Composite Slate Roof Offers Curb Appeal

 A composite slate roof was chosen to help the facility fit in with the surrounding area.

A composite slate roof was chosen to help the facility fit in with the surrounding area.

Jack Lucks has an “architectural eye.” His dedication to creating attention-grabbing projects has served him well during the past 43 years as he makes design and product decisions related to a variety of projects with different architectural styles.

In recent years Lucks and his group, Continental Real Estate Companies, have focused on the creation of senior/assisted living facilities. A recently opened facility in Granville, Ohio, has been well received, and Lucks, a founding partner with the group, credits the distinctive look of the building’s composite slate roof as a key to its curb appeal.

Roof Materials

The design goals included integrating the building with the surrounding area. “Granville is an older town, founded in the early 1800s,” Lucks notes. “There are lots of slate roofs in town that complement the Greek Revival style of this area. Having a composite slate roof on our facility that so perfectly replicates real slate was a smart decision.”

A composite slate roof from DaVinci Roofscapes was chosen for the project. “The black Bellaforté Slate roof has the aesthetic look we wanted without the weight of real slate,” says Lucks.

Lucks points out that the Middleton project is a single-story building with a roof that’s highly visible from the street. “When you look at this building, half of what you see is the roof,” he says. “That made the roofing decision especially important for us.”

According to Lucks he has been “enormously pleased” with the authentic look of the composite slate roof. “It’s not an exaggeration to say that the DaVinci roof has helped us gain tenants,” he says. “People look at the structure, see the brick and ‘slate’ exterior. It makes them take that crucial step to walk in our door.”

With 94 rooms, Middleton offers six levels of support for residents at the 92,000-square-foot structure. The facility provides restaurant-style dining, daily activities, an on-site theatre and nature paths, as well as laundry and housekeeping services, 24-hour licensed nurses and a beauty salon. “America’s population is aging,” says Lucks. “Our facilities help Americans age gracefully in beautiful settings that cater to their changing needs.”

Team

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Composite Shake Roofing Tiles Replace Cedar Shingles

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

It can be tiring to own real cedar shake roofing. There are cedar roof shingles that need replacing from time to time due to popping or warping, and insect infestations need to be dealt with regularly.

For Dave and Jeanne Schwab, the effort of cleaning and applying shake oil to their massive cedar shake roof every five years or so eventually wore them down. They loved the look of shake on their home in Mt. Vernon, Wash., but hated the maintenance aspects.

“Our home was built in 1993, and there’s a lot of roofing involved in its design,” says Dave Schwab. “Eventually the roof really needed to be replaced. We liked how the natural cedar roofing looked on the house, but when we went shopping for a new roof we wanted a cedar shake alternative.”

THE RE-ROOFING PROJECT

The Schwabs discovered DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles and were sold. “The authentic appearance of the DaVinci fake cedar shake sold us right away,” says Schwab.

“Then you add in the Class A Fire Rating, the impact resistance and the lifetime limited warranty and it was easy to make our decision.”

The large roof on the Schwab home is broken up visually by seven skylights and the addition of decorative European-designed ridge vents. The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in the Mountain blend, now covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The house was re-roofed in 2015. “Every time I pull up to the house I still get a ‘wow’ experience,” says Schwab. “The color is perfect for our home. It looks so natural, yet we know we’ll never again have to spend another hour maintaining this roof. That’s the real joy of selecting synthetic shake shingles.”

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

THE SEQUEL

The Schwabs were inspired to build an outdoor shed by the cover of an old issue of Country Living magazine. “When we saw this potting shed on the magazine cover in 2002, we knew the style matched our home perfectly,” says Dave Schwab. “We purchased the plans from the magazine and constructed it in 2004 to hold our snow blower, bicycles, lawn mower and gardening tools.”

In 2016, the real shake shingles on the shed needed replacing, and the Schwabs knew exactly what they wanted to do.

“It was very exciting to complete this DIY project a decade ago,” Jeanne Schwab says. “We wired it with electricity, and added insulation and pine tongue and groove. For the floor, we put in a black and white checkered vinyl. Now, up on the roof we’ve replaced the shake and added DaVinci simulated shake roofing that matches our home. We even used it on top of the cupola.”

“Now we have two structures on our property with unified looks,” says Dave Schwab. “Having the potting shed completed gives us a great deal of satisfaction … and we’re sure the new DaVinci roof will serve us well for many years to come.”

Roof Materials

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

DaVinci Roofscapes Recycles 1.2 Million Pounds of Polymer Scrap

DaVinci Roofscapes has kept more than 1.2 million pounds of polymer scrap out of landfills in 2016. The recycling effort includes the remolding of more than 696,000 pounds of grinded scrap into starter tiles and the transfer of 567,000 pounds of scrap to an end-user who makes pallets, crates and totes.

“Our goal is zero percentage of scrap going into a landfill,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “We are always looking for ways to recycle and reuse every piece of waste in our plant.”

“We made a capital investment in regrind machinery in recent years that’s paying off. Over the past two years we’ve decreased our trash generation by more than 50 percent annually. That’s a number we’re proud of and hope to improve upon even more in the future.”

DaVinci Roofscapes produces polymer slate and shake roofing tiles in 50 standard colors, plus custom colors. Each time the manufacturing operation changes color runs, there is a transitioning between colors. Those transition tiles are off spec and are recycled. The tiles, which are 100 percent recyclable, are segregated by color and then ground up and molded into starter shingles, which are generally unseen on the roof.

“We view Earth Day as a time to evaluate the progress of our recycling operations and share the good news about our efforts,” says Ward. “Our operation is efficient. Between reusing the regrind polymer and selling off additional scrap, we’re excited to prevent more than 1.2 million pounds of scrap from sitting in a landfill this year.”

The team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer slate and shake roofing systems. DaVinci leads the industry in the selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci roofing products are made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

DaVinci Roofscapes Lowers Price of Roofing Products

Efficiencies at its Kansas facility in 2016 has permitted DaVinci Roofscapes to lower pricing on the company’s roofing products. Price reductions went into effect during the fourth quarter of 2016 and range from 11 percent to 16 percent on several of the company’s synthetic shake and slate product lines.
           
“Adding more workers and line equipment at our plant along with other advances have enabled us to leverage our operational efficiencies and pass the savings on to our distributors,” says Ray Rosewall, president and CEO for DaVinci Roofscapes. “We’re going outside of the box by sharing our cost savings to make our composite roofing products even more accessible to roofers and owners across the country.”
           
“We’re conscious of what the market is telling us versus what our competitors are doing. For us, it’s all about advancing the growth of our customer’s business.”
           
“When DaVinci started manufacturing synthetic roofing tiles about two decades ago they were considered specialty products. Now, thanks to technological advancements our slate and shake tiles are seen more as main stream products. This means we’re very comfortable competing against products like slate, real cedar, asphalt and other materials. From an aesthetic, performance and cost standpoint synthetic roofing products are competitive.”
           
“Most importantly, we’ve heard from distributors, roofers and builders that our products are becoming preferred to the natural roofing products. People want the expected look of shake and slate, but they want the benefits that a manmade product offers. We’ve achieved that goal by creating realistic-looking products with additional features.”
           
New molds allowed DaVinci to enhance the look of all of its slate profiles in 2016. The thicker profiles replicate the quarried look of slate at a cost less than natural slate. Thanks to recent price reductions, pricing for the company’s Bellaforté Shake tiles falls below pricing of many real cedar shingles, but with the added benefit of resistance to fire, splitting, curling, mold and algae.
           
The team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer slate and shake roofing systems with an authentic look and performance. DaVinci offers a selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci roofing products are made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

Lightweight and Fire-resistant Polymer Roofing Tops Tennessee Multipurpose Center

Opened in late 2013, the multipurpose LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge in Tennessee includes 232,000 square feet of meeting and exhibit space in a sprawling lodge-type setting. Topping off the impressive structure is 965 squares of Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes in the Verde blend of light and dark green tiles to complement the facility’s Smoky Mountain setting.

Topping off the LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge is 965 squares of Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes in the Verde blend of light and dark green tiles, which complement the facility’s Smoky Mountain setting.

Topping off the LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge is 965 squares of Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes in the Verde blend of light and dark green tiles, which complement the facility’s Smoky Mountain setting.

“The size of this complex plus the building code limitations made it impossible for us to specify weighty, expensive real slate for the roof,” says Michael Smelcer, principal with SRA Architects Inc. “After researching our options, we selected the DaVinci Valoré Slate product because of aesthetics, weight and Class A fire classification. The owners of the center were very open to using this particular polymer slate roofing because it gave them the mountain lodge look they desired.”

Single-width Valoré Slate polymer roofing tiles resemble the classic traditional slate tile found on upscale projects throughout the world. Available in 12-inch tile widths, the 1/2-inch-thick Valoré Slate tiles are twice the thickness of most other synthetic slates. The roofing tiles come in a full spectrum of authentic slate colors and are made of pure virgin resins to guarantee a sustainable product. The 100 percent recyclable tiles resist impact, fire, hail, insects and algae.

Built over a two-year time frame by the team at Merit Construction Inc., Knoxville, Tenn., the LeConte Center has a 100,000-square-foot exhibit hall, 14 multipurpose rooms of varying sizes, along with pre-function and kitchen space, loading docks and spacious lobbies. Outdoor patios overlook the Little Pigeon River with views of Mount LeConte from many angles.

“Because of the close proximity to Little Pigeon River, our site design had to be low-impact,” Smelcer adds. “This included underground detention, rain gardens, vegetated swales and permeable pavers. We’ve provided similar architectural work for other large facilities, so our firm was confident in our ability to meet the design needs of this exciting project.”

The roof on the LeConte Center was installed by Detail Slate and Tile, Greenville, S.C. “We install several DaVinci roofs each year on residential and commercial projects,” says Joe Whitmore, vice president of operations for Detail Slate and Tile. “This was the largest project we’ve had the opportunity to install polymer roofing material and it went very smoothly. The result is a roof that blends in with its natural setting, is very durable, requires virtually no maintenance and will last for decades to come.”

Polymer Roofing Stands Up to Wichita, Kan., Weather

The morning of April 2, 2015, started out clear and sunny for residents at the Harbor Isle community in Wichita, Kan. By evening, a powerful microburst with winds reaching up to 100 mph destroyed a bulk of the roofs in the subdivision——except polymer roofs installed by Heiland Roofing and Exteriors, Wichita.

Polymer roofs installed by Heiland Roofing and Exteriors, Wichita, received very little if any damage during the microburst.

Polymer roofs installed in the Harbor Isle subdivision by Heiland Roofing and Exteriors, Wichita, received very little if any damage during the microburst.

“The majority of concrete tiles sustained very serious damage with many others demolished,” says Mike Heiland, president of Heiland Roofing and Exteriors. “Of the three composite roofs we installed in this community, one home had zero damage, another home had one missing ridge cap, and the third home needed approximately 10 feet of ridge replaced. That’s absolutely nothing compared to the devastation that all the other homes in that neighborhood experienced.”

According to homeowner Paul Dugan, roofing debris littered the entire Harbor Isle community after the storm. “Concrete roof tiles were thrown through neighbor’s windows, into vehicles parked along the streets and in driveways,” Dugan says. “A couple of the homes that had been recently reroofed by Heiland Roofing with polymer shake roofing tiles had every single tile in place and no visible damage to the property. I was very impressed and called Heiland Roofing the next morning.”

HOA Selects Polymer Roofing

A distant relative to a tornado, the National Weather Service, Washington, D.C., defines a microburst as sinking air (or a downdraft) in a thunderstorm that is less than 2 1/2 miles in scale. A microburst can develop as a result of cooling beneath a thunderstorm cloud base or because of mid-level dry air entrainment.

Wet, dry and hybrid microburst distinctions exist. With each of these, significant straight-line wind damage can occur, resulting in snapped power poles and tree and roof damage. There can also be a loss of power and potential hail. In Wichita on April 2, all these factors occurred when strong straight-line winds hit the area before a bow echo thunderstorm. With an appearance like a comma—a round head on one end and a tail on the other—a bow echo thunderstorm moves rapidly. Generally, the atmosphere is unstable during these moisture-laden storms and wind shear is present, making bow echo thunderstorms very dangerous.

a powerful microburst with winds reaching up to 100 mph destroyed a bulk of the roofs in the subdivision

A powerful microburst with winds reaching up to 100 mph destroyed a bulk of the roofs in the subdivision.

Kansas residents are no strangers to severe weather. Located in Tornado Alley, most homeowners, like Dugan, understand their state is subject to unusually strong weather during the course of the year. That’s why many people, like the residents of Harbor Isle, seek out durable building products to help protect their homes and families.

“When constructed about 18 years ago, our community had wood shake and concrete tiles used for roofing,” says Dee Manning, president of the Harbor Isle I homeowner association, which consists of 59 homes. “As the years went on, the wood shakes were wearing out and, at the same time, they became harder to get insured. We wanted an alternative that was realistic looking but lightweight enough to be installed over the existing roof trusses of the homes in our community. We did our research and found a polymer roof tile that was a realistic alternative to natural cedar shakes. Our community started offering polymer products three years ago as an option for homeowners looking for replacement roofing.”

Polymer Roofs Gain Foothold

After the microburst, the homeowners’ association received notice that 15 to 20 roofs, plus a variety of decks, were damaged.

“Nothing will protect a home from Mother Nature if a tornado is sitting right on top of you,” Heiland says. “But if you’re on the outskirts and just getting pounding hail or strong winds, at least a manmade polymer roof will give your home a fighting chance.”

For almost a dozen years Heiland and his team have recommended and installed imitation slate and synthetic shake roofing products. “The look and durability of these imitation slate and synthetic shake shingles is simply incredible,” Heiland notes. “For our geographic area—and any part of the country that can get severe weather—the impact resistance of these products is a tremendous asset. In the many years I’ve been installing polymer roofing, we’ve never had one of their roofs totaled by hail.”

Fifteen to 20 roofs, plus a variety of decks, were damaged during the storm.

Fifteen to 20 roofs, plus a variety of decks, were damaged during the storm.

Made of 100 percent recyclable virgin resins, the polymer tiles installed on the Harbor Isle homes are engineered to resist fire, impact, insects and algae. The products are Class A-rated for fire retardance, have achieved a Class 4 impact rating and passed the TAS-100 certification test for wind-driven rain. The durable products have also passed the maximum of 110 mph in the ASTM D 3161 Standard for straight-line winds and achieved very high design pressures in TAS-125, a test to demonstrate wind uplifts and acceptability to be installed in High Velocity Hurricane Zones.

“After the microburst in April, there are at least 10 homes ready to commit to the polymer tiles to replace their destroyed concrete tile roofs,” Manning says.

Dugan was one of the homeowners ready for change. “I now have a [polymer] roof that looks exactly the same as the concrete tile roof but has the highest impact resistance in the industry,” he says. “The impressive interlocking system allows for installation with securing the tile in all four corners so we’re not going to worry about tiles peeling back and blowing away in future storms.”

Roof Materials

Bellaforté Slate from DaVinci Roofscapes

PHOTOS: DaVinci Roofscapes

New Polymer Roof Options Receive CRRC Approval

Four new DaVinci EcoBlend options are approved by the Cool Roof Rating Council to reflect sunlight and heat away from a home or commercial structure.

Four new DaVinci EcoBlend options are approved by the Cool Roof Rating Council to reflect sunlight and heat away from a home or commercial structure.

DaVinci Roofscapes, a leader in polymer roof colors, launches four new DaVinci EcoBlend options approved by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) to reflect sunlight and heat away from a home or commercial structure. The new color blends all meet Title 24 requirements for California.

Newly introduced color blends for EcoBlend polymer shake and slate roofs include:
– Tahoe-EcoBlend: Light Tahoe, Medium Light Tahoe and Medium Tahoe blend
– Mountain-EcoBlend: Light Mountain, Medium Mountain and Dark Mountain blend
– Brownstone-EcoBlend: Light Brown, Dark Stone and Dark Tan blend
– Slate Gray-EcoBlend: Slate Gray

EcoBlend color blends previously accessible from DaVinci Roofscapes that meet the stringent requirements to receive ENERGY STAR designations and still available from the company include:
– Weathered Gray-EcoBlend: Light Weathered Gray, Medium Weathered Gray and Dark Weathered Gray blend
– Castle Gray-EcoBlend: Light Gray, Medium Gray and Dark Gray

Four new color blends for EcoBlend polymer shake and slate roofs include Tahoe, Mountain, Brownstone, and Slate Gray.

Four new color blends for EcoBlend polymer shake and slate roofs include Tahoe, Mountain, Brownstone, and Slate Gray.

Created in 1998, the Cool Roof Rating Council develops accurate and credible methods for evaluating and labeling the solar reflectance and thermal emittance (radiative properties) of roofing products. The company shares this information with architects, specifiers, builders and all other interested parties.

The experienced team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer roof systems with an authentic look and superior performance. DaVinci leads the industry in selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci roofing products are proudly made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

Project Profiles: Health Care

Mount Carmel New Albany, New Albany, Ohio

Team

Roofing Contractor: Smith Roofing, Columbus, Ohio

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital.

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital.

Roof Materials

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital. The composite roofing has achieved a Class A Fire Rating in the ASTME E 108 fire test and withstands straight-line winds up to 110 mph in the ASTM D 3161 test. The roof tiles also resist impact, severe weather conditions and wind-driven rain. Bellaforté Slate tiles not only add safety to the structure, they also add aesthetic appeal.

Composite Roofing Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Roof Report

The 60-room hospital features eight operating rooms and specializes in outpatient and inpatient orthopedic, neurologic and musculoskeletal care. The roof was installed in May 2015.

PHOTO: DaVinci Roofscapes

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Polymer Roofing Tiles Feature Quarried Look that Replicates Natural Slate

DaVinci Multi-Width Slate tiles come in five different widths—12-, 10-, 9-, 7- and 6-inch—and are available in a number of different color blends.

DaVinci Multi-Width Slate tiles come in five different widths—12-, 10-, 9-, 7- and 6-inch—and are available in a number of different color blends.

Following the successful introduction of a Single-Width Slate 12-inch tile with an enhanced profile in early 2015, DaVinci Roofscapes showcased the availability of the more realistic profiles on the company’s Multi-Width Slate and Bellaforté Slate polymer roofing tiles at the 2016 International Builders’ Show.

Details on the edges of the DaVinci slate tiles now have a more accurate quarried look that replicates natural slate. Deeper impressions in the tiles make them appear thicker, even though they’re the same weight as the previous tiles.

Low-maintenance slate tiles from DaVinci resist algae and moss growth, come in 50 standard colors and are rated for installation in areas experiencing high winds, hail and wildfires. DaVinci Multi-Width Slate tiles come in five different widths—12-, 10-, 9-, 7- and 6-inch—and are available in a number of different color blends. Single-Width Slate and Bellaforté Slate tiles from DaVinci are available in a 12-inch tile width, also in a variety of color blends.

Polymer Shakes Mimic Cedar while Protecting Historic Estates

When it was time for homeowners at the historic Fleur du Lac Estates in Homewood, Calif., to select new roofing materials, they looked for a product that would mimic the look of cedar but bring them advantages to protect their homes and buildings from Mother Nature. After a comprehensive search, they determined that the Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of Bellaforté polymer shake tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes met their needs.

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the Fleur du Lac Estates, Homewood, Calif.

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the Fleur du Lac Estates, Homewood, Calif.

A prime filming location for the 1974 movie “Godfather II,” Fleur du Lac Estates is now a private condominium development located on the beautiful west shore of Lake Tahoe. A Yacht Club and Boat House, 22 individual homeowner units and a variety of shared recreational facilities make the historic 1938 compound a much-sought-after retreat.

Fire Resistance a Prime Benefit

Years of harsh weather conditions took their toll on the real cedar shake roofs at Fleur du Lac Estates. Damage from repeated leaks, hail, ice dam issues, snow and other weather conditions recently convinced the board of directors it was time to invest in new roofs for the entire estate.

“We started with our two most valuable community structures, the Yacht Club and Boat House,” says Stewart Dalie, maintenance supervisor and project manager at Fleur du Lac Estates. “Our plans are to reroof all of the buildings in the Tahoe Blend over the next five to seven years. We did a tremendous amount of research to determine what roofing products would look realistic in this setting, meet the new codes required for roofs in our area, yet offer us superior qualities and a long life span.

“Selecting the fire- and impact-resistant Bellaforté shake material from DaVinci Roofscapes means we won’t have to be concerned with the potential spread of flames should our area ever be touched by wildfires. That’s a huge concern for our geographic area. However, not having to worry about wind-blown embers landing on a roof and then catching the building on fire is a tremendous relief.”

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the community. The durable roofing tiles have the appearance of natural hand-split cedar shake with slanted sawn edges and staggered lengths, but with the hassle-free qualities of a manufactured product. At a 1-inch average tile thickness, Bellaforté Shake roofing tiles remind many residents of jumbo cedar shakes prevalent in the Lake Tahoe area.

The Bruce Olson Construction team incorporated snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

The Bruce Olson Construction team incorporated snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

Safeguarding a Historic Setting

It’s not surprising that homeowners at the upscale Fleur du Lac Estates want to invest in the best possible roofing material. This is a mountain and lakeside homeowners association where every home has a deeded slip in the marina, resort-style services are the norm and aesthetics of the community are vigilantly upheld.

Originally the summer home of famous industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, the 15-acre lake-shore site was constructed beginning in 1938. After Kaiser sold the estate, it went through a series of transitional uses from the 1960s to 1979, including serving as a private school and as the site for many on-location scenes for Francis Ford Coppola’s film, “The Godfather II.” Only in the 1980s did the current project begin to refurbish existing key structures and transform original homes on the property to individually owned homes.

“Our community has always embraced the history of this setting while looking toward protecting its future,” says Lane Murray, general manager at Fleur du Lac Estates. “That’s one of the key reasons we wanted a roofing product that has the look of real cedar shakes but with manmade advantages like resistance to fire, impact and high winds.”

Superior Roofing Installation

Despite a variety of challenges with removing the old roofs and prepping for the new synthetic shake tiles, the team at Bruce Olson Construction, Olympic Valley, Calif., has successfully tackled their first DaVinci Roofscapes installation project at Fleur du Lac Estates.

“The roofing surface for the Yacht Club and Boat House were in bad shape and very uneven,” says Taylor Greene, general manager of Bruce Olson Construction. “We had to plane these into workable surfaces before getting started. Once we got started the product installed beautifully. We added flashing material to cover some valley locations, which made the project look exceptional. To achieve the realistic look, gable end flashing that concealed the manufactured edge of the DaVinci product was added.”

The company, which does residential and multifamily new construction, works in several states, including Hawaii. It has already started work on several additional roofs in the Fleur du Lac complex.

“The Bellaforté roofing looks amazing,” Greene says. “Best of all, these polymer shakes are perfect for this geographic area. Traditional wood shakes ‘hold’ the water from melting snow. Those saturated shakes weigh more and cause the freeze line to be a part of the shake. With the DaVinci product, the water is not absorbed into the tile, so snow melting is faster and more efficient. This can also help reduce the ice damming effect in many locations.”

Laughing at Mother Nature

Nestled amidst stunning mountain peaks and world-famous ski conditions, Fleur du Lac Estates can experience heavy snowfall during the winter months. The property is just five minutes from Homewood Mountain Ski Resort and the area usually sees snow in excess of 180 inches total. That’s one reason why the community decided to have the Bruce Olson Construction team incorporate snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

“In our area it’s very common to use snow guards and fences to help keep snow from falling on individuals and property,” Greene explains. “The previous structures at Fleur du Lac Estates didn’t have any type of snow-retention system. We believe having these products in place now—which were very simple to put in during the polymer shake installation—will make life much easier for property owners no matter how much snow Mother Nature delivers each season.”

Rocky Mountain Snow Guards custom designed the snow-retention system for Fleur du Lac Estates, incorporating its Drift III+ snow fences and Rocky Guard RG10 snow guards. The system was developed to handle the 180-PSF snow load that can occur in this geographic location.

“The snow guards are attached in a pattern above the snow fence that creates friction to hold the snow ‘slab’ in place while the snow fence provides a barrier beyond which the snow slab won’t slide,” says Lars Walberg, president of Rocky Mountain Snow Guards. “Using the combination of snow guards and snow fences gives this project a balanced snow-retention system that has the ‘look’ the owners desired.”

For homeowners, the new Bellaforté roofs on the Yacht Club and Boat House are tempting reminders of what will be on their own homes in the years to come.

“Now that the Yacht Club and Boat House roofs are complete we’re hearing very positive comments from our residents,” Murray says. “Folks are eager for the work to continue in the common areas so that their individual homes can soon get these terrific-looking new roofs!”