Composite Shake Shingles Offered in New Colors

Aged Cedar

DaVinci Roofscapes launches the Nature Crafted Collection of composite shake shingles, which includes three realistic, nature-inspired colors: Aged Cedar, Mossy Cedar and Black Oak. According to the manufacturer, each new color reflects different progressive aging processes found on real shake shingles. The Nature Crafted Collection is designed to capture the look of a moment and retain it for decades. The Nature Crafted Collection is available on all DaVinci Multi-Width and Single-Width Shake composite roofing tiles.

“The DaVinci Nature Crafted Collection is our most ambitious foray into color development in our company’s history,” said Ray Rosewall, president and CEO of DaVinci Roofscapes. “Our proprietary process technology enables us to recreate the natural warmth and softness of a patina previously only created by time and exposure to the elements.”

Black Oak

The realistic-looking colors on the composite shake tiles provide homeowners with the ability to gain the specific natural color

they desire for roofing tiles without the hassles of dealing with real wood. The DaVinci shake products have a lifetime limited warranty and will not split, crack, curl or fade, according to the company. Each tile has been crafted to resist fire and impact, along with high winds, mold, algae, fungus and insects. The composite tiles come in both wavy and straight grains throughout each shake tile to achieve an authentic wood look.

Research, time and attention have been dedicated to the development of the Nature Crafted Collection to assure a unique variety of colors appealing to homeowners nationwide. “We had our teams scanning the country to identify any colors that may be missing from our current selections,” said Rosewall. “This allowed us to identify three distinct ‘aged’ cedar palettes with different tones. In most cases when real wood has aged to the point where these beautiful patinas appear, the cedar itself begins to deteriorate as a roofing material. We have captured those

Mossy Cedar

natural colors and married them up with our composite shakes to offer long-term performance without the worry of failing roof materials.”

“People who truly appreciate the natural aesthetic that comes with the aging of a cedar shake tile will find the new colors in the Nature Crafted Collection very realistic,” Rosewall said. “The hues and tones replicated on these tiles are ‘consistently inconsistent’ … much like Mother Nature makes them. The colors in the collection allow people to have the look and character of naturally aged cedar roofs but with the performance features that are missing in the real cedar product.”

LEARN MORE
Visit: www.davinciroofscapes.com
Call: (800) 328-4624

The “Roofers’ Choice” winner is determined by the product that receives the most reader inquiries from the “Materials & Gadgets” section in a previous issue. This product received the most inquiries from our March/April 2018 issue.

DaVinci Roofscapes Recycles 820,000 Pounds of Waste

Efficient operations, new blending systems and a dedicated focus on the environment allowed DaVinci Roofscapes to recycle 820,000 pounds of composite scrap in 2017. The excess shake and slate roofing tiles were crushed, then ground down and used to create starter tiles for the roofing company.

“The big story this past year is that our company molded 30 percent more pounds of roofing tiles than in 2016 while simultaneously reducing our scrap by 242,000 pounds over the past year,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “This is a terrific achievement when considering Earth Day and our companies’ dedicated commitment to the environment.

“We were able to advance production while reducing scrap by enhancing our recycling efforts. Searching for ways to reduce waste is a full-time dedicated endeavor at our company.”

Thanks in part to an investment in a new blending system, which makes manufacturing operations more efficient, the team at DaVinci Roofscapes sold zero scrap to outside firms in 2017.

“It’s very significant that we were able to recycle and reuse 100 percent of all scrap items at our facility last year,” says Ward. “In 2016 we transferred 567,000 pounds of scrap to an outside end-user who makes pallets, crates and totes. That’s a great use for the product because it doesn’t end up in landfills. However, in 2017 our company was able to keep every pound of scrap in-house and reuse it for our own products. That’s a significant achievement.”

DaVinci Roofscapes continues to meet their goal of zero scrap going into landfills. The industry’s leading composite shake and slate manufacturer produces polymer slate and shake roofing tiles in 49 standard colors, plus custom colors.

Each time the manufacturing operation changes color runs, there is a transitioning between colors.  Those transition tiles are “off spec,” cannot be used and are recycled. The tiles — which are 100 percent recyclable — are segregated by color and then ground up and molded into starter shingles, which are generally unseen on the roof.

“Every year we take stock on Earth Day to evaluate the progress of our recycling operations and share the good news about our enhanced efforts,” says Ward. “Our manufacturing operation continues to become more efficient each year.

“The fact that we increased manufacturing production of roofing tiles in 2017 while substantially decreasing the amount of scrap generated is a huge accomplishment. We’re on a path toward continually making our operations more efficient, which is great for the environment.”

For more information, visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.

Communication Is Crucial When You’re Working on Top of the Village Hall

Lincolnshire Village Hall houses city offices and a police station. The structure’s roof and gutter systems were recently replaced by All American Exterior Solutions. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The Lincolnshire Village Hall, located in Lincolnshire, Illinois, houses city departments and the offices of elected officials, as well as the Lincolnshire Police Station. When its natural cedar shake roof and inlaid gutter system began to fail, city officials looked for a solution that would provide the desired aesthetics but last longer and require less maintenance.

Dale Pole of All American Exterior Solutions, a full-service union roofing contractor headquartered in Lake Zurich, Illinois, thought he had the answer. Pole, a 32-year industry veteran who is now the company’s vice president of operations, dropped off samples of a synthetic shake roofing tile manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes and asked if city officials wanted to give it a try.

All American was awarded the job in 2016. The scope of work consisted of a complete re-roof of the complex, including the steep-slope roof system on the hall and tower. The project also included five sections of flat roofing and replacement of the copper gutter system. The job was complex, but All American was up to the challenge. The company worked in conjunction with Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, located in McHenry, Illinois.

The Steep-Slope System

The building’s signature feature is the observatory tower over the main entrance, which extends approximately 45 feet in the air. The main roof features a pitch change at the rear of the building, where the roof goes from 4:12 to 12:12. All

The complex is located right next to a large pond and bordered by mature trees, so the jobsite limited access to sections of the roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

American installed approximately 23,000 square feet of the DaVinci product, Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, a blend of four colors. The company also fabricated the new gutter system out of 20-ounce lead-coated copper with soldered seams. Approximately 600 feet of new gutters were installed.

Work began in late spring, and the 23-year-old existing roof was torn off in sections. GAF Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield was applied as a leak barrier, followed by Proof Synthetic Underlayment from ABC Supply. “We couldn’t install the tiles until the inlaid gutter was in place, so we used a synthetic underlayment to keep everything watertight during the tear-off process,” says Pole.

Gutters were installed in an 8-inch-by-8-inch trough. “There was a course or two of the DaVinci, and then the inlaid gutters were set into the roof, and the roof starts again,” notes Pole. “The trough area was also layered with ice and water shield before the copper gutters were put in.”

Transitions and flashings were also made of copper. “Everything on this job was 20-ounce lead-coated copper,” notes Pole. “All of the valleys, transition flashing, and the gutters were all lead-coated copper.”

The DaVinci synthetic shake tiles were easy to install, according to Pole. “They are nailed in place,” he says. “You can use stainless steel nails or hot-dip galvanized nails. In this case, we used 1-1/2-inch stainless steel ring shank nails.”

Low-Slope Areas

The low-slope roofs were covered with a GAF two-ply modified bitumen system. Michael McCory, project manager, headed up the crews on the five low-slope sections, which totaled approximately 2,700 square feet.

The observatory tower over the main entrance features a walk-out area with a modified bitumen roof system. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The low-slope sections had different substrates. Two balconies had concrete decks, while two canopies and an area over the garage had wooden decks. Some of the flat roofs had paver systems, which had to be removed and replaced after the new system was installed.

Half-inch DensDeck Prime cover board from Georgia-Pacific was installed over the wood and concrete decks. The GAF mod bit system consisted of a Ruberoid 20 base sheet and Ruberoid Granular FR cap sheet in white. “It was applied in a cold-process adhesive,” says McCory. “No torches were used. A manufacturer’s inspection was part of the process for a 20-year warranty.”

The upper level of the tower features a small walk-out balcony. “That was probably the most difficult area,” notes McCory. “It was covered with pavers and difficult to reach. We had to remove the pavers and store them in the stairwell during the installation.”

A Challenging Jobsite

Logistics at the jobsite posed a few problems. “The hardest part was the observatory tower by the front entry,” Pole recalls, noting an 80-foot man lift was used to remove the existing cedar and install the synthetic shake. “On the tower, it was all lift work. For other parts of the project, workers on both the steep-slope and the low-slope portions of the roof were tied off at all times.”

Crews installed 23,000 square feet of Bellaforte Shake by DaVinci Roofscapes on the building’s main roof. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The building is bordered by mature trees and a large pond, limiting roof access. “On the west side of the structure, the pond comes right up against the building,” Pole says. “We had to use a lift that could stretch over that pond to get that end of the roof.”

An Equipter mechanized debris hauler was used to get around narrow grassy areas near the building. “We used an Equipter, which is like a gas-powered, mobile dumpster, to drive around the building and enter the courtyard for our debris,” Pole says. “We have two of those pieces of equipment, which we use on a lot of our jobs to get the shingles out. They don’t damage lawns and help protect the landscaping.”

The building was occupied during the installation, so care had to be taken to ensure business was not disrupted and passers-by would be safe. “The village offices were open for business while we were working, and the police station was open as well,” notes McCory. “The tower and front entryway had to be completed on the weekend, as that was the only walkway for the public to get in.”

The police station had several doors, so crews had to coordinate with officers while replacing the roof on that section and let them know where they were setting up the crane. The courtyard area was also restricted at times.

“We obviously had to keep everything neat and organized and make sure we cleaned up every day to make sure nothing would bother the people working in the building and the residents who came in to the village hall to get permits or whatever the case may be,” McCory says. “You don’t want police cars getting flat tires.”

Communication is the key to meeting customers’ needs, especially with an occupied building. “Whoever the building owner is, I give him my cell number and make sure I have his,” Pole notes. “I try to stay in contact with them and let them know if anything is changing. I ask them if they have any questions or issues, or if their schedule is changing. On this project, they said it was like we were never even there, and that’s what we like to hear.”

Feedback from the city has been positive, according to Pole. “They are very happy with it,” he says. “The system has the look they wanted. It looks like shake, they had a lot of colors to choose from, and they won’t have the maintenance issues that they did with the cedar. And it will last a lot longer. They will save a whole roof replacement phase in the life of the DaVinci product.”

Pole believes his company’s diverse portfolio gives it an edge. “We’re one of very few union companies that have their own shinglers, flat roofing crews, and sheet metal workers in house. We also do waterproofing, metal wall panels and insulation,” he says.

“This project shows our strength — we can do it all.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com
Roof Consultant: Illinois Roof Consulting Associates, McHenry, Illinois, www.irca.com

MATERIALS

Steep-Slope Roof System
Synthetic Shake: Bellaforté Shake in Tahoe, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.DaVinciRoofscapes.com
Underlayment: Proof Synthetic Underlayment, ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.ABCsupply.com
Leak Barrier: Weather Watch Water & Ice Shield, GAF, www.GAF.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Base Sheet: Ruberoid 20, GAF
Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet: Ruberoid Granular FR, GAF
Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.DensDeck.com

Historic Fleur du Lac Estates Gets New Synthetic Shake Roof

Fleur du Lac Estates is now a private condominium development located on the shore of Lake Tahoe. The Yacht Club and Boat House were the first structures to be re-roofed with synthetic shake. DaVinci Roofscapes

A prime filming location for the 1974 movie “Godfather II,” historic Fleur du Lac Estates in California is now a private condominium development located on the beautiful west shore of Lake Tahoe. A Yacht Club and Boat House, 22 individual homeowner units and a variety of shared recreational facilities make the historic 1938 compound a much-sought-after retreat.

Years of harsh weather conditions had taken their toll on the real cedar shake roofs at Fleur du Lac Estates. Damage from repeated leaks, hail, ice dam issues, snow and other weather conditions recently convinced the board of directors it was time to invest in new roofs for the entire estate.

Homeowners at Fleur du Lac Estates looked for a product that would mimic the look of cedar, but bring them advantages to protect their homes and buildings from Mother Nature. After a comprehensive search, they determined that the Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of Bellaforté polymer shake tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes met their needs.

“We started with our two most valuable community structures, the Yacht Club and Boat House,” says Stewart Dalie, maintenance supervisor and project manager at Fleur du Lac Estates in Homewood, California. “Our plans are to re-roof all of the buildings in the Tahoe Blend over the next five to seven years. We did a tremendous amount of research to determine what roofing products would look realistic in this setting, meet the new codes required for roofs in our area, yet offer us superior qualities and a long lifespan.”

“Selecting the fire- and impact-resistant Bellaforté shake material from DaVinci Roofscapes means we won’t have to be concerned with the potential spread of flames should our area ever be touched by wildfires,” Dalie continues. “That’s a huge concern for our geographic area. However, not having to worry about wind-blown embers landing on a roof and then catching the building on fire is a tremendous relief.”

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the community. The durable roofing tiles have the appearance of natural hand-split cedar shake with slanted sawn edges and staggered lengths, but with the hassle-free qualities of a manufactured product. At a 1-inch average tile thickness, Bellaforté Shake roofing tiles remind many residents of jumbo cedar shakes prevalent in the Lake Tahoe area.

Safeguarding a Historic Setting

It’s not surprising that homeowners at the upscale Fleur du Lac Estates want to invest in the best possible roofing material. This is a mountain and lakeside homeowners association where every home has a deeded slip in the marina, resort-style services are the norm and aesthetics of the community are vigilantly upheld.

Owners chose the Bellaforté polymer shake tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes, which offered Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Originally the summer home of famous industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, the 15-acre lakeshore site was constructed beginning in 1938. After Kaiser sold the estate, it went through a series of transitional uses from the 1960s to 1979, including serving as a private school and as the site for many on-location scenes for Francis Ford Coppola’s film, “The Godfather II.” Only in the 1980s did the current project begin to refurbish existing key structures and transform original homes on the property to individually-owned homes.

“Our community has always embraced the history of this setting while looking toward protecting its future,” says Lane Murray, general manager at Fleur du Lac Estates. “That’s one of the key reasons we wanted a roofing product that has the look of real cedar shakes, but with man-made advantages like resistance to fire, impact and high winds.”

Despite a variety of challenges with removing the old roofs and prepping for the new synthetic shake tiles, the team at Bruce Olson Construction has successfully tackled their first DaVinci Roofscapes installation project at Fleur du Lac Estates.

“The roofing surface for the Yacht Club and Boat House were in bad shape and very uneven,” says Taylor Greene, general manager of Bruce Olson Construction in Tahoe City, California. “We had to plane these into workable surfaces before getting started. Once we got started the product installed beautifully. We added flashing material to cover some valley locations which made the project look exceptional. To achieve the realistic look, gable end flashing that concealed the manufactured edge of the DaVinci product was added.”

The company, which does residential and multi-family new construction work in several states including Hawaii, has already started work on several additional roofs in the Fleur du Lac complex.

“The Bellaforté roofing looks amazing,” says Greene. “Best of all, these polymer shakes are perfect for this geographic area. Traditional wood shakes ‘hold’ the water from melting snow. Those saturated shakes weigh more and cause the freeze line to be a part of the shake. With the DaVinci product, the water is not absorbed into the tile, so snow melting is faster and more efficient. This can also help reduce the ice damming effect in many locations.”

Laughing at Mother Nature

Nestled amidst stunning mountain peaks and world-famous ski conditions, Fleur du Lac Estates can experience heavy snowfall during the winter months. The property is just five minutes from Homewood Mountain Ski Resort, and the area usually sees snow in excess of 180 inches total. That’s one reason why the community decided to have the Bruce Olson team incorporate snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

“In our area, it’s very common to use snow guards and fences to help keep snow from falling on individuals and property,” says Greene. “The previous structures at Fleur du Lac Estates didn’t have any type of snow retention system. We believe having these products in place now — which were very simple to put in during the polymer shake installation — will make life much easier for property owners no matter how much snow Mother Nature delivers each season.”

Rocky Mountain Snow Guards custom designed the snow retention system for Fleur du Lac Estates incorporating both their Drift III+ snow fences and the company’s Rocky Guard RG10 snow guards. The system was developed to handle the 180 PSF snow load that can occur in this geographic location.

“The snow guards are attached in a pattern above the snow fence that creates friction to hold the snow slab in place while the snow fence provides a barrier beyond which the snow slab won’t slide,” says Lars Walberg, president of Rocky Mountain Snow Guards. “Using the combination of snow guards and snow fences gives this project a balanced snow retention system that has the look the owners desired.”

For homeowners, the new Bellaforté roofs on the Yacht Club and Boat House are tempting reminders of what will come on their own homes within the community in the years to come.

“Now that the Yacht Club and Boat House roofs are complete, we’re hearing very positive comments from our residents,” says Murray. “Folks are eager for the work to continue in the common areas so that their individual homes can soon get these terrific-looking new roofs.”

Historic 1883 Barn Gets New Composite Slate Roof

This timber-framed Standard Pennsylvania-style barn was originally erected in 1883. When its slate roof deteriorated beyond repair, it was replaced with a synthetic slate roof manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes and installed by Absolute Roofing.

This timber-framed Standard Pennsylvania-style barn was originally erected in 1883. When its slate roof deteriorated beyond repair, it was replaced with a synthetic slate roof manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes and installed by Absolute Roofing. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Back in 1883, a timber-framed Standard Pennsylvania-style barn was constructed with a real slate roof on the homestead of the Hartong family, located in the City of Green, Ohio. After more than a century of service, the worn-out slate roof—and the rotting wood structural support system beneath it—have finally received a facelift.

“The structure was deteriorated beyond repair and had been leaking enough to also adversely affect the wood batten nailers,” says architect Chas Schreckenberger, AIA and principal of Braun & Steidl Architects. “Because this was a historic structure, our first choice was to replicate the original slate. When costs wouldn’t allow that, we investigated more economical slate alternatives.

“After reviewing all our choices, it was easy to make the selection of a DaVinci Roofscapes Single-Width composite slate roof. The appearance of the synthetic slate, its lightweight composition, affordability and durability all made it the obvious choice for this project.”

The next step required gaining approval on the roofing choice by the City of Green, which owns the structure, and the Ohio Historic Preservation Office, which awarded a grant to finance the roof’s replacement. Once approval was received, the project started. Christian & Son Inc. was brought in to replace the rotting timbers, and Absolute Roofing and Construction Inc. started the roof installation.

“The DaVinci slate tiles we specified enabled us to retain the historic character of the barn, even to the point of recreating the large ‘1883’ date on the roof,” says Schreckenberger. “The final outcome exceeded our expectations and everyone involved is extremely happy with the results.”

Roofer’s Perspective

The challenge of recreating the 1883 date on the roof, plus detailing the entire roofing job for the Hartong barn, required a great deal of collaboration between the team at Absolute Roofing and Braun & Steidl Architects. Started in the spring of 2016, from start to finish, the roof frame reconstruction and tile installation took about six months.

The 45-foot by 90-foot timber-framed barn is part of the Levi J. Hartong homestead, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

The 45-foot by 90-foot timber-framed barn is part of the Levi J. Hartong homestead, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

“There were two significant challenges in this project,” says Chris Kamis, president of Absolute Roofing. “First, we were working alongside the framing team to make sure the structure was secure and ready for the roof installation. Second, we had to configure the 1883 date carefully.”

Recreating the numerals was a challenging task. “The DaVinci product was slightly different in dimension from the original slate, so it took several layouts to accurately recreate the date,” Kamis notes. “The original date on the roof had been very faded, so we had some guidelines. In the end, the roof looks terrific with the 1883 date in Evergreen tile colors showing up beautifully against the Slate Black tile background.”

The completed roof project received the Contractor of the Year Award from the National Association of the Remodeling Industry in 2016 in the commercial specialty category.

Historic Homestead

Recreating the 1883 date on the roof was a challenge, and it took several layouts to achieve the original look. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Recreating the 1883 date on the roof was a challenge, and it took several layouts to achieve the original look. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Reflective of the Pennsylvania German heritage of the Hartong family and the community in the 1880s, the 45-foot by 90-foot timber-framed barn rests on a tooled sandstone foundation. Finished with vertical wood boards, the barn is part of the Levi J. Hartong homestead that includes a farmhouse, summer kitchen, milk house and other outbuildings.

“The city purchased the property more than a decade ago and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007,” says Sarah Haring, community development administrator for the City of Green in Ohio. “It’s located in the City of Green’s Southgate Park and since that time, the Summit County Mounted Unit has stabled their horses at the barn.

“The farmstead represents patterns in agriculture and architecture from the 19th century in our area. We’re excited to have the new roof overhead that so perfectly replicates what we believe the original roof looked like in 1883. The finished product is stunning and everyone, including visitors to the farmstead, are impressed with the look of the roof.”

TEAM

Architects: Braun & Steidl Architects, Akron, Ohio, BSA-net.com
Framing Contractor: Christian & Son Inc., Burbank, Ohio, Planexus.com
Roofing Contractor: Absolute Roofing and Construction Inc., Absoluteroofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Slate Roof System: DaVinci Roofscapes, Davinciroofscapes.com

DaVinci Roofscapes Offers Free Online Tool for Exterior Design

The new Top Down Color visualizer from DaVinci Roofscapes is designed to make it easy for homeowners, builders, remodelers, contractors and architects to quickly see how the exterior of a home can be changed. The free online tool offers a fast way to visualize how different colors and products can enhance a home’s curb appeal.

The Top Down Color visualizer starts by offering the option of uploading your own home exterior image or using one of 10 home styles supplied in the gallery of images. After selecting the desired home exterior, there are five options for making changes to the home exterior, from the roof down to the front door. Steps for the options include:

Step 1: Select a roof style and color from synthetic slate and shake tile options available from DaVinci Roofscapes.
Step 2: Select different exterior options, such as siding, brick, stone or a painted finish to the home.
Step 3: Select a color for the house trim, including brackets, millwork and shutters.
Step 4: Select a color for the front door.
Step 5: Select a color for the trim on the windows.

According to the company, thousands of paint color choices from Sherwin-Williams and Benjamin Moore are available on the visualizer. The multitude of colors can be found in the categories related to selecting the home exterior, house trim, front door and window trim. Images can be saved to an online account, posted on Facebook or Pinterest or easily shared in a tweet.

Synthetic Shake Roof Helps Hotel Fit in Mixed-Use Area of Biltmore Estate

Village Hotel, Biltmore Estate: Asheville, N.C.

The four-story, 130,000-square-foot hotel was designed to ensure it fit comfortably within the Antler Hill Village and Winery area of the Biltmore Estate.

The four-story, 130,000-square-foot hotel was designed to ensure it fit comfortably within the Antler Hill Village and Winery area of the Biltmore Estate.

Nestled on 8,000 acres of pristine land in the mountains of western North Carolina, Biltmore welcomes more than a million visitors each year. Facing increased demand for additional on-site lodging, the new Village Hotel on Biltmore Estate was commissioned.

“The task of designing the four-story, 130,000 square foot hotel to ensure it fit comfortably within the Antler Hill Village and Winery area of the estate fell to PGAV Destinations. Antler Hill Village was intended to look like a series of buildings that belonged together but maintain an individual identity through the use of different roofing materials and trim treatments,” says Emily Pelcak, director of practice and innovation for PGAV Destinations. “With the Village Hotel, we wanted to continue that story. We specified DaVinci Roofscapes synthetic shake roofing to complement the general aesthetics of the area but also to create a distinctive personality for the hotel.”

The sprawling 209-room hotel is tucked next to restaurants, shops and a winery that all have real or simulated shake roofing. Each of the structures has a natural, rustic feeling, inspired by the eclectic mix of cottages and farm homes original to the estate that opened in 1895 belonging to George Vanderbilt.

“The look of the DaVinci shake roofing is convincing as a shake shingle, which is a traditional building material in western North Carolina,” says Pelcak. “Their ability to create unique blends so the hotel could have subtle color shifts across the building roof was a key reason the DaVinci shake roofing was specified.”

To ensure a distinctive look to the roof, Pelcak and her team worked with DaVinci to gain samples of multiple color blends of Bellaforté Shake tiles. The final decision was to create and install three unique color blends with the predominant colors including a range of Tahoe colors (Light, Medium Light, Medium and Dark), plus Dark Chesapeake.

“The color selection was an arduous process since we wanted a subtle variation across the roof to blend with the adjacent existing structures and complement the main exterior facade treatment,” says Pelcak. “We’re proud of this project and pleased that The Biltmore Company is happy with the look and performance of the DaVinci product. Based on their feedback, we may specify these tiles again on future projects throughout the estate.”

The sprawling 209-room hotel is in a complex with restaurants, shops and a winery. Each of the structures has a natural, rustic feeling, complemented by a real or synthetic shake roof.

The sprawling 209-room hotel is in a complex with restaurants, shops and a winery. Each of the structures has a natural, rustic feeling, complemented by a real or synthetic shake roof.

Roof Report

With the design work complete, the installation task for the massive roof system fell to Benton Roofing. From start to finish, the project took nine months to complete, with 45 days dedicated to installation of the synthetic Bellaforté Shake roof.

“The multiple roof lines on the project give the hotel an appealing look,” says Caleb Benton, president and owner of Benton Roofing. “The project went smoothly and the roofing material was easy to install.”

“These roofing tiles are the perfect fit for this hotel since they’re impact- and fire-resistant, plus they’re basically maintenance-free. This was our first time installing DaVinci products and we were impressed.”

Although the Asheville area is not known for large amounts of snowfalls, the hotel designers took extra caution to specify snow guards be installed on the roof in key public areas. Manufactured by Rocky Mountain Snow Guards, the snow guards on the Village Hotel help prevent any collected snow from sliding off the roof in large pieces onto walkways.

Now open for more than a year, the Village Hotel provides easy access for visitors to the estate’s gardens, 10 shops, 15 dining venues, winery, equestrian center and outdoor activities. The main feature of the estate, Biltmore House, has 250 rooms with tours available daily.

Photos: The Biltmore Company

Composite Slate Roof Offers Curb Appeal

 A composite slate roof was chosen to help the facility fit in with the surrounding area.

A composite slate roof was chosen to help the facility fit in with the surrounding area.

Jack Lucks has an “architectural eye.” His dedication to creating attention-grabbing projects has served him well during the past 43 years as he makes design and product decisions related to a variety of projects with different architectural styles.

In recent years Lucks and his group, Continental Real Estate Companies, have focused on the creation of senior/assisted living facilities. A recently opened facility in Granville, Ohio, has been well received, and Lucks, a founding partner with the group, credits the distinctive look of the building’s composite slate roof as a key to its curb appeal.

Roof Materials

The design goals included integrating the building with the surrounding area. “Granville is an older town, founded in the early 1800s,” Lucks notes. “There are lots of slate roofs in town that complement the Greek Revival style of this area. Having a composite slate roof on our facility that so perfectly replicates real slate was a smart decision.”

A composite slate roof from DaVinci Roofscapes was chosen for the project. “The black Bellaforté Slate roof has the aesthetic look we wanted without the weight of real slate,” says Lucks.

Lucks points out that the Middleton project is a single-story building with a roof that’s highly visible from the street. “When you look at this building, half of what you see is the roof,” he says. “That made the roofing decision especially important for us.”

According to Lucks he has been “enormously pleased” with the authentic look of the composite slate roof. “It’s not an exaggeration to say that the DaVinci roof has helped us gain tenants,” he says. “People look at the structure, see the brick and ‘slate’ exterior. It makes them take that crucial step to walk in our door.”

With 94 rooms, Middleton offers six levels of support for residents at the 92,000-square-foot structure. The facility provides restaurant-style dining, daily activities, an on-site theatre and nature paths, as well as laundry and housekeeping services, 24-hour licensed nurses and a beauty salon. “America’s population is aging,” says Lucks. “Our facilities help Americans age gracefully in beautiful settings that cater to their changing needs.”

Team

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Composite Shake Roofing Tiles Replace Cedar Shingles

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

It can be tiring to own real cedar shake roofing. There are cedar roof shingles that need replacing from time to time due to popping or warping, and insect infestations need to be dealt with regularly.

For Dave and Jeanne Schwab, the effort of cleaning and applying shake oil to their massive cedar shake roof every five years or so eventually wore them down. They loved the look of shake on their home in Mt. Vernon, Wash., but hated the maintenance aspects.

“Our home was built in 1993, and there’s a lot of roofing involved in its design,” says Dave Schwab. “Eventually the roof really needed to be replaced. We liked how the natural cedar roofing looked on the house, but when we went shopping for a new roof we wanted a cedar shake alternative.”

THE RE-ROOFING PROJECT

The Schwabs discovered DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles and were sold. “The authentic appearance of the DaVinci fake cedar shake sold us right away,” says Schwab.

“Then you add in the Class A Fire Rating, the impact resistance and the lifetime limited warranty and it was easy to make our decision.”

The large roof on the Schwab home is broken up visually by seven skylights and the addition of decorative European-designed ridge vents. The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in the Mountain blend, now covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The house was re-roofed in 2015. “Every time I pull up to the house I still get a ‘wow’ experience,” says Schwab. “The color is perfect for our home. It looks so natural, yet we know we’ll never again have to spend another hour maintaining this roof. That’s the real joy of selecting synthetic shake shingles.”

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

THE SEQUEL

The Schwabs were inspired to build an outdoor shed by the cover of an old issue of Country Living magazine. “When we saw this potting shed on the magazine cover in 2002, we knew the style matched our home perfectly,” says Dave Schwab. “We purchased the plans from the magazine and constructed it in 2004 to hold our snow blower, bicycles, lawn mower and gardening tools.”

In 2016, the real shake shingles on the shed needed replacing, and the Schwabs knew exactly what they wanted to do.

“It was very exciting to complete this DIY project a decade ago,” Jeanne Schwab says. “We wired it with electricity, and added insulation and pine tongue and groove. For the floor, we put in a black and white checkered vinyl. Now, up on the roof we’ve replaced the shake and added DaVinci simulated shake roofing that matches our home. We even used it on top of the cupola.”

“Now we have two structures on our property with unified looks,” says Dave Schwab. “Having the potting shed completed gives us a great deal of satisfaction … and we’re sure the new DaVinci roof will serve us well for many years to come.”

Roof Materials

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

DaVinci Roofscapes Recycles 1.2 Million Pounds of Polymer Scrap

DaVinci Roofscapes has kept more than 1.2 million pounds of polymer scrap out of landfills in 2016. The recycling effort includes the remolding of more than 696,000 pounds of grinded scrap into starter tiles and the transfer of 567,000 pounds of scrap to an end-user who makes pallets, crates and totes.

“Our goal is zero percentage of scrap going into a landfill,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “We are always looking for ways to recycle and reuse every piece of waste in our plant.”

“We made a capital investment in regrind machinery in recent years that’s paying off. Over the past two years we’ve decreased our trash generation by more than 50 percent annually. That’s a number we’re proud of and hope to improve upon even more in the future.”

DaVinci Roofscapes produces polymer slate and shake roofing tiles in 50 standard colors, plus custom colors. Each time the manufacturing operation changes color runs, there is a transitioning between colors. Those transition tiles are off spec and are recycled. The tiles, which are 100 percent recyclable, are segregated by color and then ground up and molded into starter shingles, which are generally unseen on the roof.

“We view Earth Day as a time to evaluate the progress of our recycling operations and share the good news about our efforts,” says Ward. “Our operation is efficient. Between reusing the regrind polymer and selling off additional scrap, we’re excited to prevent more than 1.2 million pounds of scrap from sitting in a landfill this year.”

The team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer slate and shake roofing systems. DaVinci leads the industry in the selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci roofing products are made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.