Polymer Shakes Mimic Cedar while Protecting Historic Estates

When it was time for homeowners at the historic Fleur du Lac Estates in Homewood, Calif., to select new roofing materials, they looked for a product that would mimic the look of cedar but bring them advantages to protect their homes and buildings from Mother Nature. After a comprehensive search, they determined that the Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of Bellaforté polymer shake tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes met their needs.

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the Fleur du Lac Estates, Homewood, Calif.

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the Fleur du Lac Estates, Homewood, Calif.

A prime filming location for the 1974 movie “Godfather II,” Fleur du Lac Estates is now a private condominium development located on the beautiful west shore of Lake Tahoe. A Yacht Club and Boat House, 22 individual homeowner units and a variety of shared recreational facilities make the historic 1938 compound a much-sought-after retreat.

Fire Resistance a Prime Benefit

Years of harsh weather conditions took their toll on the real cedar shake roofs at Fleur du Lac Estates. Damage from repeated leaks, hail, ice dam issues, snow and other weather conditions recently convinced the board of directors it was time to invest in new roofs for the entire estate.

“We started with our two most valuable community structures, the Yacht Club and Boat House,” says Stewart Dalie, maintenance supervisor and project manager at Fleur du Lac Estates. “Our plans are to reroof all of the buildings in the Tahoe Blend over the next five to seven years. We did a tremendous amount of research to determine what roofing products would look realistic in this setting, meet the new codes required for roofs in our area, yet offer us superior qualities and a long life span.

“Selecting the fire- and impact-resistant Bellaforté shake material from DaVinci Roofscapes means we won’t have to be concerned with the potential spread of flames should our area ever be touched by wildfires. That’s a huge concern for our geographic area. However, not having to worry about wind-blown embers landing on a roof and then catching the building on fire is a tremendous relief.”

The Class A fire and Class 4 impact ratings of the Bellaforté tiles bring peace-of-mind to residents within the community. The durable roofing tiles have the appearance of natural hand-split cedar shake with slanted sawn edges and staggered lengths, but with the hassle-free qualities of a manufactured product. At a 1-inch average tile thickness, Bellaforté Shake roofing tiles remind many residents of jumbo cedar shakes prevalent in the Lake Tahoe area.

The Bruce Olson Construction team incorporated snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

The Bruce Olson Construction team incorporated snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

Safeguarding a Historic Setting

It’s not surprising that homeowners at the upscale Fleur du Lac Estates want to invest in the best possible roofing material. This is a mountain and lakeside homeowners association where every home has a deeded slip in the marina, resort-style services are the norm and aesthetics of the community are vigilantly upheld.

Originally the summer home of famous industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, the 15-acre lake-shore site was constructed beginning in 1938. After Kaiser sold the estate, it went through a series of transitional uses from the 1960s to 1979, including serving as a private school and as the site for many on-location scenes for Francis Ford Coppola’s film, “The Godfather II.” Only in the 1980s did the current project begin to refurbish existing key structures and transform original homes on the property to individually owned homes.

“Our community has always embraced the history of this setting while looking toward protecting its future,” says Lane Murray, general manager at Fleur du Lac Estates. “That’s one of the key reasons we wanted a roofing product that has the look of real cedar shakes but with manmade advantages like resistance to fire, impact and high winds.”

Superior Roofing Installation

Despite a variety of challenges with removing the old roofs and prepping for the new synthetic shake tiles, the team at Bruce Olson Construction, Olympic Valley, Calif., has successfully tackled their first DaVinci Roofscapes installation project at Fleur du Lac Estates.

“The roofing surface for the Yacht Club and Boat House were in bad shape and very uneven,” says Taylor Greene, general manager of Bruce Olson Construction. “We had to plane these into workable surfaces before getting started. Once we got started the product installed beautifully. We added flashing material to cover some valley locations, which made the project look exceptional. To achieve the realistic look, gable end flashing that concealed the manufactured edge of the DaVinci product was added.”

The company, which does residential and multifamily new construction, works in several states, including Hawaii. It has already started work on several additional roofs in the Fleur du Lac complex.

“The Bellaforté roofing looks amazing,” Greene says. “Best of all, these polymer shakes are perfect for this geographic area. Traditional wood shakes ‘hold’ the water from melting snow. Those saturated shakes weigh more and cause the freeze line to be a part of the shake. With the DaVinci product, the water is not absorbed into the tile, so snow melting is faster and more efficient. This can also help reduce the ice damming effect in many locations.”

Laughing at Mother Nature

Nestled amidst stunning mountain peaks and world-famous ski conditions, Fleur du Lac Estates can experience heavy snowfall during the winter months. The property is just five minutes from Homewood Mountain Ski Resort and the area usually sees snow in excess of 180 inches total. That’s one reason why the community decided to have the Bruce Olson Construction team incorporate snow fences and snow guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards into the structures.

“In our area it’s very common to use snow guards and fences to help keep snow from falling on individuals and property,” Greene explains. “The previous structures at Fleur du Lac Estates didn’t have any type of snow-retention system. We believe having these products in place now—which were very simple to put in during the polymer shake installation—will make life much easier for property owners no matter how much snow Mother Nature delivers each season.”

Rocky Mountain Snow Guards custom designed the snow-retention system for Fleur du Lac Estates, incorporating its Drift III+ snow fences and Rocky Guard RG10 snow guards. The system was developed to handle the 180-PSF snow load that can occur in this geographic location.

“The snow guards are attached in a pattern above the snow fence that creates friction to hold the snow ‘slab’ in place while the snow fence provides a barrier beyond which the snow slab won’t slide,” says Lars Walberg, president of Rocky Mountain Snow Guards. “Using the combination of snow guards and snow fences gives this project a balanced snow-retention system that has the ‘look’ the owners desired.”

For homeowners, the new Bellaforté roofs on the Yacht Club and Boat House are tempting reminders of what will be on their own homes in the years to come.

“Now that the Yacht Club and Boat House roofs are complete we’re hearing very positive comments from our residents,” Murray says. “Folks are eager for the work to continue in the common areas so that their individual homes can soon get these terrific-looking new roofs!”

DaVinci Roofscapes Names Winner of Exterior Color Contest

Rachel Delgado, a resident of Hampton, Va., has won the online public voting to receive a $2,500 cash grand prize in the DaVinci Roofscapes 2015 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest.

Rachel Delgado, a resident of Hampton, Va., has won the online public voting to receive a $2,500 cash grand prize in the DaVinci Roofscapes 2015 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest.

Rachel Delgado, a resident of Hampton, Va., has won the online public voting to receive a $2,500 cash grand prize in the DaVinci Roofscapes 2015 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest.

Almost 600 votes were cast in the contest, with Delgado’s entry generating the most votes of the three finalists. In her contest entry, the Hampton area homeowner explained how she wants to break the mold of being a boring home in her neighborhood.

“I want to shake up my home by going with an urban farm/rustic chic theme,” says Delgado. “The exterior will be painted barn red with white trim and we plan to create a porch with a swing area and space for dining.”

According to Wendy Bruch, marketing manager with DaVinci Roofscapes, the sponsor of the contest, the judges saw the potential for dramatic change using color and new products on the Delgado home exterior. “As a finalist, this home was evaluated by radio show co-host Allen Lyle with Today’s Homeowner with Danny Lipford and national color expert Kate Smith with Sensational Color,” says Bruch. “Kate worked to create an artist’s rendering of what the Delgado home would look like transformed with colorful new products.

“She specified a new Tahoe blend polymer shake roof from DaVinci along with a Therma-Tru Classic-Craft Canvas Collection fiberglass door painted in a trendy gray tone. As a final touch she recommended the addition of a new low-maintenance balustrade system from Fypon to create the porch space the Delgados desire.”

The voting public saw the potential in adding ‘top down’ color to the Delgado home that will increase the overall curb appeal of the house and make it a stand-out in its neighborhood. For the 2015 contest, the Delgado home rose above more than 180 entries to capture the grand prize.

When notified of her winning status, Delgado was excited by the prize money that will allow her to add color and new products to the exterior of her home.

“Our first priority is to purchase the red paint color recommended as part of the artist rendering to help transform the home exterior,” says Delgado. “After that we’ll focus on the new porch and a new entry door. Finally, the wish list will be complete in a few years when we can top off our ‘new’ home with the recommended DaVinci roof.”

300,000 Pounds of Polymer Roofing Tile Scraps Are Recycled Annually at DaVinci Roofscapes

The 45th anniversary of Earth Day in 2015 puts a shining spotlight on recycling efforts around the country—including at DaVinci Roofscapes in Kansas. That’s where more than 300,000 pounds of polymer roofing tile scraps are recycled each year.

“Most manufacturing operations have scrap materials,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “The difference here is that every roofing tile we create is 100 percent recyclable, so we are able to reuse every pound of scrap that comes off our production line into our roofing material’s starter shingles. This saves a significant amount of material from going to the landfill, along with making us an efficient, environmentally friendly operation.”

With more than 300,000 pounds of scrap recycled annually, DaVinci doesn’t stop there. The polymer slate and shake roofing manufacturer offers two recycling programs that provide a way for roofers to return scraps, cuttings and unused synthetic roofing material to the company’s facility for recycling.

Waste products from a job site can be returned to DaVinci’s Kansas plant for recycling (with shipping paid for by DaVinci within a 500-mile radius of the plant) and expired tiles (those older than 50 years old) can also be returned for recycling. Ward estimates that almost 5,000 pounds of product are returned from field projects each year for recycling.

Selecting polymer roofing tiles also helps save trees and energy. “Every time someone chooses a DaVinci roof instead of wood shakes, trees are saved—often young growth cedars that are difficult to harvest, produce low-quality shingles and further deplete our limited resources,” says Ward. “Natural slate roofs present other problems. The quarrying process consumes large amounts of labor and fuel and can be harmful to the local ecosystem. Up to 15 percent of natural slate tiles crack or break up during installation, so waste is significant. Because DaVinci tiles weigh one-third as much as natural slate of comparable thickness, transportation energy costs and carbon emissions are lower.

“Just as it’s important to us that all our sustainable roofing products are Made in America, it’s also vital that we keep our earth as clean and healthy as possible for future generations,” says Ward. “We’re a company that celebrates Earth Day every day of the year. By creating roofing products that meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification process standards, we’re taking a step toward saving valuable resources.”

Project Profiles: Health Care

Union Printers Home, Colorado Springs, Colo.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Interstate Roofing, Colorado Springs

Roof Materials

Interstate Roofing recommended Valoré Slate in the Villa color blend of medium and dark grays for the reroofing project. Valoré synthetic slate roofing tiles are made using proprietary VariBlend technology to form varying shades from tile to tile, creating an infinite number of color shades. Each single-width synthetic slate roofing tile is crafted using virgin polymer resins to guarantee a sustainable product. Valoré Slate tiles come in 12-inch tile widths with a 1/2-inch tile thickness, making it a lightweight yet realistic slate roofing tile option. (The Valoré Slate product line no longer is available.)
VALORÉ SLATE MANUFACTURER: DaVinci Roofscapes

Interstate Roofing recommended Valoré Slate in the Villa color blend of medium and dark grays for the reroofing project.

Interstate Roofing recommended Valoré Slate in the Villa color blend of medium and dark grays for the reroofing project.

Roof Report

Fondly known in Colorado Springs as the Castle on the Hill, the Union Printers Home has a long history of caring for people. Built in 1892 by members of the International Typographical Union to offer specialized health care to their union members, the facility today serves the general public with a multitude of services, including assisted living, nursing care, rehabilitation and hospice.

In 2012, extreme hail damage made it essential to replace the roof on the structure, which is a State of Colorado Historical Site. Interstate Roofing removed more than 50-year-old asbestos tiles on the roof and recommended polymer roofing tiles that complement the existing architectural style. “Considering the age, condition and historical value of the structure, we needed a roofing product that could work with the building while ensuring longevity to the structure,” says Scott Riopelle, owner of Interstate Roofing in Colorado Springs.

Although Riopelle was confident in the selection of the roofing product, there were many challenges for this project. The 50-man crew first had to complete the safe removal of the existing asbestos-laden tiles.

“We had to erect scaffolding 5-stories high to access the roof,” Riopelle says. “Due to the 12:12 roof pitch and the multiple turrets on the structure, building containment areas and debris removal were extremely dangerous. During the entire process, we performed continuous air-quality testing to ensure the safety of the home’s residents, staff and our crew.”

The team worked through the winter months and experienced continuous rain, wind and snow. Riopelle explains: “This means we had abatement processes, plywood redecking, dry-in and loading crews, heavy-equipment contractors, installers and supply companies all working in extreme-weather conditions. For this project, logistics and coordination went minute-to-minute.”

The temporary removal of the large historic clock on the front of the Union Printers Home created the next challenge. Because of its age, there was concern for the clock’s condition. Staff at the home asked that the hands of the clock not be moved; they were permanently set at 8 o’clock to represent the union’s efforts in the past to encourage an eight-hour workday.

Reroofing the turrets on the project was easier because of the Turret Package from DaVinci Roofscapes. Interstate Roofing provided DaVinci with four dimensions (the distance from the peak to the turret to the edge of the drip cap, the turret pitch, the turret cap length and the coursing exposure). From that information, Turret Packages were created, including the starter tiles, numbered field bundles custom-engineered for each course and a turret map diagram to guide the team through installation.

The three-month project had a gratifying outcome for Riopelle and his team. “This was a once-in-a-lifetime project,” Riopelle says. “Although we’ve completed projects much larger and more complex, this one was special because of the history associated with the Printers Union Home and the importance of the facility to the community.”

Interstate Roofing embraced the challenge of tying the old historic structure in with the new technology of the polymer slate products. “The results are amazing. This historic structure has a new life thanks to this roof,” Riopelle observes. “And since the roofing tiles are impact- and fire-resistant, there’s greater peace-of-mind for the staff and residents at the Union Printers Home.”

PHOTO: DaVinci Roofscapes

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Single-width Slate Tile Features an Enhanced Profile and Dark Gray Color

The single-width slate 12-inch tile from DaVinci is available in Smokey Gray.

The single-width slate 12-inch tile from DaVinci is available in Smokey Gray.

DaVinci Roofscapes launched the single-width slate 12-inch tile with an enhanced profile and a Smokey Gray color.

The single-width slate 12-inch tile from DaVinci now boasts a more authentic quarried look.

The refined profile is produced in eight 12-inch slate tile variations and will be included in DaVinci’s blended bundles, including all color and blend options for single-width Slate.

Already a provider of a variety of color options in the polymer roofing industry, DaVinci introduces a color for 2015, Smokey Gray.

Smokey Gray is the 50th color offered by DaVinci, and the darkest gray available from the company. Slate Gray, Medium Gray, Light Gray, Dark Gray, Light Weathered Gray, Medium Weathered Gray, Medium Light Weathered Gray, Medium Dark Weathered Gray, Dark Weathered Gray, Light Chesapeake, Medium Light Chesapeake, Medium Chesapeake and Dark Chesapeake are also available from DaVinci.

The experienced team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer slate and shake roofing systems with an authentic look and superior performance. DaVinci has an extensive selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci high-performing roofing products are made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

Projects: Hospitality & Entertainment

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

Team

Design Architect: Zehren & Associates, Avon, Colo.
Engineer: Monroe & Newell Engineers Inc., Denver
Owner: Vail Valley Foundation, Vail

Roof Materials

The Vail Valley Foundation envisioned an iconic entrance for the amphitheater that not only would accommodate guests, protect against the elements and provide facilities, but also would recognize and celebrate the Ford family and mirror the amphitheater’s atmosphere.

Under the Vail Valley Foundation, Zehren’s team of architects chose approximately 5,500 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane canopies to make the vision for The Lobby a reality. PTFE, or polytetrafluoroethylene, is a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that is durable and weather resistant. The PTFE fiber coating is chemically inert, capable of withstanding extreme temperatures and immune to UV radiation.

Designer, fabricator and installer of PTFE fiberglass membrane: Birdair

Building Report

The Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater is a remarkable outdoor venue nestled along a hillside with a stunning view of the Rocky Mountains. The Lobby, which is adjacent to the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens and Ford Park, serves not only as an impressive entrance to the amphitheater, but also as a shelter from inclement weather, a social gathering point prior to entering the amphitheater, and a place for ticket and bag check. The Lobby allows for a smooth transition into the venue.

Within the Lobby resides a mini-stage that can accommodate pre-show performances, along with a new stand for concessions and restrooms. Around the perimeter of the space rests informal boulder seating, and alpine landscapes border the surrounding walls. Overall, the aesthetics of the space mirror the pristine landscape and enjoyable outdoor atmosphere.

The Lobby also holds a Ford family tribute: a series of symbolic sculptures and interpretive elements intended to pay homage to President and Mrs. Ford and their family. This tribute is a new landmark in Vail celebrating the family’s commitment to their adopted hometown and the positive changes that they made to the community.

PHOTO: BIRDAIR

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6

DaVinci Roofscapes’ Color Consultant Names Gray 2015 Color of the Year

Thanks to aging baby boomers and their complete comfort with growing older, gray is expected to be the rising color of choice for roofs across America in 2015.

According to national color expert Kate Smith, with the youngest baby boomers now in their 50s, the generation that redefined traditional values is now making new rules for how homeowners live during the second half of their lives. The boomers, always seen as different from those who had come before, appear very comfortable simply being themselves. More grounded and balanced than they were as teens, the boomers are embracing “going gray” and doing it differently than their parents and grandparents.

Owning the majority of homes in America and having the resources to remodel and redecorate means that boomers wield influence that has been unmatched by previous generations of seniors. Gravitating towards gray—in all of its many shades—combined with warm neutrals, sets the stage for people to personalize a home color scheme that is as unique as those who rocked the ’60’s.

“Refined and elegant gray is not only accepted in today’s society, but an extremely popular choice,” says Smith, president of Sensational Color. “From embracing natural graying hair to topping off the house with a gray slate roof, it’s hard to go wrong with gray.”

The color trends forecaster believes that the introspective side of soul searching by baby boomers is reflected in them placing more value on their time, relationships and privacy. “A simpler palette of colors—gray, beige, ethereal blue or green combined with deep brown or black—give us the foundation for exploring ourselves and the world around us from the sanctity of our home,” says Smith, who serves as a color consultant for DaVinci Roofscapes.

Smith, who authored the “FRESH Color Schemes for Your Home” and “FRESH Exterior Home Colors” e-books available free from DaVinci, sees today’s homeowners as having a “renewed sense of self” that instills a feeling of exuberance at living life.

“Whether close to home or around the world, a taste for the exotic and unknown captivates our imagination and design sense,” says Smith. “Complex patterns, intricate designs, mosaic tiles, embossed leather and decorated metals combined with weathered or toned down bright colors such as Frank Blue, Nifty Turquoise or Cranapple, visually help communicate our enthusiasm for life.

“These are expressive and playful colors, with a dash of bohemian and a pinch of sophistication. Adding one of these confident colors to a home exterior area, like the front door or trim, can update any home scheme and create a joyful feeling every time residents come home. The addition of a storm gray or classic gray polymer slate or shake roof overhead caps off this feeling of security and stability in the home by uniting the entire exterior.

“Bringing together many different textures and colors seamlessly—slate or shake-looking roof tiles, partial stone facades or perhaps copper accents—is one of the ways this trend is influencing the look of home exteriors. Mixing materials works best when homeowners and designers take into consideration the whole house exterior and its surroundings while they work out their color scheme.”

Projects: Historic Preservation

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT, TOPEKA, KAN.

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

TEAM

SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (DOME): Baker Roofing Co., Raleigh, N.C.
SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (ROOF): MG McGrath Inc., Maplewood, Minn.
SPECIALTY FABRICATION (DOME): Ornametals LLC, Decatur, Ala.
ARCHITECT: Treanor Architects P.A., Topeka
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: J.E. Dunn Construction Co., Topeka

ROOF MATERIALS

The $22 million copper roof and dome replacement, completed in late December 2013, occurred over previously restored, occupied spaces and utilized approximately 127,000 pounds of copper. The east and west wing roofs are covered with 24,700 square feet of 20-ounce copper batten-seam roofing. The central, north and south wing roofs are finished with a hybrid horizontal and standing-seam roof constructed of 20-ounce copper to replicate the historic roof.

ROOF REPORT

The Kansas Statehouse’s copper dome, contrasted by the limestone structure, has captured the attention of citizens and visitors alike for more than 100 years. Built in three distinct phases during a 37-year period, the Kansas Statehouse reflects the changes in construction between the 1860s and the turn of the 20th century.

Planning for the statehouse’s restoration began in 1999 with an overall evaluation of the building and schematic design. For the legislature to continuously occupy the building, the construction was broken into six major phases and 29 separate bid packages. As part of the statehouse preservation and restoration, Treanor Architects completed a study on the existing roof and dome systems between 2007-10 and concluded the entire copper cladding needed to be replaced. Because of its longevity, copper proved to be the best long-term value for the project when other cost factors, such as access, associated repairs and maintenance, were taken into consideration.

TO COMPLY with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, the replacement copper design had to replicate the historic construction as closely as possible. However, areas identified as leak-prone or lacking in provision for thermal expansion were targeted for changes to better protect the building in the future. The design included repairs for substrate damaged by infiltration and alterations to the substrate to accommodate copper detail changes. The original copper installations lacked underlayment. To minimize changes in the manner that the roof envelope behaves, breathable underlayment was used to the greatest extent possible.

Approximately 127,000 pounds of copper were recycled and portions of the copper were salvaged for reuse in the Kansas Statehouse’s new visitor center. MG McGrath performed the fabrication and installation of 65,250 square feet of sheet metal on the roof. Low-slope areas of the central roof, which were originally clad with standing seam, were re-clad with 20-ounce soldered flat-seam copper to provide a more watertight roof. To meet the aggressive schedule, roofs were sequenced to allow for tear off and substrate repairs to occur while sheet-metal installation crews worked on another roof.

DETERIORATED SUBSTRATE required repairing structural framing and the wood and masonry decks. Work on the 21,300 square foot dome was performed by Baker Roofing with custom fabrication of the ornamental trim and windows performed by Ornametals. A 365-foot-tall, free-standing tower crane was used to deliver materials and equipment. Crews worked in a spiraling pattern from the bottom of the dome up to sequence tear-off, substrate repairs and sheet-metal installation.

Standing-seam 20-ounce copper cladding was used for radius components at the base and top of the dome. The distinctive horizontal seamed panels used in the original construction were replicated in 20-ounce copper, and templates were created for each panel to account for differences in the compound curvature and spacing of the attachment points. In total, the dome required 230 linear feet of built-in monumental gutter constructed from 32-ounce copper and 752 linear feet of 24-ounce copper rib moulding.

PHOTOS: ARCHITECTURAL FOTOGRAPHICS/TREANOR ARCHITECTS

Pages: 1 2 3 4

DaVinci Roofscapes Updates Website

A comprehensive new homeowner section, step-by-step contractor support and detailed roofing product specifics are just a few highlights of the recently-updated DaVinci Roofscapes website. With a dynamic new design and fast access to roofing information, the www.davinciroofscapes.com site is a valuable resource for both industry professionals and homeowners needing information on polymer slate and shake roofing products.

Key areas of the site include an easy-to-navigate products section, toolboxes of helpful information designated for both professionals and homeowners, a color & inspiration section, and an extensive gallery of images that can be searched by either product or color.

“The updated DaVinci web site gives visitors a better overall user experience,” says Wendy Bruch, marketing manager for DaVinci Roofscapes. “The lighter color palette makes the site easier to read and the robust new design allows the site to adjust to any screen size.

“One example of the user-friendliness of the site comes in the updated project profile section offering ideas and inspiration. Visitors can now search for roofing stories by year or by category, including residential, commercial, educational, religious and historic.”

Bruch reports that the new Homeowner Toolbox was added based on increased interest from consumers in synthetic roofing products. “We offer a ‘how to select a contractor’ section and also information on our product warranty and a comparison chart. This one-stop area of the site allows someone to compare our DaVinci products to both real slate and natural cedar shake products plus other synthetic roofing in the marketplace for beauty, labor requirements and product performance.”

Other key elements of the easy-to-navigate web site include:

    Image Gallery that has been updated with new roofing photos that allows the user to search by product or color.

    Quote tool for contractors that provides steps of items to consider when developing roof quotes for their customers.

    The DaVinci Roofscapes web site also provides instant access to the company’s blog, along with a variety of social media tools.

DaVinci Roofscapes Celebrates National Curb Appeal Month with Tips for an Impressive Roof

Can a roof affect the resale value and curb appeal of a home? Absolutely. That’s why DaVinci Roofscapes is celebrating National Curb Appeal Month in August by sharing information and tips on creating an impactful and impressive roof.

“The roof plays a major role in creating curb appeal because it can be up to 30 percent of what you see as you approach a home,” says Kate Smith, president of Sensational Color. “Homeowners should make a conscious effort to blend the color of their roofing material with other elements of the home exterior to create an overall cohesive look.”

Smith, who has authored the free online FRESH Home Exterior Colors and FRESH Color Schemes for Your Home Exterior guides, spends a good deal of her time advising homeowners, remodelers and builders on selecting the perfect colors for the exterior of the home.

“For curb appeal it’s all about creating ‘top down’ color by working from the roof down through the different elements of the exterior such as siding, windows, trim and doors,” says Smith. “For example, a colonial style home with a warm Autumn Blend polymer shake roof could be ideally matched with a home exterior in a neutral stone color. Then, for adding ‘pops of color’ for curb appeal, chocolate brown frames could be added on the vinyl windows, shutters and trim around the home. A stand-out color like pine green or marine blue could be added to the entry door to add personality to the exterior.

“However, it’s important to remember that it all starts on the roof. When you’re working ‘top down’ with unlimited color options from a company like DaVinci Roofscapes, a homeowner has an open palette for designing the perfect home exterior.”

How important is curb appeal to homeowners? More than three-quarters of U.S. homeowners* (78 percent) report that their home’s curb appeal is either “extremely” or “very” important to them.

According to the 2011 DaVinci Roofscapes’ Homeowners Exterior Preferences Study conducted online by Harris Interactive©, 61 percent of homeowners say that when house hunting or designing their home, the most attention-grabbing exterior feature was the style of the home, followed by how the house looked on the property (43 percent).

And, when it comes to adding curb appeal to a home, color counts. Fifty-nine percent of homeowners place a lot of emphasis on the role that color plays when they think about replacing major exterior home features. Color availability is so important to homeowners that a majority of them (54 percent) are influenced to buy a specific brand of product based on the color options available from that brand.

“This study shows us clearly that color influences homeowners’ buying patterns and decision processes when it comes to exterior home features,” says Smith. “People want their home to be appealing from the street and they’re looking for colorful key products — such as the roof, door, trim, siding and windows — that will help them create the impression they wish to convey on their home.”

While color is important to homeowners, don’t expect pink, orange or purple houses to pop up in neighborhoods anytime soon. According to the study, homeowners prefer neutral colors for their home’s exteriors.

“The majority of homeowners (67 percent) report that they prefer earthy, calm colors such as beige, tan, white, gray or brown as the dominant color on their home’s exteriors,” says Smith. “You’ll find these colors are very popular for sidings and in different combinations for roofs, while homeowners like to have ‘bursts of color’ on the outside of the home in smaller portions (such as on doors and trim) to add to the structure’s curb appeal.”

National Curb Appeal Month has been launched by Fypon® starting in August of 2014. The comprehensive and colorful online guides created by Smith are available for free download.