Metal Roof and Wall Panels Provide Industrial Aesthetic to Texas Ranch

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

As many architects can attest, designing a residence for oneself can present challenges. But architect Jack Carson rose to the occasion by creating a striking design for his new home, located on a ranch in the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Design for the 7,000-square-foot residence follows LEED principles and blends a unique palette of “industrial” materials with ultra-modern aesthetics.

“The house is truly on a ranch. We have cattle on the property,” says Carson, president of Carson Design Associates in Austin, Texas. “We wanted to keep the design somewhat in the ranch vernacular but with a contemporary look. The reliance on metal for the roof and cladding and an exposed structure helped create a ranch building feel. We like to think of it as an ‘industrial ranch’ aesthetic.”

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

Several of Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-CLAD profiles contributed to Carson’s success in delivering the desired look. Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof. The 16-inch roof panels were rollformed onsite because of extremely tight site conditions and because the only access to the site was via a dirt road that wasn’t wide enough to allow large trucks to deliver factory-formed panels. An additional 3,000 square feet of Snap-Clad panels also was installed vertically as siding around two garages and at specific locations on the house as accent panels.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed. All wall panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Tyler, Texas, plant.

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The onsite fabrication of the roof panels and the installation of all roof and wall panels was performed by Dean Contracting Co., Kyle, Texas. “The greatest challenge was executing the architects dream for his home,” recalls Jesse Brown, vice president of Dean Contracting. “The design included a myriad of varying geometric shapes on many different planes and a blend of materials that required complex detailing. It was probably one of the top-five most challenging jobs that we have ever done.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass. “We have great views into the valley with no neighbors,” Carson adds. “A large overhanging soffit covers a large portion of the deck and shades all of the glass.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.” Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit. Petersen functioned as distributor of the Reynobond ACM.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

The decision to use Petersen for the roof and siding was arrived at rather easily. Carson notes: “I was familiar with PAC-CLAD and wanted to use it but also wanted to rely on the builder’s recommendations regarding materials and subcontractors. In our very first meeting with the roofer, Dean Contracting, they brought in samples of PAC-CLAD and recommended using it. That made the decision pretty easy.”

Carson is a big believer in metal as a roofing and cladding material. “We wanted to be as maintenance-free as possible. And sustainability was an important component as well,” Carson says. “We used LEED principles in our design. Metal is far greener than asphalt shingles and other alternatives. It’s just a great option for residential construction.”

The installation went smoothly, Carson adds, primarily because he relied on the expertise of Dean Contracting. “My approach is to listen to the experts. Jesse Brown and his crew worked out the complex detailing. They use metal all the time and are extremely capable. We collaborated as necessary but I basically left it in their hands.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

Brown was quick to give full credit to the crew that was led by Juan Rojas, sheet-metal superintendent. Rojas is a 24-year employee of Dean Contracting and Brown cites Rojas’ attention to function and precise detailing as a main reason why the job turned out so well.

The house—in spite of its size and location in the hot Texas climate and the large amount of glass—is energy efficient. Two inches of rigid insulation was installed under the metal roof and an additional 4 inches of sprayed insulation went under the roof deck. “The heavy insulation and the shade provided by the overhang makes it very energy efficient. The house stays a very constant temperature,” Carson says.

The entire property captures rainwater in 18,000-gallon collection tanks, which is yet another reason for using metal, Carson points out.

When asked about the challenge of designing for yourself, Carson thought it was easier than designing for a traditional client. “I was probably more demanding in ‘getting it right’, but once I knew I had the right design and materials, I didn’t have to convince myself that it was the best direction. There was no negotiation or comprising the design in any way,” Carson says. “The biggest problem any architect has in designing for themselves is in ‘editing out.’ We know all of the possibilities, and being able to prioritize and filter out the unnecessary options is often the hardest challenge.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Tin-plated Products Are Designed for Rollforming

Roofinox provides a range of tin-plated (Terne) products that provide a substitute for lead-coated copper, zinc/tin-zinc-coated copper, Terne-coated materials, galvalume and lead.

Roofinox provides a range of tin-plated (Terne) products that provide a substitute for lead-coated copper, zinc/tin-zinc-coated copper, Terne-coated materials, galvalume and lead.

Roofinox provides a range of tin-plated (Terne) products that provide a substitute for lead-coated copper, zinc/tin-zinc-coated copper, Terne-coated materials, galvalume and lead. Available in coil or sheet, the tin-plated (Terne) product ensures long-term sustainability and corrosion- resistance for wall cladding, flashing, rainware, interior design and all forms of roofing applications. The tin-plated stainless-steel product has been developed and manufactured for rollforming and fabricating. It consists of a layer of 100 percent tin covering a base of 439 or 316L stainless steel. This formulation works for drainage solutions and accessory pieces. The products can be soldered, are 100 percent recyclable and are malleable.

Galvalume-coated Metal Roofs Will Last at Least 60 Years with Minimal Component Repair

The term “infrastructure sustainability” continues to gain importance because of rapidly increasing building infrastructure components around the country needing major repairs and/ or replacements. Consequently, roof maintenance or replacement materials and methods must last at least 60 years; consider LEED v4 from the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council. For more than 30 years, millions of square feet of Galvalume-coated roofs have resisted the atmospheric conditions to which they are exposed with little or no maintenance and are well prepared to continue protecting building interiors for more than 30 additional years. Material science and professional project engineering and installation prove Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roofs will perform for that period of time.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

MATERIAL SCIENCE

The first standing-seam metal roof was introduced by Armco Steel Corp., Middletown, Ohio, at the 1932 World’s Fair in Chicago. Armco Steel ceased doing business many years ago, but its standing-seam metal roof design has been adopted by all manufacturers in today’s commercial metal roofing market. The second longest-lasting introduction into this market was in the early 1970s when Bethlehem, Pa.-based Bethlehem Steel introduced a Zinc/Aluminum coating—now known as Galvalume—for carbon-steel metal roofs. This coating, applied to both sides of the steel coil, has been successfully used for the majority of metal standing-seam roofs ever since.

Since Galvalume was introduced, there have been several evaluations, reports and predictions as to how this product would “weather” the test of time. In 2012, the Chicago-based Metal Construction Association (MCA) and Olympia, Wash.-based Zinc Aluminum Coaters Association (ZAC) commissioned a study to perform forensic tests at 14 existing Galvalume standing-seam metal roof sites throughout the country in varying climates and precipitation pH. The average age of these roofs was more than 30 years at the time of testing.

Initially, the sites were selected based on temperature and humidity zones throughout the U.S. As the field results were processed, however, it became apparent the expected lives of these roofs were directly dependent on the precipitation pH levels with very little correlation to temperature and humidity. The building sites chosen were located in the following states:

  • Massachusetts (2 sites)
    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine years old.

    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine-years old.


    Ohio (3 sites)
    South Carolina (2 sites)
    Georgia (1 site)
    Colorado (1 site)
    New Mexico (1 site)
    Arizona (1 site)
    Oregon (1 site)
    Wyoming (2 sites)

The study was directed by MCA and three independent consultants and their firms, which managed and performed the field work: Rob Haddock of Metal Roof Advisory Group, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Ron Dutton of Ron Dutton Consulting Services LLC, Annapolis, Md.; and me and my firm Metal Roof Consultants Inc., Cary, N.C. This group, plus Scott Kriner, MCA’s technical director, authored the actual report, which was issued by MCA and ZAC in November 2014 and is available online.

The team harvested and analyzed actual field samples of Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roof panel materials and sealants and examined all the individual roofs’ ancillary components. Finally, it created an experienced assessment of the roofs’ conditions and associated costs to replace.

PHOTOS: METAL ROOF CONSULTANTS INC.

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Stone-coated Metal Protects Buildings

Stone-coated metal roofing systems from Gerard.

Stone-coated metal roofing systems from Gerard.


Stone-coated metal roofing systems from Gerard, a Headwaters Roofing brand, are available in a broad array of colors—three of which are ENERGY STAR approved—and profiles, including shingle, shake and tile. Constructed of 26-gauge Galvalume steel panels, Gerard roofing systems include a Class A fire rating, a 2.5-inch hailstone warranty and a 120-mph wind warranty. Although Gerard stone-coated metal roofing systems can be installed direct to deck, the optimum energy-saving method is to install on top of a batten or counter-batten grid.

Research Study Shows Certain Metal Roofs Can Last at Least 60 Years

The Metal Construction Association (MCA) has released new research findings that conclude that certain metal roof systems can last at least 60 years, meaning they do not require replacement during a commercial building’s service life.

“This study is a breakthrough for the metal construction industry because it finally provides third-party, scientific data that backs up the long held stance that 55 percent Al-Zn coated steel standing seam roofing systems are very durable, economic, and can be better for the environment,” said Scott Kriner, Technical Director, Metal Construction Association. Most non-metal roofing systems require one or more full replacements within a typical building’s 60-year service life, which is costly and often adds to the solid waste stream in landfills.

The study, sponsored by MCA and the ZAC Association, was conducted with oversight of three independent consulting firms which analyzed low-slope, unpainted 55% Al-Zn coated steel standing seam roofing, in a wide range of environments across the U.S.

This type of roof material is known by many trade names throughout the world, principally GALVALUME and Zincalume in the United States. It is very common on low rise commercial buildings such as warehouses, schools, distribution centers, shopping centers, exposition halls and other facilities. Experts estimate that the market size for this type of low slope roofing in the U.S. is over 350 million square feet.

The study incorporates the results of multiple field inspections, independent laboratory analyses of metallic corrosion of the roof panels, components and sealants, and includes assessment of all integral ancillary components that impact the end of roof service life.

The research team selected 14 building sites in five climate regions of various geographies in the continental United States, exhibiting a spectrum of climates related to heat and humidity including Hot-Dry, Hot-Humid, Cold-Dry, Cold-Humid, and Moderate-Acid. The precipitation acidity also varies considerably from one site to the next over this broad geography.

The research study concluded that the expected service life of an unpainted 55 percent Al-Zn coated steel standing seam roof constructed today in a wide range of environments using best practices can be expected to be in excess of 60 years, a value that equals the assumed building service life as described in the USGBC’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design building rating program, version 4.

In the study, the steel panel roofs experienced corrosion rates that conservatively project service lives well beyond the service life of most buildings. The range depends on the climate and the local precipitation pH.

The study also confirmed that these types of metal roofs resist corrosion even in “weak” spots, such as sheared edges and panel profile bends. Inspections showed an absence of significant red rust after up to 35 years, indicating exceptional corrosion resistance in areas susceptible to exhibiting the first signs of corrosion.

The study acknowledges that all roof systems require a regular maintenance program (at least annually) to clean off debris and to inspect the condition of the roof in order to achieve the kind of service lives shown in this study. While low-slope steel standing seam roof systems were projected to last up to 60 years, ancillary components (such as fasteners) may need to be replaced during the roof life, but this represents significantly less than 20% of a total roof replacement cost.

“We are planning to conduct more studies on different types of metal roofing, and in some cases we expect similar or even better results in terms of roof service life,” adds Kriner. “We think these studies will help to motivate building owners and architects to specify metal roofing more often.”

The report was authored by Ron Dutton, Ron Dutton Consulting Services LLC; Rob Haddock, Metal Roof Advisory Group; Chuck Howard, Metal Roof Consultants and Scott Kriner, Metal Construction Association. The report was also peer reviewed by Morrison Hershfield laboratory in Canada.

Exterior Coatings Are Field-proven

Valspar’s Fluropon exterior coatings

Valspar’s Fluropon exterior coatings

With its high durability and large color palette, Valspar’s Fluropon exterior coatings have become an industry standard for both metal coil coating and aluminum extrusion applications. These field-proven, high-performance, 70 percent polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) coatings are offered in two- to four-coat systems in nearly any formulation, including low gloss, low sheen, solar reflective and ENERGY STAR. A wide variety of colors also are available, from neutral to bright colors, micas, metallic, pearlescent and Kameleon color shifting coatings.

Fluropon coatings are ideally suited for long-life external use on monumental high-rise structures and pre-engineered buildings’ exterior architectural products made from aluminum, galvanized steel and Galvalume coils and aluminum extrusions. End-uses include: metal roofing and wall panel systems; framing for curtainwall, windows, skylights and entrance systems; louvers and grills, soffits, fascia, mullions, column covers and more.

Examples of projects featuring Fluropon include:

    • 930 Poydras residential tower, New Orleans
    • Sunnyvale Town Center Target Store, Calif.
    • Central Arizona College’s Maricopa Campus, Ariz.
    • Dallas Cowboys’ Stadium, Texas
    • Exploration Tower at Port Canaveral, Fla.
    • Waubonsee Community College, Plano, Ill.
    • Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis, Minn.
    • Paul David Athletic Training Center at Massillon High School, Ohio
    • Aria Resort and Hotel Las Vegas
    • Skyventure entertainment facility, Nashua, N.H.

These and other project examples can be viewed on Valspar’s website.

Fluropon, containing a 70 percent PVDF proprietary resin system, meets or exceeds the American Society for Testing and Materials’ stringent standards, the American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s AAMA 2605 high-performance exterior specification. Fluropon demonstrates reliable performance including resistance to harmful ultraviolet rays, chemical degradation, abrasions and humidity.

The Valspar Corporation supports its high-performance Fluropon system with industry-leading technical expertise, color-matching and sustainability resources, responsive customer service and high-priority lead times.

Metal Sales Galvalume Roof and Wall Panels Accepted in Declare Program

Metal Sales has been included in the rigorous and exclusive Declare program. Declare is an “ingredients label” program for building products operated by the International Living Future Institute. Declare aims to provide transparency and open communication by allowing manufacturers to voluntarily share their product sources, materials and manufacturing locations.

Metal Sales has fully disclosed all of the ingredients in the Acrylic-coated Galvalume roof and wall panels through Declare, and they are designated as being Red List Free on the Declare Label. This designation means Metal Sales Galvalume finish does not contain any ingredients on the Living Building Challenge’s Red List, a collection of worst-in-class building materials, chemicals and elements known to pose serious risks to human health and the greater eco-system. Building design teams pursuing the Living Building Challenge will use the Declare database and label to select products to meet what many consider to be the world’s most advanced green building rating system.

Galvalume Coil and Sheet Products with SMP Paint System

Drexel Metals' 26-gauge Galvalume coil and sheet products feature a 25-year silicone-modified polyester (SMP) paint system.

Drexel Metals’ 26-gauge Galvalume coil and sheet products feature a 25-year silicone-modified polyester (SMP) paint system.

Drexel Metals now offers competitive 26-gauge Galvalume coil and sheet products with a 25-year silicone-modified polyester (SMP) paint system. The products allow Drexel Metals’ contractors and distributors to compete with light and wide metal panel offerings, as well as asphalt shingles. The coil and sheet products are available in 11 standard colors and Drexlume, an acrylic-coated Galvalume. All products are Energy Star-listed and are warranted for 25 years against chalk and fade and for film integrity.

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