State Sales Taxes Create Administrative Challenges for Contractors

As most of us know, taxes are among the few certainties we can expect in life.

And a look at state laws nationwide indicates that sales and use taxes in particular are having a moment, especially laws imposing sales tax on certain types of real property improvements and services. According to a 2015 publication by tax software provider Avalara, at least 18 states impose a sales tax on at least some services that are considered improvements to real property. These states include Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, and Wisconsin. States appear to be trending toward collecting sales taxes from end customers on materials, labor, repairs, and services associated with real property improvements.

The impact is not only an increase in construction costs for consumers, but will also push contractors to overcome administrative challenges and to keep their prices competitive in spite of additional tax costs they must impose on customers. As discussed below, this is especially true for contractors who do both taxable and non-taxable improvements. Anyone unsure of how their state’s law applies to their activities should consult with a CPA, tax attorney, or their state’s department of revenue.

What Services Are Taxable in my State?

Generally, most states have long imposed a sales tax on purchases of goods both on consumers and on businesses. The growing trend appears to be that some states are also imposing sales tax on certain services that may or may not be related to taxable goods. In at least a few states, the distinction between capital improvement projects and repair, installation and/or maintenance work is important. Often, contractors who perform work in both categories — work subject to sales tax and work that isn’t — can submit some type of affidavit or other paperwork in order to be excused from sales tax liability or from the responsibility to pass it to others. However, in many cases, the distinctions between taxable and non-taxable services is highly technical and can depend on the circumstances of the transaction in question.

In Florida, the distinction between “tangible personal property” and “real property” determines when contractors must charge sales tax to the end customer. Under the Florida Department of Revenue Rule 12A-1.006, if contractors furnish parts directly to customers, they must charge sales tax to customers both for the parts and for “adjusting, applying, installing, maintaining, remodeling, or repairing” tangible personal property. Section 192.001(11)(d) of the Florida statutes defines tangible personal property as “goods, chattels, and other articles of value … capable of manual possession and whose chief value is intrinsic to the article itself.” The statute defines “real property” to include “land, buildings, fixtures, and all other improvements to land.” Contractors performing labor to install permanent fixtures that constitute “real property” do not have to charge sales tax to their customers; contractors who will eventually charge their customers sales tax are entitled to purchase the materials as tax-exempt.

A Florida Department of Revenue online guide cites permanent carpeting, roofing, tile, and landscaping as example of “real property” improvements that are not subject to sales tax. However, the same guide states that “carpet” constitutes tangible personal property unless it becomes real property; this provision seems potentially confusing and likely requires flooring contractors to impose sales tax on some of their services but not others. Similarly, the guide states that “stepping stones” constitute tangible personal property; it would therefore seem that landscaping contractors are tasked with taxing some of their services but not others, as the guide generally lists landscaping work as a “real property” improvement.

In Ohio, contractors need to understand the legal distinction between “construction contracts,” which are not subject to customer sales tax, and “tangible personal property” contracts, which are. According to the Ohio Department of Revenue, tangible personal property becomes real property when it is permanently installed or affixed upon the real property pursuant to a construction contract. The Department specifically lists carpet, carpeting materials, and landscaping materials as tangible personal property. The Department advises that for transactions that are not construction contracts and that include the sale of tangible personal property (TPP) for sales tax purposes, contractors should present their vendors with a direct pay permit that will allow them to buy the materials tax free, charge customers sales tax, and then pay the sales tax to the state on a monthly basis.

New York and North Carolina require contractors and other service providers to charge customers sales taxes on the sales price of “repair, installation, and maintenance” work (commonly referred to as RIM), whereas “capital improvements” are not subject to sales tax. The New York Department of Taxation and Finance’s Publication 862 purports to give guidance to contractors and property owners on New York’s sales tax rules. It explains that “repair” and “maintenance” work — work done to keep real property in good working order, safe, or to restore it to a good and safe condition — is subject to sales tax. Publication 862 cites replacing damaged roof shingles, repairing a broken railing, and replacing a faucet as examples of RIM services that, along with the materials, are subject to sales tax. It goes on to discuss taxable installation services and provides that “freestanding appliances” like washing machines, dryers, dishwashers, and refrigerators are among items that, although installed, do not become a permanent part of the real property under New York law.

North Carolina law similarly sets forth particular activities that constitute RIM services — like “floor refinishing and the installation of carpet, flooring, floor coverings, windows, doors, cabinets, countertops, and other installations where the item being installed may replace a similar existing item … .” The repair or replacement of roofing, gutters, and flashing appears to fall squarely within North Carolina’s definition of RIM services for which contractors must charge their customers sales tax. North Carolina’s law — N.C. Gen. Stat. § 105-164.3(33l) — goes on to say that RIM services that are part of a real property contracts for capital improvements are exempt from the sales tax.

“Capital improvements,” on the other hand, are not subject to sales tax in New York and North Carolina. In New York, whether a project constitutes capital improvement work appears to depend heavily on the particular circumstances; even the method of installation can affect how the work is taxed. For example, some projects that ordinarily would qualify as capital improvements are not considered capital improvements if a commercial tenant installs items as trade fixtures. Whether they are taxable depends on whether the intent is for the improvements to remain permanent. In North Carolina, capital improvements include new construction; work that requires a permit (with some exceptions); installation of equipment or fixtures that is “capitalized and depreciated”; paint or wallpaper not incidental to RIM services; landscaping; and HVAC unit or system installation or replacement.

How Is the Industry Being Impacted?

For many contractors performing RIM or other sales taxable work in one or more of these states, distinguishing which services are and aren’t subject to sales tax is only the first step. Contractors also need to comply with the requirements and, when applicable, take the administrative measures needed in order to avoid what is effectively double payment. When contractors buy goods and materials from wholesalers, they are generally responsible for paying sales tax at that time. Typically, though, the states that impose sales tax on RIM or other similar services don’t require contractors to pay sales tax on materials that will be used in transactions where the end customer will have to pay sales tax. In many states, including North Carolina and Ohio, contractors can submit a form E-595E and potentially be exempt from paying sales tax on goods they will eventually resell and assess taxes upon. But for those contractors who buy goods and materials to be used both for RIM and capital improvements — for example, roofers who perform both new construction and repair work in North Carolina — the logistics of keeping the purchases separate (and keeping two sets of books, essentially) might be too administratively costly to justify the tax savings.

Mike Tenoever is the president and owner of The Century Slate Company, a roofing construction company in Durham, North Carolina, and he also is a member of the Roofing Editorial Board. Tenoever stated that even though the new sales and use tax laws took effect in North Carolina in 2016, some general contractors don’t seem familiar with North Carolina’s affidavit of capital improvement form when he submits it — something that indicates that not everyone is complying with or aware of the new law yet. If that’s the case, then it would appear that contractors who aren’t complying with the law and charging sales tax to end customers would be gaining a competitive edge over contractors who are following the law and charging sales tax on projects that constitute RIM under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 105-164.3(33l).

Furthermore, requiring contractors to determine what materials and supplies for which they should pay sales tax versus for which ones to tax customers is burdensome and, at least in Tenoever’s case, has effectively resulted in double tax payment because purchasing capital-improvement materials and RIM materials separately from the same vendors has been too administratively burdensome for his company.

About the author: Caroline Trautman is an attorney with Oak City Law, LLP, based in Durham, North Carolina. Questions about this article can be directed to her at caroline@oakcitylaw.com.

Author’s note: This article does not constitute, and should not be construed as, legal advice on any particular scenario. For specific advice, consult with an attorney licensed in your state.

Speaking of Education…It May Be Back to Class for Contractors

It’s no surprise that almost all states require general contractors and some subcontractors to register with regulatory boards and pass a qualifying exam in advance of bidding, contracting, and certainly physically undertaking construction work. That’s not new. However, there is an emerging trend towards requiring general contractors, and even some subcontractors, to participate in continuing education. Depending on the jurisdiction, some contractors and subcontractors are now statutorily obligated to complete a certain amount of continuing education — similar to what has been historically required only of doctors, lawyers, and accountants — to maintain licensure.

For instance, this summer, North Carolina became the most recent state to impose continuing education requirements for general contractors. Effective January 1, 2020, general contractors will be required to complete 8 hours of continuing education per year. Because roofing contractors in North Carolina performing work in excess of $30,000 are required to be licensed as general contractors, they will now be subject to the new continuing education requirements.

This recent legislation and its impact on the roofing industry raises questions about what is required for roofing contractors nationwide. Does roofing require special licensure and registration or continuing education? The answer is entirely dependent on the jurisdiction where the work is to be performed.

The following states currently require licensure for roofing: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

Other states don’t require licensure per se but do require roofing contractors to register. For instance, Oklahoma requires roofing contractors to register with the Construction Industries Board. Failure to register is a misdemeanor, and registration and endorsement as a commercial roofing contractor requires 4 hours of continuing education every 36 months. Similarly, Idaho does not require a state license, but requires roofing contractors to register with the Idaho Contractors Board.

As seen in Figure 1, even among the states which require continuing education, the requirements vary greatly both in the amount and type of education required. For instance, Florida law requires contractors holding a roofing license to take 1 hour of wind mitigation methodologies as part of the 14 annually required continuing education hours. In Massachusetts, construction supervisors within the roofing industry are required to take 2 hours of continuing education in code review and four one-hour courses in topics of workplace safety, business practices, energy, and lead safe practices.

Figure 1. Licensing and continuing education requirements by state.

Finally, in those states which don’t require licensure or continuing education, some industry groups have developed self-regulation. These industry groups are aimed at consumer protection and seek to secure public confidence in the roofing industry. In Georgia, which does not require a state roofing license, the Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association of Georgia (RSMCA) provides a voluntary licensing program. Similarly, Kentucky has no license requirements for roofing contractors. However, the Kentucky Roofing Contractor Association (KRCA) is a nonprofit and professional organization which certifies roofing contractors. To obtain and maintain KRCA certification, roofing contractors must complete 10 hours of continuing education per year.

But just because a state legislature or professional association has not enacted regulations necessitating continuing education does not mean contractors are free from such requirements. While not mandated by the state itself, many cities have imposed their own directives. States such as Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and Pennsylvania each contain at least one municipality that compels contractors to take board-accredited continuing education courses. For example, Idaho Falls, Idaho, requires 8 hours of continuing education.

Regardless of where you are engaged in the practice of roofing contracting, it is imperative that all contractors exercise due diligence and review and comply with all state and local regulations before undertaking any project.

Contractors and trades are seeing a rise in regulation through the government by way of mandated continuing education courses. Do you think contractors should be required to take continuing education classes? Is this a necessary void that needs to be filled by the government intervention or is this just another example of unnecessary government regulation? Tell us what you think.

About the author: Lindsey E. Powell is an attorney with Anderson Jones, PLLC practicing in North Carolina and Georgia. Questions about this article can be directed to her at lpowell@andersonandjones.com. Special research credit is given to Kyle Putnam, Juris Doctor candidate and summer law clerk with Anderson Jones, PLLC.

Author’s note: This article is intended only for informational purposes and should not be construed as legal advice.

How Can the H-2B Classification Help Contractors Find Good Workers?

Nearly all businesses require employees to operate, and all successful businesses require that those employees be competent and capable. One issue facing contractors is the inability to find well-qualified and competent workers. Another issue facing contractors is the shortage of workers available to keep up with increased building demands in the United States. The H-2B classification can help contractors address these issues by expanding the pool of potential workers.

What Is the H-2B Classification?

The H-2B classification was created in order to facilitate the hiring of foreign workers to fill temporary needs with U.S. businesses. For the H-2B classification, it must be established that (1) there are not sufficient U.S. workers who are qualified and available to perform the temporary services or labor for the employer; (2) that the employment of foreign workers will not affect the wages and working conditions of similarly employed U.S. workers; and (3) that a temporary need exists for the employer.

The H-2B program has two components with two different government agencies. The first component deals with the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and the second component deals with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Each agency oversees a different aspect of the H-2B program. The DOL focuses on the labor market, and is tasked with determining that:

  1. There are not sufficient U.S. workers who are qualified and who will be available to perform the temporary services or labor for which an employer desires to hire foreign workers.
  2. The employment of H-2B workers will not adversely affect the wages and working conditions of similarly employed U.S. workers.

At the end of the day, the DOL wants to make sure that the foreign worker is not taking a job from an American or affecting the wage market for American workers. The USCIS component of the H-2B program focuses on the temporary need of the employer and the foreign worker’s qualifications. The USCIS component is the last part of the process and is the final authority on whether the H-2B classification will be granted to the foreign worker.

What Is a Temporary Need?

A critical element of the H-2B analysis focuses on the temporary need of the employer. There are four types of needs for H-2B classification purposes. They are (1) one-time occurrence; (2) seasonal need; (3) peak-load need; and (4) intermittent need. A one-time occurrence is as the name suggests; it is an event that occurs one time which requires the need for additional workers and after this event concludes, so does the need for the workers. A seasonal need exists where the employment is traditionally tied to a season of the year by an event or pattern and is of a recurring nature. Examples include the hiring of workers during the Christmas shopping season by UPS and FedEx due to an increase in holiday shipping demands, and when the Disney theme parks require additional workers in the summertime because of an increase in visitors after schools are no longer in session. Both these needs are seasonal and recur every year. A peak-load need exists where the employer normally employs permanent workers to perform a service or labor and an increased seasonal or short-term demand requires additional workers who will not become part of the employer’s regular operations. The key with a peak-load need is that it is not recurring. An intermittent need exists where an employer does not employ permanent or full-time workers to perform services or labor and occasionally needs temporary workers for short periods of time.

What Is the Process?

The H-2B classification process starts with the DOL and ends with USCIS. The first step is to file an Application for Prevailing Wage Determination with the DOL. This application outlines the proposed employment and results in a Prevailing Wage Determination (PWD) issued by DOL, which sets the minimum amount that can be paid to the foreign worker. After the employer received the PWD from the DOL, the employer can begin the recruitment process. The recruitment process includes posting a job order with a state agency and running two print advertisements as well as interviewing candidates that apply for the position. After recruitment is completed, the employer submits an Application for Temporary Employment Certification with the DOL along with a completed recruitment report. Once a final determination is made by the DOL and the application is certified, the process then shifts to USCIS. The final step is to file an I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker. If the foreign worker is outside the United States, he or she will also need to apply for an H-2B visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

H-2B “Cap” and the Period of Stay

For the H-2B classification, there is a statutory limit on the total number of foreign nationals who may be granted H-2B status or issued an H-2B visa. This is commonly referred to as the H-2B “cap” and is currently set at 66,000. Unlike other statutory limitations, the H-2B cap is split between two parts of the year, with 33,000 allocated for the first half of the U.S. government fiscal year (October 1 to March 31) and 33,000 allocated for the second half of the U.S. government fiscal year (April 1 to September 30). If any of the first 33,000 are not used by the beginning of the second half of the fiscal year, those unused numbers will be reallocated to the second half of the fiscal year. While cases based on a one-time occurrence can be approved for up to 3 years, all other H-2B classifications will be approved for, at most, 10 months. The H-2B classification can be renewed, in increments of up to one year, and the foreign worker can stay in the United States for a maximum for 3 years. After 3 years, the foreign worker must stay outside the United States for an uninterrupted period of 3 months before seeking readmission under the H-2B classification.

Pros and Cons of H-2B Classification

For contractors, the H-2B classification can provide them temporary workers when needed for short periods of time. This can be especially important when there is difficulty finding quality workers in the United States. But as with any immigration classification, there are some pros and cons to consider when it comes to the H-2B classification.

Pros

  • While there is a cap on the number of H-2B statuses granted/visas issued, there is no lottery system in place like the H-1B. This means that there are usually H-2Bs available if you file at the right time.
  • There are no special qualifications, educational or otherwise, required for the H-2B classification, unlike some other immigration classifications. The foreign worker must simply meet the requirements for the position.
  • Premium processing from USCIS, which guarantees a response in 15 days after filing, is available.
  • The H-2B classification is renewable, in increments up to 1 year, for a total stay in the United States of 3 years. After the 3-year limit is reached, the foreign worker only needs to leave the United States for 3 months before he or she is eligible for H-2B classification again.

Cons

  • The H-2B classification essentially requires the foreign workers to be employees of the company by requiring an employee-employer relationship for the proposed employment. Independent contractors would not qualify.
  • From start to finish, it takes about 3 to 4 months while utilizing USCIS’s premium processing service, or 4 to 7 months without the premium processing service. If a worker is needed quickly, the H-2B classification may not be the right choice.
  • Only individuals from certain countries are eligible for the H-2B classification.
  • The minimum wage that must be paid to the H-2B recipient is fixed by the DOL and may be higher than what the employer is willing to pay or normally pays similar workers.
  • The foreign worker needs to have legal status in the United States or reside outside the United States to qualify. Illegal immigrants do not qualify for the H-2B classification.

The H-2B classification may help contractors address some of their labor needs. Contact an experienced immigration attorney to see whether this is a good fit for your company.

About the author: Paul Messina is an attorney at Cotney Construction Law who focuses his practice on immigration law. Cotney Construction Law is an advocate for the roofing industry and serves as General Counsel for FRSA, RT3, NWIR, TARC, WSRCA and several other roofing associations. For more information, visit www.cotneycl.com.

Author’s note: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

Why Do I Need a Marketing Plan?

As marketing professionals who have worked in the roofing industry for more years than we like to admit, we are very aware of the challenge that contractors have in developing and implementing successful marketing programs. With the flurry of lead generation companies popping up seemingly every day, and the SEO companies who promise first page of Google results, how can you decide what to spend money on and how do you know what will work? 

It’s very tempting to fall victim to “spray and pray” marketing, where you throw some money to a bunch of different things, spray some marketing ads or mailers out there and pray that it works and the phone rings. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Success comes from having a plan in place that supports your business goals and provides consistent activities and messaging. 

We know that marketing for roofing contractors can be confusing, frustrating and elusive. Most roofing contractors are craftsmen and women who have started businesses by understanding and excelling at roofing, waterproofing and building envelope technology. They are not marketing professionals, so it is hard to change gears and figure out how to sell or promote their services while also running operations, estimating, sales and the business overall. A good marketing plan helps drive marketing without having to worry all the time.

Taking the time up front to strategize and plan on how to market your business successfully enables you to move on to other challenges of the day, week or month. A good plan can be the template for what needs to happen daily, weekly and monthly to keep marketing on task. It also eliminates daily questions or sales calls for additional marketing initiatives. By creating and sticking to a yearly plan, you are simplifying the day-to-day decisions that can stymie progress.

Fewer approvals and more action reduce the stress put on decision makers and puts the action into the hands of the marketing professionals. Whether it is a person in the office, an agency or a marketing coordinator implementing the marketing plan, by being prepared ahead of time you will reduce the stress of making reactive decisions or, worse, doing nothing due to lack of time and/or planning.

A good marketing plan will also save you money. Without a plan it is easy to say yes to that advertising salesperson from the local media or free coupon website; or that great new advertising concept for ad words or events that is purchased mid-year without planning or research. It can cost the company in lost time, low productivity and extra expense when you do not budget in advance. When you formulate a plan and establish a budget, you can still move money around if necessary, but there is a set allocation to work within.

Timing is important. Look at starting your yearly marketing plan in the fall if possible. It should be a planned exercise to review the past year and look at the upcoming year. Reviewing statistics, campaigns and lead/close ratio is important before starting on the tactical plans for advertising, PR and direct marketing. By organizing budgeting meetings or even off-site working retreats with your leadership team (ideally comprised of leadership from sales, operations, accounting and marketing), you can take the time to review past performance while setting new goals that reflect growth. By being conscious of past performance, you will set the stage for developing strong marketing programs for the next year.

Establish Your Goals

In fact, you should not even start looking at a marketing plan until you have your goals set. What are the company’s plans for growth next year? Will there be new services or products? Will there be any changes in overall company mission? Marketing supports the goals of the company and supports the sales team in attaining the revenue and profitability goals that make a company successful. If you do not have strong goals and plans, then marketing will most likely flounder.

Regarding sales, it is critical that marketing works hand-in-hand with sales. The marketing plan needs to reflect the goals of the sales team so that the marketing activities are nurturing and delivering the right types of leads for sales success. If the goal is to grow metal roofing but marketing is delivering asphalt shingle leads that are not upgradable, both teams will fail. 

By understanding the types of customers the sales team is looking for and the products and services they will be selling, a marketing plan can be created that will result in success for all departments as well as for the company.

By creating a marketing plan for your roofing business, you are taking the time to determine the ideal customer for your business and how you will attract, convert, close and delight that customer. A good marketing plan that is well thought out will address every stage of the sales and marketing process and detail how you will retain the attention of past customers while also gaining ongoing referrals.

So, let’s get back to that original question: how will you know where you should be spending your marketing dollars? Well, it depends. That’s the reason developing your marketing plan is so important. During the process you will have identified your goals and ideal customers. If your business goal is to focus on commercial roof restorations, then you want to invest dollars where your customers can be reached. You might consider joining your local chapter of a building owner or facility manager’s group, or implement an advertising program on LinkedIn that targets specific job titles in your area. 

On the other hand, if your business goal is to focus on residential roof replacements, you might consider a digital advertising program that is geofenced to target neighborhoods with homes that are 20 years or older and will soon need a new roof. The strategies that you use to reach your customers really depend on what you have determined in your marketing plan.

Your marketing plan serves as a guide for your business. It spells out your company’s positioning statement, the markets you will serve, your yearly goals, your brand promise, the tasks and timelines as well as the tools and technology needed to achieve your goals. It will also help you determine budget and resources needed to implement the tasks, campaigns and initiatives detailed in the plan. 

About the authors: Heidi J. Ellsworth and Karen L. Edwards specialize in the roofing industry, helping contractors, manufacturers and associations achieve their marketing, branding and sales goals. They have authored two books: “Sales and Marketing for Roofing Contractors” and “Building a Marketing Plan for Roofing Contractors.” Both are available in the NRCA Bookstore and on Amazon. 

Spring Forward, Fall Protect

Spring arrived late here in Michigan, and before the weather — and construction — began to heat up, I saw a press release from MIOSHA indicating the second year of its “Stop Falls. Save Lives.” safety awareness campaign would focus on the roofing industry. I called Nella Davis-Ray, Director of MIOSHA Consultation Education and Training (CET) Division in Lansing, to ask her why.

“Nationally and at the state level, we are pleased to see that overall, when you look at general industry and construction, there is a downward trend in work-related fatalities and injuries, and we like to think we play a part in that downward trend,” she said. “Even though we are seeing this downward trend, when you look at roofers’ fall-related incidents, and particularly when you look at roof-related fatalities, their rate is 10 times higher than the rate for construction workers as a whole. So, if there is any trade we can talk to about falls, the data shows the one group we should be focusing on is the roofers.”

The statistics were sobering, but the overall message was hopeful. “Our message is that all falls are preventable,” Davis-Ray said. “We really do believe that in MIOSHA.”

The key is making sure every employee is properly trained, has the proper safety equipment — and knows how to use it — and follows the jobsite-specific safety plan. According to Davis-Ray, the MIOSHA can help with all of those things — and the services are free.

The CET Division works independently of the Enforcement Division. It provides guidance to employers and employees through a variety of methods, including classroom training and educational materials including literature, videos, and a fall protection website, www.michigan.gov/stopfalls. The greatest tool of all, noted Davis-Ray, is a staff of consultants who can provide individualized training.

“I’m surprised how many employers, particularly contractors, are not aware that all they have to do is pick up the phone and call us,” she said. “At their request, we can schedule a time and location for one of our construction safety consultants to come out and work with them directly on safety and health issues.”

Consultants can review written requirements, explain interpretations of the standard, and answer specific questions about a project and whether or not a contractor might be in compliance. They can also help in crafting a comprehensive safety program. “We always try to look at the big picture,” Davis-Ray says. “The overarching issue is to have an effective system in place so that you ensure that safety is considered as a part of every contract.”

Davis urges contractors in every state to explore the free educational resources OSHA can provide. Michigan contractors can call 800-866-4674 or visit www.michigan.gov/miosha to learn more.

 

Owens Corning Roofing and Asphalt Welcomes Four Contractors to Platinum Advisory Board

Owens Corning Roofing and Asphalt, LLC is welcoming four roofing contractors to its Platinum Advisory Board. The prestigious honor is awarded to Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Preferred Contractors who have demonstrated a commitment to sustained excellence in all aspects of their business.

The newly announced Platinum Advisory Board members are: Levi Phillips, Idaho Roofing Contractors, Inc. (Boise, Idaho); Lenny Scarola, DreamHome Remodeling (Springfield, Va.); Wayne Holloway, Best Choice Roofing & Home Improvement (Hendersonville, Tenn.); and John Phillips, ARAC Roof It Forward (Kennesaw, Ga.). These new members join 13 existing members on the Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Advisory Board.

Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Advisory Board members provide in-the-field experience and business insights while collaborating with Owens Corning twice a year to offer perspective from the vantage point of leading contractors. Members of the Platinum Advisory Board also work with Owens Corning to evaluate products and provide suggestions for continuous improvement.

“We are excited to continue to grow our Platinum Advisory Board with roofing contractors who have demonstrated high levels of market leadership and customer service,” said Jason Lewinski, Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network Leader. “Our Platinum Advisory Board members play an important role in keeping us connected to emerging issues and opportunities that impact both contractors and the homeowners they serve.”

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

TAMKO Offering Exclusive Training for Pro Certified Contractors

TAMKO Building Products, Inc. is excited to offer new live webinar training exclusively for its Pro Certified Contractors. The training is available now and includes multiple webinars that cover business tools to help contractors increase and manage their business.

“We want success for our TAMKO Pro Certified Contractors,” said Vice President of Sales and Marketing for TAMKO, Stephen McNally. “These webinars introduce TAMKO Pros to technology and business resources that are available to help them achieve more with their roofing business.”

TAMKO’s 2018 webinar series began in March and the lineup includes topics such as: home industry trends, led by HomeAdvisor; the basics of social media for businesses, led by Digital Fusion; how financing jobs can increase your business revenue, led by GreenSky; and the importance of roof measurement technology and how to use it, led by EagleView Technologies. Webinar host companies and topics will vary monthly.

A goal of the TAMKO Pro Certified Contractor program is to help contractors grow their business and assist them with finding the tools and services to help along the way. As part of the program, contractors are also eligible for Pro Rewards where they can earn cash back for qualifying purchases.

For more information, visit TAMKOpro.com.

 

MRA Predicts Major Demand for U.S. Metal Roofing Installers this Spring

With a hot U.S. housing market and still-favorable interest rates, the Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) is predicting a heavier than usual demand for qualified metal roofing installers and contractors for spring 2018.

For homeowners planning improvement projects this season, that means the time to swing into action is now, says MRA’s Executive Director Renee Ramey. That’s especially true for metal roofing, which is booming in popularity thanks to its durability and exceptional performance in severe weather.

“Not only are we seeing greater demand in general, we’re also coming off a tough winter which leads to the need for more qualified re-roofing contractors,” said Ramey. “In many cases, homeowners should be aware that these factors can significantly increase the competition and the timeframe for being able to complete re-roofing projects.”

Even with the flurry of activity predicted for this spring, MRA is cautioning homeowners to take their time and do their homework to vet contractors thoroughly before embarking on any re-roofing job. Inexperienced installers may prey on homeowners’ impatience and the high market demand, using it as a means to overcharge or push sub-quality services and materials. Inadvertently or not, rushed contractors under pressure or anxious to get to their next job may cut corners or overlook key details, so it’s up to homeowners to make sure the job is done to their satisfaction each step of the way.

“No matter what the material, a new roof is a major investment, so homeowners will want to take the necessary steps now to ensure their home is protected, comfortable and will perform reliably for many years to come,” said Ramey.

MRA is reinforcing these tips for homeowners seeking quality metal roofing installers this year:

  1. Don’t assume all roofers are equally skilled

Some contractors push homeowners towards a certain roofing material, not because it’s the best or most appropriate for their home, but because it may simply be the option the installer is most familiar with.  Make sure your installer is properly trained, experienced and skilled in installing metal roofing. Ideally, look for a roofer that has been in business for at least five years; roofers who don’t do quality work usually don’t last that long.

  1. Get referrals

Reputable installers are typically involved in the industry and are committed to keeping abreast of the latest trends and techniques. Check to see if the prospective installer is a member of MRA and other reputable trade alliances. Be sure to ask for and contact recent references. When contacting references, ask if they were satisfied with the work, if the process went smoothly, if the installers were careful and courteous and they did what they promised, including sticking to the estimate and change orders.  Also, ask the installer to provide you with a few recent job locations so you can drive by and check out the work. While pictures may be helpful, there’s nothing like seeing how a roof looks first-hand.

  1. Do your own homework

With metal roofing alone, there are hundreds of different options, material types, finishes and installation techniques. Request the highest-rated, longest lasting material you can afford and always do your own research for whatever product recommendation your installer suggests, verifying it’s what you want for your home. For resources about metal roofing materials, styles and options, check out www.metalroofing.com or visit the manufacturer’s website directly.

  1. Protect yourself

Make sure that installers are licensed, insured and carry workers’ compensation coverage. Don’t be afraid to ask for proof-of-insurance certificates and the insurance agent’s name. A reputable installer won’t hesitate to provide you with that information. Don’t pay the full amount of a job upfront; ideally, pay one-third upfront for materials, and the remainder when roofing and clean up are completed to your satisfaction. It goes without saying that evaluating warranties is essential: make sure it covers not only materials and finishes, but leaks, flashing failures and other labor-related defects.

  1. Be thorough

Putting on a new roof is only part of the equation. Replacing eaves flashing, pipe boots and roof jacks is less complicated when reroofing, so consider having it done at the same time if needed. Be sure to have your contractor or HVAC provider verify proper attic ventilation. Poor ventilation can cause significant damage, high utility bills and worse case, can lead to serious safety issues.

“Metal roofs are one of the best and most reliable ways to protect a home for the long run,” said Ramey. “We’re encouraging homeowners to invest some time and effort upfront before their re-roofing project begins, and it will pay off with many years of loving their home’s roof.”

For more information, visit www.metalroofing.com.

 

KM Coatings Unveils New Website

KM Coatings, a manufacturer of quality roof coatings for roofing professionals, announced the launch of its new website. Introduced on Jan. 22, 2018, the new site is dynamic, searchable and improves the web experience for visitors.

The new design is modern with cleaner page layouts featuring hues of blue, gray and white to match the KM Coatings rebranding. From the website, contractors can sign up for the KM Academy, search and download content, and connect with roofing experts.

“We are pleased with the new website which allows for improved online access to our products, people and services,” said Brady Kolden, national coatings manager for KM Coatings. “The website was constructed with the needs of our customers in mind and reflects our dedication and commitment to them. We believe they will find what they need every time they come through our virtual doors.”

For more information visit kmcoatings.us.

 

Polyglass Launches New Q Rewards Website

Polyglass U.S.A., Inc. announced the launch of its newly revamped Q Rewards website. The new platform allows roofing contractors to quickly earn points for Polyglass purchases and redeem them for trips, event tickets and merchandise.

A leading manufacturer of roofing and waterproofing solutions, Polyglass introduced the Q Rewards program in 2013 as a way to say thank you to contractors. From the website, contractors can enroll in the Q Rewards program, manage points and redeem prizes. The newly designed website has improved navigation and functionality and is compatible with mobile devices. It features Snap2Claim Technology, enabling photo capture and faster upload of invoices.

“We are excited about the launch of the new Q Rewards website,” said Director of Strategic Marketing Scott Lelling. “The website has a cleaner design, is user-friendly and improves the overall customer experience. We value our customers and look forward to making more amazing rewards possible through the Q Rewards program.”

Contractors can sign up for Q Rewards now at www.polyglassqrewards.com and earn bonus points at the 2018 International Roofing Expo on Feb. 6-8 in New Orleans, LA.  Stop by booth 701 and play the Spin2Win game.

For more information, visit www.polyglass.us.