New Roof Systems Top University of Minnesota’s Renovated Pioneer Hall

Pioneer Hall was renovated by the University of Minnesota in 2019 at cost of $104 million. Photo: Central Roofing Company

Pioneer Hall is a central fixture on the University of Minnesota campus. Built in 1934, the five-story structure serves as a freshman dormitory and dining hall. The building was almost totally rebuilt as part of a $104 million renovation project in 2019.

A key goal of the project was to keep the distinctive, highly visible brick facades on the four outer wings in place while totally replacing the main section of the building. Work included entirely renovating the interior, replacing all mechanical systems, and installing a new roof.

Working along with McGough Construction, the St. Paul-based general contractor on the project, Minneapolis-based Central Roofing Company installed the new roof systems on the building, which included 47,000 square feet of synthetic slate, as well as built-up roofs, EPDM roofs, and a garden roof.

Central Roofing has been in business since 1929, and the company is a fixture on the University of Minnesota campus. “We do a wide variety of different types of commercial roofs, ranging anywhere from flat to steep to sheet metal roofs,” says Michael Mehring, vice president of commercial sales for Central Roofing. “We also have a metal panel division. There is no system that we cannot do in regard to flat roofs. On steep roofs, we do both tile and shingle as well as sheet metal. In addition to that, we have one of the largest service divisions in the Midwest.”

The building’s 93 dormers posed some detail challenges. The dormer roofs were topped with synthetic slate, and the sides were clad with it as well. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The project involved multiple scopes of work, including the DaVinci Roofscapes synthetic slate on the steep-slope sections, Johns Manville built-up roofs on the main roof and green roof area, as well as sheet metal work, gutters and downspouts. Central Roofing developed a detailed plan to bid on all the scopes of work — and execute everything.

“The project was interesting in the sense that approximately 75 percent of the building was demolition,” notes Mehring. “That included all of the internal parts of the building. The four bays around the perimeter were saved because of historical ramifications. The university wanted to try and keep those four bays because of the distinctive windows and the brick. The middle portion of the structure was pretty much demoed out. So much internal work was needed on the mechanical and electrical systems that they couldn’t save it.”

Synthetic Slate Roof

Central Roofing worked closely with McGough Construction and the project architect, St. Paul-based TDKA Architects, to ensure the new synthetic slate roof system would closely replicate the structure’s original slate roof. According to Henri Germain, project manager/estimator with Central Roofing, the DaVinci Multi-Width Slate product was approved for the project because it so authentically duplicates real slate.

DaVinci Multi-Width Slate in a custom color blend was chosen for the steep-slope sections of the roof.

“We started by making presentations of product options to the project architect,” says Germain. “The architect moved forward with the DaVinci product because of the aesthetics, value, and long-term benefits to the university.”

Selection of a roofing color was also a critical factor. DaVinci created a custom color blend of dark purple, medium brown, dark stone, medium green and dark green for Pioneer Hall. “The capability of DaVinci to develop the custom color blend was amazing,” says Germain. “The roofing colors really complement the dormitory plus other structures on campus.”

Installation Begins

Work began on the steep slope sections with the installation of the synthetic slate system on the brand-new metal deck. “From a scheduling standpoint, the first thing that we did was the tile areas,” Mehring recalls. “In order to maintain the milestones that McGough had, we had to essentially get them watertight within 60 days. To do that, we did the tile work in phases utilizing 15-20 workers every day.”

The men were split into three crews. A crew of six to seven roofers began installing the substrate board and Grace Ice & Water Shield, which served as the vapor barrier. The second crew came in behind the first to install the wood blocking and insulation, which was capped with plywood and covered with Grace Ice & Water Shield and GAF FeltBuster synthetic underlayment.

Crews from Central Roofing Company installed RG 16 Snow Guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards.

A third crew of four or five technicians then installed the DaVinci synthetic slate tiles. The product was easy to install, notes Germain, but the numerous details — including some 93 dormers — posed some challenges. Crews also installed RG 16 Snow Guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards Inc.

“There were many details, and because of the extreme difficulty in accessing the area after the scaffolding was removed, everything was treated as if it would never be returned to in the lifetime of the roof — not for caulking, not for anything,” Germain says. “The thought was to make sure it was done once and done right.”

As the tile work progressed, the sheet metal crew started installing the gutters. The waterproofing, gutter installation and tile application had to be coordinated carefully to make sure everything was tied in perfectly. “It was a sequencing nightmare,” says Mehring.

Central Roofing crews installed the wood blocking, sheathing and waterproofing in the decorative cornices, which had been recreated out of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) by another subcontractor. Central Roofing then fabricated and installed the copper internal gutters, as well as the downspouts, which were constructed of pre-finished steel to match the window frames.

On the smaller flat roof areas abutting the steep-slope roof, a 60-mil EPDM system from Johns Manville was installed. These areas were completed as work progressed on each section.

Built-Up Roofs

On the low-slope sections of the main roof, crews applied a four-ply built-up roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. Approximately 31,500 square feet of JM’s 4GIG system was installed and topped with a gravel surface.

Central Roofing’s sheet metal crew installed custom fabricated gutters. The waterproofing, gutter installation and tile application had to be carefully coordinated.

The built-up roof areas were bordered by parapet walls, which were east to tie into, notes Mehring. “What made this project a tad bit easier is that the other scopes of the work — the flat roofs — didn’t have too many sequencing issues with the tile work and the gutters,” he says. “The built-up roofers were on their own and had their own schedule.”

On the 13,000-square-foot area for the green roof, a Johns Manville three-ply system with a modified cap sheet was installed. The green roof features a built-in leak detection system from International Leak Detection (ILD). “The leak detection system is encapsulated between the polyiso and the cover board,” notes Mehring. “We installed a JM modified cap sheet. All of the seams had to be reinforced with their PermaFlash liquid membrane to maintain the warranty because of the green roof.”

Installation Hurdles

Challenges on the project included a tight schedule and difficult weather. “Essentially we had a 40-day schedule to get all of the built-up roofing on,” Mehring says. “The challenge with not only the built-up but the tile as well is that the work started in the late fall and we had to work through the winter. You can imagine the problems with the Minnesota weather.”

Days were lost to rain, snow, cold temperatures and high winds. The green roof system couldn’t be completed until May, near the end of the project, when Central Roofing installed the growing medium and plants. After a drainage layer was installed over the cap sheet, crews applied engineered soils and sedum mats supplied by Hanging Gardens, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Access at the site was also difficult. Central Roofing used its Potain cranes to get materials on and off the roof. “Those self-erecting stick cranes can go 120 feet up in the air and they also have the ability to deliver materials 150 feet from the setup location,” Mehring explains. “That was critical because we only had two locations we could set up: on the south side, in between the opening of the two wings, and on the north side, also in the opening between the wings. We had to have the ability to get material to the middle section and the corners of all four wings, and that was the only way to do it.”

Another logistical challenge was posed by a large tree at the southeast corner of the building — the oldest tree on campus. Great care had to be taken to avoid damaging it. “The tree goes as high as the steep roof, and you had to work right by it,” notes Germain. “While working and using the crane, we couldn’t touch it. The guys were very careful and very conscious of it. Adam Fritchie, the foreman on the project, did a great job communicating with the university and the crews to make sure everyone understood the project goals.”

Safety Plan

As part of the site-specific safety plan, crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time on the steep-slope sections — even with scaffolding in place for the project. The flat roof areas were bordered by parapets, but they were only 2 feet high, so safety railing systems were installed. “We used Raptor Rails all the way around, and when we were installing the railings, we used Raptor carts,” Mehring says. “Our men were fully tied off while installing the railings — and taking them down.”

It was a complicated project, but executing complicated projects with multiple scopes of work is one of the company’s strengths. “Overall, I think we had more than 20,000 hours on this project,” Mehring says. “So, I think that a roofer having the ability to garner 20,000 hours on a project speaks for our ability to finish large and challenging projects within the milestones required — as well as keeping safe protocols and paying the bills. The tile, the copper, the sheet metal, the built-up roofing, the green roofing, the EPDM — all of those were self-performed by our guys.”

“This was such a special project,” Germain says. “Aside from the sheer size, it captures the heart. When we look at the finished structure we’re extremely proud. Our team, which also included Lloyd Carr, Matt Teuffel and Corey Degris, played a big part in re-establishing Pioneer Hall as a key building on the University of Minnesota campus.”

TEAM

Architect: TDKA Architects, St. Paul, Minnesota, www.tkda.com

General Contractor: McGough Construction, St. Paul, Minnesota, www.mcgough.com

Roofing Contractor: Central Roofing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota, https://www.centralroofing.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Slate: DaVinci Multi-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Built-Up Roofs: Four-ply 4GIG system and, Johns Manville, www.JM.com

EPDM Roof: 60-mil EPDM, Johns Manville

Vapor Barrier: Grace Ice & Water Shield, GCP Allied Technologies, www.gcpat.com

Underlayment: FeltBuster synthetic underlayment, GAF, www.GAF.com

Leak Detection System: International Leak Detection, https://leak-detection.com

Snow Guards: Rocky Mountain RG 16 Snow Guards, Rocky Mountain Snow Guards Inc., www.rockymountainsnowguards.com

Green Roof: Sedum mats, Hanging Gardens, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, www.hanging-gardens.com

New Roof Systems Make Shopping Center a Showplace Once Again

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

LK Construction tackles many composite shingle roofing projects each year. On an average, they’ve been known to knock out 20 or more commercial and residential composite roofs annually. And, while each project is special, nothing compares to their 2018 mega-project: the re-roofing of South Lake Village Shopping Center in Reston, Virginia.

With almost two dozen retailers and businesses, the shopping center has 109,527 square feet of space. And every building in the connected community center had a failing cedar roof.

Built in 1984, South Lake Village had a natural cedar roof complementing a low-slope membrane roof system. Fast forward to 2018. Functionally, the roof was failing badly. Stores complained of water leaks. Shingles were cracked and had moss growth, degrading the look of the entire shopping center. That’s when the management company decided to invest in a new roof system featuring Bellaforté Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“We knew this project was a winner the moment we started the installation,” says Scott Kim, vice president at LK Construction in Annandale, Virginia. “Both store residents and shoppers were astonished by the transformation. Everyone expressed their excitement at the look of the new synthetic shakes. We immediately got calls from people wanting the Bellaforté Shake on their homes. Within several months, 10 houses in the area had composite shake roofing. And now there are many other homeowners inquiring about the DaVinci product on a regular basis.”

Safety First

The process of re-roofing South Lake Village came with a unique set of challenges for the team at LK Construction. While shoppers were going in and out of Safeway, Starbucks, CVS Pharmacy and other stores, the team had to take great care.

The roof replacement project at South Lake Village Shopping included a new TPO roof system on the low-slope section and synthetic shake on the steep-slope sections.

“This is the largest DaVinci project we’ve ever done,” says Kim. “There were a lot of moving pieces. From ordering, receiving and storing the composite shakes to staging onsite. In addition, when it came to assuring pedestrian safety during the roofing process, the challenges were enormous. We focused a great deal on safety measures throughout the entire two-week project.”

LK Construction brought in traffic controllers and road guards to help control the active environment. “Our goal was to safely install the composite roofing without disturbing the businesses,” says Kim. “Safety was our top priority. And, we were able to achieve that goal.”

The shops at South Lake Village now feature Bellaforté Shake composite shingles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

As shoppers moved smoothly in and out of stores, the LK Construction team replaced the flat roofing with a new thermoplastic membrane. Approximately 52,000 square feet of Sure-Weld TPO from Carlisle SynTec was installed on this project.

Crews then installed the Bellaforté Shake tiles. Made to withstand fire, impact and severe weather, the synthetic shakes are ideal for the shopping center location.

“There’s no other synthetic product in the market that can mimic natural hand-split cedar as perfectly as Bellaforté Shake,” says Kim. “These tiles are designed to simulate a multi-width look. They’re extremely realistic and cost-effective.”

Mission Accomplished

With their beautiful new roofs overhead, the shops at South Lake Village now stand out again as a showplace in the Reston community. From banks to restaurants to retailers, each structure can count on their DaVinci roofs to provide long-term beauty and durability.

“The high visibility of this project opened the door for us even more in this marketplace,” says Kim. “We’re now busy replacing old cedar roofs throughout the area with synthetic shake.”

“People are embracing the look of Bellaforté,” he continues. “They love the many advantages of the product. At this point, we’re forecasting a great number of homeowners throughout Reston will switch to DaVinci products in the near future.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: LK Construction, Annandale, Virginia, www.lkconstructionusa.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Sure-Weld TPO, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

DaVinci Roofscapes Names General Manager

DaVinci Roofscapes, a subsidiary of Royal Building Products, has announced that Mark Pagel has been appointed as general manager of the company. Effective immediately, Pagel, who has served as interim general manager for DaVinci Roofscapes since February of 2020, will now fill that role on a permanent basis.

In his position, Pagel will lead the DaVinci composite roofing and siding business. Pagel will also continue to manage the National Builder Program for Royal Building Products, where he has worked for the past 10 years.

Pagel, from Northfield, Minnesota, has extensive industry background in roofing and siding. He has worked for manufacturing, distribution and installation companies throughout his nearly 30-year career.

For more information, visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.

Re-Roofing a Frank Lloyd Wright Home

The Thomas P. Hardy House in Racine, Wisconsin, was designed and built in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Frank Lloyd Wright. Just the name brings to mind images of beautiful homes. So, when the team at Allrite Home & Remodeling had the opportunity to work on one of Wright’s creations, they jumped at the chance. A year later, the newly-added DaVinci Single-Width Shake roof brought the team industry recognition along with praise from Frank Lloyd Wright enthusiasts.

The home, on the shore of Lake Michigan, is located in Racine, Wisconsin. It was designed and built in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright for attorney Thomas P. Hardy. The stucco finished front, intricately detailed windows and breathtaking waterfront views make this a home like no other in the neighborhood.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Wisconsin, the Thomas P. Hardy House has changed hands seven times. In 2012, the then-homeowner began working to restore the home to its former beauty.

The exterior was repainted to the original terracotta color. The foundation was jacked up and rotting beams were replaced. And, original light fixtures and pocket doors were all restored. As the restoration progressed, Allrite Home & Remodeling was brought in by the home’s newest owner to tackle the roof.

Selecting the Right Shake Roof

“The homeowner had three very important priorities for this historic renovation project,” says Randy Miller, owner of Allrite Home & Remodeling. “First, they wanted cedar shake, just as Frank Lloyd Wright had intended for the roof. However, they wanted to take advantage of modern advances in materials. Second, they wanted to be environmentally responsible. And third, they wanted the roof selection to please Frank Lloyd Wright loyalists.”

Many years prior, previous owners had asphalt roofing installed on the home, which was not consistent with Frank Lloyd Wright’s style. After reviewing a variety of products, the current owners decided on a composite shingle that simulates a cedar shake roof.

Single-Width Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes in the natural Aged Cedar color was chosen to restore the original appearance to the home’s exterior.

“The DaVinci product has the right quality, texture, color and warranty that the owners wanted,” says Miller. “The Single-Width Shake in the natural Aged Cedar coloring brought back the original appearance to the home exterior. As an added bonus, the composite shake shingle has a longer lifespan and will require far less maintenance.”

Soon after the team started removing the old roof, they noticed significant fire damage to the rafters above the kitchen area. Apparently a fire in the early 1960s extensively damaged the inner structure of the roof.

“The current owners had no idea so much harm had occurred,” says Miller. “We proceeded to replace the damaged wood. That was important so the home will be structurally sound and able to support the new roof.”

According to Miller, safety was also a concern. The home is located on a steep bluff overlooking Lake Michigan. High winds were a challenge as the team worked to keep materials, tools and technicians secure.

Another challenge was the location of the home on a busy road. There was also a walled-in yard. This meant there was not a good staging location for materials or a dumpster. They were able to squeeze a dumpster onto the property, but neither the placement nor the access was ideal.

Finishing Touches

After the installation of the composite shake roofing came the finishing touch: copper accents. The area around the chimney had previously been plain brown flashing. It was decided to update it with copper flashing that will continue to add character to the home as it ages and patinas.

“Installing the copper without it rippling required our expert technicians to be extremely precise as they worked,” says Miller. “Then there was the added pressure of knowing that every step of this project was being scrutinized.”

Copper accents were added, including copper flashing around the chimney.

“There are Frank Lloyd Wright fans and enthusiasts both online and in our community who watched our progress closely,” Miller continues. “They wanted to make sure every step of the way that we honored the original design of the home.”

For their successful efforts, the team at Allrite Home & Remodeling won an award in the 2019 National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) Milwaukee Remodeler of the Year Awards competition. The home received a Silver Award in the category of “Residential Historical Renovation/Restoration.”

“Our company has installed many DaVinci composite roofs during the past 15 years,” says Miller. “We’re proud of all of them. However, this project was a true labor of love. We’ve now added our mark to a beloved historical home in our community. Our entire team takes great satisfaction in knowing we were able to help bring a longer life to this Frank Lloyd Wright home.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Allrite Home & Remodeling, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, https://allriteremodeling.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Single-Width Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Persistence Pays Off for Roofer

After the Muirfield Design Control Committee agreed to allow the installation of DaVinci synthetic slate and shake in their community, Great Roofing and Restoration re-roofed this home in late 2019 with shake composite. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Determined. Resilient. Stubborn. Those words could easily describe Ryan Lephart. Whether it’s a single home project or the challenge of securing roofing for a community, Lephart digs in for perfection.

One of Lephart’s longest quests was to secure approval to install composite roofing on homes in the Muirfield Village community in Dublin, Ohio. It took nine years, but his patience and diligent efforts paid off.

“Acceptance of new products comes slowly to some people,” says Lephart, director of business development for Great Roofing and Restoration. “This is a planned community. In the past it has only accepted real slate and shake roofing materials. Now we’ve finally gotten a toehold. We’ve gained approval for composite materials in Muirfield. As a result, we’ve installed our first DaVinci Multi-Width Shake roof there.”

Developing Muirfield

The Muirfield concept was started in 1968. That’s when golfer Jack Nicklaus teamed up with design and building professionals in Ohio. His goal was to convert unspoiled land into a world-renown golf club and living area.

The family-friendly community of Muirfield now boasts nearly 2,400 families. A winding complex of tree-lined streets includes condos, patio homes and single-family homes. And, two Jack Nicklaus golf courses.

Fast-forward about 40 years. That’s when Lephart started lobbying for composite roofing tiles at Muirfield.

The Wenners chose DaVinci synthetic shake for their residence in Findlay, Ohio.

Many of the original shake and slate roofs at Muirfield have deteriorated over time. The Design Control Committee for the development does not allow roof repairs — only roof replacements.

“Design standards are very high at Muirfield,” says Lephart, a licensed general contractor. “For nine years I presented the DaVinci product option because of its high aesthetic and performance values. Recently I met with their board again. New, more progressive people are now on the board. I brought in six boxes of DaVinci tiles and laid them out on the tables. I wanted people to see and feel the quality of the products.”

Thanks to Lephart’s persistence, the Muirfield Design Control Committee finally agreed to allow the installation of DaVinci Multi-Width Shake and DaVinci Multi-Width Slate in their community. Lephart re-roofed his first DaVinci home at Muirfield in late 2019.

“We had a beautiful shake composite in a Chesapeake color installed on a home on Aryshire Drive,” says Lephart. “We see this as a starting point in this community. With the DaVinci product now being an option for homeowners to choose for roof replacements, we believe residents will select the product for its beauty and durability.”

 “We’re confident that we’ll be re-roofing up to 10 houses in this community in 2020,” he continues. “That gets the ball rolling for future composite re-roofing projects in Muirfield.”

Single Home Attention

Lephart and the team at Great Roofing and Restoration put as much attention and effort into single family re-roofing projects as they do into multi-family communities. One example of this is homeowner Steve Wenner, a resident of Findlay, Ohio.

Amid constant worry that his real cedar shingles were blowing off in wind storms, Wenner decided to take action. He began investigating composite roofing options.

“My wife and I liked the DaVinci roofs we saw locally,” says Wenner. “We contacted several roofers and the DaVinci corporate headquarters. They gave us locations throughout northwest Ohio where we could see the composite roofing installed.”

So, the Wenners went on a mini-road trip. They spent an entire day driving around looking at dozens of roofs. And they liked what they saw.

The next step in replacing the 1991 cedar shake shingles on their home came in making the color decision. Wenner did what many homeowners do in the same situation. He took a ladder out and placed the samples on the roof. His wife Nancy stood back and evaluated the color options.

“When Nancy kept coming back to the Mountain blend color I knew we had our choice,” says Wenner. “The combination of the three shades of Mountain tones really complements the other elements of our home exterior.”

After receiving several bids for the project, the Wenners decided they liked the personal attention offered by Lephart and his company. “Selecting Great Roofing and Restoration was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made,” says Wenner. “That roofing crew has an exceptional work ethic. They took care of our property at all times and worked from sun up to sun down. I just can’t say enough good things about working with Great Roofing.”

According to Lephart, the Wenner home was a dream project. “Helping the Wenners gain a low-maintenance, top-quality DaVinci roof means they’ll have years of worry-free enjoyment,” says Lephart. “Demand for composite slate and shake shingles is up in all our locations. From Ohio to Colorado, people want impact- and fire-resistant roofing. They want roofing with a strong warranty and incredibly appealing looks. Basically, they want everything that DaVinci has to offer them in a roofing product.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Great Roofing and Restoration, Cleveland, Ohio, www.greatroofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Multi-Width Shake and Multi-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Renovated Seaview Resort Boasts Composite Slate Roof

Seaview, a Dolce Hotel, replaced its roof with a composite slate roofing system as part an extensive $18 million renovation project. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Following an extensive $18 million renovation, the award-winning Seaview, a Dolce Hotel, is once again open for business. Located on 670 scenic acres along Reed’s Bay in picturesque Galloway, New Jersey, the luxury resort and golf club now boasts a composite slate roof overhead.

“You don’t get many chances to renovate a hotel, so we wanted to do it right,” says Mike Tidwell, director of sales and marketing for Seaview, a Dolce Hotel. “We selected a DaVinci Roofscapes Single-Width Slate roof to provide us with the same aesthetic appeal as the original slate roof.”

Founded in 1914, the historic resort had its natural slate roof for more than 100 years. “The slate was cracked and brittle after all this time,” says Tidwell. “The decision on a new roof was important because we face the bay and have constant exposure to salt air and strong winds. We needed to preserve the historic look of the roof while finding a product that weighed less than real slate and could give us decades of hassle-free maintenance.”

The composite roof material is made of pure virgin resins, UV and thermal stabilizers. There’s also a highly-specialized fire retardant. And, the composite slate roofing tiles from DaVinci are designed to resist fading, rotting, cracking and pests. The 12-inch composite tiles are 1/2-inch thick and are modeled after actual slate for natural, non-repeating beauty.

“One of the aspects we liked best about selecting the DaVinci product was our ability to choose a custom color mix that replicated the original roof,” says Tidwell. “We chose a blend of Dark Violet, Medium Tan and Dark Terracotta that helps preserve the historic look of the structure.”

First Impressions Count

The celebrated resort has 298 guest rooms, public spaces and meeting areas. It has hosted many famous guests over the years. Grace Kelly’s sweet 16 party was held at the resort in 1946. Former President Dwight D. Eisenhower played golf at the resort in the 1950s. And, the Rolling Stones stayed for 10 days in 1989 during their Steel Wheels Tour.

The luxury resort and golf club features a composite slate roof from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“The ‘sense of arrival’ is really important at Seaview,” says Tidwell. “I drive by the front of this hotel every day and the renovated structure looks terrific. We’re ready to welcome an entirely new era of guests to the hotel … and we know the new composite slate roof will make a strong first impression on them.”

Located just eight miles from Atlantic City, Seaview boasts 34,500 square feet of space for indoor and outdoor events. The resort has two championship golf courses. In addition, it has a world-class Elizabeth Arden Red Door spa, tennis courts and a pool.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: ACG Roofing & Sheet Metal, Warminster, Pennsylvania

MATERIALS

Composite Slate Roof: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Composite Slate Roof Tops New Train Station

The 2,800-square-foot Wyandanch Station is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci composite slate roofing. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

These days, when trains stop at the Wyandanch Station in Wyandanch, New York, they’re traveling through a completely renovated, eye-stopping facility. Atop that train station can be found a new composite slate roof.

The state-of-the-art location is the most recent new train station constructed by the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR). The 2,800-square-foot structure is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing in a Castle Gray color.

As part of the Double Track Project, the LIRR built two new 12-car-long platforms that include a snow melt system, a pedestrian overpass with elevators, new stairs, new canopies and new platform shelters. The interior of the station features Terrazzo tile floors, a wood-paneled ceiling and chandeliers. Some 4,200 people use the train station each day.

The new Wyandanch Station is part of a revitalization effort called Wyandanch Rising. A highlight was the construction of the new train station and adding a second Long Island Rail Road track running through the Wyandanch area. The LIRR partnered with the Town of Babylon and Suffolk County in the site location and design of the new Wyandanch Station.

As construction progressed on the train station, Ashlar Contracting was brought in to work on the project and install the roof. “The roof is a key architectural element on the design of this station,” says Christopher Monahan, owner of Ashlar Contracting in Bohemia, New York. “The DaVinci composite slate was very easy to install and makes a large visual impact on this structure. The product looks like real slate and complements the entire look of this train station.”

Opened in September of 2018, the Wyandanch Train Station is receiving positive reviews from daily users and the general public. “We get compliments all the time on the train station,” says Peter Casserly, project manager with Bay Village Consultants Inc. out of Amityville, New York, developer of the site. “The entire facility has been well received by the immediate community and all those who utilize it. The roof plays a vital visual role in the train station. I’m pleased to say we’ve had no issues with it and look forward to it providing both shelter and beauty for the structure for decades into the future.”

TEAM

Roof System Installer: Ashlar Contracting, Bohemia, New York, www.ashlarcontracting.com

MATERIALS

Roof System: DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

A New Roof Now Protects Priceless Literature at the Yiddish Book Center

The Yiddish Book Center was designed to resemble a shtetl, or traditional Jewish town. The complex features multiple steep-slope roof sections with distinctive double rooflines. Photos: Joshua Narkawicz

The Yiddish Book Center is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to preserve and celebrate Yiddish and modern Jewish literature and culture. Located in Amherst, Massachusetts, the Center is a repository for historic works of literature and art, and it hosts various educational and cultural programs throughout the year to share them with others. The complex that houses the Yiddish Book Center was designed to resemble a shtetl, or traditional Jewish town common in Eastern Europe before World War II. The effect is achieved by incorporating multiple steep-slope roof sections with distinctive double rooflines, all topped by cedar shakes. But when the natural cedar shake roof system began to fail, the priceless works of art and literature were suddenly at risk.

Administrators reached out to Tech Roofing Service Inc., Chicopee, Massachusetts, to repair the leaks and assess the condition of the roof, which included several interlocking steep-slope and low-slope sections. Tech Roofing, founded in 1975, focuses primarily on commercial projects and prides itself on its ability to install a wide variety of systems.

Joshua Narkawicz, vice president of Tech Roofing, says the company thrives on jobs with multiple scopes of work. “We like complex jobs,” he says. “Those are the ones we love. We’re not afraid of anything — the more difficult, the better.”

As Tech Roofing repaired the leaks, Narkawicz realized the roof was nearing the end of its service life. Tech Roofing crew members handled preventive maintenance issues while they worked with the Yiddish Book Center to develop a plan and a budget to replace the entire roof system.

Formulating the Plan

“Two years ago, we started to develop a game plan of what the end stage was going to be on re-roofing,” Narkawicz says. Working with the client and the original architect, the team explored re-roofing with wood shakes, as well as various options for synthetic shake roofing. Narkawicz worked with his local supplier, Beacon Roofing Supply’s branch in Chicopee, Massachusetts, to obtain samples of various synthetic shake products. The goal was to find the product that would most closely mimic the look of real cedar shake while providing a longer service life with fewer maintenance issues. “They ended up deciding to go with the DaVinci Multi-Width Shake product in Tahoe.”

Tech Roofing replaced all of the steep-slope and low-slope roofing on the project, installing custom-fabricated copper flashing and drip edge.

The schedule would be a daunting one, as the job would have to be sandwiched in during a summer break period, with work beginning right after a major event in mid-July and wrapping up before the end of August. “They still had some classes being conducted over the summer, so were kind of playing hopscotch,” Narkawicz notes. “There were four buildings we had to kind of jump around to work on.”

The removal of the existing steep-slope roof was the first step. “We ended up tearing off the existing wood shakes and breather vent,” Narkawicz says. “There was 30-pound felt beneath every layer. We tore everything off, down to the existing tongue-and-groove, which was in beautiful shape.”

As one crew did the tear-off work, a second crew installed custom fabricated copper drip edge and applied Grace Ice & Water Shield to dry in each section before the end of the day. The roofing crew then started installing the synthetic shake roofing tiles.

“Guys were falling back and setting the DaVinci starter courses over the custom fabricated copper drip edges,” Narkawicz explains. “We then started snapping lines and installing the DaVinci Multi-Width Shake. They chose a 9-inch exposure, and it has a multi-width pattern, so they range from 4 inches to 6 inches to 8 inches, and are staggered to get the desired look.”

The synthetic shake tiles were installed using a nail gun and 1-5/8-inch coiled ring shank nails. “There are marks on each shake that determine precisely where the nails should go,” says Narkawicz.

Administrators wanted to find a synthetic shake product that would closely mimic the look of natural cedar shake while providing a longer service life. They chose DaVinci Multi-Width Shake in Tahoe.

With the hut-shaped roofs bunched closely together, the courses had to line up perfectly, so crews were meticulous in the installation process, checking it carefully against the other sections as work proceeded.

At the horizontal break at the mid-roof, it was like starting the roof installation all over again. “That break was purely an aesthetic feature,” says Narkawicz. “We got the shingles up underneath there as high as we could. There was an existing head flashing there, and we sealed it in with copper ring shank nails as the counterflashing went over it. Then we started on the next tier, installing another copper drip edge and starter course, just like we were starting a separate roof.”

Some of the steep-slope roofs had a small section of flat roofing at the peak, while others had ridges where GAF Cobra ridge vent was installed. “DaVinci has pre-molded ridge caps, and we used those on the hips and on the ridge for a uniform look,” says Narkawicz. “They were actually really easy to install.”

After the steep-slope work was completed, work began on the low-slope sections. Tapered insulation was installed and topped with a 60-mil fully adhered EPDM roof system from Carlisle. Tech Roofing crews also rebuilt a small cupola, which was sided with rough cedar planks.

Overcoming Challenges

Challenges on the project included not only the compressed schedule but tricky logistics at the jobsite. Crews had to work closely with the Yiddish Book Center to make sure work did not affect ongoing classes. Narkawicz credits Ollie Schmith, the building and grounds supervisor, for helping coordinate the schedule. “He was phenomenal,” Narkawicz says.

The property is bordered by an apple orchard and has streams running through it, so access to some roof areas was difficult. There are also several elevation changes, and the back of the building features a landscaped terrace.

“We had to make sure the roof was set up correctly with the crane,” Narkawicz states. “We also had two scissor lifts on site, as well as a shingle buggy — the Equipter. The Equipter was huge for the tear-off because of the distances we had to travel to the dumpsters, which had to be located at the edge of the site.”

The project featured a multi-pronged safety plan. On the flat roof, crews used stanchions with a warning line and a safety monitor. During the steep-slope installation, crew members did some of the work from lifts, while other areas were scaffolded. Workers on the sloped sections were tied off at all times. “The guys would have ropes and harnesses,” explains Narkawicz. “We used planks and brackets for the removal, and we would have the shingle buggy down at the bottom to catch the debris. When we started going back up, we had the scissor lifts at the bottom with the material, and the guys did the first 5 feet or so working from the scissor lifts.”

Rainy weather made the schedule even tougher, and crews worked on weekends to keep the project on track. Narkawicz credits the teamwork of his company’s multi-talented crews for the successful outcome of the project.

“It was a great project overall, and a great client to work for,” Narkawicz says. “It just demonstrates the expertise of all the guys. We did the carpentry work, the sheet metal, the installs, the ripping. That’s a huge part of our company — we all do everything as one.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Tech Roofing Service Inc., Chicopee, Massachusetts, https://techroofing.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Shake: DaVinci Multi-Width Shake in Tahoe, DaVinci Roofscapes, https://www.davinciroofscapes.com

Underlayment: Grace Ice & Water Shield, GCP Applied Technologies, https://gcpat.com/en

Ridge Vent: Cobra Ridge Vent, GAF, www.gaf.com

EPDM Roof System: 60-mil EPDM, CarlisleSynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

After a Hailstorm, Nineteen Office Buildings Are Restored During the Winter

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Featuring 22 office buildings, fitness, conference and training centers, plus a hotel, the Denver West Office Park is an impressive complex. So, when it came time to re-roof 19 of the buildings with composite roofing tiles, it took two talented roofing crews to handle the project.

“Our crew re-roofed 14 of the buildings at Denver West,” says John Werpy, estimator/project manager for Arapahoe Roofing. “We had 85 installers on the project for four months straight. Access to the buildings, which are four stories tall, was a challenge. And, we could only load product on the weekends to minimize disturbing the tenants.”

The true challenges for Denver West began on May 8, 2017. That’s when a massive hailstorm caused extensive damage to the existing real cedar roofs on all of the structures. The National Weather Service reported hail that day ranging in sizes from golf balls to large eggs. One of the largest pieces of hail was recorded at 2.75 inches in diameter.

The damaged roofs at the Denver West Office Park were restored using 560,000 square feet of DaVinci composite shake tiles. Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

With the idea that the complex needed more durable roofing in case of future hail storms, the search was on. The result was the selection of resilient composite shake tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes. The Bellaforté Shake tiles chosen for the complex are Class 4 impact resistant and Class A fire rated. The tiles are also designed to resist high winds (up to 110 mph), curling, cracking, insects and algae.

Once the roofing system was selected, the clock was ticking. The property owners started the project in October 2017 and set a deadline of April 2018 for completion of the roofing. Arapahoe Roofing and Gen 3 Roofing were brought in to tackle the massive composite roofing project, which continued right through the bitterly cold winter months in Denver.

Winter Installation

“We immediately started removing the damaged cedar shake roofing, but then discovered asbestos felt problems in some buildings,” says Cameron Hummel, CEO of Gen 3 Roofing. “After dealing with those issues, we went on full-push to meet the deadline.”

“For our company, this project was very personal,” Hummel continues. “We’re a third-generation family of roofers and our family has been roofing the Denver West office complex since the 1970s, when they were first built. Just as our name implies, we’ve roofed these same buildings for three generations … in the 1980s, 1990s, early 2000s, and now again in 2017/2018. We’re proud that we accomplished our portion of the re-roofing project during the winter months ahead of schedule and without any injuries or safety violations.”

A massive hailstorm caused extensive damage to the existing real cedar roofs at the complex. Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Winter weather was top-of-mind for the installers of the project. The first freeze in the Denver area arrived on October 10, making for a cold installation. Fortunately, DaVinci products are made of an engineered resin system designed so that tiles remain flexible for installation in colder weather. DaVinci composite tiles can be installed in temperatures as cold as 20 degrees.

“Our guys had many cold days of installation with this roofing project,” says Hummel. “However, we were able to keep on schedule because of the DaVinci products.”

When complete, the Denver West project had used 560,000 square feet of DaVinci composite shake tiles, 390,000 of them installed by Arapahoe Roofing.

“This was an ‘all hands on deck’ type of project,” says Werpy. “Re-roofing 14 structures in just a few months is intense. Our teams also re-lined the existing internal gutters and installed thousands of Rocky Mountain Snow Guards around the structures to help protect snow from avalanching down on cars and people below the roofline during winter months.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Arapahoe Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc., Louisville, Colorado, www.arapahoeroofing.com

Roofing Contractor: Gen 3 Roofing, Centennial, Colorado, www.gen3roofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shake: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Snow Guards: Rocky Mountain Snow Guards, www.rockymountainsnowguards.com

Royal Building Products Acquires DaVinci Roofscapes

Royal Building Products (USA) Inc. announced that it has completed the acquisition of DaVinci Roofscapes, L.L.C. DaVinci began in 1999, and the Lenexa, Kansas-based company supplies premium composite roofing and siding. Its products, which will continue to be sold under the DaVinci brand, will complement the existing products, including Celect, Zuri and Cedar Renditions, available from Royal Building Products.

“We are very excited about the addition of DaVinci, which brings an impressive business with a strong leadership position in the composite roofing industry,” said Scott Szwejbka, vice president – exteriors. “DaVinci has an outstanding reputation for meeting customer needs with superior technology, product quality, and operating excellence. We are pleased to welcome this talented team into the Westlake family.”

Royal Building Products, a Westlake Chemical Corporation company, manufactures and distributes materials for the home remodeling, building and construction markets. With operations throughout Canada and the United States, Royal Building Products offers the renovation, remodeling and new construction industries a broad range of products including siding, trim, accessories, soffit, rainware, mouldings and decking. 

For more information, visit www.royalbuildingproducts.com.