Single-width Slate Tile Features an Enhanced Profile and Dark Gray Color

The single-width slate 12-inch tile from DaVinci is available in Smokey Gray.

The single-width slate 12-inch tile from DaVinci is available in Smokey Gray.

DaVinci Roofscapes launched the single-width slate 12-inch tile with an enhanced profile and a Smokey Gray color.

The single-width slate 12-inch tile from DaVinci now boasts a more authentic quarried look.

The refined profile is produced in eight 12-inch slate tile variations and will be included in DaVinci’s blended bundles, including all color and blend options for single-width Slate.

Already a provider of a variety of color options in the polymer roofing industry, DaVinci introduces a color for 2015, Smokey Gray.

Smokey Gray is the 50th color offered by DaVinci, and the darkest gray available from the company. Slate Gray, Medium Gray, Light Gray, Dark Gray, Light Weathered Gray, Medium Weathered Gray, Medium Light Weathered Gray, Medium Dark Weathered Gray, Dark Weathered Gray, Light Chesapeake, Medium Light Chesapeake, Medium Chesapeake and Dark Chesapeake are also available from DaVinci.

The experienced team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer slate and shake roofing systems with an authentic look and superior performance. DaVinci has an extensive selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci high-performing roofing products are made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

Projects: Hospitality & Entertainment

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

Team

Design Architect: Zehren & Associates, Avon, Colo.
Engineer: Monroe & Newell Engineers Inc., Denver
Owner: Vail Valley Foundation, Vail

Roof Materials

The Vail Valley Foundation envisioned an iconic entrance for the amphitheater that not only would accommodate guests, protect against the elements and provide facilities, but also would recognize and celebrate the Ford family and mirror the amphitheater’s atmosphere.

Under the Vail Valley Foundation, Zehren’s team of architects chose approximately 5,500 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane canopies to make the vision for The Lobby a reality. PTFE, or polytetrafluoroethylene, is a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that is durable and weather resistant. The PTFE fiber coating is chemically inert, capable of withstanding extreme temperatures and immune to UV radiation.

Designer, fabricator and installer of PTFE fiberglass membrane: Birdair

Building Report

The Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater is a remarkable outdoor venue nestled along a hillside with a stunning view of the Rocky Mountains. The Lobby, which is adjacent to the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens and Ford Park, serves not only as an impressive entrance to the amphitheater, but also as a shelter from inclement weather, a social gathering point prior to entering the amphitheater, and a place for ticket and bag check. The Lobby allows for a smooth transition into the venue.

Within the Lobby resides a mini-stage that can accommodate pre-show performances, along with a new stand for concessions and restrooms. Around the perimeter of the space rests informal boulder seating, and alpine landscapes border the surrounding walls. Overall, the aesthetics of the space mirror the pristine landscape and enjoyable outdoor atmosphere.

The Lobby also holds a Ford family tribute: a series of symbolic sculptures and interpretive elements intended to pay homage to President and Mrs. Ford and their family. This tribute is a new landmark in Vail celebrating the family’s commitment to their adopted hometown and the positive changes that they made to the community.

PHOTO: BIRDAIR

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DaVinci Roofscapes’ Color Consultant Names Gray 2015 Color of the Year

Thanks to aging baby boomers and their complete comfort with growing older, gray is expected to be the rising color of choice for roofs across America in 2015.

According to national color expert Kate Smith, with the youngest baby boomers now in their 50s, the generation that redefined traditional values is now making new rules for how homeowners live during the second half of their lives. The boomers, always seen as different from those who had come before, appear very comfortable simply being themselves. More grounded and balanced than they were as teens, the boomers are embracing “going gray” and doing it differently than their parents and grandparents.

Owning the majority of homes in America and having the resources to remodel and redecorate means that boomers wield influence that has been unmatched by previous generations of seniors. Gravitating towards gray—in all of its many shades—combined with warm neutrals, sets the stage for people to personalize a home color scheme that is as unique as those who rocked the ’60’s.

“Refined and elegant gray is not only accepted in today’s society, but an extremely popular choice,” says Smith, president of Sensational Color. “From embracing natural graying hair to topping off the house with a gray slate roof, it’s hard to go wrong with gray.”

The color trends forecaster believes that the introspective side of soul searching by baby boomers is reflected in them placing more value on their time, relationships and privacy. “A simpler palette of colors—gray, beige, ethereal blue or green combined with deep brown or black—give us the foundation for exploring ourselves and the world around us from the sanctity of our home,” says Smith, who serves as a color consultant for DaVinci Roofscapes.

Smith, who authored the “FRESH Color Schemes for Your Home” and “FRESH Exterior Home Colors” e-books available free from DaVinci, sees today’s homeowners as having a “renewed sense of self” that instills a feeling of exuberance at living life.

“Whether close to home or around the world, a taste for the exotic and unknown captivates our imagination and design sense,” says Smith. “Complex patterns, intricate designs, mosaic tiles, embossed leather and decorated metals combined with weathered or toned down bright colors such as Frank Blue, Nifty Turquoise or Cranapple, visually help communicate our enthusiasm for life.

“These are expressive and playful colors, with a dash of bohemian and a pinch of sophistication. Adding one of these confident colors to a home exterior area, like the front door or trim, can update any home scheme and create a joyful feeling every time residents come home. The addition of a storm gray or classic gray polymer slate or shake roof overhead caps off this feeling of security and stability in the home by uniting the entire exterior.

“Bringing together many different textures and colors seamlessly—slate or shake-looking roof tiles, partial stone facades or perhaps copper accents—is one of the ways this trend is influencing the look of home exteriors. Mixing materials works best when homeowners and designers take into consideration the whole house exterior and its surroundings while they work out their color scheme.”

Projects: Historic Preservation

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT, TOPEKA, KAN.

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

TEAM

SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (DOME): Baker Roofing Co., Raleigh, N.C.
SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (ROOF): MG McGrath Inc., Maplewood, Minn.
SPECIALTY FABRICATION (DOME): Ornametals LLC, Decatur, Ala.
ARCHITECT: Treanor Architects P.A., Topeka
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: J.E. Dunn Construction Co., Topeka

ROOF MATERIALS

The $22 million copper roof and dome replacement, completed in late December 2013, occurred over previously restored, occupied spaces and utilized approximately 127,000 pounds of copper. The east and west wing roofs are covered with 24,700 square feet of 20-ounce copper batten-seam roofing. The central, north and south wing roofs are finished with a hybrid horizontal and standing-seam roof constructed of 20-ounce copper to replicate the historic roof.

ROOF REPORT

The Kansas Statehouse’s copper dome, contrasted by the limestone structure, has captured the attention of citizens and visitors alike for more than 100 years. Built in three distinct phases during a 37-year period, the Kansas Statehouse reflects the changes in construction between the 1860s and the turn of the 20th century.

Planning for the statehouse’s restoration began in 1999 with an overall evaluation of the building and schematic design. For the legislature to continuously occupy the building, the construction was broken into six major phases and 29 separate bid packages. As part of the statehouse preservation and restoration, Treanor Architects completed a study on the existing roof and dome systems between 2007-10 and concluded the entire copper cladding needed to be replaced. Because of its longevity, copper proved to be the best long-term value for the project when other cost factors, such as access, associated repairs and maintenance, were taken into consideration.

TO COMPLY with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, the replacement copper design had to replicate the historic construction as closely as possible. However, areas identified as leak-prone or lacking in provision for thermal expansion were targeted for changes to better protect the building in the future. The design included repairs for substrate damaged by infiltration and alterations to the substrate to accommodate copper detail changes. The original copper installations lacked underlayment. To minimize changes in the manner that the roof envelope behaves, breathable underlayment was used to the greatest extent possible.

Approximately 127,000 pounds of copper were recycled and portions of the copper were salvaged for reuse in the Kansas Statehouse’s new visitor center. MG McGrath performed the fabrication and installation of 65,250 square feet of sheet metal on the roof. Low-slope areas of the central roof, which were originally clad with standing seam, were re-clad with 20-ounce soldered flat-seam copper to provide a more watertight roof. To meet the aggressive schedule, roofs were sequenced to allow for tear off and substrate repairs to occur while sheet-metal installation crews worked on another roof.

DETERIORATED SUBSTRATE required repairing structural framing and the wood and masonry decks. Work on the 21,300 square foot dome was performed by Baker Roofing with custom fabrication of the ornamental trim and windows performed by Ornametals. A 365-foot-tall, free-standing tower crane was used to deliver materials and equipment. Crews worked in a spiraling pattern from the bottom of the dome up to sequence tear-off, substrate repairs and sheet-metal installation.

Standing-seam 20-ounce copper cladding was used for radius components at the base and top of the dome. The distinctive horizontal seamed panels used in the original construction were replicated in 20-ounce copper, and templates were created for each panel to account for differences in the compound curvature and spacing of the attachment points. In total, the dome required 230 linear feet of built-in monumental gutter constructed from 32-ounce copper and 752 linear feet of 24-ounce copper rib moulding.

PHOTOS: ARCHITECTURAL FOTOGRAPHICS/TREANOR ARCHITECTS

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DaVinci Roofscapes Updates Website

A comprehensive new homeowner section, step-by-step contractor support and detailed roofing product specifics are just a few highlights of the recently-updated DaVinci Roofscapes website. With a dynamic new design and fast access to roofing information, the www.davinciroofscapes.com site is a valuable resource for both industry professionals and homeowners needing information on polymer slate and shake roofing products.

Key areas of the site include an easy-to-navigate products section, toolboxes of helpful information designated for both professionals and homeowners, a color & inspiration section, and an extensive gallery of images that can be searched by either product or color.

“The updated DaVinci web site gives visitors a better overall user experience,” says Wendy Bruch, marketing manager for DaVinci Roofscapes. “The lighter color palette makes the site easier to read and the robust new design allows the site to adjust to any screen size.

“One example of the user-friendliness of the site comes in the updated project profile section offering ideas and inspiration. Visitors can now search for roofing stories by year or by category, including residential, commercial, educational, religious and historic.”

Bruch reports that the new Homeowner Toolbox was added based on increased interest from consumers in synthetic roofing products. “We offer a ‘how to select a contractor’ section and also information on our product warranty and a comparison chart. This one-stop area of the site allows someone to compare our DaVinci products to both real slate and natural cedar shake products plus other synthetic roofing in the marketplace for beauty, labor requirements and product performance.”

Other key elements of the easy-to-navigate web site include:

    Image Gallery that has been updated with new roofing photos that allows the user to search by product or color.

    Quote tool for contractors that provides steps of items to consider when developing roof quotes for their customers.

    The DaVinci Roofscapes web site also provides instant access to the company’s blog, along with a variety of social media tools.

DaVinci Roofscapes Celebrates National Curb Appeal Month with Tips for an Impressive Roof

Can a roof affect the resale value and curb appeal of a home? Absolutely. That’s why DaVinci Roofscapes is celebrating National Curb Appeal Month in August by sharing information and tips on creating an impactful and impressive roof.

“The roof plays a major role in creating curb appeal because it can be up to 30 percent of what you see as you approach a home,” says Kate Smith, president of Sensational Color. “Homeowners should make a conscious effort to blend the color of their roofing material with other elements of the home exterior to create an overall cohesive look.”

Smith, who has authored the free online FRESH Home Exterior Colors and FRESH Color Schemes for Your Home Exterior guides, spends a good deal of her time advising homeowners, remodelers and builders on selecting the perfect colors for the exterior of the home.

“For curb appeal it’s all about creating ‘top down’ color by working from the roof down through the different elements of the exterior such as siding, windows, trim and doors,” says Smith. “For example, a colonial style home with a warm Autumn Blend polymer shake roof could be ideally matched with a home exterior in a neutral stone color. Then, for adding ‘pops of color’ for curb appeal, chocolate brown frames could be added on the vinyl windows, shutters and trim around the home. A stand-out color like pine green or marine blue could be added to the entry door to add personality to the exterior.

“However, it’s important to remember that it all starts on the roof. When you’re working ‘top down’ with unlimited color options from a company like DaVinci Roofscapes, a homeowner has an open palette for designing the perfect home exterior.”

How important is curb appeal to homeowners? More than three-quarters of U.S. homeowners* (78 percent) report that their home’s curb appeal is either “extremely” or “very” important to them.

According to the 2011 DaVinci Roofscapes’ Homeowners Exterior Preferences Study conducted online by Harris Interactive©, 61 percent of homeowners say that when house hunting or designing their home, the most attention-grabbing exterior feature was the style of the home, followed by how the house looked on the property (43 percent).

And, when it comes to adding curb appeal to a home, color counts. Fifty-nine percent of homeowners place a lot of emphasis on the role that color plays when they think about replacing major exterior home features. Color availability is so important to homeowners that a majority of them (54 percent) are influenced to buy a specific brand of product based on the color options available from that brand.

“This study shows us clearly that color influences homeowners’ buying patterns and decision processes when it comes to exterior home features,” says Smith. “People want their home to be appealing from the street and they’re looking for colorful key products — such as the roof, door, trim, siding and windows — that will help them create the impression they wish to convey on their home.”

While color is important to homeowners, don’t expect pink, orange or purple houses to pop up in neighborhoods anytime soon. According to the study, homeowners prefer neutral colors for their home’s exteriors.

“The majority of homeowners (67 percent) report that they prefer earthy, calm colors such as beige, tan, white, gray or brown as the dominant color on their home’s exteriors,” says Smith. “You’ll find these colors are very popular for sidings and in different combinations for roofs, while homeowners like to have ‘bursts of color’ on the outside of the home in smaller portions (such as on doors and trim) to add to the structure’s curb appeal.”

National Curb Appeal Month has been launched by Fypon® starting in August of 2014. The comprehensive and colorful online guides created by Smith are available for free download.

DaVinci Roofscapes Celebrates 15 Years in Business

DaVinci Roofscapes is celebrating its 15th anniversary this year.

“We’ve grown a good deal since our beginnings 15 years ago and we realized that our leased facility would not support our future growth,” says Ray Rosewall, president and CEO of DaVinci Roofscapes. “We recently relocated to a much larger owned facility in Lenexa, Kansas. Our new facility has enabled us to add much-needed capacity and will assure that we can meet the ongoing increases in demand for our impact- and fire-resistant roofing products.”

Started in 1999, DaVinci Roofscapes manufactures award-winning synthetic slate and shake roofing products that are installed on residential and commercial projects. The company offers a wide spectrum of 49 colors in shake and slate roofing tiles along with a variety of unique roofing color blends. Each roofing tile resists insects, fungus, algae, mold, cracking, fading and curling.

“We’re extremely proud that all of our products are made in the United States and that we support our economy by providing jobs for hard working folks around the country,” says Rosewall. “We’re part of the multiplier effect because our ‘Made in America’ commitment also means we purchase from suppliers located only in the United States. So, with every roofing tile we sell we’re helping our economy to expand in many, many ways.”

Rosewall relates that the company feels especially patriotic this year because of the company’s anniversary and the use of DaVinci products on several noteworthy American projects.

“Our roofs can be found on thousands of American homes from coast-to-coast along with structures at the University of Notre Dame, at DuSable Museum and on historic St. Patrick’s Church,” says Rosewall. “DaVinci roofs are on the Dayton Veteran’s Administration Chapel, several college campuses, in theme parks and even on the William Penn home. The successful reach of our products into the daily lives of Americans makes all of us at DaVinci extremely proud.”

The experienced team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture industry-leading polymer slate and shake roofing systems with an authentic look and superior performance. DaVinci leads the industry in the greatest selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s reliable products have a 50-year limited warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci high-performing roofing products are proudly made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

Choose a Winner Among Four Finalists in ‘Shake It Up’ Exterior Color Contest

DaVinci Roofscapes, a provider of polymer roofing, has announced the five finalists in the 2014 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest. Public online voting is open from May 19 – June 1, 2014, to determine which finalist receives the most votes to win the $5,000 cash grand prize to help the winner add color to the exterior of his or her home.

Led by national color expert Kate Smith, judges evaluated more than 125 contest entries from homeowners across the country wanting to “shake up” the exterior of their homes with color. The five finalists, who will each receive a professionally-created color rendering and product wish list of how they can transform their home’s exterior by adding colorful products to their home, include:

Brigitte Meehan of Elgin, Ill., with “Trapped in Cookie Cutter Land”
Eric Nogami of Perkasie, Pa., with “Historic Pennsylvania Stone Farmhouse”
Marquis Cayce of Nashville, Tenn., with “LOVVE SHAKE!”
Kimberly Schwerdtfeger of Bel Aire, Kan., with “Ugliest House on the Block”
Justin and Rachel Vedder of Fort Wayne, Ind., with “White Washed in Williams Woodland”

“Again this year the judging was a challenging experience because there were so many houses that qualify as needing color exterior assistance,” says Smith, president and chief color maven of Sensational Color. “The homes of the five finalists are all beautiful properties, but they could each benefit from a colorful makeover.

“One finalist’s home is ‘white on white’ and begs for colorful accents while a ‘cookie cutter’ development home needs colorful help to make it stand out in the neighborhood. Then there’s a home that the homeowner deems the ‘ugliest house on the block’ that truly needs colorful new products to help with a transformation. All five of the finalists now have a ‘color blueprint’ to follow with product and color recommendations to give new life to their homes.”

Now that the finalists have been selected, their “before” house image along with the artist’s rendering of what the home could look like, are all posted on the DaVinci Facebook contest page. From May 19 – June 1, people can visit the site and cast their vote for the grand prize winner. The finalist generating the most online public votes will receive the $5,000 cash grand prize.

The artist renderings of the finalist’s homes showcase a variety of color hues recommended by Smith along with colorful polymer Slate and Shake roofs from contest sponsor, DaVinci Roofscapes. Additional colorful products from the product partners of the contest (including Fypon urethane millwork and Therma-Tru entry doors) are also specified on the renderings. The combination of the products and color expertise of Smith showcase how each home can be transformed.

The 2014 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest grand prize winner will be announced on June 10, 2014.

DaVinci Roofscapes Launches ‘Shake It Up’ Exterior Color Contest

DaVinci Roofscapes, a polymer roofing manufacturer, launched the 2014 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest on March 21, 2014, in conjunction with International Colour Day. Open to all homeowners nationwide the contest includes a $5,000 cash grand prize to help the winner add color to the exterior of his or her home.

To enter the contest, homeowners should visit the DaVinci Facebook page. After “Liking” the page, a person can enter by submitting a digital photo of their home’s exterior along with up to a 250-word description stating how they wish to “shake up” the exterior of their home with color and colorful products.

National color expert Kate Smith will again help judge the contest to determine five finalists. She will then work with a professional artist to create renderings and product wish lists of how the five finalists can transform their home’s exteriors by adding color and colorful products manufactured by the contest sponsor and partners. The original photo submission and the artist’s renderings for the five finalists will be posted on the contest site for two weeks of online public voting from May 19, 2014, to June 1, 2014. The finalist with the most online votes will receive the $5,000 grand prize.

“This is the second year we’re doing this fun contest to showcase how easy it is to add ‘top down’ color to the home’s exterior,” says Smith, president and chief color maven of Sensational Color. “The timing is perfect to launch the contest on International Colour Day. Just as we did in 2013, we¹re going to help people turn ordinary home exteriors into extraordinary, color-coordinated showstoppers!”

The contest sponsor, DaVinci Roofscapes, offers polymer slate and shake roofing tiles in 49 standard colors with the option to custom create any color a homeowner desires. Contest partners Therma-Tru doors and Fypon urethane and PVC trim products also offer product options that allow homeowners to enhance their home’s exterior in colorful ways.

The “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest is open for online entries until April 13, 2014. After the selection of the five finalists, public online voting will take place from May 19, 2014 to June 1, 2014. The grand prize winner will be announced on June 10, 2014. Find more information, along with the entry form, complete rules and regulations regarding the contest.

More than 170 entries were received during the inaugural year of the 2013 “Shake it Up” Exterior Color Contest. Homeowners Dennis and Pat Hodkinson of Paris, Tenn., won the $5,000 grand prize for their “Facelift” submission. “The prize money allowed us to turn several home improvement dreams of ours into reality,” says Dennis Hodkinson. “We still have colorful house dreams and plan to add more color and enhancements to our home in the future!”

Homeowners looking for color exterior ideas and inspiration can download the free ebooks written by Smith, “FRESH Color Schemes for Your Home Exterior” and “5 Steps for Finding the Perfect Color Hues for Your Home” on DaVinci’s website.

Smart Roofing Selection Helps a New York House Reach Lofty Sustainability Goals

Built in 1932, the once-grand structure, known as The Beach House, was in need of a major overhaul. The bungalow-style home, located on the west shore of Truesdale Lake in South Salem, a hamlet of Lewisboro, N.Y., was falling into disrepair and showed signs of age throughout. Three years ago, the homeowner called Sylvain Côté, owner of Absolute Green Homes Inc., South Salem, to preserve the home and showcase how sustainability can be embraced. Today, the renovated beach house is Energy Star certified by Energy Star, Washington, D.C., and LEED for Homes Platinum certified by the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington, and, with a score of 30, is a Home Energy Rating System (HERS)-certified home.

Top Down

The roof arguably is among the most important elements of a home. It takes a direct beating from the sun, rain, hail, snow and other elements. It reflects or refracts heat and can make the difference between a comfortable, efficient house and a house where the heating and cooling system is fighting the natural inclinations of the building.

The Beach House features a polymer slate roof.

The Beach House features a polymer slate roof.

The reroof took place in 2011, starting in May with the installation of a 3/4-inch plywood roof deck. Côté did not remove the entire existing roof deck. “We only removed what we had to, so we could accommodate the new dormers,” he explains. Then Côté’s crew of two to three installed a peel-and-stick roof underlayment, followed by a foil-faced 1-inch-thick rigid foam board, which Côté opted for because of its UV-reflecting capacity and ability to reduce heat gain in the summer. The insulation board then was covered with another layer of 1/2-inch-thick plywood and a second layer of the peel-and-stick underlayment, for a total R-value of 41. The fascia installation also was completed alongside this step.

The unventilated attic is insulated with closed-cell spray-foam insulation, which prevents condensation and helps the attic serve as a buffer to outside temperature fluctuations affecting the house. This method nearly eliminates the extreme temperatures in the attic area during hot and cold seasons.

By September, Côté had finished installing a new stone chimney, so shingle installation could begin. An impact- and fire-resistant polymer slate product in black was chosen to replace the existing asphalt-shingle roof on The Beach House. Côté specified the new roof type in part because of its durability, aesthetic appeal and warranty. “I chose this roofing product on my own home and knew it’d be a perfect match for this retrofit project since it’s a very realistic-looking material and has a solid thickness to each tile,” Côté says. “Having this polymer roof makes it possible for the homeowner to collect rainwater runoff from the roof that drops down the gutters and chains into rain-collection barrels. Because there are no particles from the tiles, the rainwater is the highest quality and better suited for landscaping applications.” About 18 squares of the 12-inch-exposure polymer shingles took approximately one month to install.

Then, Côté integrated 450 square feet of solar slates into the south roof where sun exposure is greatest. The 5-kilowatt solar photovoltaic installation blends almost seamlessly with the remainder of the roof. No flashing or connecting element is necessary between the polymer and solar shingles because the solar shingles fill the entire roof plane in the areas where they are installed; a natural divider, such as a hip, makes connecting the roofing types unnecessary.

Although the 15-inch solar slates have a slightly different exposure than the polymer slates, Côté notes the solar area has a gentler slope (6:12) than the rest of the roof (8:12), so the naked eye barely notices the size discrepancy. The south side’s roof system also includes thermal components that are concealed under the solar slates and assist in producing some of the domestic hot-water needs.

One of the biggest challenges Côté encountered was adding two new dormers to the roof and enlarging the existing three. The finished home has five tightly spaced dormers, all of which have three windows; Côté exercised creativity so they wouldn’t appear crowded. “The nice thing about the roof is it dramatically changes the curb appeal,” he notes.

The Beach House before its remodel.

The Beach House before its remodel.

Smart Design

Through The Beach House’s retrofit, Côté demonstrates thoughtful design actually can allow a house to be downsized while still feeling spacious. Originally 1,840 square feet, the house at completion measured 1,780 square feet. Design features include an open floor plan with the kitchen, dining and family/ lounge area on the main floor. Floorto- ceiling glass doors open to views of the waterfront, and the outdoor living space is accented with a wide patio and gas fire bowl. The home’s first level also includes a wet bar that expands outside, a mudroom and half bath. Upstairs, a master suite, which also has expansive views of the waterfront, features a twosided gas fireplace and a free-standing Japanese-style soaking tub. Two other bedrooms, one bathroom and laundry facilities complete the second floor.

Côté reused quite a few materials to create visual elements within The Beach House. For example, he crafted kitchen cabinets from reclaimed tongue-and-groove sheathing from the home’s original roof and attic floors. Wood from a recently disassembled 200-year-old local barn was used to make custom, built-in closets and cabinetry, a bar, three bathroom vanities, tub surround and structural exposed beams.

With a HERS rating of 30, The Beach House is more than three times as efficient and costs about one-third as much as a conventional home of similar size to operate. Côté attributes this in part to the well-designed roof system.

PHOTOS: Sylvain Côté, Absolute Green Homes Inc.

Roof Materials

Polymer slate roof: Bellaforte synthetic roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes
Foil-faced rigid board: Tuff-R from Dow Building Solutions
Underlayment: Peel & Seal, MFM Building Products
Solar tiles and thermal components: Sunslates from Atlantis Energy Systems
White board trim fascia: Kleer from The Tapco Group