Concrete Roof Tiles Are Available in Six Color Blends Inspired by the Southwest

Boral Roofing launched its Gemstone Collection derived from earthy southwestern hues in six unique concrete roof tile blends.

Boral Roofing launched its Gemstone Collection derived from earthy southwestern hues in six unique concrete roof tile blends.

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of sustainable clay and concrete roof tile systems, launched its Gemstone Collection. Boral Roofing is introducing these pallets derived from earthy southwestern hues in six unique concrete roof tile blends. The Gemstone Collection is now available for sale in California.

Designed with subtle shifts of rich color that converge into elegant configurations, these sophisticated blends incorporate hues originating from, and inspired by, the Southwest. All of the Gemstone Collection selections share the same benefits as the full Boral Roofing concrete tile solutions product line, including durability, protection from inclement weather and energy efficiency.

The collection includes six new blends: Sea Pearl, Garnet, Smokey Topaz, Bronze Pearl, Ocean Jasper and Sahara Quartz Blend. All Gemstone colors meet the new California Title 24 compliance requirements and are listed by the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Sea Pearl Blend emulates the iridescence of pearls with a subtle balance of hues. Warm, gray tones shimmer with lustrous patina, reflecting sophistication and grace. Garnet Blend, an amalgam of deep, earthy reds is reminiscent of the majestic sandstone structures that Sedona, Arizona is famous for. Rustic and awe-inspiring, Garnet Blend conveys a sense of enduring strength and ancient grandeur. Smokey Topaz Blend mixes calming shades of honey and brown to evoke a sense of security and tranquillity. Bronze Pearl Blend emulates the rich, shimmery patina that forms naturally on the surface of bronze and embodies the uniquely rich color qualities of the metal itself. Ocean Jasper Blend was created to emulate a rare and beautiful rock found only on the coast of Madagascar. The multiple colors unite into a single vivacious platform that attracts the eye. Sahara Quartz Blend evokes the ethereal beauty of the desert at sunrise.

With the Gemstone theme, Boral Roofing adds the Saxony 900 Country Slate profile. This sleek design features unique bevelled edges precisely defining each roof tile for a staggered appearance. Other profiles featured with the color collection are the Spanish Barcelona “S” tile, the Mediterranean Villa 900 and the rustic Saxony 900 Shake to complement any architectural style.

Modified Acrylic Latex Binders Are Designed for Restoration of TPO Roofing Membranes

Arkema Coating Resins, a business unit of Arkema, has added to its line of waterborne binders for use in formulating roof coatings.

Arkema Coating Resins, a business unit of Arkema, has added to its line of waterborne binders for use in formulating roof coatings.

Arkema Coating Resins, a business unit of Arkema, has added to its line of waterborne binders for use in formulating roof coatings. The new product is ENCOR Flex 192, a modified acrylic latex binder designed for coatings used in the restoration of low-slope, commercial thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roofing membranes. Properly formulated, ENCOR Flex 192 offers outstanding dirt pickup resistance and adhesion to TPO, and can eliminate the need for a solvent primer to help lower roof maintenance and restoration costs.

The AC Cool Roof Binder systems are based on Kynar Aquatec PVDF binders, developed by Arkema’s fluoropolymer group, and ENCOR Flex polymers from Arkema Coating Resins.

Currently three systems are available, allowing greater formulation flexibility across different applications:

  • AC III Binder System – This system uses a Kynar Aquatec FMA-12 PVDF based topcoat and ENCOR Flex 187 all acrylic or ENCOR Flex 192 modified acrylic basecoat to provide the highest possible level of performance and durability. It is designed primarily for the most demanding cool roof coating applications.
  • AC II Binder System – Utilizing a proprietary ENCOR Flex 187 all acrylic polymer or ENCOR Flex 192 modified acrylic latex, this base and topcoat system delivers excellent performance and meets ASTM D-6083, “Standard Specification for Liquid Applied Acrylic Coating Used in Roofing.”
  • AC I Binder System – This ENCOR Flex 3186 styrene acrylic system provides a good mix of performance and value for less demanding applications.

Metal Resembles Clay and Wood

Presidio Metal Roofing from CertainTeed Corp. replicates the appearance of natural clay tile and wood shake.

Presidio Metal Roofing from CertainTeed Corp. replicates the appearance of natural clay tile and wood shake.


Presidio Metal Roofing from CertainTeed Corp. replicates the appearance of natural clay tile and wood shake. The high-performance, aesthetically pleasing steel alloy panels feature a patented anti-corrosive coating with cool roof technology. ENERGY STAR-qualified, Presidio is manufactured with up to 50 percent recycled material and is 100 percent recyclable when removed. Its solar-reflective, fade-resistant surface can significantly lower roof temperature, decreasing the amount of heat transferred into a home. The lightweight product, which does not require battens, contains overlaps that conceal the joints. Presidio resists winds exceeding 110 mph, is Class IV impact-resistant-rated and can be installed to achieve a Class-A fire rating.

White Coating Improves Energy Efficiency

The Kemperol Reflect 2K FR from Kemper System is a cold, liquid-applied reinforced cool roofing system that can improve building energy efficiency.

The Kemperol Reflect 2K FR from Kemper System is a cold, liquid-applied reinforced cool roofing system that can improve building energy efficiency.


The Kemperol Reflect 2K FR from Kemper System is a cold, liquid-applied reinforced cool roofing system that can improve building energy efficiency. The white surface helps reflect sunlight and reduce the impact of infrared rays that can tax building cooling systems. The easy-to-apply, fully reinforced membrane is applied the same way as Kemper System’s Kemperol 2K-PUR solvent- and odor-free system, but the new liquid waterproofing pours out white and dries to a bright white. Because no topcoat is necessary, labor costs and installation times are reduced. The system consists of 70 percent rapidly renewable resources, is fire-rated for Class-A assemblies, and is odor-free and low-VOC.

The Cool-roof Bandwagon: Is It Headed To Your City?

Spring is here, and summer is on the horizon. But for millions of Americans, it will take more than a few days of sunshine to thaw the memories of the winter of 2013-14. The National Weather Service is still compiling the statistics to let us know just how bad the winter really was. In the meantime, most of us have a more immediate way to measure the impact of the polar vortex on our lives: One look at our heating bills and we know that this past winter deserves its reputation as one of the most brutal on record.

On the West Coast, as 2014 dawned, very different climate issues were front and center. The city of Los Angeles was being praised for its mandate requiring all new and renovated domestic housing to install “cool”, or reflective, roofing. The L.A. City Council passed the requirement as one of its last acts of 2013, and the new ordinance became part of California’s Title 24, which already required “cool” roofs in new and remodeled commercial construction.

THE NEWS media hailed Los Angeles as the “first major city to require cool roofs”, implying other urban areas will inevitably follow its lead. However, the winter of 2013-14 did a good job of reminding us that the climatic conditions of Southern California are dramatically different from the Midwest, Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the U.S. This simple fact needs to be underscored as the bandwagon to require cool roofs travels somewhat erratically to major Eastern cities.

Last June, the mayor of Pittsburgh initiated a lukewarm cool roofs program by calling for volunteers to help paint the roofs of 10 city buildings white. Two-thirds of the Pittsburgh effort—$56,000—was funded by the Bloomberg Philanthropies, a project of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The tagline of Bloomberg Philanthropies is “Good Intentions, Great Results.” I applaud the mayor’s good intentions in supporting projects that are designed to save energy. As for achieving “great results” by painting the roofs of 10 Pittsburgh buildings white? Don’t bet your next heating bill on it.

While Bloomberg was mayor of New York, the city launched the “NYC °Cool-Roofs” initiative, encouraging building owners to cool their rooftops by applying a reflective white coating as part of the city’s overall plan to reduce greenhouse- gas emissions 30 percent by 2030.

In Baltimore, the talk about cool roofs was fueled by a report issued last October by the Abell Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to enhancing quality of life in Baltimore and Maryland. The report, which is primarily an overview of previously published research, recommended increased use of cool roofs in Baltimore.

While these cities institute varied programs to support cool roofs, several major facts are ignored:

    ▪▪ Energy costs are closely related to climate. A solution that works in a warm and temperate climate to curb energy costs will not necessarily work in a colder climate.
    ▪▪ It’s vitally important to consider the source of information about cool roofing. Unbiased, up-to-date scientific studies can provide the data you need to make an independent judgment. Likewise, the manufacturers of roofing membranes have a vested interest in ensuring their products are used correctly and have in-depth knowledge of how roofing systems will perform in a wide variety of conditions.
    ▪▪ Choosing and installing a roof that will contain energy costs is a complex business. It requires understanding the interaction between building design, climate, insulation and all the other factors that impact the efficiency of a roofing system. A one-size-fits-all approach will only delay the discovery of workable, cost-effective, energy-efficient solutions.

IN FACT, a study conducted by Arizona State University published this past winter in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences underscores the pitfalls of disregarding climate differences in roofing decisions. “What works over one geographical area may not be optimal for another,” says sustainability scientist Matei Georgescu, who led the research.

Although the headlines are touting Los Angeles’ cool roof requirements, I’d like to see headlines that read, “Energy Savings Achieved by Roofs Designed to meet Midwest and Northeast Climate Challenges”. Before anyone thinks about driving that cool-roofing bandwagon from Los Angeles to New York, you might want to equip it with snow tires.

RCMA Enhances Reflective Roof Rebates Database

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) launched an enhanced Reflective Roof Rebates Database with increased functionality for searching available reflective roof incentives across the country. Created exclusively for use by RCMA members, the customized search tool can be used to find the most up-to-date listings of local, state, federal, and utility financial incentives available for installing reflective roofs.

The enhanced search tool now allows users to filter results to show comprehensive energy rebates, reflective roof rebates, or all available rebates. Available only to members of the RCMA, the database searches by state or ZIP code to find available financial incentives and has proven an essential tool for members’ sales teams to use when speaking with prospective customers.

“Since its launch, the RCMA Reflective Roof Rebates Database has been one of our most popular member benefits,” says John Ferraro, RCMA executive director. “Independently tracking such a wide array of financial incentives has proven a challenge for our members for years, and they now have come to rely on this user-friendly tool to take the work out of discovering relevant rebates for the installation of reflective roofs all across the United States.”

Additional improvements to the database include the addition of more detailed information on each of the available incentive programs including eligibility, links to supporting documents, key program contacts, and online applications to apply for rebates. A newly-added print view allows RCMA Members to more easily review the available information in a ready-to-share format.

The RCMA Solar Reflective Coatings Council (SRCC), representing the producers of acrylic and elastomeric (non-bituminous) coatings and suppliers to the industry, initiated the creation of the Reflective Roof Rebates Database in 2013 and it has been met with tremendously positive feedback from the industry since its launch.

For more information on how to join the RCMA and acquire access to the database, email RCMA Staff Associate Laura Dwulet.

Replacement Solution Includes Framing, Sub-framing and Metal Roof Panels

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.’s Retro-Master roof replacement solution

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.’s Retro-Master roof replacement solution

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.’s Retro-Master roof replacement solution includes structural framing, sub-framing and metal roof panels. The 100 percent steel system can be installed over any existing sloped or flat roof whether metal, asphalt, built-up or membrane. Insulation can be added to the roof system, and a variety of cool-roof-compliant colors are available. The system also accommodates photovoltaic integration and rainwater catchment.

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