The Stud Wall and the Roof

Photo 1. With a stud wall parapet, inappropriate wall substrate and base anchor screws into a material with low pull-out resistance, this roof blew off in what would be considered moderate winds. Images: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LTD.

How do I start an article on a topic that is so problematic, yet it’s not being addressed by designers, roof system manufacturers, FM, SPRI, NRCA or any other quality assurance standard? Like many transitions in the building industry, the use of metal studs in exterior wall construction and roofing in new construction developed out of the twin concerns of value engineering and cost reduction. It has crept silently forward without any real consideration of the possible effects this less robust construction method would have on roof system performance. 

Photo 2. When the base anchors pull out of the substrate, the membrane becomes unsecured and will lift up. Here the membrane was observed lifting to heights of 3 to 4 feet, at which point it popped the coping off.

You would think that someone along the line would say, “Hmm, I wonder how strong, effective or appropriate a screw fastener through a modified gypsum board sheathing would be?” Let me answer that question: Worthless. (See Photos 1-3.) 

There are many issues with metal stud wall construction as it relates to roofing: air drive, moisture, interior pressures, and membrane adhesion to substrate, just to name a few. This article will address only one concern: The base anchor attachment horizontally into steel stud walls, most often clad with a modified gypsum substrate board. (See Photo 4.)

Why Is This a Concern?

Photo 3. All the base anchor screws pulled out of the substrate except one that was into the stud, which just tore away when the rest of the membrane lifted.

Problems often begin in the design phase when the condition is not detailed appropriately. (See Figures 1 and 2.) The architect/engineer/ designer shows some lines and figures that the roofing contractor or manufacturer will make it work — and specifies a 20-year warranty. The designer’s first mistake is to think that contractors and manufacturers design. They do not.If I were a betting man, I would guess that 99 percent of the specified wall substrate for roof-side metal stud walls is a product that is unacceptable for roofing base flashing application. You’re smiling now, aren’t you? Been there, huh? Designers often have little knowledge as to how a roof system, or even a roof membrane, is installed, and thus don’t even realize the errors of their ways. If they did, they might realize that at the very least a base anchor attachment is at 12 inches on center, and at some time a screw is going to have to go horizontally into the inappropriate sheathing substrate. Concept 1: Architects design. I know this is scary.

Figure 1. This is a common architectural stud wall parapet detail. No base anchor is even being acknowledged, nor is the concern with vertical vapor drive in the stud wall cavity. This type of detailing, in my opinion, is below the standard of care of the architect.

Architects and designers who do not prepare project-specific details seem to love manufacturers’ standard details, which are provided as a baseline for developing appropriate project-specific details. They are not an end all, and thinking they are is a huge mistake. Another common mistake is not realizing that manufacturers do not have a standard detail for base anchor attachment into metal stud walls. This is probably because they never imagined that anyone would really try to anchor into such a poor substrate. Concept 2: Manufacturers produce products that can be assembled in a roof system; they do not design.

Oh, but the contractor will make it work. Yeah, right. Concept 3: Contractors install materials provided by the manufacturer, as specified by the designer; they do not design. Are you starting to see a trend here?

You can now see the conundrum of the blind leading the blind. 

So, to be clear:

  • Architects: Design
  • Manufacturers: Produce products
  • Contractors: Install materials

To say it a bit clearer:

  • Architects: Design
  • Manufacturers: Do Not Design
  • Contractors: Do Not Design

Read it again and see where the responsibility lies. Of course, the manufacturer needs to produce quality materials, which sometimes does not occur, and contractors need to install the materials correctly, which sometimes does not occur.

Pull-Out Strength

So that we can get this detail correct, let’s look at pull-out strengths of various materials. But let’s start with trying to determine what pull-out resistance is required. For our example, let’s use 60-mil TPO, a common roofing membrane on new construction projects. 

Figure 2. This parapet detail has been well thought out in regard to thermal drive and concerns with condensation within the stud wall cavity, but ignores how the roof membrane will be attached to the wall. The insulation thickness will result in an unbraced section of the screw and allow rotation before it pulls out of what is assumed to be a gypsum base sheathing.

Manufacturers report on their data sheets for 60-mil TPO tear strength of around 130 pounds of force (lbf). The test for this isn’t pulling the membrane out from base anchors, but it’s a good start for our discussion. I suspect that if base anchors are attached at 9 inches or 12 inches on center that the series of fasteners will elevate this value.

Given that we know that the tear resistance of TPO with a series of fasteners is greater than the ASTM D751 Tearing Strength test, I will suggest that we need a substrate with a pull resistance greater than 260 lbf, or twice the tear strength value. After that the membrane will tear itself out from around the fastener plate. 

To determine the pull-out resistance of various sheathing materials, I had the pull-out resistance of a base anchor screw tested on several materials by Pro-Fastening Systems, a specialty distributor focusing on commercial roofing in the Midwest that provides certified pull-out testing. Three pull-out tests were performed on each material. (See Photo 5.) The mean resistance values are as follows:

Photo 4. This exterior view gives a good idea of how inadequate gypsum-related products are in regard to providing a pull-out resistance. A 16-, 18- or 20-gauge plate should have been placed at the stud wall from the concrete deck up above the anchor point.

1/2” plywood: 422 pounds

5/8” plywood: 402 pounds

1/2” glass-faced gypsum: 13.3 pounds

1/2” integral fiber reinforced gypsum: 110 pounds

22-gauge steel deck: 646 pounds

22-gauge acoustical steel deck: 675 pounds

18-gauge steel stud: 1,086 pounds

26-gauge metal stud: 646 pounds

16-gauge steel plate: 1,256 pounds

18-gauge steel plate: 978 pounds

20-gauge steel plate:724 pounds

22-gauge steel plate:625 pounds

So as a starter we eliminate all the typical gypsum-based sheathing materials from being used at the base of the roof. I’m not keen on plywood either, as over time, as the plywood dries, the pull-out strength lessens. Additionally, gluing to wet plywood never works well. 

Designing the Base Anchor on Metal Stud Walls

Photo 5. Various materials were tested to determine their pull-out resistance. The results confirmed what intuitively most roofing contractors would know — that gypsum-based products have very little holding power.

The concept is simple — provide a substrate with a pull-out resistance greater than the tear strength of the roofing membrane attached in series. So, let’s pretend you’re drafting. Come on now, get your paper out, a number 2H pencil, a parallel rule and triangle to get the feel of the detail — no CAD for you today. For our example, assume you’re in the Chicago area, minimum R-value of 30, tapered insulation and 24 feet from the drain to the wall. 

First, draft and show the roof deck and your wall, roof edge and studs. Now you’re ready to start your detail. First go to your roof plan, where you have shown all the tapered insulation, and calculate what the thickness will be at your studs. Remember, code requires thickness within 4 feet of the drain. For our detail, you’re near Chicago and thus the height of a tapered insulation layout might be as follows. For the R-30 at the roof drain with a substrate board, insulation and cover board, let say for simplicity it’s 6.5 inches (1/2-inch cover board + 5.4 inches of code-required insulation + 1/2-inch cover board). Now you need to calculate the tapered insulation. For our example, the distance from drain to wall is exactly 24 feet. With a taper of 1/4-inch per foot tapered that is 6.5 inches (1/4 inch x 24 feet = 6 inches, plus the 1/2-inch starting thickness of the tapered). If you plan to use foam adhesive, add 3/8 inch per layer of foam, and be sure you understand all the layers in a tapered system. So, at the wall, the insulation will be approximately 13 inches. With the screw and plate anchor say, 2 inches above the insulation surface, we have a height of 15 inches. So, let’s say we need a substrate capable of pull-outs at least 18 inches in height from the roof deck.

Figure 3. Design of a stud wall parapet includes delineating all the components and tells the contractor what is expected. Burying such information in the specification does no one any good, as the architect most likely will not know to review the shop drawings to those requirements.

Now, I know you are thinking, “OMG, 18 inches — I can cut in a little 6-inch strip at the top of the insulation.” Don’t do it. The strip will not have any continuity or strength and will often buckle under load. Additionally, this continuous substrate piece needs to be placed on the stud. 

Back to your drafting board. Draw in against your stud a continuous 16-, 18- or 20-gauge galvanized steel plate. Depending if the membrane is to be taken up and over the stud wall or terminated some distance above the roofing, the rest of the wall can be clad in less robust materials. Pick any substrate that is roofing membrane compatible and place it over the continuous steel plate and studs above. Tell the contractor how often you want the substrate anchored.

Figure 4. We often find that a simple isometric drawing showing the construction of stud wall parapets is helpful in informing all the related trades how their work interrelates.

Draw in your substrate board, vapor retarder, insulation (and don’t forget to show and call out the spray foam seal between the insulation and wall, as there is often a void). Bring your membrane to the wall, turn it up 3 inches fully adhered to the substrate and show a plate and screw. Call this plate and screw out and note the spacing on the drawing; I’ve never seen a spec up on the roof. The base flashing can now be delineated coming down over the anchors and out onto the flat. Depending on the material, show a weld or seam tape. Now compare your detail to Figures 3 and 4. Who has properly designed the condition?

Remember

There are many issues and concerns with steel stud walls and roofing. This issue with substrate cladding in regard to the interface with the roofing system is only one that I see again and again on projects that have wind damage issues. By carefully designing the roof termination conditions, taking into account all the possible impacts and then detailing the conditions properly, your standard of care can be met and the owner well served.

About the author: Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, CSI, RRP, is a principal of Hutchinson Design Group Ltd. in Barrington, Illinois. For more information, visit www.hutchinsondesigngroup.com

Coating System Makes Roofing and Cladding Appear Aged, Weathered

McElroy Metal's Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Bossier City, La.-based McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw is new to the company’s product line, offering the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles. The look of aged or weathered roofing and wall cladding is growing in popularity and used in commercial, residential and industrial applications. Cor-Ten AZP Raw provides the appearance of rusted metal with the advantages of a highly reflective PVDF coating.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.


“We’re offering the appearance of weathered steel without having to wait for time and Mother Nature,” says Ken Gieseke, vice president of Marketing at McElroy Metal. “As soon as it’s installed, the weathered aesthetic is evident, attractive and durable. It’s sure to become a popular choice of architects and building owners seeking the look of weathered steel.”

In 2005, U.S. Steel introduced Cor-Ten AZP prepainted steel sheet to provide architects, building owners and homeowners with an enhanced performance product to its Cor-Ten steel. McElroy Metal offers the moderately weathered Cor-Ten AZP Raw, a carefully crafted and engineered system to provide any roofing or cladding project with the authentic look of timelessness.

Raw is produced by McElroy Metal in collaboration with Valspar and U.S. Steel.

To learn more, visit here or call (318) 747-8000.

PHOTOS: McElroy Metal

Project Profiles: Historic Preservation

CATHEDRAL OF ST. PAUL, BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Midland Engineering Co., South
Bend, Ind.
ARCHITECT: ArchitectureWorks LLP, Birmingham
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Hoar Construction LLC, Birmingham,
MASONRY CONTRACTOR: Ziolkowski Construction Inc., South Bend

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

Roof Materials

The Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham required the cathedral’s new roof system be a historically accurate reproduction of the original in materials, design and craftsmanship. The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles. Six large slate crosses and multiple accent patterns, barely visible on the faded original roof, required exacting measurements prior to tear-off and a high level of precision to recreate and maintain over such a large field and on octagonal steeples.

Because of metal thinning brought on by their advanced age, every copper architectural and functional feature in the existing roof system had to be carefully removed and shipped to Midland Engineering’s South Bend facility to be historically replicated in its metal shop. This included seven ornate crosses (up to 17-feet tall), finials, turret caps and more. There were more than four dozen components, for which no original prints existed, as well as over 500 feet each of custom copper cornices and radius gutters with matching straps. More than 20,000 square feet of 16- and 20-ounce copper was utilized for fabrication of architectural elements and flashing.

Midland Engineering was asked to make improvements to the original roof system to improve attic ventilation while maintaining the Gothic Revival period look. To accomplish this, the crew integrated bronze screen (invisible from the ground) into the original copper cornice and eave design to provide improved cold air intake while new louvered copper dormers replaced the original painted roof ventilator.

An updated lightning protection system was incorporated into the new roof design, hidden within many of the new copper crosses and other architectural elements. The system was fabricated in Midland Engineering’s shop to maintain the Gothic Revival look.

The metal shop also clad 10 previously painted windows and mullions in copper, effectively eliminating frequent and costly maintenance. These windows, reachable only by crane at considerable expense, formerly required painting and other maintenance every five to seven years.

About 6,500 square feet of lead-coated copper, which patinas to a limestone color, was utilized to cap all limestone exposed to weather, reducing ongoing maintenance of limestone joints.

Extensive termite damage to structural framing required repair prior to installation of the new roofing system. Upon removal of the original slate roof and completion of the structural repairs, the new roof was dried-in and installation of the new slate roof began. The historically accurate replacements of the original copper architectural features were installed according to schedule.

SLATE SUPPLIER: North Country Slate
COPPER SUPPLIER: Hussey Copper

Roof Report

The Cathedral of St. Paul is the centerpiece of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Birmingham. Completed in 1893 at a cost of $90,000, the cathedral is widely considered to be a handsome example of the American Neo-Gothic variant of the Gothic Revival style. The cathedral measures 96-feet wide by 140-feet long and encompasses more than 60,000 square feet. It features twin octagonal steeples, rising 183-feet high.

Work schedules on this project were a challenge. The contract required parishioner and clergy access to the church must be maintained 24 hours a day, seven days a week, throughout the eight-month duration of the project. Further, because of the noise inherent in roof construction, work schedules had to be planned around regular church services and events and rescheduled several times a month for funerals and other unscheduled events.

“We could not have been more pleased with the work accomplished by the team from Midland Engineering,” says Very Rev. Kevin M. Bazzel, V.G., J.C.L., rector of the Cathedral of St. Paul. “It is a marvel to us to be able to see the church in its original glory, and all of this thanks to Midland!”

The National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, Ill., awarded Midland Engineering the prestigious Gold Circle Award in 2016. Midland was recognized in the Outstanding Workmanship—Steep-slope Category.

Photo: Rob Culpepper

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Roof and Cladding Panels Look Like Rusted Metal

Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

McElroy Metal has made available Cor-Ten AZP Raw, which offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding. Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles.

ARMA Helps Update Wind-resistance Standard for Asphalt Shingles

DURING THE past year, the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has led the process to update the ASTM International wind-resistance standard for asphalt shingles to help ensure that it complies with the latest methods to determine design loads for roofs and cladding used on buildings. ASTM standards are consensus standards that are used around the world to improve product quality and build consumer confidence.

The 2016 version of ASTM D7158 is now coordinated with the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE 7-10, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”, which is the document that the International Building Code relies on for its structural provisions. The ASCE 7-10 standard had significant revisions in wind design. ARMA worked with recognized structural engineers who are leaders in the wind-engineering field and industry stakeholders who provided specific updates to D7158 that ensure consistency with ASCE 7-10. Although the building code includes conversion factors to account for differences between versions of ASCE 7, ARMA and other industry stakeholders recognized the value of correlating D7158 with the latest version of ASCE 7. The updates were balloted and approved via the ASTM consensus process.

“ARMA has always been a leader of progress and innovation in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Spearheading the revision of the test standard that determines wind resistance of asphalt shingles shows ARMA’s commitment to the roofing community, building owners and home-owners alike. We continue to strive to make asphalt the leading roofing technology.”

ASTM D7158-16, “Standard Test Method for Wind Resistance of Asphalt Singles (Uplift Forces/Uplift Resistance Method),” is now available for purchase on the ASTM website. Learn more about ARMA at AsphaltRoofing.org.

AkzoNobel Combines Sales and Marketing Teams from Its Liquid and Powder Coatings Businesses

AkzoNobel will combine the sales and marketing teams from its liquid and powder coatings businesses that serve the aluminum architecture and façade and cladding markets. The move reflects the growing importance of powder coatings in that sector, and will help customers and specifiers to make the right coatings choices, says Ben Mitchell, manager, Extrusion Coatings at AkzoNobel.

”Because liquid and powder coatings are not always interchangeable in aluminum applications, it is important for customers to understand which are most appropriate,” he says. “Having a combined team will ensure a unified approach to helping designers, specifiers and fabricators to select the optimal solution for their project.”

The new team builds on an effort to educate industry professionals about powder and liquid coatings choices for aluminum, Mitchell adds. These include an AkzoNobel research paper presented at the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat 2015 Conference and the AEC Daily continuing education course “High Performance Coatings for Aluminum Fenestration”.

“Specifiers need accurate information on all available products in order to make the best decision for a given application, Mitchell adds. “AkzoNobel prides itself on superior customer service, so our priority is to keep internal experts networked throughout our organization and provide clients with optimal solutions for their specific application, regardless of chemistry or application method.”

AkzoNobel’s products for metal coil and extrusions include TRINAR, CERAM-A-STAR, POLYDURE, ACRA-BOND, INTERPON D3000, INTERPON D2000 and INTERPON D1000.

MCA Publishes Technical Resource on Selecting Proper Types of Fasteners

The Metal Construction Association (MCA) has published a new technical resource to assist designers and installers in selecting the proper type of fastener: Fastener Compatibility with Profiled Metal Roof and Wall Panels.

Found in the technical resources section of the MCA website at www.metalconstruction.org, the new bulletin includes a convenient table that serves as a guideline to check fastener compatibility with different types of cladding materials. The table references corrosion resistance between eight common types of metal roof and wall cladding materials and nine different fasteners. With it, users can quickly determine if they are matching the right fastener with the right roof or wall material to ensure performance over time and a strong, weather tight attachment.

The integrity and aesthetics of a building is at risk when the wrong type of fastener is used with a metal roof or wall cladding system. Premature corrosion of the metal panel and/or the fastener may occur under certain conditions. Known as galvanic corrosion, this is often a result of corrosion between the dissimilar metals that are in contact with each other. To prevent dissimilar metal corrosion at the connection point, fasteners should be made of a compatible or the same material as the roof or wall material whenever possible. At the very least, the fastener should display equivalent corrosion resistance to the material being fastened.

The bulletin also provides a discussion on the fastener durability and the roles (primary or secondary) and type (self-drilling, self-tapping and self-piercing) of fasteners that will help designers and installers achieve high fastener performance.

The MCA updates its education/technical resources section on its website on a regular basis, addressing practical and educational topics related to the metal construction industry. All materials are available free to website visitors to download in PDF format.

Roofinox Expands Sales and Distribution of Products in the U.S.

Roofinox International, a European-based, 30-year-old manufacturer of metal roofing materials, has announced plans to expand sales and distribution of three key products in the U.S. through its subsidiary, Roofinox America Inc.

Products include Roofinox Classic, a brush-rolled material designed for roofing and wall cladding, Roofinox Plus .0157, a ribbed surface material for smoother roofing results and economy and Roofinox Terne-Coated with a tin-plated surface that develops a matt grey patina finish over time.

The announcement comes in response to an increasing demand for Roofinox products since 2012 when the only domestic manufacturer of terne-coated steel products went out of business.

“From then on we supplied to various projects all over the U.S. with increasing quantities every year,” notes Pascal Metzler, who with his brother, Marc, own the company. “In 2014 we decided to move to the U.S. by opening an office and warehouse from where we could service the increasing demand,” he notes. Meanwhile, sales in Europe were also continuing to grow with marketing and distribution to Poland, Russia, Slovenia and Sweden. The company also regularly supplied its unique products to various commercial projects in strong markets like Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Singapore. Last year, the company started selling the Roofinox product range in Turkey as well. And while Roofinox is currently examining business relations in several more countries, Metzler emphasizes the main efforts are now to grow market share in the U.S.

He notes the technology for his products date back to 1995 with the development of inoxidable (stainless) steel as a roofing material. The idea behind the product was to create a stainless steel specifically designed for roofing and roll-forming. “We found two major features that made it ideal for the application—mechanical properties and surface design with an architecturally distinctive matt finish for rollformed roofing panels. The product features within these two areas differentiated Roofinox from any other product in the roofing market, he contends and the success of Roofinox Classic and Roofinox tin-plated led to the development of several more products available today.

Architectural demand for Roofinox as a natural metal is very high, notes Metzler. “Aging is no problem for Roofinox because the surface is all natural and typically does not change over time.” In addition, he notes that Roofinox products achieve superior results for LEED-related construction and the sustainability of building products. “More and more building owners are looking into long-lasting and environmentally friendly products,” he notes. And there’s the issue of durability.

“Increasing weather extremes require more durable solutions for roofing and Roofinox stainless steel is the best solution for these environments because it was originally developed for Switzerland and Austria in a region known for challenging weather conditions.”

The current goal is to develop nationwide relationships with metal fabricators and installers who need a reliable source for quality architectural grade stainless steel and tin-plated materials the company offers.

Roofinox materials also offer growth potential to contractors who can now differentiate through specializing into more sophisticated work. “Some of the largest institutional building owners, such as the armed forces, school and education authorities, hospitals and churches, are specifying stainless steel for these reasons—it simply is a very high-quality roofing material,” Metzler notes.

One of the brothers’ first steps toward expansion has been the recruitment of David Rowe, a 28-year veteran of the metal roofing and wall panel industry, who has been named vice president-sales of Roofinox America Inc. Rowe joined Roofinox from Englert Inc., an American manufacturer of metal and aluminum roofing and wall panel coil, where he was director of product management responsible for the planning, development and introduction of all new products.

Roofinox America Names Vice President of Sales

David H. Rowe, a 28-year veteran of the metal roofing and wall panel industry, has been named vice president of sales for Roofinox America Inc., a supplier of quality Roofinox stainless steel coil, featuring mechanical properties and an architecturally distinctive matt finish for rollformed roofing panels.

Rowe joins Roofinox from Englert Inc., an American manufacturer of metal and aluminum roofing and wall panel coil, where he was director of product management responsible for the planning, development and introduction of all new products.

At Roofinox America, Rowe will be responsible for the direction and management of all sales and business development operations, including distribution and fabricator and installer relations for the Roofinox stainless steel product line; Roofinox Classic, a brush-rolled material designed for roofing and wall cladding; Roofinox Plus 0.0157, a ribbed surface material for smoother roofing results and economy; and Roofinox Terne-Coated with a tin-plated surface that develops a matt grey patina finish over time.

Rowe’s roots run deep in this market. He joined Englert in ’92 as a member of its sales force and since then held a variety of management positions in regional and national sales, project management and product development. During his career, he was responsible for the development and launch of more than 30 roofing and wall panel products and programs and several strategic partner alliances for related materials.

Among his responsibilities at Roofinox will be the development of alliances with distributors and metal wholesalers, leading manufacturers for roofing and wall-cladding panels and sheet metal workshops—all looking for Roofinox stainless steel’s combination of high longevity with a dull surface without artificial coating. This natural metal was developed in Europe especially for roofing and wall cladding.

Rowe also brings to Roofinox a proven track record for creating, developing and completing architectural detailing and material specifications for high-end commercial, institutional, and residential projects, and will be responsible for counseling, assisting and training customers, including designers, specifiers and roofing contractors.

He is well-known in the roofing fabrication and contracting industry and early on in his career was associated with Bass Associates, a Massachusetts-based contracting company, installing metal roofing and wall panels.

PVC Liner Panels Are Easy to Clean and Install

AG-TUF and AG-TUF UV corrugated PVC liner panels from H&F Manufacturing Corp.

AG-TUF and AG-TUF UV corrugated PVC liner panels from H&F Manufacturing Corp.

AG-TUF and AG-TUF UV corrugated PVC liner panels from H&F Manufacturing Corp. are fire-retardant and provide efficient cladding of structures, offering many benefits for all types of agricultural and industrial applications.

AG-TUF and AG-TUF UV can be used in applications ranging from hog barns to dairy sheds, from poultry houses to wineries.

AG-TUF and AG-TUF UV panels are also ideal for interior applications such as car/truck wash liners, and commercial/residential garages. The panels withstand harsh treatment from chemicals, impacts from livestock and farm equipment, and are easy to clean and install.

AG-TUF UV panels are ideal for exterior applications where a heavier panel with all the same characteristics as the standard AG-TUF panel are required, but with added UV protection.