Lightweight and Fire-resistant Polymer Roofing Tops Tennessee Multipurpose Center

Opened in late 2013, the multipurpose LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge in Tennessee includes 232,000 square feet of meeting and exhibit space in a sprawling lodge-type setting. Topping off the impressive structure is 965 squares of Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes in the Verde blend of light and dark green tiles to complement the facility’s Smoky Mountain setting.

Topping off the LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge is 965 squares of Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes in the Verde blend of light and dark green tiles, which complement the facility’s Smoky Mountain setting.

Topping off the LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge is 965 squares of Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes in the Verde blend of light and dark green tiles, which complement the facility’s Smoky Mountain setting.

“The size of this complex plus the building code limitations made it impossible for us to specify weighty, expensive real slate for the roof,” says Michael Smelcer, principal with SRA Architects Inc. “After researching our options, we selected the DaVinci Valoré Slate product because of aesthetics, weight and Class A fire classification. The owners of the center were very open to using this particular polymer slate roofing because it gave them the mountain lodge look they desired.”

Single-width Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles resemble the classic traditional slate tile found on upscale projects throughout the world. Available in 12-inch tile widths, the 1/2-inch-thick Valoré Slate tiles are twice the thickness of most other synthetic slates. The roofing tiles come in a full spectrum of authentic slate colors and are made of pure virgin resins to guarantee a sustainable product. The 100 percent recyclable tiles resist impact, fire, hail, insects and algae.

Built over a two-year time frame by the team at Merit Construction Inc., Knoxville, Tenn., the LeConte Center has a 100,000-square-foot exhibit hall, 14 multipurpose rooms of varying sizes, along with pre-function and kitchen space, loading docks and spacious lobbies. Outdoor patios overlook the Little Pigeon River with views of Mount LeConte from many angles.

“Because of the close proximity to Little Pigeon River, our site design had to be low-impact,” Smelcer adds. “This included underground detention, rain gardens, vegetated swales and permeable pavers. We’ve provided similar architectural work for other large facilities, so our firm was confident in our ability to meet the design needs of this exciting project.”

The roof on the LeConte Center was installed by Detail Slate and Tile, Greenville, S.C. “We install several DaVinci roofs each year on residential and commercial projects,” says Joe Whitmore, vice president of operations for Detail Slate and Tile. “This was the largest project we’ve had the opportunity to install polymer roofing material and it went very smoothly. The result is a roof that blends in with its natural setting, is very durable, requires virtually no maintenance and will last for decades to come.”

Atlas Roofing Supports Wildlife Biologists Expedition With Build of Tiny House

Atlas Roofing is supporting a group of Canadian-based wildlife biologists this summer on their expedition to study the whale and dolphin species of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Led by Katy Gavrilchuk and David Gaspard, in association with a non-profit organization, the Mingan Island Cetacean Study, the expedition will focus on the long-term monitoring of large baleen whales on an important summer feeding ground. With the assistance of donations from Atlas Roofing and several other companies, Katy and David were able to build an environmentally sound tiny house that will serve as their mobile research base. It will assist in their expedition, while keeping their carbon footprint to a minimum.

“This expedition is truly one of a kind and Atlas is very excited to be a part of this innovative project,” said Tom Robertson, wall insulation business manager for Atlas. “What Katy and David are doing with their mobile research base is both smart and unique. We can’t wait to see what they are able to achieve in both their studies and in the name of environmental awareness with the help of the tiny home.”

Background on the Expedition
Studying mammals, such as dolphins and whales, requires the ability to move at any time in order to properly observe and track these amazing creatures. In the biologists’ previous expeditions, that level of flexibility was not economically or plausibly feasible. In addition, the biologists had a desire to raise awareness of the consequences of global consumption and reduce their own personal impact on the environment while still accomplishing their research.

In order to address these issues, they came up with the idea of constructing a tiny home on wheels, giving them the ability to overcome the logistical obstacles of studying mammals on the move, while also raising environmental awareness.

Building the Tiny House
For Katy and David’s tiny house, they developed a set of criteria for the products used in the construction and one of the most important was that the supplier companies be eco-conscious.

The wildlife biologists found that Atlas products are highly energy efficient, water and fire resistant and are manufactured with sustainable processes.

While the environmental aspect of the tiny homes insulation was important, Atlas had to meet other criteria as well including:
·High thermal resistance: A smaller space can lose heat quickly and the tiny home needed to be used in varying weather and temperature conditions.
·Lightweight: Since the tiny house would be attached to a trailer, the biologists had to respect the maximum load capacity and save weight where they could.

After the wildlife biologists determined Atlas met their needs both environmentally and logistically, EnergyShield PRO foam boards were installed in the building envelope. EnergyShield PRO wall insulation features a high R-value, Class A durable aluminum facer that also serves as a water resistive barrier, all helpful qualities for the tiny house. In addition, the insulation boards hold a Class A fire rating and can be used for exterior CI (continuous insulation) for installation over concrete, wood, wood stud and more. Because of size constraints, it was important to get the greatest insulation value possible from the few inches of space that could be allocated to insulation. With an R-value of 6.5 per inch, the highest available in the market, EnergyShield PRO was able to provide a total R-value of 22 in a 3.5 inch product. Overall, it took the wildlife biologists four days to install the Atlas insulation.

What’s Next?
The expedition is 670 miles long, and the field season will last until September 2016. The journey to the whales begins in Montreal, where the biologists will be stopping along the way in Quebec City, Tadoussac, Baie Comeau and Sept-Iles. The journey to the Gulf of St. Lawrence will serve two purposes: raise public awareness about living sustainably and ecologically, as well as monitoring for whales along the north coast of the Gulf. To follow Katy and David’s journey along the way, visit http://venturebiologists-tinyhome.weebly.com/ or BigWhaleTinyHouse.com.

DCE Rooftop Solar Racking System Receives Class A Fire Rating

DCE, a sister company of Daetwyler, a globally recognized provider of industrial equipment and services, precision machinery, and mechanical and engineering consulting has announced the designation of Class A fire rating for its Eco-Top rooftop solar racking system. The company voluntarily submitted their assembly for testing through Underwriters Laboratory (UL) fire testing as part of the firm’s proactive approach to safety and quality. “Throughout its entire 40-year history in the US, the Daetwyler brand has been driven by a desire to be the best at what we do for our clients,” says Bill Taylor, President of DCE. “Our solar energy company has been committed to achieving the most stringent testing to now include UL classifications for fire safety and other compliance considerations from our very first day in business.”

The Eco-Top racking system was awarded the Class A distinction in accordance with various UL requirements. Specifically, the system meets the standards set forth in UL 1703 (2014) Section 31.2 and UL 2703 (2012) in compliance with UL 790 (2004) “Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Roof Covering” for low slope applications. These test results will be used to further certify the Eco-Top line as fully UL2703 compliant – a standard required in some States like California for 2015 but that will be nationwide requirements by 2016. “The UL-certification process is very detailed and takes time for testing and evaluation,” explains Taylor. “We firmly believed in obtaining this certification sooner, rather than later, so that our clients could move forward with new installations without worrying about compliance or reinstallation in the future. If we are really going to support the growth of solar in a meaningful way, the worry-free safety aspect simply must be in place for everyone we serve.”

The immediate benefit of the new UL Class A Fire Rating is that all contractors, developers, installers, and other solar industry stakeholders will have a clearly recognizable standard of quality to look for when choosing racking and mounting products. The Eco-Top line is one of the most rigorously tested and most reliable systems available, while still offering competitive up-front costs and long-term savings on installation and maintenance.