OMG Roofing Will Showcase Upcoming Products at IRE

OMG Roofing Products is offering contractors a sneak peek at some upcoming products at this year’s International Roofing Expo, March 1 – 3, booth 1431 at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas.

The sneak peeks will be held at OMG’s Exhibitor Product Clinics scheduled for 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. on the first two days of the show, March 1st and 2nd. During these demonstrations, OMG Roofing Products will showcase developments to the RhinoBond Induction Welding System, new drain products as well as updated edge metal products. The demonstrations, which will highlight roof-top productivity and performance benefits, are open to all IRE participants. Stadium seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

In addition to the sneak peeks, OMG Roofing Products will also hold a silent auction for a custom painted OMG PaceCart 3, a 15 Gallon Drum Conversion Kit, and two sets (a total of 60 gallons) of OlyBond500 in 15 Gallon Drums. The OlyBond package has an estimated value of over $11,000, and proceeds from the silent auction will benefit OMG’s named scholarship, which is part of the Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarship Program offered through the National Roofing Contractors Association.

Headquartered in Agawam, Massachusetts, U.S.A., OMG Roofing Products is a global supplier of commercial roofing products including specialty fasteners, insulation adhesives, engineered edge metal systems, roof drains, pipe supports, repair tape as well as productivity tools such as RhinoBond. The company’s focus is delivering products and services that improve contractor productivity and enhance roof system performance.

Prefabricated Edge Metal Helps Shape Unique Roofs on a Georgia Hospital

To expand its services and make it easier for patients and visitors to navigate its facility, Gordon Hospital, Calhoun, Ga., underwent a $37 million expansion. The project added 59,000 square feet of hospital space, renovated 11,500 square feet of space, and created a new patient tower entrance to separate inpatient and outpatient service entrances. The various aspects of the project included 11 different roof areas, so the project’s general contractor, the Atlanta office of Birmingham, Ala.-based Brasfield & Gorrie, brought Atlanta’s Diamond Roofing Co. into the project during concept design.

The architects designed all the curves and unique walls to make the campus beyond ordinary and give the hospital a certain appeal.

The architects designed all the curves and unique walls to make the campus beyond ordinary and give the hospital a certain appeal.

“The hospital addition and renovation was still just a sketch and a narrative, and we worked together to understand the owner’s needs and architect’s intent,” says Dave Mossige, Diamond Roofing’s president. “Roofing systems have be- come very complex over the years and it really does take a roofing specialist to navigate the numerous options and decide the best roofing systems for the project.”

Having the roofing contractor onboard from inception also helped with staging. When it became apparent that two canopies between the new and existing buildings would pose significant challenges with materials’ access, the team was able to plan ahead and stock-pile materials near the area months pri- or to needing them.

GETTING THINGS LEVEL

Because this was a fast-track project, 10 to 15 crew members worked across multiple roof areas. “All the other trades come in behind us once we have the roof ready, so getting the roof area dried-in was key to the schedule,” Mossige says. “That’s why we chose a more durable two-ply modified bitumen rather than a single-ply system for the roofing. Disturbances that happened to the base while the trades were working off the roofs could be quickly and easily repaired before we applied the cap sheet.”

The roofing areas added up to 25,400 square feet of space, including the main roof, penthouse and various other canopies. The main roof on the new addition was unique because it was divided into two portions: one with a steel deck and another with a concrete deck for future vertical expansion. The concrete deck was 5-inches higher than the steel deck.

To make the steel deck meet the thickness of the adjacent concrete deck for a level roof, Diamond Roofing’s team mechanically fastened 5 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation on the steel and then installed a 1/4-inch-per-foot-total tapered ISO system. The team then applied a cover board to increase the system’s wind rating and provide better adhesion of the base ply. The tapered system and cover board were set in ribbons of low-rise foam adhesive. The next layer was an SBS modified bitumen as a cold-process adhesive and then a fire-rated granular cap sheet, also set in a cold-process adhesive.

Although Diamond Roofing has a sheet-metal shop in which team members fabricate edge metal, it worked with a supplier to source prefabricated edge metal that had been formally tested to meet or exceed the hospital's required FM 1-105 criterion.

Although Diamond Roofing has a sheet-metal shop in which team members fabricate edge metal, it worked with a supplier to source prefabricated edge metal that had been formally tested to meet or exceed the hospital’s required FM 1-105 criterion.

PRECISE EDGE METAL

Although Diamond Roofing has a sheet-metal shop in which team members fabricate edge metal, most of the roofing firm’s product is equivalent to a wind rating of FM 1-60 and FM 1-90. FM approval ratings apply to uplift pressures in pounds per square foot. Hospitals are constructed to stricter standards, however, and officials at Gordon Hospital wanted to ensure an FM 1-105 approval rating. Diamond Roofing worked with a supplier to source prefabricated edge metal that had been formally tested to meet or exceed the FM 1-105 criterion.

The ability to order the sheer volume of edge metal needed also saved time on the project. “We had over 2,500 lineal feet of edge metal on this project. That would’ve taken us three weeks to fabricate,” Mossige explains. “In addition, the highly unique specifications of the edge metal needed for the project made it more cost-effective for us to outsource it.”

The edge metal needed to be a heavy gauge of 0.063 prefinished aluminum with a protective Kynar 500 resin-based coating. The architects also wanted welded mitered corners. In certain places on the roofs, unusual radiuses and slopes—occasionally joining with straight coping at offset angles—meant some inside and outside miters had to be exactingly produced for odd angles like 104 and 140 degrees.

For example, on one parapet, two different elevations come together at a corner, making precision critical for the manufacturer and installer. “When you are dealing with preformed metal, you have to be precise,” Mossige notes, “but when you’re doing a raised, offset miter, you have to be perfect.”

PHOTOS: OMG EDGESYSTEMS

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The Success of Your New (Replacement) Roof Depends on Adjacent and Connected Elements, including Masonry

Although the name of this publication is Roofing, the roofing/waterproofing/construction industry recognizes more and more that the building envelope is a fully integrated and interrelated assembly of systems.

masonry cracks due to freeze thaw

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As such, I feel the need to discuss the importance of water resistance and structural integrity in existing wall surfaces, which are adjacent and connected to your project’s new (replacement) roof system. The focus of this article is not how to design a replacement roof system but how to address adjacent masonry to ensure it doesn’t work against the success of the new roof.

These principles actually apply to any wall system that connects, generally above and adjacent, to your roof, but masonry poses some distinct concerns. Water intrusion, thermal movement and structural integrity of this masonry, along with locations of embedded flashing, all come into play as the new roof system is properly integrated into the adjacent rising wall, parapet wall or even perimeter edge wall beneath the roof.

COMMON MASONRY ISSUES

Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, a regular Roofing contributor, has said, “long-term service life is the true essence of sustainability”. Moreover, designers specify (for owners to buy) warranties of 20, 25 years or more with new roof systems. It’s just good common sense that you can’t allow a new roof to be jeopardized by water intrusion from an adjacent system because of an oversight in the original analysis of the situation.

Many of us have been called by an owner who says his or her new roof is leaking, only to find roof-mounted equipment or an unrelated system is actually leaking. However, if the leak is stemming from another aspect of the building envelope, such as an adjacent parapet or rising wall, which is now jeopardizing the investment made on a new roof, that you (the designer) should have foreseen, it makes for a very difficult position. The roofing system manufacturer, who holds the warranty, and the owner are going to look at you as being responsible.

masonry

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Let’s examine three common occurrences using actual case studies. All three situations, which occurred on schools in the Northeast, exemplify the condition of adjacent masonry was deficient and had to be corrected, adding a significant degree of scope and cost to the project to guarantee a roof design that would perform over the long haul. These three cases cover:
1. Repairing the masonry and covering it.
2. Altering the masonry to change the location of embedded flashings.
3. Replacing structurally unsound/failed masonry with another material.

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Edge Metal Products Feature TPO Skirt

Mule-Hide Products' TPO-coated metal edge products with an attached 6-inch TPO skirt

Mule-Hide Products’ TPO-coated metal edge products with an attached 6-inch TPO skirt

Mule-Hide Products has introduced TPO-coated metal edge products with an attached 6-inch TPO skirt. The skirt can be heat-welded to the perimeter TPO membrane, making installation faster by eliminating a lot of required hand-welding with traditional non-skirted products. Available in white, the products include a drip edge, T-edge, double-folded T-edge and gravel stop edge.

Website Provides Easier Navigation through Single-ply Roofing’s Metal Specialty Products

EXCEPTIONAL Metals has redesigned its website, exceptionalmetals.com, to help users experience the visual appeal and navigate through a user-friendly site. Featured products now have unique landing pages that contain corresponding literature and materials. Customers will benefit by the opportunity to learn about unique specialty products including the T-Edge, 2-Piece Snap-On Compression, skirted scupper and collector box.

The new website showcases EXCEPTIONAL Metals continuous drive to grow in the industry and create unique and innovative products that help contractors get on and off the roof faster. A true testament to this growth occurred in June as the company expanded manufacturing operations into Texas.

EXCEPTIONAL Metals, a division of Duro-Last Inc., manufactures high-quality metal products designed for use with any single-ply roofing system. Products include roof accessories, metal edge details, drainage systems, scuppers, collector boxes, pitch pans, custom-fabricated products, skirted vinyl-coated metal products, and standing seam roofing panels for architectural and structural applications. EXCEPTIONAL Metals is headquartered at its manufacturing facility in Saginaw, Mich., with additional fabrication locations in Carrollton, Texas; Grants Pass, Ore.; and Jackson, Miss. As a family-owned business, EXCEPTIONAL Metals is proud to be an American-made product.