Arkema to Introduce New Specification Guides at METALCON

Arkema Inc.will present its Kynar 500 FSF and Kynar Aquatec polyvinylidene fluoride resins used in high-performance coatings, along with Bostik’s hurricane-resistant adhesive products, at METALCON 2017, to be held Oct. 18–21 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Kynar 500 FSF resin-based coatings for aluminum, galvanized steel and aluminized steel exceed the exterior AAMA 2605 specification for resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss loss and chemicals. This next-generation Kynar 500 PVDF technology can also contribute to LEED credits, as it is produced using a patented fluorosurfactant-free process. 

According to the company, Kynar Aquatec PVDF emulsions provide the same long-lasting protection as Kynar 500 resin-based coatings in an easy-to-apply waterborne form. Given their excellent weatherability and exceptional resistance to dirt pickup and biological growth, Kynar Aquatec resin-based coatings offer a high-performance solution for metal restoration and repair projects, as well as a variety of other applications.
 
At the show, Arkema Inc. will introduce its new Kynar Aquatec specification guides for façade restoration and cool roof coatings applications. Each 14-page guide is divided into the Construction Specifier Institute’s three-part format and written in concise language to facilitate the evaluation of coating systems for meeting a metal restoration or cool-roof project’s long life, durability and sustainability goals.

During the event, Bostik, an Arkema company, will also present its full line of “smart adhesives” and sealants for a wide variety of metal construction applications. These high-performance products provide unprimed adhesion to Kynar 500 FSF and Kynar Aquatec resin-based coatings, are hurricane-strong (Miami-Dade County hurricane-approved) and come with a best-in-class warranty.
 
The new specification guides on field-applied fluoropolymer coatings for façade restoration and cool-roof applications will abe available at the Arkema exhibit at METALCON (booth 923). For more information, visit kynar500.comkynaraquatec.com and bostik-industrial.com.

Specialty Coating Creates Weathered Metal Appearance

Fabral has added the Weathered Metal Series to its line of Specialty Coatings. Fabral has added the Weathered Metal Series to its line of Specialty Coatings. Users have a choice of two stages of aged steel—moderately weathered Raw and more heavily weathered Robust. According to the manufacturer, each pattern is crafted and engineered to give any roofing or cladding project the authentic look of timelessness. The Weathered Metal Series is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology applied over GALVALUME-coated steel sheets.

Coating Protects Homes from Fire

Sun FireDefense’s SPF 3000 Flame Resistant coating is a post-treatment, interior/exterior fire retardant via a silicone ceramic coating that provides insulation and reflects heat up to 3,000 degrees F.

Sun FireDefense’s SPF 3000 Flame Resistant coating is a post-treatment, interior/exterior fire retardant via a silicone ceramic coating that provides insulation and reflects heat up to 3,000 degrees F.

More than 50 percent of homes destroyed in wild fires aren’t in the direct path of the fire. Burning embers that float for miles and land on rooftops and find their way under eaves cause most homes to burn. Sun FireDefense’s SPF 3000 Flame Resistant coating is a post-treatment, interior/exterior fire retardant via a silicone ceramic coating that provides insulation and reflects heat up to 3,000 degrees F. The coating protects exterior and interior woods, such as maple, mahogany, cedar shake shingles, open-air roof decking and structural lumber. The clear spray lasts seven to 10 years and has a five-year warranty for exterior and seven-year warranty for interior wood applications.

Coating Comes with List of Ingredients

Fluropon Pure is Valspar's newest addition to its Fluropon 70 percent PVDF family of coil and extrusion coatings.

Fluropon Pure is Valspar’s newest addition to its Fluropon 70 percent PVDF family of coil and extrusion coatings.

Fluropon Pure is Valspar’s newest addition to its Fluropon 70 percent PVDF family of coil and extrusion coatings. Formulated with material transparency in mind, Fluropon Pure does not include hexavalent chromium, lead, phthalates and PFOA, allowing the product to meet Living Building Challenge’s Red List 3.0-Compliant requirement. Fluropon Pure delivers the same capabilities of Valspar’s original Fluropon line, including cool roof formulations. Additionally, the coating is trusted to protect buildings against harsh outdoor elements, including humidity and corrosion, dirt, stains and chemicals.

Denver International Airport Is Reroofed with EPDM after a Hailstorm

The millions of passengers who pass through Denver International Airport each year no doubt have the usual list of things to review as they prepare for a flight: Checked baggage or carry-on? Buy some extra reading material or hope that the Wi-Fi on the plane is working? Grab
a quick bite before takeoff or take your chances with airline snacks?

The storm created concentric cracks at the point of hail impacts and, in most cases, the cracks ran completely through the original membrane.

The storm created concentric cracks at the point of hail impacts and, in most cases, the cracks ran completely through the original membrane.

Nick Lovato, a Denver-based roofing consultant, most likely runs through a similar checklist before each flight. But there’s one other important thing he does every time he walks through DIA. As he crosses the passenger bridge that connects the Jeppeson Terminal to Gate A, he always looks out at the terminal’s roof and notices with some pride that it is holding up well. Fifteen years ago, after a hailstorm shredded the original roof on Denver’s terminal building, his firm, CyberCon, Centennial, Colo., was brought in as part of the design team to assess the damage, assist in developing the specifications and oversee the installation of a new roof that would stand up to Denver’s sometimes unforgiving climate.

HAIL ALLEY

DIA, which opened in 1995, is located 23 miles northeast of the metropolitan Denver area, on the high mountain desert prairie of Colorado. Its location showcases its spectacular design incorporating peaked tent-like elements on its roof, meant to evoke the nearby Rocky Mountains or Native American dwellings or both. Unfortunately, this location also places the airport smack in the middle of what is known as “Hail Alley”, the area east of the Rockies centered in Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming. According to the Silver Spring, Md.- based National Weather Service, this area experiences an average of nine “hail days” a year. The reason this area gets so much hail is that the freezing point—the area of the atmosphere at 32 F or less—in the high plains is much closer to the ground. In other words, the hail doesn’t have time to thaw and melt before it hits the ground.

Not only are hail storms in this area relatively frequent, they also produce the largest hail in North America. The Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, Greenwood Village, Colo., says the area experiences three to four hailstorms a year categorized as “catastrophic”, causing at least $25 million in damage. Crops, commercial buildings, housing, automobiles and even livestock are at risk.

Statistically, more hail falls in June in Colorado than during any other month, and the storm that damaged DIA’s roof followed this pattern. In June 2001, the hailstorm swept over the airport. The storm was classified as “moderate” but still caused extensive damage to the flat roofs over Jeppesen Terminal and the passenger bridge. (It’s important to note that the storm did not damage the renowned tent roofs.) The airport’s original roof, non-reinforced PVC single-ply membrane, was “shredded” by the storm and needed extensive repair. Lovato and his team at CyberCon assessed the damage and recommended changes in the roofing materials that would stand up to Colorado’s climate. Lovato also oversaw the short-term emergency re- pairs to the roof and the installation of the new roof.

The initial examination of the roof also revealed that the existing polystyrene rigid insulation, ranging in thickness from 4 to 14 inches, was salvageable, representing significant savings.

The initial examination of the roof also revealed that the existing polystyrene rigid insulation, ranging in thickness from 4 to 14 inches, was salvageable, representing significant savings.

Under any circumstances, this would have been a challenging task. The fact that the work was being done at one of the busiest airports in the world made the challenge even more complex. The airport was the site of round-the-clock operations with ongoing public activity, meaning that noise and odor issues needed to be addressed. Hundreds of airplanes would be landing and taking off while the work was ongoing. And three months after the storm damaged the roof in Denver, terrorists attacked the World Trade Center, making security concerns paramount.

INSPECTION AND REROOFING

Lovato’s inspection of the hail damage revealed the extent of the problems with the airport roof. The original PVC membrane, installed in 1991, was showing signs of degradation and premature plasticizer loss prior to being pummeled by the June 2001 storm. The storm itself created concentric cracks at the point of hail impacts and, in most cases, the cracks ran completely through the membrane. In some instances, new cracks developed in the membranes that were not initially visible following the storm. The visible cracks were repaired immediately with EPDM primer and EPDM flashing tape until more extensive repairs could begin. Lovato notes that while nature caused the damage to DIA, nature was on the roofing team’s side when the repairs were being made: The reroofing project was performed during a drought, the driest in 50 years, minimizing worries about leaks into the terminal below and giving the construction teams almost endless sunny days to finish their job.

The initial examination of the roof also revealed that the existing polystyrene rigid insulation, ranging in thickness from 4 to 14 inches, was salvageable, representing significant savings. Although a single-ply, ballasted roof was considered and would have been an excellent choice in other locations, it was ruled out at the airport given that the original structure was not designed for the additional weight and substantial remediation at the roof edge perimeter possibly would have been required.

Lovato chose 90-mil black EPDM membrane for the new roof. “It’s the perfect roof for that facility. We wanted a roof that’s going to perform. EPDM survives the best out here, given our hailstorms,” he says. A single layer of 5/8-inch glass-faced gypsum board with a primed surface was installed over the existing polystyrene rigid insulation (secured with mechanical fasteners and metal plates) to provide a dense, hail-resistant substrate for the new membrane.

In some areas adjacent to the airport’s clerestory windows, the membrane received much more solar radiation than other areas of the roof.

In some areas adjacent to the airport’s clerestory windows, the membrane received much more solar radiation than other areas of the roof.

In some areas adjacent to the airport’s clerestory windows, the membrane received much more solar radiation than other areas of the roof. When ambient temperatures exceeded 100 F, some melting of the polystyrene rigid insulation occurred. “That section of the roof was getting double reflection,” Lovato points out. To reduce the impact of this reflection, the roof was covered with a high-albedo white coating, which prevented any further damage to the top layer of the polystyrene rigid insulation board and also met the aesthetic requirements of the building.

LONG-TERM SOLUTION

Lovato’s observations about the durability of EPDM are backed up by field experience and controlled scientific testing. In 2005, the EPDM Roofing Association, Washington, D.C., commissioned a study of the impact of hail on various roofing membranes. The study, conducted by Jim D. Koontz & Associates Inc., Hobbs, N.M., showed EPDM outperforms all other available membranes in terms of hail resistance. As would be expected, 90-mil membrane offers the highest resistance against punctures. But even thinner 45-mil membranes were affected only when impacted by a 3-inch diameter ice ball at 133.2 feet per second, more than 90 mph—extreme conditions that would rarely be experienced even in the harshest climates.

Lovato travels frequently, meaning he can informally inspect the DIA roof at regular intervals as he walks through the airport. He’s confident the EPDM roof is holding up well against the Denver weather extremes, and he’s optimistic about the future. With justified pride, Lovato says, “I would expect that roof to last 30-plus years.”

PHOTOS: CyberCon

Roof Materials

90-mil Non-reinforced EPDM: Firestone Building Products
Gypsum Board: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime from Georgia-Pacific
Plates and Concrete Fasteners: Firestone Building Products
White Elastomeric Coating: AcryliTop from Firestone Building Products
Existing Polystyrene: Dow

Silicone Roof Coating Fixes Roof Leaks

Gaco Western's GacoElastomeric Silicone Roof Coating

Gaco Western’s GacoElastomeric Silicone Roof Coating

Gaco Western‘s GacoElastomeric Silicone Roof Coating offers customers a better choice for fixing roof leaks. Because acrylic elastomerics have issues with ponded water and UV degradation, they do not provide a lasting solution.

Not only does GacoElastomeric withstand ponded water, it remains flexible over time whereas acrylics become hard and brittle. It has higher solids than acrylics so more coating stays on the roof to provide better coverage and because of the unique chemistry it can be rained on after just two hours and won’t wash off the roof.

Reduce Roof Temperatures by as Much as 20 Percent

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface.

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface.

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface. The granulated, uncoated finish is designed to be a cost-effective way to lower commercial building energy consumption and increase occupant comfort. It handles like a standard roofing product without special installation requirements, is more aesthetically pleasing, and yet maintains a high solar reflectivity, reducing roof temperatures as much as 20 percent.

CoolStar products meet ENERGY STAR and California Title 24 requirements. CoolStar also qualifies for LEED points and meets NAHB National Green Building Standards.

CoolStar is designed to work with a wide range of roof systems, including built-up roofing, SBS, APP and self-adhering modified bitumen. It is extremely flexible and durable, because of the layering of high-quality reinforcements, heavy asphalt coating and highly reflective ceramic granules. This toughness combats the negative effects of natural expansion and contraction caused by heating, cooling, light and moisture. In addition, the brilliant white CoolStar surface is factory applied for hassle-free, one-step installation, which helps reduce labor costs.

GAF Acquires Quest Construction Products

GAF announced it has completed the acquisition of Quest Construction Products (QCP), a former division of Quest Specialty Chemicals and a supplier of fluid-applied roofing systems and roof-coating products in North America. The transaction, which also provides GAF with a strong presence in coating solutions for pavement and vertical surfaces, is expected to accelerate the robust growth of GAF’s commercial business.

QCP brings excellent brands and product lines to GAF including the Hydro-Stop family of liquid membrane products, the United Coatings line of coating solutions, and the StreetBond pavement coatings. The acquisition instantly gives GAF a position in a high-tech, environmentally friendly, and economically efficient segment of the commercial roofing business.

QCP’s strategically positioned geographic footprint and unique technical expertise in the field will provide GAF with additional solutions to bring to its customers. QCP’s products have gained rapid acceptance in the marketplace due largely to their reflectivity, ease of application, and energy-efficiency. These highly practical and effective products will complement GAF’s existing offerings of roofing technologies and commercial solar solutions.

“This acquisition combines a North American manufacturer and marketer of roofing products with a producer of fluid-applied solutions,” says Bob Tafaro, president and CEO of GAF. “We have acquired excellent brands and will provide an enhanced platform for their growth. QCP’s differentiated and innovative products will also boost our commercial business’s competitive advantage by offering a broader range of solutions to the market. We are empowering our contractors with the products they need to grow their businesses while strengthening our relationships with strategic building owners.”

“This acquisition demonstrates GAF’s ongoing commitment to growth and leadership in the commercial roofing industry. It is in keeping with the extraordinary investments we have made and continue to make to add capacity and gain share in commercial solutions such as insulation (ISO), TPO, and PVC single-ply membranes. We know that the QCP team will further enrich our culture of achievement, and we look forward to working together on a smooth integration.”

Traditional Wood Shakes Are Made of High-strength Steel

The Roser Stone Wood Shake pairs the aesthetic beauty of the traditional wood shake with the low maintenance and exceptional performance of high-strength steel.

The Roser Stone Wood Shake pairs the aesthetic beauty of the traditional wood shake with the low maintenance and exceptional performance of high-strength steel.

The Roser Stone Wood Shake pairs the aesthetic beauty of the traditional wood shake with the low maintenance and exceptional performance of high-strength steel. Tested against the elements, Stone Wood Shake by Roser has been tempered against hurricanes, fires, hail storms and earthquakes and has proven its durability and protection for your greatest investment—your home.

The roofing system includes:

  • Clear acrylic over-glaze protective coating
  • Roofing granule coating
  • Adhesive basecoat
  • Protective surface coating
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Commercial-grade steel core
  • Protective surface coating

The Stone Coated Steel Roofing System, manufactured by Roser, offers the advantage of high-strength steel with a look a variety of traditional and innovative architectural styles. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1,000 pounds per square, the Roser Stone Coated Roofing System, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane. While the standard shingle and shake roofs naturally deteriorate over time, the Roser Roofing System will continue to maintain its beautiful appearance and requires the least amount of maintenance in the roofing industry. An eco-friendly Roser roof will increase the resale value of your home not only with its elegance, but also with its proven durability.

About Roser Roofing System:

  • Installs direct to deck or over battens.
  • Stone surface resists fading and provides for a quiet roof.
  • Fastener design features a confirmed and a locking profile.
  • Low-maintenance roof system with water-shedding performance.
  • Storm driven engineering design is proven throughout the world.
  • Includes the stringent Miami-Dade Approval.

RCMA Offers an Educational Presentation on Reflective Roof Coatings

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) has launched its Speakers Bureau program to offer an educational presentation on reflective roof coatings. RCMA’s Speakers Bureau consists of several RCMA members with expertise on the topic who have volunteered to deliver presentations throughout the country.

This presentation, titled “Reflective Roof Coatings: Cool Stories,” is approximately one hour in length, and discusses the key benefits and the environmental importance of reflective roof coatings used on low-slope roof systems. The science behind reflective roof coatings is presented in an easy-to-understand format and real-world case studies are presented to illustrate the information presented. The presentation content is intended to enable attendees to:

  • Understand the benefits that reflective roof coatings impart on low-slope roof systems.
  • Recognize why reflective roofs are environmentally important and comprehend the science behind how reflective roofs save energy.
  • Determine best practices for preparing a roof membrane and application methods for reflective roof coatings on low-slope roof systems.
  • Identify payback, energy savings, and other non-quantifiable benefits by evaluating several real-world roof-reflectivity case studies.

RCMA is an approved continuing education provider with the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and RCI Inc. By attending the course, attendees qualify to earn 1 AIA General Learning Unit Hour (1 LU Hour) as part of AIA’s Continuing Education System or 1 RCI Continuing Education Hour (CEH).

Groups interested in offering this presentation at an upcoming meeting or event should contact RCMA Staff Associate Cecily Alfonsi to participate.