Designing Thermally Efficient Roof Systems

Photo 1. Designing and installing thermal insulation in two layers with offset and staggered joints prevents vertical heat loss through the insulation butt joints. Images: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd.

“Energy efficiency,” “energy conservation,” and “reduction of energy use” are terms that are often used interchangeably, but do they mean the same thing? Let’s look at some definitions courtesy of Messrs. Merriam and Webster, along with my interpretation and comment:

· Energy efficiency: Preventing the wasteful use of a particular resource. (Funny thing, though — when you type in “energy efficiency” in search engines, you sometimes get the definition for “energy conservation.”

· Energy conservation: The total energy of an isolated system remains constant irrespective of whatever internal changes may take place, with energy disappearing in one form reappearing in another. (Think internal condensation due to air leaking, reducing thermal R-value of the system.)

· Reduction: The action of making a specific item (in this case energy use) smaller or less in amount. (Think cost savings.)

· Conservation: Prevention of the wasteful use of a resource.

So, looking at this article’s title, what does “designing a thermally efficient roof system” imply?

Photo 2. Rigid insulation is often cut short of penetrations, in this case the roof curb. To prevent heat loss around the perimeter of the curb, the void has been sprayed with spray polyurethane foam insulation. Open joints in the insulation have also been filled with spray foam insulation. Note too, the vapor retarder beyond the insulation.

I conducted an informal survey of architects, building managers, roof consultants and building owners in Chicago, and they revealed that the goals of a thermally efficient roof system include:

  • Ensuring energy efficiency, thus preventing the wasteful use of energy.
  • Reducing energy use, thus conserving a resource.
  • Being energy conservative so that outside forces do not reduce the energy-saving capabilities of the roof system.

Unfortunately, I would hazard a guess and say that most new roof systems being designed do not achieve energy conservation.

Why is this important? The past decade has seen the world building committee strive to ensure the energy efficiency of our built environment.

A building’s roof is often the most effective part of the envelope in conserving energy. The roof system, if designed properly, can mitigate energy loss or gain and allow the building’s mechanical systems to function properly for occupant comfort.

Photo 3. Rigid insulation is often not tight to perimeter walls or roof edges. Here the roofing crew is spraying polyurethane foam insulation into the void to seal it from air and heat transfer. Once the foam rises it will be trimmed flush with the surface of the insulation.

Energy conservation is increasingly being viewed as an important performance objective for governmental, educational, commercial and industrial construction. Interest in the conservation of energy is high and is being actively discussed at all levels of the building industry, including federal and local governments; bodies that govern codes and standards; and trade organizations.

As with many systems, it is the details that are the difference between success and failure on the roof. This article will be based on the author’s 35 years of roof system design and in-field empirical experience and will review key design elements in the detailing of energy-conserving roof systems. Best design and detail practices for roofing to achieve energy conservation will be delineated, in-field examples reviewed and details provided.  

Advocacy for Improvement

In the past decade, American codes and standard associations have increased the required thermal values every updating cycle. They have realized the importance of energy conservation and the value of an effective thermal layer at the roof plane. They have done this by prescribing thermal R-values by various climatic zones defined by the American Society of Heating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, now better known by its acronym ASHRAE. Additionally, two layers of insulation with offset joints are now prescribed in the IECC (International Energy Conservation Code). Furthermore, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has also realized the importance of conserving energy and defined an energy conservation goal called the 2030 Challenge, in which they challenge architects, owners and builders to achieve “zero energy” consuming buildings by 2030.

These codes, standards and laudable goals have gone a long way to improving energy conservation, but they are short on the details that are needed to achieve the vision.

Energy Conservation Is More Than Insulation

Roofs are systems and act as a whole. Thus, a holistic view of the system needs to be undertaken to achieve a greater good. Roof system parameters such as the following need to be considered:

  • Air and/or vapor barriers and their transitions at walls, penetrations and various roof edges.
  • Multiple layers of insulation with offset joints.
  • Preventing open voids in the thermal layers at perimeters and penetrations.
  • Protection of the thermal layer from physical damage above and warm moist air from below.
Photo 4. The mechanical fasteners below the roof membrane used to secure the insulation conduct heat through them to the fastening plate. The resultant heat loss can be observed in heavy frost and snowfall.

Air intrusion into the roof system from the interior can have extremely detrimental consequences. In fact, Oak Ridge National Laboratory research has found that air leakage is the most important aspect in reducing energy consumption. Interior air is most often conditioned, and when it moves into a roof system, especially in the northern two-thirds of the country where the potential for condensation exists, the results can include wet insulation, deteriorating insulation facers, mold growth and rendering the roof system vulnerable to wind uplift. Preventing air intrusion into the roof system from the interior of the building needs to be considered in the design when energy efficiency is a goal. Thus, vapor retarders should be considered for many reasons, as they add quality and resiliency to the roof system (refer to my September/October 2014 Roofing article, “Vapor Retarders: You Must Prevent Air and Vapor Transport from a Building’s Interior into the Roof System”). The transition of the roof vapor/air barrier and the wall air barrier should be detailed and the contractors responsible for sealing and terminations noted on the details.

One layer of insulation results in joints that are often open or could open over time, allowing heat to move from the interior to the exterior — a thermal short. Energy high to energy low is a law of physics that can be severe. Thus, the International Code Council now prescribes two layers of insulation with offset joints. (See Photo 1.)

When rigid insulation is cut to conform around penetrations, roof edges and rooftop items, the cuts in the insulation are often rough. This results in voids, often from the top surface of the roof down to the roof deck. With the penetration at the roof deck also being rough, heat loss can be substantial. Thus, we specify and require that these gaps be filled with spray foam insulation. (See Photos 2 and 3.)

Insulation Material Characteristics and Energy Conservation

In addition to the system components’ influence on energy loss, the insulation material characteristics should also be considered. The main insulation type in the United States is polyisocyanurate. Specifiers need to know the various material characteristics in order to specify the correct material. Characteristics to consider are:

Photo 5. Heat loss through the single layer insulation and the mechanical fasteners was so great that it melted the snow, and when temperatures dropped to well below freezing, the melted snow froze. This is a great visual to understand the high loss of heat through mechanical fasteners.
  • Density: 18, 20, 22 or 25 psi; nominal or minimum.
  • Facer type: Fiber reinforced paper or coated fiberglass.
  • Dimensional stability: Will the material change with influences from moisture, heat or foot traffic.
  • Thermal R-value.

In Europe, a popular insulation is mineral wool, which is high in fire resistance, but as with polyisocyanurate, knowledge of physical characteristic is required:

  • Density: If you don’t specify the density of the insulation board, you get 18 psi nominal. Options include 18, 20 and 25 psi; the higher number is more dimensionally stable. We specify 25 psi minimum.
  • Protection required: Cover board or integral cover board.
  • Thermal R-value.

Protecting the Thermal Layer

It is not uncommon for unknowledgeable roof system designers or builders looking to reduce costs to omit or remove the cover board. The cover board, in addition to providing an enhanced surface for the roof cover adhesion, provides a protective layer on the top of the insulation, preventing physical damage to the insulation from construction activities, owner foot traffic and acts of God.

The underside of the thermal layers should be protected as well from the effects of interior building air infiltration. An effective air barrier or vapor retarder, in which all the penetrations, terminations, transitions and material laps are detailed and sealed, performs this feat. If a fire rating is required, the use of gypsum and gypsum-based boards on roof decks such as steel, wood, cementitious wood fiber can help achieve the rating required.

Insulation Attachment and Energy Efficiency

The method in which the insulation is attached to the roof deck can influence the energy-saving potential of the roof system in a major way. This fact is just not acknowledged, as I see some mechanically attached systems being described as energy efficient when they are far from it. Attaching the insulation with asphalt and/or full cover spray polyurethane adhesive can — when properly installed — provide a nearly monolithic thermal layer from roof deck to roof membrane as intended by the codes.

Figure 1. Roof details should be drawn large with all components delineated. Air and vapor retarders should be clearly shown and noted and any special instructions called out. Project-specific roof assembly details go a long way to moving toward ensuring energy conservation is achieved. Here the air and vapor retarder are highlighted and definitively delineated. Voids at perimeters are called out to be filled with spray foam and methods of attachment are noted.

Another very popular method of attaching insulation to the roof deck and each other is the use of bead polyurethane foam adhesive. The beads are typically applied at 6 inches (15.24 cm), 8 inches (20.32 cm), 9 inches (22.86 cm) or 12 inches (30.48 cm).

The insulation needs to be compressed into the beads and weighted to ensure the board does not rise up off the foam. Even when well compressed and installed, there will be a ±3/16-inch void between the compressed beads, as full compression of the adhesive is not possible. This void allows air transport, which can be very detrimental if the air is laden with moisture in cold regions. The linear void below the insulation also interrupts the vertical thermal insulation section.

The most detrimental method of insulation attachment in regard to energy loss is when the insulation is mechanically fastened with the fasteners below the roof cover. Thermal bridging takes place from the conditioned interior to the exterior along the steel fastener. This can readily be observed on roofs with heavy frost and light snowfall, as the metal stress plates below the roof cover transfer heat from the interior to the membrane, which in turn melts the frost or snow above. (See Photo 4.)

The thermal values of roofs are compromised even more when a mechanically attached roof cover is installed. The volume of mechanical fasteners increases, as does the heat loss, which is not insignificant. Singh, Gulati, Srinivasan, and Bhandari in their study “Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Analysis of Metal Fasteners in Roofing Assemblies”found an effective drop in thermal value of up to 48 percent when mechanical fasteners are used to attach roof covers. (See Photo 5). This research would suggest that for these types of roof systems, in order to meet the code-required effective thermal R-value, the designer needs to increase the required thermal R-value by 50 percent.

Recommendations to Increase Energy Savings

Code and standard bodies as well as governments around the world all agree that energy conservation is a laudable goal. Energy loss through the roof can be substantial, and an obvious location to focus on to prevent energy loss and thus create energy savings. The thermal layer works 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year. Compromises in the thermal layer will affect the performance of the insulation and decrease energy savings for years to come. Attention to installation methods and detailing transitions at roof edges, penetrations, walls and drains needs to be given in order to optimize the energy conservation potential of the roof system.

Based on empirical field observation of roof installations and forensic investigations, the following recommendations are made to increase the energy-saving potential of roof systems.

  • Vapor and air barriers are often required or beneficial and should be specifically detailed at laps, penetrations, terminations and transitions to wall air barriers. (See Figure 1.) Call out on the drawings the contractor responsible for material termination so that this is clearly understood.
  • The thermal layer (consisting of multiple layers of insulation) needs to be continuous without breaks or voids. Seal all voids at penetrations and perimeters with closed cell polyurethane sealant.
  • Design insulation layers to be a minimum of two with offset joints.
  • Select quality insulation materials. For polyisocyanurate, that would mean coated fiberglass facers. For mineral wool, that would mean high density.
  • Attach insulation layers to the roof deck in a manner to eliminate thermal breaks. If mechanically fastening the insulation, the fasteners should be covered with another layer of insulation, cover board or both.
  • Design roof covers that do not require mechanical fasteners below the membrane as an attachment method.
  • Protect the thermal layer on top with cover boards and below with appropriate air and vapor barriers.

Saving limited fossil fuels and reducing carbon emissions is a worldwide goal. Designing and installing roof systems with a well thought out, detailed and executed thermal layer will move the building industry to a higher plane. Are you ready for the challenge?

About the author: Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, CRP, CSI, is a principal of Hutchinson Design Group Ltd. in Barrington, Illinois. For more information, visit www.hutchinsondesigngroup.com.

Restoring the Saskatchewan Legislative Dome Is a Labor of Love

The Saskatchewan Legislative Building in Regina was originally completed in 1912. The structure had undergone deterioration due to poor drainage around the dome, and a restoration project was initiated to repair the masonry and restore the copper dome. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

“At the end of the day, why do we go to cities?” asks Philip Hoad. “We go to cities to look at their beautiful old buildings. We don’t generally go to look at their skyscrapers. It’s the old building that gets our minds and hearts working. When you go to a city and look at these old buildings intermingled with new buildings—that’s what gives a city life.”

Hoad is with Empire Restoration Inc., headquartered in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. He’s been restoring historic buildings for some 30 years, and when he found out about the project to renovate the dome on the Saskatchewan Legislative Building, he knew it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “The architect put out a pre-qualification across Canada, and four firms were successful. We were one of them,” he remembers. “Then we ended up securing the tender bid. I’ll never forget it because I did the tender estimate just after a hernia operation in my dressing gown. It was really a project I won’t forget.”

The building was originally constructed in Regina, Saskatchewan, between 1908 and 1912, and it serves as the seat of government for the province and houses the legislative assembly. Designed by architects Edward and William Sutherland Maxwell of Montreal in a mix of English Renaissance and French Beaux-Arts styles, the building features ornate stone elements and unique decorative copper finishes that accent its iconic copper-clad dome. It is designated as a National Historic Site of Canada and a Provincial Heritage Property, and is subject to strict regulations regarding materials and methods of repair.

Work on the dome was carried out in a fully enclosed and heated temporary structure that allowed crews to continue throughout the winter months. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

The structure has undergone some restoration work over the past 100 years, but in 2013, planning began for a conservation project designed to repair and restore the tower. The reasons for the project were twofold, according to Hoad. “First of all, the copper panels were blowing off, and somebody had re-secured them with face screws back in the ’60s or ’70s. But more importantly, the water was coming off the dome and damaging the stone below it. The dome was originally never designed with gutters, and then they later put gutters on, and these failed. So those were the two things that drove the project in the first place.”

Hoad knew the project would be challenging, but it he was confident that his company had the experience and passion to handle it. “These projects come along, for most of us, once in a lifetime,” he notes. “It’s the scale and the detail and the level of commitment that you need to restore an old building that sets us apart from, say, new construction. It’s not cookie-cutter. Everything is different, and you never know what you’re getting into—although with our experience, we’ve done so many old buildings we sort of know what we’re going to run into. All of the people who work for us love to work on these old buildings. It’s very satisfying at the end of it.”

The goals of the project were perfectly aligned with Hoad’s business philosophy. “When I start with an old building, I don’t want to change it,” he says. “It might look a little newer, but I want it to be the same as when we found it. I don’t want it to stand out as a brand-new building. We just want it to last another 100 years and to know that we’ve helped preserve it for future generations.”

The ornamental copper elements were restored and reset over the new copper panels. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

Repairing the Substructure

Work on the dome was more complicated than initially thought. During the pre-construction condition survey and assessment, additional problems were discovered by the conservation architect, Spencer R. Higgins of Toronto. “Once the architect had done all his work and surveyed the building, they also realized the original woodwork was not quite up to snuff,” Hoad explains. “Basically, much of the original wood framing was made up of old pallets. It was quite remarkable. So structurally, we had to re-frame the hips, which we call the ribs. We completely removed the old pallet framing and re-framed it. We also tried to straighten the slight twist in dome, but it wasn’t easy to do since it was a poured concrete structure underneath.”

New ribs were constructed out of Douglas fir plywood using a CNC machine from 3-D architectural drawings to create templates. It was also necessary to remove and replace approximately 40 percent of deteriorated wood deck on the concrete dome, with both the interior and exterior surfaces of the concrete being repaired by the general contractor on the project, PCL Construction Management of Regina. “Re-framing the ribs was quite a challenge,” notes Hoad. “Once the concrete deck was repaired, we screwed new Douglas fir roof boards into the repaired concrete dome, added an air vapor barrier, Roxul insulation, wood nailers and an additional layer of Douglas fir roof boards, with housewrap and asphalt saturated roofing felt as the underlayment system for all the new copper roofing and cladding that would follow.”

Internally drained stainless-steel gutters were installed at the base of the dome. The gutters were lined with sheet lead. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

After the masonry restoration was completed by RJW-Gem Campbell Stonemasons of Ottawa, Empire Restoration installed new gutters at the base of the dome. According to the architect’s design, heavy stainless-steel plate gutters were formed and then lined with sheet lead. Projecting stone cornice ledges were also covered in sheet lead.

Restoring the Copper Dome

The existing 16-ounce copper panels were all removed, and they were replaced with new 20-ounce panels recreated to match the original sizes and profiles. More than 20,000 square feet of copper panels were custom fabricated and installed. Great care was taken to carefully remove and restore decorative elements, including the copper garlands.

Decorative elements that could be saved were installed on new brass armatures. The dome is topped by a cupola and lantern, which were carefully restored. “The mantel on the very top, we didn’t strip that off,” Hoad notes. “We just replaced and repaired selective components, so that’s why you have a mix of old and new.”

Logistics at the job site were well coordinated. “Access was quite remarkable because PCL had erected a steel frame onto which we erected scaffolding, so the dome was right there in front of us,” Hoad notes.

Cornice sections were restored, and extensive sheet lead flashings were installed over stone cornices and ledges. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

When working on the dome itself, crew members had to be tied off with personal fall arrest systems, as it was possible to slip through gaps between the scaffold decks and the dome roof surface. Weather was not an issue, as the steel frame structure was totally enclosed with a heavy-duty insulated tarp system. “We had our own ventilation system, we had a heating system, we had electricity up there, we had pneumatic power—we basically had everything up there. PCL had it well set up for the various trades. There was a large crane on site to hoist all our materials up.”

Hoad cites the sheer size of the project as one of his greatest concerns. “The biggest challenge was just the scale of the project, being able to produce the amount of work necessary and get the job done in the prescribed time,” he says. “It was a lot of the same thing, albeit with some very complicated detailing. We had multiple skill sets on the site dealing with multiple materials and details.”

The project has won numerous awards, including a 2017 North American Copper in Architecture Award from the Copper Development Association. Hoad is proud of his company’s role in the project but relieved it is completed. “During it, I was at times tearing my hair out,” he recalls. “It was a very high-pressure project that lasted a long time. It was three or four days a week of constant men, materials, equipment, meetings, details, changes, extras, credits. From start to finish, it was two years of my life.”

The cupola and lantern at the top of the dome were repaired in situ. Photos: Ministry of Central Services, Government of Saskatchewan

Despite the pressure, Hoad found the work extremely satisfying. “What we are doing is permanent and built to last for future generations,” he says. “We’re using natural, traditional building materials of stone, wood, copper and other noble metals. That’s what drives me to love the industry and my job—because it’s permanent, sustainable and it’s for future generations.”

After all, it’s often the roof and flashings that play one of the most critical roles in fighting the elements of weather, notes Hoad. “Roofing and sheet metal deficiencies is where much of building damage and deterioration starts,” he says. “You can repair a masonry wall, but if you don’t stop it getting saturated, it’ll just deteriorate again in another few years. Regina was a good example of that. We’ve now provided great protection to these beautiful stone elements, allowing them to last another 100 years.”

TEAM

Conservation Architect: Spencer R. Higgins, Architect Incorporated, Toronto, Ontario, Higginsarchitect.com
General Contractor: PCL Construction Management, Regina, Saskatchewan, PCL.com
Sheet Metal Contractor: Empire Restoration Inc., Scarborough, Ontario, EmpireRestoration.com
Masonry Contractor: RJW-Gem Campbell Stonemasons Inc., Ottawa, Ontario, RJWgem.com

MATERIALS

Copper: 20-ounce copper sheet metal
Wood Framing: Douglas fir
Insulation: Rockwool Rigid Insulation, Roxul, Roxul.com