Hanger Connects Rafters to Hip/Valley Beams

The Simpson Strong-Tie LSSJ field adjustable jack rafter hanger features a hinged seat that adjusts to typical rafter slopes.

The Simpson Strong-Tie LSSJ field adjustable jack rafter hanger features a hinged seat that adjusts to typical rafter slopes.

Simpson Strong-Tie has introduced a hanger that easily connects rafters to hip/valley beams in roof framing. The Simpson Strong-Tie LSSJ field adjustable jack rafter hanger features a versatile, hinged seat that easily adjusts to typical rafter slopes. The gripper seat frees up a hand for the installer at the time of attachment. The hanger attaches to the open side of the jack rafter for easier fastener placement. The LSSJ can be installed after the rafters are set into place so a framer doesn’t have to pause during installation. The LSSJ is sold in two versions—skewed to the left or right—and is available in three sizes.

Project Profiles: Historic Preservation

CATHEDRAL OF ST. PAUL, BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Midland Engineering Co., South
Bend, Ind.
ARCHITECT: ArchitectureWorks LLP, Birmingham
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Hoar Construction LLC, Birmingham,
MASONRY CONTRACTOR: Ziolkowski Construction Inc., South Bend

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

Roof Materials

The Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham required the cathedral’s new roof system be a historically accurate reproduction of the original in materials, design and craftsmanship. The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles. Six large slate crosses and multiple accent patterns, barely visible on the faded original roof, required exacting measurements prior to tear-off and a high level of precision to recreate and maintain over such a large field and on octagonal steeples.

Because of metal thinning brought on by their advanced age, every copper architectural and functional feature in the existing roof system had to be carefully removed and shipped to Midland Engineering’s South Bend facility to be historically replicated in its metal shop. This included seven ornate crosses (up to 17-feet tall), finials, turret caps and more. There were more than four dozen components, for which no original prints existed, as well as over 500 feet each of custom copper cornices and radius gutters with matching straps. More than 20,000 square feet of 16- and 20-ounce copper was utilized for fabrication of architectural elements and flashing.

Midland Engineering was asked to make improvements to the original roof system to improve attic ventilation while maintaining the Gothic Revival period look. To accomplish this, the crew integrated bronze screen (invisible from the ground) into the original copper cornice and eave design to provide improved cold air intake while new louvered copper dormers replaced the original painted roof ventilator.

An updated lightning protection system was incorporated into the new roof design, hidden within many of the new copper crosses and other architectural elements. The system was fabricated in Midland Engineering’s shop to maintain the Gothic Revival look.

The metal shop also clad 10 previously painted windows and mullions in copper, effectively eliminating frequent and costly maintenance. These windows, reachable only by crane at considerable expense, formerly required painting and other maintenance every five to seven years.

About 6,500 square feet of lead-coated copper, which patinas to a limestone color, was utilized to cap all limestone exposed to weather, reducing ongoing maintenance of limestone joints.

Extensive termite damage to structural framing required repair prior to installation of the new roofing system. Upon removal of the original slate roof and completion of the structural repairs, the new roof was dried-in and installation of the new slate roof began. The historically accurate replacements of the original copper architectural features were installed according to schedule.

SLATE SUPPLIER: North Country Slate
COPPER SUPPLIER: Hussey Copper

Roof Report

The Cathedral of St. Paul is the centerpiece of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Birmingham. Completed in 1893 at a cost of $90,000, the cathedral is widely considered to be a handsome example of the American Neo-Gothic variant of the Gothic Revival style. The cathedral measures 96-feet wide by 140-feet long and encompasses more than 60,000 square feet. It features twin octagonal steeples, rising 183-feet high.

Work schedules on this project were a challenge. The contract required parishioner and clergy access to the church must be maintained 24 hours a day, seven days a week, throughout the eight-month duration of the project. Further, because of the noise inherent in roof construction, work schedules had to be planned around regular church services and events and rescheduled several times a month for funerals and other unscheduled events.

“We could not have been more pleased with the work accomplished by the team from Midland Engineering,” says Very Rev. Kevin M. Bazzel, V.G., J.C.L., rector of the Cathedral of St. Paul. “It is a marvel to us to be able to see the church in its original glory, and all of this thanks to Midland!”

The National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, Ill., awarded Midland Engineering the prestigious Gold Circle Award in 2016. Midland was recognized in the Outstanding Workmanship—Steep-slope Category.

Photo: Rob Culpepper

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MBMA Releases Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released its new Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems, a resource intended for use by individuals who are responsible for contracting, performing, and reporting the inspection tasks related to the construction of a metal building project.
 
This guide is available for online purchase, in print or PDF format, at www.techstreet.com/mbma. The audience consists of general contractors and erectors, design professionals, building officials, owner’s representatives, and others who are involved in project delivery.
 
Input for the guide was provided by MBMA members as well as representatives from the Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association. The result is a publication designed to help eliminate misunderstandings and lead to shorter punch lists, efficient project delivery, and quality construction of metal buildings.
 
Depending on the project and jurisdiction, building code and contractually required inspections may be necessary, as well as other inspections such as owner acceptance and insurance evaluations. The scope of the guide focuses on inspecting newly constructed metal building systems, including primary framing, secondary framing, and metal roof and wall cladding. It also overviews standards on materials common to the building envelope, such as windows, doors, skylights, and insulation materials. 
 
Dustin Cole, PE, serves on MBMA’s Technical Committee and chaired the task group that developed the MBMA handbook. He presented information on this publication at the 2016 METALCON convention. He discussed the different qualities of metal buildings, focusing on the function of components that comprise metal building systems and inspection requirements found in the building code.
 
“As metal building projects and building codes continue to grow more complex, inspection becomes more necessary and expected. Knowing what is required and what to look for when performing an inspection helps reduce delays and decreases costs,” says Dan Walker, PE, associate general manager of MBMA. “The Metal Building Manufacturer Association’s Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems will benefit anyone who is responsible for evaluating new or existing metal building construction.”
 
The guide can be purchased at this website for $60 for non-members and $36 for MBMA members.

Shop for Equipment Screens and Rooftop Mounting Solutions Online

RoofScreen Manufacturing is putting its entire product offering at your fingertips. RoofScreen has opened an online store to showcase its entire line of pre-engineered modular rooftop framing systems designed to be used as equipment screens and rooftop mounting solutions for commercial and industrial buildings. It’s the perfect place for roofers, architects, general contractors and building owners and managers to learn about and purchase RoofScreen products.

“We launched this online store as a comprehensive user-friendly resource to showcase RoofScreen’s complete line,” says Lad Wallace, Chief Operating Officer at RoofScreen. “Visitors who don’t need our custom engineering and design capabilities can purchase our unique products and place orders for any of our pre-engineered kits, panels and trims, patented roof attachment systems, tubing, hat and zee sections, connectors, hardware and all other parts.”

Customers should also visit the Design Ideas section of the store where they will see how these products have been used in boat docks, rooftop equipment platforms, elevated waterproof duct supports and other applications. The possibilities are endless.

RoofScreen Manufacturing designs, manufactures and distributes pre-engineered modular rooftop framing systems designed to be used as equipment screens and rooftop platform supports on commercial and industrial buildings. Visit RoofScreen’s new store or the company’s website.

Replacement Solution Includes Framing, Sub-framing and Metal Roof Panels

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.’s Retro-Master roof replacement solution

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.’s Retro-Master roof replacement solution

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.’s Retro-Master roof replacement solution includes structural framing, sub-framing and metal roof panels. The 100 percent steel system can be installed over any existing sloped or flat roof whether metal, asphalt, built-up or membrane. Insulation can be added to the roof system, and a variety of cool-roof-compliant colors are available. The system also accommodates photovoltaic integration and rainwater catchment.

(800) 406-7387