IPS Corp. Acquires Roof Coatings Company, Metacrylics

IPS Corp., a manufacturer of building and specialty adhesive products, has acquired the Metacrylics roof coatings company, based in Gilroy, Calif. This acquisition is in support of the IPS growth strategy within the roofing industry. IPS Roofing Products is known for roof flashing products for vent pipes, which are manufactured in Tennessee and sold nationally through both wholesale roofing distribution and building products retailers.

Gary Rosenfield, vice president and general manager of the IPS Roofing Products division, comments, “We are excited to enter the cool roof coatings market with the products and service proposition provided by Metacrylics. With the resources of IPS Corp. in support of this business, we plan to build on the previous success and reputation of Metacrylics. I am looking forward to working with the Metacrylics team to help them continue in that effort.”

Mark Anthenien, president and CEO of Metacrylics, says, “We are delighted to be associated with the IPS organization. With their support, we will be able to expand our resources and reach more customers with the high level of service and support that has become the foundation of our success.”

T. Tracy Bilbrough, chairman and CEO of IPS Corp., adds, “The addition of Metacrylics to our portfolio of brands, product lines, and operating facilities is a step forward in our journey of building a platform in industrial and construction related specialty products. We are thrilled to welcome the team and products of Metacrylics to the IPS family.”

Metacrylics is a manufacturer of cool roof coatings, and offers both acrylic and silicone varieties of products. It has a long history of successful installations in many regions of the country. Most recently, Metacrylics’ Extreme Performance acrylic product has been recognized in the commercial roofing market due to its adhesion, ease of installation, solar reflectivity rating, and ability to resist debris over time.

Roofing Problem Areas

Flat roofs are prone to ponding water.

Flat roofs are prone to ponding water.

Facilities maintenance issues can have a major impact on productivity in industrial and commercial environments with something as small as a leaking roof causing significant disruption and downtime. Years of experience suggest that 90 percent of the problems we are presented with today will arise from a mere 10 percent of the roof’s total area. But are some roof types and roof areas more susceptible to damage than others? Moreover, how do these roofing problems arise and how can they be categorized?

Flat Roofs

Flat roofs are commonly chosen for industrial and commercial buildings, covering the vast majority of offices, factories and warehouses around the globe. However, despite their popularity, my firm’s experience indicates that the bulk of roofing applications owe to the failings of flat roofs. This begs the question; do the benefits of flat roofs outweigh the disadvantages?

Currently, the flat roofing market is in a particularly healthy state. It is easy to see why because flat roofs do in fact offer a great deal of advantages. Notably, they are a low-cost option for many projects, being easier and more economical to install, inspect and maintain. Therefore, they prove highly popular with many commercial facilities and industrial buildings.

However, flat roofs are historically problematic, suffering from an array of issues commonly arising from standing water and traditional roofing materials. Pooling of water on roofs can be attributed to inadequate roofing materials or, strangely, a roof being “too flat”. Flat roofs should actually feature a small gradient to allow sufficient rainwater run-off; otherwise, the weight of water pooling can lead to deflection and numerous subsequent issues.

Roof flashings can prove problematic due to dissimilar materials.

Roof flashings can prove problematic due to dissimilar materials.

Of course, other roof variations, such as pitched or slanted roofs, will offer their own range of complications; however, complications with pooling water are not among these. This distinct disadvantage is one of several that can lead to serious problems within that troublesome 10 percent. The most common problems can be split into three separate categories.

Dissimilar Materials
Most roofs form a veritable patchwork of materials, including anything from glass and plastics to masonry and metals. Industrial roofs can be particularly troublesome as they boast a multitude of pipes, heating units and other protrusions that make the roof geometry complex to cover effectively. Whatever the combination of roofing materials is, ensuring long-term adhesion and sealing between all these dissimilar materials is crucial—and can prove problematic.

Flashings fall into this category and are a common fixture of flat and pitched roofs, where metal, brick and felt or bitumen can often all meet. Exposed to varying temperatures and weather conditions, these materials can act differently, altering shape and size dependent upon that material’s characteristics. This can result in roofing weakness due to different expansion and contraction rates of the materials, allowing for water ingress through developing gaps. Moreover, this category includes areas where two metals may meet. Dissimilar metals exposed to continuous weathering can potentially lead to galvanic corrosion, which deteriorates the roof’s protection, loosening the materials and once again leading to issues like leaking.

Joints and Seams
Joints and seams spell considerable trouble for many roofs, predominantly due to the effects of movement. All buildings will feature a degree of movement as a result of thermal expansion, contraction and wind, making joints and seams one of the most vulnerable areas. Resulting gaps or lips can be created, increased further by wind uplift, which may allow water ingress or exposure of unprotected materials to corrosion and weathering.

Seams around skylights and roof protrusions can cause roof vulnerabilities.

Seams around skylights and roof protrusions can cause roof vulnerabilities.

Found whenever two materials meet, joints and seams are a common sight on industrial roofs and one that occurs frequently on roofs covered using traditional materials. For instance, felt or bitumen surfaces are layered in strips and require heat to fuse them together and create one barrier of protection. However, continuous exposure to the elements can lead to delamination of the roofing material, creating areas of vulnerability, such as lips.

Similarly, parapet walls can also become vulnerable at the joints, normally caused by movement between the brickwork. This can develop through movement in the building or perhaps vegetation forcing through the joint, widening any gaps further and causing moisture ingress. Furthermore, this problem is shared by the seams around skylights and glazing bars, which degrade over time due to the dissimilar materials present and associated movement.

Unlike other problem areas in this category, cut-edge corrosion does not stem from two materials meeting. In fact, it falls into this category as it is an uncoated seam of metal that, left exposed, will corrode and result in the damage spreading as the metal is slowly eaten away. Corrugated metal roofs are susceptible as they are cut and the edges never receive protection, meaning when cut-edge corrosion begins, it is important to treat it as soon as possible. In certain instances, roof sheets need to be removed and replaced, which is extremely expensive.

Metals seams are often neglected and can develop cut-edge corrosion

Metals seams are often neglected and can develop cut-edge corrosion.

Other Forms of Damage
Lastly, roofs are susceptible to various forms of damage in the immediate and long term. Long-term damage will generally arise if roofing is left unmaintained, to suffer from aging and neglect. A key example of this type of damage involves single-ply roof coverings. Over time, rubber roofing materials are subjected to the environment and constant UV exposure. Once again, over this period the material expands and contracts, becoming brittle and losing its former flexibility, making it prone to cracking.

In addition to weathering, wildlife can have a detrimental effect on roofing materials, as bird litter can chemically attack the plastic coating on some roofing systems. High levels can cause damage and subsequent deterioration of the lining, which can potentially lead to leaks or exposure of metal to corrosion.

With regard to immediate damage, working on roofs is also a common way in which damage can occur. As highlighted before, one of the key selling points of flat roofs is the ability to carry out maintenance and inspection easily. Whether it derives from maintenance or rooftop developments, such as HVAC installation, extensions or rooftop fire escapes, the foot traffic over flat roofs can lead to immediate damage of the roofing substrate, through piercing and general wear.

Over time, rubber roofing materials can become brittle and crack

Over time, rubber roofing materials can become brittle and crack.

Eliminating the Troublesome 10 Percent

For the majority of these problems, it is possible to find a repair solution. However, when left without treatment, the roof can become too damaged to refurbish, leaving costly replacement as the only option. Repair methods have evolved significantly over the years and eliminating the troublesome 10 percent is becoming far easier to do since the advent of liquid and cold-applied technologies. Not only does this signify a breaking of tradition, but crucially highlights the evolution of roofing maintenance materials.

PHOTOS: Belzona

RCI Announces Speakers for October Building Envelope Technology Symposium

Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc. has assembled a panel of expert speakers to discuss methods for designing sound building exteriors. More than 300 building designers and construction professionals are expected to be in attendance at the association’s annual Building Envelope Technology Symposium, which will be held Oct. 17-18 at the Westin Galleria Houston, Texas.

The program features 12 educational sessions presented by leading building envelope designers. Speakers offer their experience-based insight for specification of sound, durable exterior enve- lopes. Most programs focus on repair and/or sustainable design methods for strengthening and improving existing structures.

Attendees can earn up to 12 continuing-education credits from RCI and the American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C. An evening reception after the close of the first day’s meeting will allow those in attendance to network and mingle with fellow professionals.

This year’s topics and speakers include:

The Performance of Weather-Resistant Barriers in Stucco Assemblies
Karim P. Allana, RRC, RWC, P.E. | Allana Buick & Bers Inc., Palo Alto, Calif.

Aluminum Windowsill Anchors and Supplemental Waterproof Flashing Design Practices
Rocco Romero, AIA | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc., Seattle

The Ideal Third-party Warranty: A Risk-managed Approach
Lorne Ricketts, P.Eng. | RDH Building Science Inc., Vancouver

Playing Against a Stacked Deck: Restoration of a Stone Fin Façade
Matthew C. Farmer, P.E. | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Fairfax, Va.

Everyone Loves a Pool, But What’s Lurking Beneath the Surface?
Rob Holmer, P.E., GE | Terracon Consulting Engineers, Sacramento, Calif.
Michael Phifer | Terracon Consulting Engineers, Sacramento

Design Principles for Tower and Steeple Restoration
Robert L. Fulmer | Fulmer Associates Building Exterior Consultants LLC, North Conway, N.H.

When the Numbers Don’t Work: Engineering Judgement Tips for Historical Buildings
Rachel L. Will, P.E. | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Chicago
Edward A. Gerns, RA, LEED AP | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Chicago

Air Barrier Integration: Don’t Entangle Yourself with These Common Pitfalls
Timothy A. Mills, P.E., LEED AP, CIT | TAM Consultants Inc., Williamsburg, Va.

Upgrading the Performance of Heritage Windows to Suit Modern Design Conditions
Scott Tomlinson, P.Eng. | Morrison Hershfield, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Design Considerations for Renewing Podium Waterproofing
Bereket Alazar, RRO, LEED AP BD+C | Morrison Hershfield, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Stéphane P. Hoffman, P.E. | Morrison Hershfield, Seattle

Fully Soldered Metal Roofing: More Complicated Than You Think
Nicholas T. Floyd, P.E., LEED AP | Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., Waltham, Mass.

A Case History of ETFE on Today’s Projects
Lee Durston | Morrison Hershfield, St. Paul, Minn.
Shawn Robinson | Morrison Hershfield, Atlanta

For more information, visit RCI’s website, or call (800) 828-1902.

Spray Polyurethane Foam and Photovoltaic Roofing Systems

Spray polyurethane foam and photovoltaic systems are increasingly utilized together as
a joint solution for energy savings. With the continued push toward sustainability and growing
movements, like net-zero-energy construction, SPF and PV systems are a logical combined solution for the generation of renewable energy, the conservation of heating and cooling energy, and the elimination of the structure’s dependence on fossil-fuel-consuming electricity sources. Regardless of whether net-zero energy is the end goal, SPF and PV combined in roofing can be quite effective for many structures. Here are some considerations when looking to join these two powerful systems on the roof of a building.

ROOFTOP PV INSTALLATION TYPES FOR USE WITH SPF

Installation of PV systems on SPF roofing will inevitably create additional foot traffic. It is important to protect heavily trafficked areas with additional coating and granules or walk pads.

Installation of PV systems on SPF roofing will inevitably create additional foot traffic. It is important to protect heavily trafficked areas with additional coating and granules or walk pads.


Rooftop PV systems can vary significantly in size. Large-footprint buildings can employ PV systems rated from 50 kilowatts to 1,000 kW or larger while residential rooftop PV systems are commonly 3 kW to 5 kW.

Rooftop PV systems may be installed on racks or adhered directly to the roof surface. When looking to combine PV with SPF, it is generally not advised to adhere or place the PV panels directly onto the roof surface. Solar heat and water can accumulate between the PV and roof coating which could negatively impact coating performance. Moreover, panels applied directly to a low-slope roof will not be properly aligned with the sun to achieve optimal performance.

Non-penetrating rack systems may be placed directly on a rooftop and held in place with ballast. Racks may also be installed with penetrating supports that require flashings. Each type provides advantages and disadvantages. For example, ballasted racks may block water flow and affect drainage while penetrations require leak- and maintenance-prone flashings. SPF is unique in that it easily self-flashes around penetrating supports.

PV EXPLANATION

PV cells are the basic unit used to convert light to electricity. Many PV cells are bundled together to make a PV panel, or module. PV panels are grouped electrically to create a PV string. Depending on the system size, two or more strings are combined to create a PV array.

The dominant type of PV panel used with SPF roofing is cSi, or crystalline silicon. cSi is a typically rigid panel with a glass and metal frame and may be applied, unlike other dominant PV panel types, via rack installation methods.

A PV system includes many components in addition to the panels. Components include racks, rails, rooftop attachment devices, grounding systems, wiring and wiring harnesses, combiner boxes, inverter(s) and connection to the main electrical panel. Components may also include control modules and storage batteries for off-grid PV system installations.

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Photovoltaic panels must be handled and maintained with caution. Electricity is produced when a single panel is exposed to light; however, because a panel is not part of a circuit, that electricity will not flow until the circuit is complete. A worker may complete the circuit by connecting the two wires from the backside of a PV panel.

When maintaining a PV system, it may become necessary at some point to disconnect or remove an individual panel from a string or an array. The whole system must be shutdown properly as a precautionary measure to prevent shocks from occurring to workers and arcing between electrical connections. This “shutdown” procedure must be followed with precision as part of a lock-out/tag-out program. This procedure is provided by the inverter manufacturer. Under no circumstances should SPF contractors ever disconnect or decommission a PV panel or system unless they are trained and qualified to do so.

HEAT BUILDUP

Photovoltaic panels convert approximately 15 to 20 percent of light to electricity, leaving the remaining unconverted energy to be released as heat. Additionally, PV panels are more effective when their temperature drops. It is for these reasons that the majority of rooftop PV systems are installed to encourage airflow under panels, which reduces the temperature of the panels, improves conversion efficiency and releases heat effectively. Photovoltaic panels installed 4 to 5 inches above the roof will not change the temperature of the roof and, instead, provide shade to the surface of that roof. This additional shade may extend the life of SPF roof coatings.

LOAD

PV panels add weight to a rooftop and this must be factored into the design and installation. Existing structures should be analyzed by a structural engineer to determine if the additional weight of the PV system is acceptable.

Rack-mounted arrays with penetrating attachments are fairly lightweight at 2 to 3 pounds per square foot, and ballasted arrays add 4 to 6 pounds per square foot. However, with the latter, more ballast is utilized at the perimeters and corners of a PV array. Thus, localized loading from ballast may reach as high as 12 to 17 pounds per square foot, which must be considered. Most SPF roofing systems have a compressive strength of 40 to 60 psi.

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A Watertight Warranty Convinces HOA to Select Standing-seam Metal Roofing

When you know you can do a good job and you know you’re working with good products, you don’t mind being held accountable. On Top Roofing of Park City, Utah, recently completed a demanding roofing project and supplied the homeowners association with a watertight warranty.

With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected for Cache Condos

With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected for Cache Condos.

Homeowners associations, or HOAs, have been known to provide challenges to roofers, especially metal roofing installers. The only thing more daunting than an uneducated HOA board is an HOA board that was forced to learn about roofing. The HOA board at the Cache Condos in Park City knows roofing.

The original roof on the condos was a cedar shake that lasted more than 20 years, but a little more than five years ago, it was starting to fail. The board elected to go with a corrugated metal roof with a rusty look.

“In the five years they had that corrugated roof, they had more trouble with leaks than they did in 20 years with the shake roof,” says Jeremy Russell of On Top Roofing. “It was a bad install by a company no longer in business. So they hired a consultant—a consultant who insisted that all details be installed to specification. That’s what we do.”

First, the consultant and the board had to be re-sold on metal roofing for the Cache Condos. The rusty 7/8-inch corrugated metal roof installed just five years ago was installed with exposed fasteners, was rusting in flashing areas and leaking in the laps when snow built up on the roof. With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty from Drexel Metals to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected.

“One of the requirements was we had to inject the seams with butyl,” Russell says. “So we purchased a Hot Melt [Technologies] system. It was a huge investment, but we were happy to do it. It was something we’ve wanted to do and this project got us to take that step.

“We received plenty of support from Drexel, putting everything together to meet the requirements of the consultant,” he adds. “We worked out all the details to spec and added some of our own that were above spec.”

One requirement was to use no exposed fasteners. That meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings. “We etched it, primed it and painted it with automotive paint to match,” Russell notes. “It took more time, but it will not leak.”

One requirement was to avoid exposed fasteners, which meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings.

One requirement was to avoid exposed fasteners, which meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings.

More than 33,500 square feet of 22-gauge Galvalume 1 3/4-inch snap-lock standing-seam panels—all formed onsite—were installed by Russell’s crew. The roofing panels, rollformed on one of On Top Roofing’s two New Tech Machinery rollformers, were PVDF-painted in Medium Bronze. The project took about eight months to complete and On Top Roofing wrapped up in November 2014.

“We issued the warranty in December 2014,” says Frank Oswald, warranty inspector for Drexel Metals. “I’d say Jeremy went above and beyond what a typical installer would have done on this project. I was at this site on three different occasions because this project was really under a microscope. Ultimately, we’re quite satisfied with the work and the install.”

Triangle Fastener Releases Market Specific Product Catalogs for the Metal and Low-slope Roofing Industries

Triangle Fastener Corp. has released its Market Specific Product Catalogs for the metal roofing/building, low-slope roofing, and the interior/drywall construction industries.

Triangle Fastener Corp. has released its Market Specific Product Catalogs for the metal roofing/building, low-slope roofing, and the interior/drywall construction industries.

Triangle Fastener Corp. has released its Market Specific Product Catalogs for the metal roofing/building, low-slope roofing, and the interior/drywall construction industries. The catalogs provide information about a variety of fasteners, sealants, flashings, tools and contractor accessories, as well as technical information and installation tips. They are available for download on the Triangle Fastener website.

FlashCo to Open New Flashings Manufacturing Facility in Piedmont, S.C.

FlashCo Manufacturing Inc. is building its first location dedicated to serving the East Coast and Southeast. The new FlashCo plant opening in Piedmont, S.C., will produce standard and custom accessories for commercial and residential roofing projects. Accessories manufactured will be available in TPO, PVC, lead, copper, zinc and galvanized metal to meet the needs of roofing contractors.

FlashCo saves the contractor time by providing single-ply roof flashings and accessories that install up to five times faster than field-fabricated parts. On a typical job, roof flashings can represent about 5 percent of the project cost but can take up to 20 percent or more of the project time. Saving time and labor costs can make a big difference on the bottom line for contractors. “Saving the contractor time is our mission,” says Greg Morrow, FlashCo president and founder. “With our Piedmont facility, FlashCo will be ideally located to significantly reduce freight costs and transit times for our East Coast and Southeast customers, as well as our private-label partners.”

A key part within FlashCo’s growth has been its commitment to getting standard and custom-made parts to contractors in one to three days. According to Morrow, “It has always been my vision and dream to strategically locate FlashCo throughout the country, because in our business, it is all about getting product into the contractor’s hands when they want it. Roof flashings and accessories are sometimes overlooked on projects, so we get them the parts they need to finish the job on schedule and move their valuable labor resource to new projects.”

FlashCo’s Piedmont facility is scheduled to open June 1, 2014. It will be the seventh facility for FlashCo, joining Santa Rosa, Calif.; Chandler, Ariz.; Woodland, Wash.; Englewood, Colo.; Raytown, Mo.; and North Salt Lake City, Utah.

Sealant Adheres to Various Substrates

Titebond Roof Plus Sealant

Titebond Roof Plus Sealant

Varied substrates comprise roofing materials, and contractors need a roofing sealant sufficiently versatile to adhere to as many of them as possible. Now, they have one, with the introduction of Titebond Roof Plus Sealant.

Titebond developed its newest roof sealant for a wide variety of roofing applications, such as metal trim, solar roof systems, architectural metals, painted metals, aluminum and general roofing projects. It provides excellent adhesion to a range of substrates: shingle and tiled roofs, sheet roofing, metal roofs, wood forms, flashings, edge and ridge tiles and liquid applied roofs. In addition, contractors can apply the sealant in temperatures from 20 F to 100 F, advancing its status as a great all-around roof sealant.

Titebond develops its adhesives and sealants with the professional contractor in mind, so it’s no surprise that its newest sealant offers performance characteristics that will appeal to the pro – and, by extension, the skilled DIYer. Beyond the wide application temperature range, Roof Plus can speed up application, increasing contractor productivity. The ready-to-use formula requires no messy, time-consuming mixing; the contractor simply inserts the cartridge in the gun and tools for quicker application and neater joints. It easily fills properly prepared joints one-quarter to two-inches wide. In addition, its clear formulation blends with most substrates – although the contractor can paint it with any non-rigid paint within just two hours.

However quick the application time, when cured, Titebond Roof Plus Sealant is an extremely long-lasting, supple sealant. It provides a weather-tight seal with 560 percent elongation and 25 percent total joint movement. The contractor can leave the job site confident that the sealant will meet high performance standards.

The newest Titebond sealant also complies with ASTM C-920 Type S Grade NS Class 12.5 Use T, NT, M, A and O; Federal Specification TTS-00230C Type II Class B; and SCAQMD Rule #1168.

Titebond Roof Plus Sealant is available in 10.1-ounce cartridges through building materials suppliers and hardware stores. It joins a full line of Titebond caulks and sealants for siding, roofing, multi-purpose, interior and specialty applications.