Silicone Sealant Repairs Roofs, Masonry and Sheet Metal

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

Mule-Hide Products Co. has added 100 percent Silicone Sealant choices to its Silicone Roof Coating System, expanding the color offering to include clear and the packaging options to include 10-ounce tubes.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant is a mastic version of the Mule-Hide 100 percent Silicone Roof Coating. It is a moisture-cure silicone sealant designed for use in sealing and repairing roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners. 
 
The addition of clear sealant allows contractors to complete projects that would otherwise require color-matching. It is available packaged in tubes only.

In addition to clear, the tubes are available filled with white sealant. The plastic cartridges are an option for use in smaller applications or when precision is required. They also can be submerged under water to repair roof leaks, gutters and downspouts.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant provides adhesion to concrete, masonry, polyurethane foam, EPDM membranes, TPO membranes, aged PVC membranes, aged acrylic coatings, granular cap sheets, wood, metals, Kynar finishes and most other building materials. When using 100 percent Silicone Sealant with a TPO roof membrane, Mule-Hide Si TPO Primer must be applied first. 
 
The sealant has minimal odor, making it contractor- and building-occupant-friendly. Its volatile organic compound (VOC) content of less than 10 grams per liter makes it acceptable for use in areas with VOC restrictions. It does not corrode metals.
 

The Integration of Roof and Brick Requires Concise Details

PHOTO 1: The through-wall flashing stainless-steel drip can be observed projecting nicely from the wall—but the termination of the roof base flashing more than 1-inch below resulted in a section of the brick wall that allows water to pass into the wall below the through-wall flashing and behind the roof base flashing, resulting in the damage seen in Photo 2.

PHOTO 1: The through-wall flashing stainless-steel drip can be observed projecting nicely from the wall—but the termination of the roof base flashing more than 1-inch below resulted in a section of the brick wall that allows water to pass into the wall below the through-wall flashing and behind the roof base flashing, resulting in the damage seen in Photo 2.

Projects are perceived to be successful by their ability to prevent disturbance from weather, including rain. Have you ever heard two architects talking about Frank Lloyd Wright?

“What a genius! His spatial conception is magnificent, even after 100 years.”

“But all his buildings leak!”

I used to give a talk to University of Illinois architecture students in which I told them the quickest way to go out of business is to be sued. The quickest way to be sued is to have a building allow moisture intrusion. If he were alive today, Frank Lloyd Wright—God rest his soul—would be in jail (and a few current architects may be well on their way). Owners are not very kind when their “babies” leak.

Many roof termination interfaces are never even thought about by designers and are left to the roofing contractor to work out. This is not a recommended practice. One such condition—that every architect should be able to detail—is how the roof base flashing terminates at a masonry wall that has through-wall flashing and weeps at the base of the wall above the roof. I believe so fervently that architects should be proficient in detailing these conditions that I believe it should be required to procure their license.

WHY THE IMPORTANCE

The interface of roof base flashing and masonry through-wall systems occurs on a majority of commercial construction projects. If this transition is not performed correctly, moisture intrusion behind the roof base flashing to the interior will occur (see Photo 2). When this occurs, besides angering owners, it befuddles the architect. Photo 1 (left) shows a nice through-wall flashing drip extended out from the wall, weeps and roofing terminated with a termination bar and sealant. What could be wrong?

PHOTO 2: Moisture intrusion at the base of this wall was the result of water circumventing the through-wall flashing and roof base flashing termination seen in Photo 1. A big concern with conditions, such as this, is the propensity of the materials to promote mold growth.

PHOTO 2: Moisture intrusion at the base of this wall was the result of water circumventing the through-wall flashing
and roof base flashing termination seen in Photo 1. A big concern with conditions, such as this, is the propensity of the materials to promote mold growth.

The exposed brick above the termination bar and below the stain- less-steel drip of the through-wall flashing is susceptible to water flowing down the surface of the brick. Water passing through the brick above is supposed to be weeped out; however, at the exposed brick above the termination bar, the water moves into the wall and has nowhere to go but inward.

The cost to repair these conditions can be, depending on the conditions, expensive. Repairs often require brick removal and through-wall flashing mitigation. In this particular case, be- cause there is a stainless-steel drip, my team recommended a stainless-steel counterflashing be pop-riveted to the drip and extended over the termination bar.

CHALLENGES

Why is the interface of roof base flashing and masonry through-wall systems so difficult for architects and roof consultants to detail? I believe it is because they have no clue it needs to be detailed as an interface, especially because detailing of appropriate through-wall systems is so sporadic. I endeavor in this article to change at least the knowledge part.

The detailing of this condition not only requires the ability to interface two building systems, but also requires considerable time to ensure specification of wall sectional details and roofing details are appropriately placed where the responsible trades will see them.

PHOTO 3: Still under construction, the stainless-steel counterflashing has been installed. The roof base flashing will terminate below the stainless-steel counterflashing receiver. Hutch prefers brick below the through-wall flashing and above the roof deck, though the masonry mortar joints below the through-wall flashing should have been struck flush.

PHOTO 3: Still under construction, the stainless-steel counterflashing has
been installed. The roof base flashing will terminate below the stainless-steel counterflashing receiver. Hutch prefers brick below the through-wall flashing and above the roof deck, though the masonry mortar joints below the through-wall flashing should have been struck flush.

NEW CONSTRUCTION

New construction provides us a clean slate to “do it right the first time”. The first order of business is to determine the height of the base flashing. This can be tricky with tapered insulation and slope structures with saddles. Let’s consider the following examples (see Detail 4, page 3):

EXAMPLE 1
We are dealing with a flat roof, tapered insulation, cover board and bead-foam insulation in ASHRAE Climate Zone 5, which has an R-30 minimum.

  • The roof drain is 32-feet away from the wall. Code requires 5.2 inches of insulation at 4 feet from the drain, so let’s assume 5 inches at the drain.
  • 1/4-inch tapered starts at 1/2 inch at 32 feet. That’s 8 inches, plus the starting thickness of 1/2 inch, which equals 8 1/2 inches.
  • Cover-board thickness is 1/2 inch.
  • Bead foam thickness is 3/16 inch for each layer. Let’s assume five layers, so 1 foot of bead foam.
  • Thus, the surface of the roof at the wall will be 15 inches above the roof deck.

Because you would like to work at the masonry coursing level and given that concrete masonry units (CMU) are nominal 8 inches, you are looking at placing the through-wall flashing 24 inches above the roof deck.

This 24-inch dimension of where to place the through-wall flashing needs to be placed on the building section and/or wall section because the mason, which will be onsite prior to the roofing contractor, will need to know this information.

This 24-inch height begs another termination question: What occurs at the roof edge with this height? Hold that thought for now. Terminations at intersections will be discussed in future articles.

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Insulation Can Act as Standalone Underlayment

Environmentally Safe Products Inc.’s Therma Sheet roofing underlayment has been certified by the International Code Council Evaluation Service.

Environmentally Safe Products Inc.’s Therma Sheet roofing underlayment has been certified by the International Code Council Evaluation Service.

Environmentally Safe Products Inc.’s Therma Sheet roofing underlayment has been certified by the International Code Council Evaluation Service. The designation means Therma Sheet meets the code requirements of a standalone roofing underlayment for the building industry. Previously, code required roofers to install Therma Sheet over a layer of felt paper or another underlayment. Therma Sheet insulation is constructed of 99 percent pure polished aluminum facings, heat laminated to a closed-cell polyethylene foam core. This patented process makes Therma Sheet a thermal and moisture barrier under metal roofing, stone-coated steel, concrete, clay tile and more.

Cemen Tech Commits to Hiring Veterans

Cemen Tech, a manufacturer of mobile concrete mixing systems, partnered with Home Base Iowa and Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR). The company has committed to hiring veterans who are transitioning out of service to the country and back to civilian life over the next three years.

“Cemen Tech recognizes the significant contribution these veterans make to our country and we are honored to be part of Home Base Iowa and the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve,” says Connor Deering, president and CEO of Cemen Tech. “Veterans exhibit strong leadership skills, integrity and loyalty. Their work ethic is an ideal fit with our company’s core values.”

In the coming years, Cemen Tech will be looking to hire veterans to fill roles in engineering, finance, supply, clerical and manufacturing at its headquarters in Indianola, Iowa. Cemen Tech manufactures mobile and stationary concrete mixing systems and silos. Cemen Tech supplies the concrete mixers that the U.S. military uses to rebuild the infrastructure around the world.

Home Base Iowa was formed through a partnership between members of Iowa’s military community, Iowa Workforce Development, Iowa Economic Development Authority and the Iowa Governor. The program provides veterans with resources to find employment, welcoming communities, and ongoing engagement with other military families.

ESGR is an agency of the Department of Defense. According to the ESGR, they serve as a proactive liaison between military leaders and employers to address issues and develop solutions to problems that arise because of employee participation in the National Guard and Reserves.

Sealant Is Elastomer-based

Lucas #5400 is a high-performance, thermoplastic elastomer-based roofing sealant.

Lucas #5400 is a high-performance, thermoplastic elastomer-based roofing sealant.

Lucas #5400 is a high-performance, thermoplastic elastomer-based roofing sealant. The multipurpose sealant adheres to most surfaces, including asphalt, shingles, modified bitumen, metal, Kynar, wood, concrete, tile, masonry and others. It is available in three grades: brush grade, trowel grade and caulk grade. Lucas #5400 is manufactured from UV-stable SEBS thermoplastic elastomers while the asphalt portion of the formula adheres to asphaltic materials and other surfaces. The product will not crack or harden over time and is easy to apply even in cold weather.

ECHOTape Repair Tape Now Sold by The Home Depot via HomeDepot.com

Pressure-sensitive tape supplier, ECHOtape’s full repair line will be sold online by a home improvement retailer, The Home Depot via HomeDepot.com. Launched in 2014 at the beginning of the third quarter, the repair line provides contractors with an alternative to duct tapes, and is designed to deliver solutions for repairs, sealing and waterproofing.

“We are very excited to be working with such a trusted name in home improvement like The Home Depot,” says Risa Edelstein, director of marketing for ECHOtape. “We dedicate our business to providing the ultimate tape solutions for a variety of applications and now contractors, remodelers, retrofitters and builders across the nation can purchase our performance-based repair tapes.”

ECHOtape’s comprehensive repair line is geared towards building contractors. In total, seven tapes are available now on HomeDepot.com. The products include three types of repair tapes with different color options:

  • All Purpose Repair Tape: This tape leaves little residue in comparison to a duct tape and is thick and flexible. Ideal for stretching and wrapping, this tape can be used for temporary repairs as well as for rips, tears, gashes and holes. This tape is available in clear and white.
  • All Weather Repair Tape: This tape is made with a butyl-based adhesive, which makes it sticky enough for applications to concrete, stone, wood, glass, metal, plastic, cement, plywood, and damp fabrics, and is ideal for sealing holes and cracks. It is puncture- and tear-resistant, waterproof, and will not crack in temperatures as low as -30 F or fail in temperatures as high as 200 F if applied correctly. The tape is available in white, silver and black.
  • All Leak Repair Tape: Also made with butyl-based adhesive, it is considered an extreme adhesive tape with double the stickiness of the All Weather Repair Tape. It shares many of the same qualities, including being waterproof, but is also resistant to corrosion. Because of its high level of adhesive, it can be used for repairing leaks in roof joints, skylights, RVs, pools and ponds. This tape is available in black and white.

“We are committed to making our products widely available to contractors in the U.S.,” says Edelstein. “This is an important step in increasing convenience for purchasers, and we look forward to continuing to expand our reach and product availability.”

Screw Fastens Wood to Concrete

The WOOD-TO-CONCRETE Tapping Screw from Triangle Fastener Corp.

The WOOD-TO-CONCRETE Tapping Screw from Triangle Fastener Corp.

The WOOD-TO-CONCRETE Tapping Screw from Triangle Fastener Corp. was developed for attaching 2X wood to concrete, masonry or block. Engineered with a proprietary “Hex-Countersunk” drive, it provides the driving stability of a hex drive with the flush mounting feature of a countersunk-head wood screw. The product has been coated for corrosion protection even in treated wood. Case hardened dual thread taps concrete and provides pullout resistance while the nail point guides the screw into concrete and assists in removing debris in the hole.

Several ‘Sandwich’ Roof Assemblies Mitigate Sound Transfer

We all want a roof over our heads to protect us from the cold winter months, hot summer months and precipitation year round. How much thought goes into the sound-control construction of a roof, though? Have you considered the acoustic properties of your roofing system? Admittedly, acoustics is not a topic that many roofing contractors think about. The construction of a roof, however, can have a significant impact on the sound quality of the building interior. While this may not seem important in every project, it can be a critical element of the design for concert halls, theaters, auditoria and even school classrooms.

Sound Isolation

The acoustics of a space depend on many criteria, including sound isolation, sound reflection, impact noise and sound transfer. In many cases, particularly in noisy, urban environments, there is a need to prevent loud outside noises, such as traffic, sirens and airplane noise, from entering quiet spaces. Sound isolation depends on the entire envelope of a space, including external walls, windows and roofs.

Green roofs, particularly the “intensive” version, which includes several inches of heavier-weight soil, can provide effective sound control.

Green roofs, particularly the “intensive” version, which includes several inches of heavier-weight soil, can provide effective
sound control.

Historically, roofs over sound-sensitive spaces have been built with fairly dense materials, such as concrete, which by themselves are relatively effective in blocking sound transfer. As construction methods have developed, however, more lightweight construction is being used. If thought and care are not given to the assembly, these lightweight construction methods can cause serious issues with acoustics. Rain noise, mechanical noise and other exterior sounds can all transfer readily through a thin, lightweight roofing system.

In an effort to use lighter-weight construction, a “sandwich” assembly may be used to mitigate sound transfer. Similar to an Oreo cookie, a sandwich assembly’s outer layers are comprised of a heavy, dense material, and the inner filling consists of insulation and/or airspace. The materials of this assembly can differ from concrete to roofing board, rigid insulation to fibrous insulation, gypsum board to acoustic ceiling tiles. The components can be combined in a variety of ways, each with varying levels of sound isolation.

One of the principle phrases often heard when discussing sound isolation is “mass air mass”, which refers to the separation of two bodies of mass by an air space. The greater the mass and the deeper the air space, the more sound isolation will result. For this reason, a heavy mass, such as 5-inch concrete, followed by a deep air space, such as an 18- to 24-inch ceiling cavity in which ducts are run, followed by a continuous layer of drywall ceiling will provide a high level of sound isolation. Additional steps, like adding sound-absorptive material to the air space and/or using resilient connections when supporting drywall, further improves the sound isolation of the assembly.

Sandwich Roof Assemblies

Several sandwich roof assembly approaches are possible, including:

Good: Multiple layers of dense roofing board (at 2.5 psf per board, a final density of 10 psf or four-ply is often recommended) on either side of insulation, which ideally would be a sound-absorptive fibrous fill, like mineral wool, can reduce sound transmission. This approach is similar to a “floating floor”, often used in interior spaces to isolate sound transfer from one room to another. (Equivalent Sound Transmission Class, or STC, ratings can range from low 50s to low 60s, depending on whether a ceiling is included below the deck.)

Drywall ceilings hung on resilient hangers in conjunction with a lightweight roofing system provide even greater sound isolation by virtue of the resilient connection or “decoupling” of the drywall layer from the rest of the building structure.

Drywall ceilings hung on resilient hangers in conjunction with a lightweight roofing system provide even greater sound isolation by virtue of the resilient connection or “decoupling” of the drywall layer from the rest of the building structure.

Good: Green roofs, particularly the “intensive” version, which includes several inches of heavier-weight soil, can provide effective sound control. These can be part of a sandwich approach with airspace or rigid insulation between soil and a more-dense roofing material, similar to the roofing board described in the previous example. The mass-air-mass combination is similar to the approach just mentioned, and the benefits of green roofs appeal to many building owners for a multitude of reasons, including minimizing urban heat islands and storm-water management.

Good: A 5-inch slab of normal-weight concrete (150 pcf) has a density of 62 psf. This tried-and-true method is still used regularly and often proves to be the most cost-effective method of enclosing a space. The best sound isolation will occur if this is used in conjunction with a ceiling below, but on its own it still provides a reasonable level of isolation in many environments. This isn’t technically a sandwich system unless paired with a ceiling below or a green roof above. (Equivalent STC ratings can range from low 50s to low 80s. The highest ratings require pairing a resiliently hung ceiling with the concrete, as described under “Multi-function Roof Assemblies”.) IMAGES: Threshold Acoustics LLC [Read more…]

New Cool Roof Colors in Concrete Roof Tile Product Line

The Madera 900 Tahoe Blend, which is included in the Boral Concrete Roof Tile product line

The Madera 900 Tahoe Blend, which is included in the Boral Concrete Roof Tile product line

Boral Roofing unveiled its latest offerings in its Cool Roof portfolio during the recent International Builders’ Show (IBS) in Las Vegas.

The two Cool Roof colors making their debut at IBS 2014 are the Saxony 900 Slate Charcoal Blend and the Madera 900 Tahoe Blend, both of which are included in the Boral Concrete Roof Tile product line. These new colors have been designed to accommodate the updated California Code of Regulations, Title 24, Part 6. A major revision of the energy code involves new prescriptive Cool Roof requirements in select climate zones for low-rise residential steep-slope roofs. The change has resulted in a sizable increase in the aged Solar Reflective Index (SRI) for all roofing materials: from 10 to 16 or greater.

The new additions to Boral Roofing’s color portfolio ensure that Cool Roof requirements are met without sacrificing beauty or performance. The Saxony 900 Slate Charcoal Blend, which comes from Boral Roofing’s manufacturing plant in Rialto, Calif., perfectly complements the inherent beauty in French and Tudor architectural styles. Saxony Slate emulates the distinctive appearance of natural slate, while delivering the advantages of concrete tile. The Madera 900 Tahoe Blend, which is manufactured in Boral Roofing’s plant in Gilroy, Calif., offers an authentic replication of a hand-split cedar shake roof that is flexible enough to complement any architectural style. The award-winning Madera 900 is the most affordable, authentic hand-split wood shake replacement product available with all the benefits of concrete tile.

Boral Roofing’s latest Cool Roof technology is also being showcased via a rooftop display that demonstrates the real-time thermal performance of Boral Tile compared to other roofing materials. According to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, an independent testing agency, a family in a typical single-family house could save up to 22 percent per year on heating and cooling costs compared to the standard asphalt shingle roof.* A single family house with a Boral Cool Roof System could save an average of $15 to $20 per month immediately compared to a standard asphalt shingle roof, and, as energy rates rise year over year, savings could increase up to $20,000 over 30 years.**

Boral Roofing is the first clay roof tile manufacturer in the world to receive the prestigious Cradle-to-Cradle Gold Certification for environmentally sustainable products. Boral Clay Roof Tiles have a recycled content of up to 59 percent and come in an array of rich, kiln-fired hues with unrivaled color retention. Boral Concrete Roof Tiles contain no chemical preservatives and are up to 100 percent recyclable.

*Steep-slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile with and without Cool Pigmented Colors, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2005. Results vary based on profile of tile installed, location, weather and other factors.

**Results based on a 22 square roof in Southern California with no additional energy efficient upgrades during an average annual weather pattern, annual inflation rate of 3 percent, and annual energy cost increase of 3.5 percent. Savings may vary based on location, weather and other factors. Savings estimates are based on comparison to a similar size asphalt shingle roof.

Patch a Variety of Poured Roof Decks

SECUROCK Gypsum-Concrete Patch

SECUROCK Gypsum-Concrete Patch

SECUROCK Gypsum-Concrete Patch, formerly known as PYROFILL Gypsum Concrete, is a high-performing patch solution that delivers a professional finish on a variety of poured roof decks. It features more than 500 psi of compressive strength while its fast-setting properties enable foot traffic and fasteners within four hours of application.

  • Easy application to patch many different types of roof decks such as gypsum roof decks.
  • Mill-formulated and composed of specially calcined gypsum and wood chips or shavings.
  • Provides excellent fire performance – non-combustible in accordance with ASTM E136, and it’s fire rated and approved for use in UL Roof Deck Systems (P676, P503, P207, P229, P505, P507)
  • Manufactured to conform to ASTM C317, “Standard Specification for Gypsum Concrete”