CertainTeed Metal Roofing Exceeds Industry Standards

Roof specifiers and installers can now achieve project goals in fire resistance and solar reflectance more easily with CertainTeed Presidio Metal Roofing as a result of testing to the latest editions of industry performance test standards. Introduced last year, the line of steel roofing products blends the look of classic roofing materials with the exceptional wind/hail resistance and solar reflectance of metal roofing.

Specifiers now can achieve Class A fire rating with Presidio applied over a layer of a specific fire-resistant roofing membrane product paired with a single layer of select CertainTeed underlayments – a barrier board is no longer needed. Further, the Presidio metal roofing products now earn a Class B fire rating when applied over a single layer of a variety of CertainTeed roofing underlayments.

In regards to solar reflectance, seven colors from the Presidio roofing product line have recently been listed for solar reflectance and thermal emittance by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC). Presidio Tile colors English Toffee, Nutmeg, Speckled Bronze and Terra Cotta, and Presidio Shake colors Ash, Sand Dune and Weathered Wood are listed by CRRC with initial solar reflectance values ranging from 0.26 to 0.34.

“Sustainability and providing customers with products that help ensure the safety of homeowners have long been top priorities at CertainTeed,” says Dale Walton, residential products manager for CertainTeed Roofing. “And, the recent ratings from Intertek and the CRRC serve as proof of this commitment. With Presidio, specifiers and contractors will have the peace of mind to install the highest quality energy-efficient, fire- and weather-resistant roof, all while more easily meeting project certification goals.”

Each easy to install Presidio panel has overlaps that conceal the joints and create a seamless appearance. Presidio Tile embodies the same Mediterranean magnetism of traditional clay, but weighs hundreds of pounds less, and at a fraction of the cost. Presidio Shake is pre-weathered, aged and distressed to recreate the look of wood. Lastly, Presidio Slate showcases the natural beauty of stone in a lightweight, fully recyclable, energy-efficient material.

Kemper System America Moves Office to the Top Floor of Heights Plaza in New Jersey

Kemper System America Inc. moved its New York metro sales office from Closter, N.J. to the top floor of Heights Plaza at 777 Terrace Ave., Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. 07604. The 200,000-square-foot office building gives ready access to major highways and transportation hubs and offers views of the Manhattan skyline.

“This is an ideal location for us to support our customers across the New York metropolitan region who include commercial architects, building owners and real estate management companies,” says Richard Doornink, president and managing director of Kemper System America, based in West Seneca, N.Y.

The company’s liquid-membrane waterproofing systems protect many iconic structures in the region, including the Empire State Building and the World Trade Center. Newer products span highly reflective ‘Cool Roof’ systems that help manage building energy from the top, and reinforced systems that add another layer of protection for indoor tiled areas.

Roof Tiles Are Embedded with Solar Cells

Power Shield Inc. has introduced roof tiles that have solar cells embedded into them.

Power Shield Inc. has introduced roof tiles that have solar cells embedded into them.

Power Shield Inc. has introduced roof tiles that have solar cells embedded into them. The tiles are designed to cover the whole roof. The Power Shield roof system features a cool roof coating, above-deck ventilation, and is made from recycled and non-combustible, lightweight steel. Energy is produced through the 16 watts of power per solar tile. Building-envelope thermal performance is improved through:

  • Cool roof coatings on tile keep it cool and improve energy production. The cool roof coating has high emissivity on the sun side to allow heat to be radiated out and low emissivity underneath, making the tiles a radiant barrier.
  • The efficient above-sheathing ventilation on the tile system provides a chimney effect as warm air flows between the tiles and the roof deck and out from the building. In winter, the air gap between the tiles and roof deck are insulating, reducing the heat transfer out of the attic.

Inland Coatings’ James David Wilder Passes Away

James David Wilder, technical sales representative for Inland Coatings, passed away at his home in Eureka Springs, Ark., on Sept. 30.

James David Wilder, technical sales representative for Inland Coatings, passed away at his home in Eureka Springs, Ark., on Sept. 30.

James David Wilder, technical sales representative for Inland Coatings, passed away at his home in Eureka Springs, Ark., on Sept. 30. Wilder was being treated for esophageal cancer. He was 74 years old.

Wilder represented Inland Coatings for 17 years as a technical salesperson. He loved people and was genuinely interested in his customers. Wilder formed close relationships with many roofing industry professionals through his attendance at trade shows, warranty inspections and sales trips. He enjoyed traveling and welcomed the opportunity to sample the food and culture throughout the U.S. and Canada. Wilder was a pleasure to work with and he will be greatly missed by the entire Inland Coatings family.

RCMA Offers an Educational Presentation on Reflective Roof Coatings

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) has launched its Speakers Bureau program to offer an educational presentation on reflective roof coatings. RCMA’s Speakers Bureau consists of several RCMA members with expertise on the topic who have volunteered to deliver presentations throughout the country.

This presentation, titled “Reflective Roof Coatings: Cool Stories,” is approximately one hour in length, and discusses the key benefits and the environmental importance of reflective roof coatings used on low-slope roof systems. The science behind reflective roof coatings is presented in an easy-to-understand format and real-world case studies are presented to illustrate the information presented. The presentation content is intended to enable attendees to:

  • Understand the benefits that reflective roof coatings impart on low-slope roof systems.
  • Recognize why reflective roofs are environmentally important and comprehend the science behind how reflective roofs save energy.
  • Determine best practices for preparing a roof membrane and application methods for reflective roof coatings on low-slope roof systems.
  • Identify payback, energy savings, and other non-quantifiable benefits by evaluating several real-world roof-reflectivity case studies.

RCMA is an approved continuing education provider with the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and RCI Inc. By attending the course, attendees qualify to earn 1 AIA General Learning Unit Hour (1 LU Hour) as part of AIA’s Continuing Education System or 1 RCI Continuing Education Hour (CEH).

Groups interested in offering this presentation at an upcoming meeting or event should contact RCMA Staff Associate Cecily Alfonsi to participate.

GAF Offers Products That Meet Green Building Code and Title 24 Guidelines

In response to recent changes in local code and increased demands for asphalt shingles featuring higher reflectivity levels, GAF offers several products and colors that meet the new Los Angeles Green Building Code and California Title 24 guidelines.

The Los Angeles Green Building Code reflectivity requirement for a residential asphalt shingle is a minimum three-year aged solar reflectance of 0.20, a minimum thermal emittance of 0.75, OR a SRI (solar reflectance index) of 16.

In accordance with this new code, GAF has 11 products that have been tested and listed with the Cool Roof Rating Council for sale in the city of Los Angeles and all other areas covered by California Title 24:

    Timberline Cool Series

  • Antique Slate
  • Weathered Wood
  • Barkwood
    Timberline Ultra HD

  • Birchwood
    Timberline HD

  • Birchwood
  • Copper Canyon
  • Golden Amber
    Timberline American Harvest

  • Amber Wheat
    Timberline Natural Shadow

  • Arctic White
    Royal Sovereign

  • White
  • Desert Sand

“GAF remains dedicated to sustainability and will continue to invest in products and technologies focused on energy savings,” states Dan Witte, steep-slope product manager. “We fully support green building initiatives and are committed to manufacturing eco-friendly products.”

Project Profiles: Retail/Mixed-use

Outlet Collection at Niagara Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada

Team

DEVELOPER: Ivanhoé Cambridge, Montreal

The largest open-air outlet mall in Canada features approximately 23,000 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane walkway canopies.

The largest open-air outlet mall in Canada features approximately 23,000 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane walkway canopies. PHOTO: Birdair

Roof Materials

The largest open-air outlet mall in Canada features approximately 23,000 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane walkway canopies. The membrane canopies exhibit a flying-mast cone design that provides relief from the elements and creates a signature look for the shopping center.

PTFE, or polytetrafluoroethylene, is a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that is durable and weather-resistant. PTFE fiberglass membranes can be installed in climates ranging from the frigid arctic to the scorching desert heat with a project life in some cases exceeding 30 years.

PTFE fiberglass coating is chemically inert, and the low-surface free energy of the material results in an electrical-grade fabric membrane that is readily rinsed by rain-water. It is also immune to UV radiation. This combination makes PTFE-coated fabric membrane ideal for projects requiring weather endurance and fire resistance.

PTFE fiberglass is ENERGY STAR- and Cool Roof Rating Council-certified. During scientific tests of its solar properties, it was discovered that PTFE fiberglass membranes reflect as much as 73 percent of the sun’s energy while holding just 7 percent on its exterior surface. Certain grades of PTFE fiberglass can absorb 14 percent of the sun’s energy while allowing 13 percent of natural daylight and 7 percent of reradiated energy (solar heat) to transmit through.

PTFE FIBERGLASS MEMBRANE DESIGNER, FABRICATOR, INSTALLER: Birdair

Roof Report

Located beside the Queen Elizabeth II Highway, less than 20 kilometers from the U.S. border, the 520,000-square-foot shopping center features 102 retailers, including Canada’s first Pandora outlet, White House Black Market outlet and Bass Pro Shops Outpost. Other sought-after brands at the center include a Kate Spade Outlet, NIKE Factory Store, Calvin Klein Outlet and Michael Kors Outlet.

The Niagara Outlet Collection was developed to attract shoppers and visitors who might have otherwise crossed the U.S. border to shop in the Fashion Outlets of Niagara Falls, the Walden Galleria or the Boulevard Mall. David Baffa, Ivanhoé Cambridge senior vice president of retail development, said the developer wants the new outlet collection to be part of the Niagara experience.

Outlet Collection at Niagara is committed to corporate responsibility and environmental sustainability and has a number of design features throughout the property to raise awareness of its green initiatives. Its canopies make the open-air concept possible, reducing energy consumption because the common areas do not need to be heated or cooled. Some of the public buildings, like guest services and the eatery, have been designed so that they can be opened to the outdoors in favorable weather, thus saving energy and connecting people to the outdoors.

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Asphalt Roofing Provides Comprehensive Weather Protection for a Luxury Condominium

Working with the unique variables of a region and its climate poses a significant challenge to roofing contractors. Installing a roof system that looks beautiful and can stand up to ice, snow and freezing temperatures takes an expertise that only comes with experience. This is the case in the snowy and picturesque mountains of Park City, Utah. The city is a winter haven for skiers who vacation there, but the extended snow and cold season can deliver a beating to a roof.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves.


The Grand Lodge at Deer Valley Resort, a luxury condominium development at one of North America’s top-ranked ski resorts, sits at an elevation of 9,000 feet in the mountainous area. Along with the breathtaking views comes an average annual snowfall of 350 inches. As a result, the 40,000-square-foot concrete tile roof of the lodge had begun to fail after only six years of intense weather and needed to be replaced immediately.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves. Dangerous icicles would form, and noisy chainsaws were frequently needed to cut through the ice on the 5-story building. In 2013, the owner of the condominium decided to completely redesign the roofing system. IronClad Exteriors Inc., a Sandy, Utah-based roofing company had successfully installed roofs for Deer Valley in the past and was contacted by Deer Valley Resort Management to consult on the new design.

“Due to insufficient insulation and poor ventilation on the existing roof, ice dams were forming, tiles were cracking and the roof was falling apart,” says Eric Kircher, owner of IronClad Exteriors. “There was an architect involved in redesigning the roof … . I was asked to take a look at the design, and I recommended an asphalt shingle roof instead.

Kircher advised that a full asphalt roofing system with proper insulation and moisture protection would be able to withstand the harsh weather of the ski resort.

“Asphalt was the ideal material for the reroof for reasons that involve aesthetics, safety, and the long-term health and viability of the roof,” he notes. “I recommended a shake style because it really fit the architecture and look of the roof while being able to protect the building and residents from the weather conditions.”

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow.

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow.

Installation

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow. FlintBoard ISO NB (Nail Base) Composite Polyisocyanurate/OSB Roof insulation was installed over the plywood deck, followed by a 3- by 10-inch fascia board. WinterGuard HT advanced waterproofing underlayment and DiamondDeck High Performance Synthetic Underlayment were then added to provide important moisture resistance. Finally, the Presidential Shake TL asphalt shingles provided a beautiful look that matched the lodge’s breathtaking surroundings. The project was completed in November 2014.

The Grand Lodge’s new asphalt roof also contains a unique feature that sets it apart in form and function. IronClad installed 11,000 copper snow guards that offer another layer of weather protection. Snow freezes around the copper pieces and keeps it from sliding down the roof to form dangerous ice dams at the eaves. Lodge residents no longer have to walk underneath potentially hazardous icicles or listen to the sounds of manlifts and chainsaws that are used to remove them.

“The roofing system we designed had the unique ability to withstand that type of cold environment,” Kircher notes. “There will be no heat loss contributing to ice and snow on the eaves, and the insulation protects the interior of the lodge. These are high-end condominiums with finished ceilings and no attic space at the top where you can put more insulation, so the insulation had to be installed on the existing roof deck to prevent ice dams.”

The installation process went smoothly despite the challenges brought on by Park City’s weather. Snow can begin to fall as early as September and lasts through the spring, providing little time for construction projects to take place. Fortunately, IronClad had extensive experience with the roofing systems needed in Park City.

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Research Helps Industry Organizations Conclude Ballasted Roofs Provide Energy Savings

During the last decade, the roofing industry has been increasingly impacted by two strong forces: first, rising energy prices with no real end in sight, and, second, increasingly stringent building codes and regulations, designed to limit emissions, reduce energy use and mitigate the impact of urban heat islands.

The first definitive study to measure the energy-saving potential of ballasted roofs was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2007.

The first definitive study to measure the energy-saving potential of ballasted roofs was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2007. PHOTO: EPDM Roofing Association

The industry response has also been two-fold: In some instances, new products have been created, such as lower VOC adhesives, primers and sealants, self-adhering membranes and a wider variety of reflective membranes. At the same time, roofing professionals have taken a close look at some of the products that have been in use for a generation. Using rigorous science, they have tested these tried-and-true products to see how they measure up against the new standards. And in many cases, they’ve found that products that have been in use for decades are delivering great results in this new, energy-sensitive environment. Case in point: ballasted roofing, which has been available since the early 1970s, is turning out to be a great choice to meet 21st century needs.

2007 Study

The first definitive study to measure the energy-saving potential of ballasted roofs was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2007. Andre Desjarlais, ORNL’s group leader of Building Envelope Research, and his colleagues had just completed work in which “we had done a fairly substantial comparison of different cool roof technologies, both membrane types, as well as coatings,” Desjarlais says. At the request of EPDM manufacturers, working together at the newly founded EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), Bethesda, Md., as well as manufacturers within Waltham, Mass.-based SPRI, Desjarlais designed and implemented a second study to assess the performance of ballasted roofing. “We undertook a study to effectively expand what we had done earlier on coatings and membranes,” he says.

Other factors also encouraged ORNL to generate data about ballasted roofing. The California Energy Commission, Sacramento, had just revised its codes, essentially defining roofs with high reflectance and high emittance as the only choice of roofing membranes that would deliver high energy savings. Desjarlais believed this definition of a “cool roof” might be inaccurately limiting roofing choice by excluding other roofing materials, such as ballasted roofs, that would deliver comparable savings.

The California Energy Commission, Sacramento, had just revised its codes, essentially defining roofs with high reflectance and high emittance as the only choice of roofing membranes that would deliver high energy savings.

The California Energy Commission, Sacramento, had just revised its codes, essentially defining roofs with high reflectance and high emittance as the only choice of roofing membranes that would deliver high energy savings. PHOTO: EPDM Roofing Association

In addition, in Chicago, a new Chicago Energy Code was adopted as early as 2001 “with high reflectivity and emissivity requirements that limited severely building owners’ and managers’ roof system choices”, according to a paper presented in 2011 by Bill McHugh of the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association. At the roofing industry’s request, a reprieve was granted, giving the industry until 2009 to come up with products with a reflectivity of 0.25.

Faced with that 2009 deadline, the Chicagoland Roofing Council, Chicago Roofing Contractors Association and Rosemont, Ill.-based National Roofing Contractors Association began in 2001 to conduct research on products that would help to meet the city’s goal of creating a workable Urban Heat Island Effect Ordinance while giving building owners a wider choice of roofing products. As part of their effort, the industry coalition turned its attention to the energy-saving qualities of ballasted roofing and coordinated its work with the research at ORNL.

Desjarlais points out the concept of thermal mass having energy benefits has been accepted for years and has been a part of the early version of ASHRAE 90.1. “Thermally massive walls have a lower insulation requirement, so there was industry acceptance of the fact that using mass is a way of saving energy,” he says. “But we had a hard time translating that understanding from a wall to a roof. Whether you do that with a concrete block or a bunch of rocks doesn’t really matter. The metric is no different. Roofs or walls.”

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Clay and Concrete Roof Tiles Offered in More ‘Cool’ Colors

Boral Roofing LLC now offers a complete listing of 50 colors on ENERGY STAR and 150 tile colors on the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Boral Roofing LLC now offers a complete listing of 50 colors on ENERGY STAR and 150 tile colors on the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Boral Roofing LLC now offers a complete listing of 50 colors on ENERGY STAR and 150 tile colors on the Cool Roof Rating Council. Boral Roofing Cool Roof Colors are available across multiple profiles to complement a spectrum of architectural styles. According to CRRC, Boral Roofing Clay and Concrete Cool Roof Tiles reflect up to 75 percent of the sun’s solar energy. Boral Roofing Cool Roof Colors are covered under an exclusive and limited product warranty, offering peace-of-mind to homeowners in a long roof lifespan.