FlashCo Hires Director of Operations

FlashCo Manufacturing Inc. has hired Jonna Greene as director of operations. Jonna will work out of the corporate office in Santa Rosa, Calif., and will be responsible for leading and directing the operations of FlashCo’s seven branch and warehouse sites. She will be part of FlashCo’s executive team and will focus on strategic planning initiatives, improving manufacturing strategies and helping FlashCo maintain its high customer satisfaction rate.

Jonna comes to FlashCo with an impressive track-record and more than 20 years of operations and human resources experience. During the last nine years, Jonna has held executive positions in operations, human resources and management with La Tortilla Factory; most recently as vice president of operations. During her time with La Tortilla Factory, Jonna was responsible for strategic planning, operations management and profit and loss for a $60+ million company with more than 350 employees. Jonna holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Pacific Union College and a master’s degree in human resources and organizational development from the University of San Francisco.

“We feel fortunate to add Jonna to our executive team,” says FlashCo President Greg Morrow. “She is in perfect alignment with our core values and we feel strongly that Jonna has the experience and competencies to help us achieve our strategic plans. She will be a key leader in helping all of our employees reach their full potential.”

A Standing-seam Roof Protects a Bank and Its Offices for the Long Term

Located on a high-traffic, signature intersection in Taylorville, Ill., Palmer Bank sought a timeless design that would visually represent its strength and stability to the community of just more than 11,000 people.

Design for the project was provided by The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis. The design team blended extensive detailing and profiling of the metal roof with a masonry façade to create an attractive prairie-style look.

Design for the project was provided by The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis. The design team blended extensive detailing and profiling of the metal roof with a masonry façade to create an attractive prairie-style look.

Design for the project was provided by The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis. The design team blended extensive detailing and profiling of the metal roof with a masonry façade to create an attractive prairie-style look.

“We clearly wanted to take advantage of the great location with a strong, timeless design,” says Andy Young, The Redmond Co.’s director of project development and construction manager on the project. “We presented two options to the bank regarding the roof … It was pretty unanimous that everyone liked the standing-seam profile look. We also liked the life-cycle cost of the roof since the bank plans to be the owner of this building for the long term.”

Installation of the standing-seam roof was completed by E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill.

Installation of the standing-seam roof was completed by E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill.

Installation of the standing-seam roof was completed by E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill. The crew, which consisted of six tied-off workers, installed fascia, gutters, downspouts and soffit. Flashing components were custom-fabricated in E.L. Pruitt’s shop.

The metal is coated with ENERGY STAR-approved colors and is vented for optimal airflow, which greatly in-creases the roof’s longevity and energy efficiency. The metal was installed over roof-deck protection and a self-adhered underlayment.

The metal is coated with ENERGY STAR-approved colors and is vented for optimal airflow, which greatly in-creases the roof’s longevity and energy efficiency.

The metal is coated with ENERGY STAR-approved colors and is vented for optimal airflow, which greatly in-creases the roof’s longevity and energy efficiency.

According to Dallas Stephenson, E. L. Pruitt’s project manager, the roofing job took about six weeks to complete. He explains: “The most difficult part was doing all the seam layout because the product requires a progressive install, which means you can’t really start in the middle of the roof and work both directions. You have to start in a corner and work out of a corner and then work into a corner and then work back out of the corner.”

The metal was installed over roof-deck protection and a self-adhered underlayment.

The metal was installed over roof-deck protection and a self-adhered underlayment.

Stephenson notes symmetrically lining up seams on the bank’s dormers and then across the roof was challenging. “Once we got all that figured out—took all the measurements on the job site and confirmed them—it went fairly smoothly,” he says.

“We knew the many hips and valleys would be somewhat of an installation challenge, but the installer did a terrific job,” Young notes.

Stephenson is quick to return the compliment: “Scott Brooks, site superintendent, and Andy Young from The Redmond Co. did an excellent job of picking a good team to build Palmer Bank. Everything just worked out great!”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Team

Roofing installer: E.L. Pruitt Co., Springfield, Ill.
Designer: The Redmond Co., Waukesha, Wis.

Roof Materials

Approximately 9,000 square feet of 24-gauge, 16-inch Snap-Clad panels and 2,200 square feet of PAC-850 Soffit Panels were utilized to meet the design objectives. The Snap-Clad panels were finished in Charcoal and the 0.032 PAC-850 Panels were finished in Slate Gray.
Panels’ manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Roof deck protection manufacturer: Deck-Armor from GAF
Underlayment manufacturer: Grace Ice and Water Shield

Cordless Multi-tool Can Be Used to Cut Flashing

The Rockwell 20V MaxLithium Sonicrafter makes short work of numerous DIY projects and repairs without the need for an electrical outlet or power cord in tow.

The Rockwell 20V MaxLithium Sonicrafter makes short work of numerous DIY projects and repairs without the need for an electrical outlet or power cord in tow.

The Rockwell 20V MaxLithium Sonicrafter combines the versatility and convenience of cordless operation with the exclusive features found only on the company’s new generation of oscillating tools. This go-anywhere multi-tool makes short work of numerous DIY projects and repairs without the need for an electrical outlet or power cord in tow.

The 20V Sonicrafter is useful at home, in a workshop, pickup truck’s toolbox, or onboard an RV or boat. The cordless oscillating tool can be used in remote locations; on ladders and scaffolds; or in hard-to-access areas, such as under sinks or boat hulls; in automobile trunks for stereo speaker cutouts; inside cabinets; in attics; and even on roofs to cut flashing.

The 20V Sonicrafter can perform the same wide range of renovation and maintenance tasks as its corded counterparts. It’s powered by a 20V MaxLithium, 2.0 Ah battery for longer run time, high working efficiency and shorter recharge time. The battery also affords more charge cycles with minimal self-discharge.

For instance, with an end-cut blade attached, the 20V Sonicrafter can trim doorjambs or cut PVC and metal plumbing pipe. An Extended Life wood and nail plunge cut blade works great for removing nailed-on trim, cutting aluminum thresholds to length or plunge cutting holes in sheet metal and wood up to 1 5/8-inch depth.

Switch to a carbide grit semicircular blade to grind grout from between floor or wall tiles. Clamp on a rigid scraper blade to remove blistered paint, take rust to bare metal or scrape hardened caulk or adhesives. Triangular sanding pads and sanding sheets are great for sanding in corners and tight spaces.

Because even the best batteries eventually wear out, Rockwell provides its free Batteries for Life program once the tool is registered. A Rockwell cordless tool, such as the 20V Sonicrafter, can save its owner up to 70 percent versus competitors’ tools over the tool’s life, due to battery replacement costs.

The 20V Sonicrafter features a spring-loaded centering mount that positively engages accessories with the help of the Hyperlock tool-less blade change system. Hyperlock provides 1 ton of clamping force to prevent blade slippage and stopped cuts.

Universal Fit enables the 20V Sonicrafter to accept other brands of accessories without adapters. Plus, Rockwell’s universal accessories can be used with all competitors’ oscillating tools without sacrificing fit or performance.

The 20V Sonicrafter weighs only 3.1 pounds (with battery). A built-in LED work light improves visibility, and a metal gear housing assures durability and long service life. The oscillating multi-tool’s variable speed dial allows precise control, ranging from 5,000 to 20,000 oscillations per minute (OPM).

The cordless Sonicrafter comes with an assortment of 27 Universal Fit accessories, including a 1 1/8-inch standard wood end cut blade, 3/8-inch Extended Life wood & nail plunge cut blade, 3 1/8-inch HSS semicircle saw blade, rigid scraper blade, sanding pad, 20 sanding sheets, 3 1/8-inch carbide semicircle saw blade, 20V lithium-ion battery, one-hour charger and carrying bag.

Waterproof and Maintenance-free Roof Penetrations

The fewer people with access to the roof, the better chance the roof has at meeting the basic expectation of keeping the elements out of the building.

Pitch pockets are flanged, open-bottomed metal containers, placed around roof penetrations.

Pitch pockets are flanged, open-bottomed metal containers, placed around roof penetrations.

Because they make their living on the roof, commercial roofing installers know how to complete a watertight system, one that does not allow damaging moisture into the building. Unfortunately, when the roofing installer finishes the job, more work, perhaps by other trades, most notably HVAC contractors, may be done with possible impacts on the roofing membrane.

Someone has to get on the roof to install that equipment and at that point it’s going to be an equipment installer, not a roofing installer. It’s important to be aware of who is doing what on the roof!

Attaching equipment to the building structure, through the roof, is the most efficient method of attachment, but often such work is done without consideration of waterproofing concerns. Any attachment penetration must not compromise the integrity of the roofing system.

This is why RoofScreen Manufacturing got into the business: to discover and develop a better method for leak-proof attachment for all types of roofing and building structures.

the caulk and band method, commonly used on round penetrations, which employs a single-ply or soft lead pipe flashing around the penetration.

The caulk and band method is commonly used on round penetrations and employs a single-ply or soft lead pipe flashing around the penetration.

The equipment installer has options. A traditional penetration waterproofing system is what is known as the pitch pocket. Pitch pockets are flanged, open-bottomed metal containers, placed around roof penetrations. They are filled with coal tar pitch, hot asphalt, grout or other chemical sealants. They are effective around odd-shaped penetrations but require maintenance, which means slapping on more sealant when it leaks.

Another method is the caulk and band method, commonly used on round penetrations, which employs a single-ply or soft lead pipe flashing around the penetration. Near the top of the flashing is an adjustable draw-band that clamps the flashing to the penetration. Caulking is applied around the top of the flashing to make the final seal.

Both practices are accepted by the National Roofing Contractors Association. The problem is both require annual or semi-annual maintenance to check if the sealant has cracked or separated from the penetration and addition of sealant as necessary.

RoofScreen offers a patented engineered and leak-proof roof attachment system to ensure the integrity of the roofing system. It starts with a 6- by 6-inch steel base support, available in a variety of lengths to accommodate any insulation thickness. The support is attached with bolts or lag screws to the roof structure through the interior of the base support. Specially fitted flashing boots are then installed and roofed in by a qualified roofing contractor. After roofing is completed, a self-adhesive EPDM gasket strip is applied around the top of the flashing, which provides added protection from snow, ice and splashing water. The final step is to install the Base Cap Assembly, which counterflashes 2.4 inches over the flashing and creates a seal by compressing the gasket. This watertight structural mounting point is ideal for mechanical equipment screens, equipment platforms and solar panel racking systems.

This watertight structural mounting point is ideal for mechanical equipment screens, equipment platforms and solar panel racking systems.

A watertight structural mounting point is ideal for mechanical equipment screens, equipment platforms and solar panel racking systems.

Many roofing manufacturers require penetration flashings to extend a minimum of 8 inches above the roof surface. RoofScreen has performed successful independent lab testing on its roof attachment system with only a 3-inch flashing height and had no leaks. Ultimately, it’s up to the roofing contractor and the roofing manufacturer to determine the flashing height in relation to the roof. Consult with both, especially if there is a roofing warranty involved.

If a base support needs to be raised to meet a required flashing height, RoofScreen offers 5-, 9- and 12-inch versions of the base support, plus 3- and 4-inch extensions. A taller base support should, in most cases, provide enough clearance for the amount of insulation being used. It should be noted the height of base supports impacts the overall design of the frame. RoofScreen provides fully engineered solutions incorporating all equipment screen variables.

In addition to installing a patented engineered leak-proof roof attachment system, RoofScreen eliminates the need for periodic maintenance. There will never be a need to add temporary caulking. With no need for maintenance, there’s one less reason for anyone being up on the roof to compromise the roofing system. That’s a good thing.

The Success of Your New (Replacement) Roof Depends on Adjacent and Connected Elements, including Masonry

Although the name of this publication is Roofing, the roofing/waterproofing/construction industry recognizes more and more that the building envelope is a fully integrated and interrelated assembly of systems.

masonry cracks due to freeze thaw

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As such, I feel the need to discuss the importance of water resistance and structural integrity in existing wall surfaces, which are adjacent and connected to your project’s new (replacement) roof system. The focus of this article is not how to design a replacement roof system but how to address adjacent masonry to ensure it doesn’t work against the success of the new roof.

These principles actually apply to any wall system that connects, generally above and adjacent, to your roof, but masonry poses some distinct concerns. Water intrusion, thermal movement and structural integrity of this masonry, along with locations of embedded flashing, all come into play as the new roof system is properly integrated into the adjacent rising wall, parapet wall or even perimeter edge wall beneath the roof.

COMMON MASONRY ISSUES

Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, a regular Roofing contributor, has said, “long-term service life is the true essence of sustainability”. Moreover, designers specify (for owners to buy) warranties of 20, 25 years or more with new roof systems. It’s just good common sense that you can’t allow a new roof to be jeopardized by water intrusion from an adjacent system because of an oversight in the original analysis of the situation.

Many of us have been called by an owner who says his or her new roof is leaking, only to find roof-mounted equipment or an unrelated system is actually leaking. However, if the leak is stemming from another aspect of the building envelope, such as an adjacent parapet or rising wall, which is now jeopardizing the investment made on a new roof, that you (the designer) should have foreseen, it makes for a very difficult position. The roofing system manufacturer, who holds the warranty, and the owner are going to look at you as being responsible.

masonry

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Let’s examine three common occurrences using actual case studies. All three situations, which occurred on schools in the Northeast, exemplify the condition of adjacent masonry was deficient and had to be corrected, adding a significant degree of scope and cost to the project to guarantee a roof design that would perform over the long haul. These three cases cover:
1. Repairing the masonry and covering it.
2. Altering the masonry to change the location of embedded flashings.
3. Replacing structurally unsound/failed masonry with another material.

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Tile Roofing: Closed Valleys with Low-profile Tile

Batten extensions are installed on standard tile W valley metal.

Photo 1: Batten extensions are installed on standard tile W valley metal.

A common failure point on steep-slope roof systems is at valleys. Often, aging material, improper fastening, lack of maintenance and ice dams make valleys vulnerable. A common cause of valley troubles with tile roofing occurs when flat tiles are used in areas where closed valleys are preferred and a simple installation requirement is missed.

The Tile Roof Institute (TRI) Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual for Moderate Climate Regions allows for open (flashing exposed) and closed (tiles meet over flashing) valley installations. Installers develop a preference based on their experience with the local climate. Contractors also consider job-specific environmental conditions, aesthetic preferences, pitch and maintenance needs when choosing from valley-installation options.

Although there are a wide variety of flashing and installation options for valleys, one important requirement is often overlooked and can cause leaks with low-profile tile. The specification is listed on pages 48 and 49 of the installation manual: “When a flat profiled tile is installed as a ‘closed valley’, a ribbed valley metal or single crown valley metal with batten extension shall be used.”

Batten extensions are installed on standard tile W valley metal.

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Unobstructed water flow in the valley flashing is critical. A flat tile installed directly onto standard valley flashing in a closed method restricts water in the valley flashing during heavy rains and may cause it to overflow. This can speed degradation of the underlayment and may cause rot in the battens and decking. A closed-valley installation can be repaired by replacing the standard tile valley flashing with the correct ribbed metal or by adding a batten extension to each row (see photo 1).

Because medium- and high-profile tiles have a natural cavity between the flashing and tile, this requirement only applies to low-profile tile. According to the TRI installation manual, the definition of a low-profile tile is, “Tiles, such as flat tile, that have a top surface rise of 1/2 inch or less.” Most tiles with a wood grain, lined or brushed surface still fall into the low-profile category and will require batten extensions or ribbed valley flashing.

An elevated batten system with ribbed valley flashing.

Photo 2: An elevated batten system with ribbed valley flashing. PHOTO: Boral Industries

When using a counter-batten system, or raised batten, the battens themselves can be extended into the valley because they are elevated on a pad or shim. In photo 2, a ribbed valley flashing and an elevated batten are used. Fasteners are not installed in/through the valley flashing.

Tile installers are craftsmen and each develops his or her own approach to valley details. Depending on the length of the valley and the tributary area, installers may flare or gradually open the width of the valley tile cut. Experienced installers may make a cut (dog ear) to the point of the tile that is overlapped by the succeeding row. Before accessory products, like ribbed valleys and batten extensions, were commercially available and before manufacturers improved the lug design, installers often removed lugs with their hammers. They developed propping and gluing skills to avoid creating a dam with their installation. Now the accessories and flashing designs make this type of installation better and easier.

Despite the variety of tiles within the low-profile category—some are flat on the back side and fastened directly to the deck, some have lugs on the back that can also utilize battens for attachment— all low-profile tile installed in a closed-valley method requires ribbed flashing or batten extensions unless precluded by manufacturer design and/or approved by the local building inspector.

An elevated batten system with ribbed valley flashing.

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Because of Florida’s wind and weather extremes, TRI and the Florida Roofing, Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors Association collaborated on Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, which also is available on TRI’s website.

PHOTOS: TILE ROOFING INSTITUTE, unless otherwise noted

FlashCo Hires Sales and Marketing Director for Eastern Region

FlashCo is pleased to announce the recent hire of Bill Bartell, director of Sales and Marketing for the Eastern Region. Bill is responsible for the growth of this region’s sales and overseeing its operations. Additionally, Bill will develop the team, reps, and the territory until branch manager(s) are hired after achieving sales objectives. Bill will be working closely with Greg Morrow, the president, to realize and further develop a strategic sales and marketing plan for this new region. The eastern region includes all states east of the Mississippi River, as well as Eastern Canada.

Bill comes to FlashCo with an impressive resume and more than 25 years of sales/marketing experience. During the last 22 years, Bill has held various positions in sales, marketing, and management with Sealed Air Corporation; most recently as director of Sales and Marketing, Systems and Integration. Bill holds a BA degree in Speech Communication from Gonzaga University. Bill will be based out of greater Greenville, S.C., which will be very close to FlashCo’s new facility in South Carolina.

FlashCo is a manufacturer of roof flashings and accessories primarily fabricating parts out of TPO, PVC, Lead, Zinc, and Copper. Established in 2000 in Sonoma County California FlashCo has grown to 6 locations with Piedmont being its 7th. FlashCo’s mission is to “Save the Contractor Time”. FlashCo primarily comes to market via roofing wholesale distribution and private labeling with major single-ply manufacturers.

Flashing Is CSA-approved

Leland Industries' Master Flash

Leland Industries’ Master Flash

Leland Industries introduces Master Flash, which is now CSA-approved. Master Flash, a development of the Aztec Washer Co., is specially designed to accommodate roof penetrations for pipe up to 28 1/2-inch diameter, cable, conduit and wire. Some flashings are of the multi-port design. CSA, IAPMO and ICC listing or approvals are only available on Master Flash products.

System Combines Flashing and Counterflashing

FlashCo's FlashCap System

FlashCo’s FlashCap System

FlashCap’s innovative design and easy one-minute installation provides contractors with a fast, high-quality option for flashings. The FlashCap System from FlashCo combines the flashing and counterflashing, completely sealing the penetration without compromising the integrity of the protrusion. With FlashCap, venting capacity is maximized while the pipe and flashing are allowed to naturally expand and contract.

The purpose of the prefabricated part is to save the contractor field fabrication and installation time and provide a quality part fabricated in a controlled factory environment. The FlashCap system eliminates the need for a hose clamp and caulking. Compared to the universal boots in the market, FlashCap does not need to be cut down to fit the penetration. The FlashCap system is made to size and is customizable for a snug and secure fit. When utilizing FlashCap the seal is complete and simply needs to be heat welded to be secure. The FlashCap is available in TPO, PVC and lead.

The mission of FlashCo is to save the roofing contractor time and money by providing quality products that are easy to install.

Painted Aluminum Panels Are for Fascia, Flashing, Roof Caps and Other Trim

Alucobond Axcent flat panel, a line of painted aluminum metal panels designed for installation as building trim

Alucobond Axcent flat panel, a line of painted aluminum metal panels designed for installation as building trim

Alucobond Axcent flat panel, a line of painted aluminum metal panels designed for installation as building trim, now is available from 3A Composites USA in colors matching 12 of the of the company’s most popular stocked colors of Alucobond aluminum composite material (ACM).

Alucobond Axcent is a 0.040-inch-thick flat aluminum panel that is perfect for any building project that requires painted metal trim, including building fascia, flashing and roof caps. Axcent offers the perfect finishing touch to projects clad in matching Alucobond ACM colors.

Alucobond Axcent is available in 12 popular Alucobond ACM colors, including Bone White, Alabaster, Oyster, Castle Gray, Cadet Gray, Statuary Bronze, Platinum Mica, Anodic Clear Mica, Sunrise Silver Metallic, Silver Metallic, Champagne Metallic and Focus Black.

Alucobond, which consists of two sheets of 0.020-inch aluminum thermobonded to a plastic core, has been specified by architects as high-tech metal cladding for some of the world’s most unique buildings. Alucobond provides extraordinary flatness and rigidity, excellent formability, low weight and outstanding weather resistance. Alucobond aluminum-faced panels are manufactured in the standard 4-mm thickness.