Shears Feature Curved Blade

The KD-446L Profile Shears features a curved blade configuration for maneuverability when making tight-curved cuts.

The KD-446L Profile Shears features a curved blade configuration for maneuverability when making tight-curved cuts.

Kett Tool Co. introduces the KD-446L Profile Shears, featuring a curved blade configuration for maneuverability when making tight-curved cuts in profile and flat materials.
 
Professionals working in the construction, metal building, metal fabrication, roofing and other industries will appreciate the flexibility of the KD-446L thanks to its lightweight design and ability to cut corrugated and flat metal, as well as soft non-ferrous metals at a radius as tight as three inches. At only 15 inches long and weighing five pounds, the KD-446L provides the versatility to make curved cuts while maintaining comfort and control.
 
The KD-446L features a five-amp pistol grip, variable speed motor that allows users to control speeds from 0 to 2,500 RPMs. The shears cut profile and flat materials up to 18-gauge cold-rolled (C.R.) mild steel, soft non-ferrous metals like aluminum, copper and brass (up to .090 inches thick); wire mesh and many other sheet materials – all at speeds of up to 28 feet per minute.
 
The cutting blades are made from quality steel, heat treated and precision ground for extended operation.
 
To see the KD-446L Profile Shears in action, watch the video here.  
 
KD-446L Profile Shears are available through authorized dealers. For more information or to locate a dealer, visit the website or call (513)271-0333.

Tool Makes Curved, Straight Cuts in Flat or Corrugated Steel

The KL-2030 Long Neck Electric Nibbler provides contractors flexibility for making straight and curved cuts in flat or corrugated steel.

The KL-2030 Long Neck Electric Nibbler provides contractors flexibility for making straight and curved cuts in flat or corrugated steel.

Kett Tool’s KL-2030 Long Neck Electric Nibbler provides contractors flexibility for making straight and curved cuts in flat or corrugated steel. The tool’s elongated neck and one-handed maneuverability allow clean and burr-free cuts. The KL-2030 features a 4-amp, 2500 rpm straight handle electric motor to cut 18-gauge cold rolled mild steel and most grades of stainless steel (up to 20 gauge). The long neck allows easy cutting of corrugated sheet and flat sheet at more than 80 inches per minute. Weighing 4 1/2 pounds, the nibbler creates a 1/4-inch-wide cut and has a cutting radius of 1 1/2 inches.

Corrugated Metal Applied in Unusual Ways Brings a 1918 Building into the 21st Century, and a TPO Roof Protects Its Icon Status

Dorchester is Boston’s largest neighborhood and one of its most diverse. In July 2013, the Four Corners commuter rail station opened in the Mount Bowdoin section of the neighborhood, setting in motion plans to bring more transit-oriented buildings to Dorchester. Among the first projects to meet this goal is the AB&W Building, a mixed-use facility located about one block from the Four Corners station.

Originally built in 1918 as a car dealership that sold Model T’s, the AB&W Building has become a neighborhood icon.

Originally built in 1918 as a car dealership that sold Model T’s, the AB&W Building has become a neighborhood icon.

Originally built in 1918 as a car dealership that sold Model T’s, the building has become a neighborhood icon. Therefore, even though the goal was to create an active center that connected tenants and others with the new commuter station, Project Architect P. Nicholas Elton, AIA, a partner in Elton + Hampton Architects, Roxbury, Mass., still desired to connect the new development to its surroundings as much as possible. “The intention was to create a development that was a little denser than the rest of the neighborhood but still respected and tried to be a little like the neighborhood,” he says.

To achieve this, the decision was made to maintain the front façade of the original building and integrate it with all new construction. Elton used specific building materials to pay homage to the surrounding area. For example, a yellowish brick on the front of the new second and third stories of the AB&W Building mimics the brick used on the 1930s-era building across the street. The addition of fiber-cement and corrugated-metal siding breaks up the enlarged AB&W Building’s scale so it better fits in its location.

Elton, who is a fan of corrugated metal, decided also to have some fun with the material, flexing it in unusual ways for overhangs above windows and doors. “When you start using materials that you are using on the walls on the roof, then you get to play a little game,” he says. “The material will come down a wall and wrap into the roof; there are a lot of materials you can’t do that with but you can when you use corrugated.”

It took a team of three metal fabricators from Lancaster Enterprises Inc., a family roofing business in Dedham, Mass., to carefully curve and flex the corrugated metal to meet Elton’s specifications. Meanwhile eight to 10 of the metal fabricators’ colleagues were installing a watertight TPO membrane on the AB&W Building’s six newly constructed roofs.

The 32,096-square-foot AB&W Building features 24 affordable-housing units, primarily rentals with a few coop ownership opportunities, and 3,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space.

The 32,096-square-foot AB&W Building features 24 affordable-housing units, primarily rentals with a few coop ownership opportunities, and 3,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space.

OLD BECOMES NEW

Elton + Hampton Architects concentrates its work on what the firm’s partners—Elton and Bruce M. Hampton, AIA—refer to as socially relevant projects. The firm almost exclusively works with non-profit organizations on affordable housing and housing for special populations, as well as community-resource buildings.

The 32,096-square-foot AB&W Building features 24 affordable-housing units, primarily rentals with a few coop ownership opportunities, and 3,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space. One retail space is an art gallery and there currently are conversations to merge the other two retail locations for a restaurant specializing in Caribbean cuisine.

PHOTOS: Grieg Cranna

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