice President, Diversified Products.

Steinberg earned a B.A. in Communications from Richard Stockton College in Pomona, New Jersey. 

For more information, visit www.carlisleccw.com

Carlisle Hosts Legislative Officials at Polyisocyanurate Manufacturing Facility

Carlisle Construction Materials (CCM) hosted Illinois State Senator Don Harmon and a team from his office on April 24, 2019, for a tour of its Franklin Park, Illinois, Polyisocyanurate (Polyiso) insulation manufacturing facility. Senator Harmon and his team observed the facility’s production of Polyiso insulation and met with several of the company’s employees. CCM invited these legislative officials as part of an ongoing effort to raise legislators’ awareness of the benefits that manufacturers bring to their communities and to discuss the challenges now facing America’s manufacturing sector. 

“As a U.S.-based manufacturing company, we were privileged to host Senator Harmon and his team. We are eager to discuss ways in which we can work together to create and sustain good-paying jobs for Illinois and support the growth of the manufacturing industry,” said Mike DuCharme, CCM’s Vice President of Marketing. 

“A changing economy and innovations in technology pose challenges for the future of the manufacturing sector in our state. I appreciated the time in the district and the chance to learn firsthand about this company and the industry,” said Senator Harmon. 

CCM is a member company of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), a national trade association representing Polyiso insulation manufacturers and suppliers to the Polyiso industry. PIMA advances the use of Polyiso insulation and is one of the nation’s foremost industry advocates for energy-efficient practices and policies. In addition, PIMA has been recognized by both the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Sustainable Building Industries Council for its advocacy and products. 

For more information, visit www.carlisleconstructionmaterials.com.



Carlisle Companies to Acquire Petersen Aluminum Corporation

Carlisle Companies Incorporated, through its Carlisle Construction Materials (CCM) operating segment, announced that it has entered into a definitive purchase agreement to acquire Petersen Aluminum Corporation for approximately $197 million. 

Headquartered in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Petersen’s primary business is the manufacture and distribution of architectural metal roof panels, steel and aluminum flat sheets and coils, wall panels, perimeter roof edge systems and related accessories for commercial, residential, institutional, industrial and agricultural markets. Founded by Maurice R. Petersen in 1965, Petersen, through its premier brand PAC-CLAD, has grown to become a company with approximately $160 million of annual revenue. 

Chris Koch, CEO and president of Carlisle Companies, said, “The acquisition of Petersen is part of our strategy of providing customers with a portfolio of high quality, innovative products and solutions that meet an increasing array of their building envelope needs. Petersen is an excellent fit with our recent acquisitions in the metal roofing space, including Drexel Metals, Sunlast Metal and Premium Panels, as well as a significant complementary addition to our single-ply roofing systems. We anticipate achieving annual synergies of $4.0 million across our metal roofing platform as a result of the acquisition. Petersen further broadens our scale and geographic penetration of the attractive and fast growing regions of Texas, Arizona, Georgia and the Midwest as we continue to execute on our metal roofing growth strategy. I look forward to welcoming the Petersen team to Carlisle and driving further growth and innovation with the help of the Carlisle Operating System.” 

Upon completion of the transaction, the business will be reported as part of the CCM segment. 

For more information, visit www.carlisle.com

Vent Secured Roofing System Offers Easy Installation, Wind Uplift Certification

Carlisle SynTec Systems introduces the VacuSeal Vent Secured Roofing SystemCarlisle SynTec Systems introduces the VacuSeal Vent Secured Roofing System. This revolutionary assembly uses special vents that harness the power of the wind to lock roof membranes in place. According to the manufacturer, VacuSeal systems are quick and easy to install and save cost and labor by substantially reducing the amount of glue, ballast, or fasteners a project requires. This engineered system is designed to provide optimal performance while maximizing opportunities for retrofit and monolithic deck applications.

According to the company, the VacuSeal Vent Secured Roofing System reduces installation time and minimizes the need for traditional fastening methods. Negative pressure venting pulls air and moisture out from under the membrane to maintain insulation dryness and R-value. There are no cold-weather limitations for installation and no VOCs or odors.

VacuSeal V2T Vents are made from UV-resistant PVC, contain no moving parts, require no penetrations, and provide effective performance regardless of wind direction, notes the manufacturer. The system is UL certified with uplift certification at 195 psf negative pressure. The VacuSeal Vent Secured Roofing System offers a maximum 20-year Total System Warranty.

For more information, visit www.carlislesyntec.com.