Roofing Contractor Flexes its Muscles at Kissing Tree San Marcos

The amenities campus at the Kissing Tree includes swimming pools, a fitness center, pickleball courts, a golf course, bocce ball courts, horseshoe pits and a beer garden. Texas Traditions Roofing

Kissing Tree is a 1,300-acre gated community for residents 55 and older in San Marcos, Texas. Its centerpiece is The Mix — a 20-acre activity campus with amenities for residents including indoor and outdoor swimming pools, a fitness center, pickleball courts, a golf course, bocce ball courts, horseshoe pits, and a beer garden.

Texas Traditions Roofing tackled a variety of work on the project, including metal roofing, single-ply roofing, and wall panels for the Fitness Center and Swim Center. They also provided roofing for the Comfort Center, pool cabanas, and a covered walkway. Challenges on the project included the multiple scopes of work, as well adapting to an ever-changing schedule and working around multiple trades on a busy jobsite.

As work progressed under the general contractor, BEC Austin, crews from Texas Traditions were ready to jump in as needed. “The project consisted of multiple buildings, so we just rolled as they were ready,” recalls Michael Pickel, vice president of Texas Traditions Roofing. “When they were ready for us to do the TPO at the Fitness Center, we got started right away. A few weeks later, they were ready for metal, and we ran our metal guys out there. Then we went over to the next building, whether it was the indoor pool or the Comfort Center, as they were ready. There were multiple trades working with the general contractor, so we made sure that we were meeting their expectations and being out there when we needed to be out there so they could open on time.”

The Fitness Center

Work on the Fitness Center began with the section of TPO roof in the area that supported the HVAC units. Crews mechanically attached the two layers of 2.2 inch polyiso insulation, along with tapered insulation to provide proper drainage. “We gang fastened all of that together with half-inch DensDeck and then adhered the 60-mil GAF EverGuard TPO over that,” notes Pickel. “We installed walkway pads for the HVAC units and terminated everything.”

The design featured screens designed to shield the HVAC units from view. When the roofing work began, the base of the framing had already been installed through the deck, and crews for Texas Traditions set up pourable pitch pockets and boots. The screens were installed after the roofing work was completed.

Texas Traditions Roofing installed approximately 10,000 square feet of metal roofing, 5,000 square feet of TPO, and 2,500 square feet of Corten metal wall panels.

The roof was bordered by a very low parapet, so the safety plan included flags at the perimeter as well as personal fall arrest equipment. “It’s not a huge, wide-open building, so it was not ideal from a safety perspective,” Pickel recalls. “You’re going to have times where it’s crowded up there. Crew members had to be tied off at the perimeter and while installing the coping cap.”

The low-slope area is intersected by a large plane of sloped metal roofing. The metal roof was comprised of Sheffield Metals 1-1/2-inch mechanical lock panels, which were installed over Sharkskin High-Temp Ice and Water Shield and the wood deck. “On the fitness center, we rolled all metal on site,” Pickel says. “There were multiple trips for metal for each building, but the nice thing with the Fitness Center was it was pretty straightforward. We just ran the panels out to length and installed them. Later we came back and installed the awnings on the first floor as well, using the same metal.”

The Indoor Pool

The Swim Center also featured a TPO roof where the HVAC units were installed, as well as a large metal roof. “The indoor pool was fun,” Pickel says. “The TPO section was similar to the Fitness Center — tight space, low parapet — but even smaller. There was a lot of detail work for such a small area. The difference was that the roof was structurally sloped from front to back, so we didn’t have to install tapered insulation.”

Pool buildings have crucial considerations, notes Pickel. “When you are dealing with a pool —an indoor pool especially — you’ve got different concerns that you’re worried about, including condensation and chlorination. We’re thinking through all of those items when we are talking with the GC to minimize any issues with condensation in the future.”

The metal roof on the Swim Center is comprised of 1.5-inch mechanical seam panels from Sheffield Metals that are 110 feet long.

Consultations with the architect and waterproofing contractor were designed to ensure the structure could handle high levels of moisture. “A lot of it was making sure everyone understood what was going on below the deck,” Pickel explains. “We had to make sure they were waterproofing the interior — the understructure of the facility. From a roofing standpoint, you don’t want water to seep up through the ceiling and cause issues with the underside of the panels. We had to make sure the facility was good and watertight both inside and outside.”

After the TPO section was completed, crews moved on to the metal roof. “The metal panels were 110 feet long,” Pickel says. “We ran one panel all the way down because we didn’t want any breaks. It was only one story high, but getting those panels up to the roof without bending or scratching them was a challenge.”

Ultimately crews implemented a three-man pulley system to lift the panels to the roof. “We moved one long panel at a time, nice and slow,” he says. “We had three or four guys up top to maneuver the panels into position. It’s not fun carrying a 110-foot panels about 90 feet  from one end to the other, but you do what you’ve got to do.”

Poolside

Texas Traditions also installed a TPO roof on the Comfort Center (an outdoor restroom) and metal roofs on the open pool cabanas. “The cabanas were added afterwards,” says Pickel. “They originally wanted those roofs to be made from corrugated panels, but we told them it would look better if they went with the same panel all of the way across the board. They agreed and went with the 1 1/2-inch mechanical lock panels and half-round gutters to go with them to give it a clean, professional look.”

Crews also roofed the covered walkway with translucent KODA XT polycarbonate panels. “It was something we hadn’t done before, which was kind of fun,” Pickel says. “It’s an engineered panel — fully custom.”

Since it was the company’s first experience with the system, the manufacturer was on site to provide training and answer questions throughout the process. “There was good communication through and through with the manufacturer,” notes Pickel.

Wall Panels

Work didn’t stop at the roof. Texas Traditions also installed Corten A606 wall panels in Rust color on the Swim Center and Fitness Center. The panels were custom fabricated at the jobsite. “We actually made those out of flat sheets and bent everything on site. They were about 3 feet wide and 4 or 5 feet long. We literally cut a sheet, bent it up, cut the sides, and installed the panels. Each panel interlocked and interconnected.”

Texas Traditions is proud of its multifaceted work at Kissing Tree. “This project showcases what we are able to do,” Pickel says. “We handled multiple aspects of the project, from TPO, to metal roofs, to wall panels, to walkways. Our crews have the ability to tackle everything from a standard, cut-and-dried residential or commercial replacement, all the way to cut-up, detailed, custom metal roofs and metal wall panels.”

Challenges such as working with other trades and a shifting schedule are all part of any new construction project. “You’ve got to be able to cope with delays and last-minute changes,” Pickel says. “You just have to be willing to work with other people. Some roofers don’t like to do that, but it’s the nature of the beast. If you want to do new construction, you have to work as a team. At the same time, you’ve got to own your section, own your responsibilities. You can make other guys’ lives easier, or you can make them way more difficult. You want to be a contractor that is good to work with from the GC’s standpoint, and also good to work with from the standpoint of other trades.”

TEAM

General Contractor: BEC Austin, Austin, Texas, becaustin.com

Architect: Marsh & Associates Inc., San Antonio, Texas, mai-architects.com

Roofing Contractor: Texas Traditions Roofing, Georgetown, Texas, texastraditionsroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 1.5-inch Mechanical Seam Panels, Sheffield Metals, sheffieldmetals.com

Underlayment:  Sharkskin Ultra SA,  Sharkskin, sharkskinroof.com

Single-Ply Roof: 60-mil EverGuard TPO, GAF, gaf.com

Cover Board: 1/2-inch DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, buildgp.com

Wall Panels: Corten A606, Corten Roofing, cortenroofing.com

Polycarbonate Panels: KODA XT, 3form, 3-form.com

Innovative Approach Solves Re-Roofing Puzzle at Oceanside Resort

The existing metal roof on the Ritz-Carlton Coconut Grove was removed and replaced with 30,000 square feet of the Sarnafil Decor PVC roof system. Photos: Coatings Application & Waterproofing Co.

Sometimes re-roofing projects are pretty straightforward. Others can present a complex puzzle. Sometimes looking at things in a different light can lead to an unexpected solution that proves more cost-effective and less intrusive for the building and its occupants.

The Ritz-Carlton Coconut Grove in Miami, Florida, serves as an excellent example. The hotel consists of two 26-story towers, and each was topped with a standing-seam metal roof, with steep sections transitioning to sloped roof sections at their base.

When the original standing seam roof reached the end of its service life, the owners solicited bids to replace it with a new standing-seam metal roof. The installation would require large construction cranes to be mounted near the entrance of the property.

Bill Devine, area manager for Coatings Application & Waterproofing Co., was convinced a new metal roof was not the answer. He proposed installing the Sarnafil Décor PVC system as an alternative, asserting it would be more cost-effective, more durable and less invasive to the hotel owners and guests.

Devine’s intimate knowledge of the jobsite helped him craft his plan. “We had an existing relationship at the Ritz,” he explains. “We went in about nine years before that to repair the metal roof that was up there. We patched it after some storms and painted it for them. We’ve helped them out with some other stuff over the years, and the consultants came in to talk to them about taking the metal roof off and putting a new metal roof back on it. That’s when I got involved to try to convince them otherwise.”

There were several key factors influencing Devine’s recommendation, including the harsh, corrosive oceanside environment, which is tough on metal. “I convinced them to use the Sarnafil PVC Decor Rib System, which has the appearance of a standing seam metal roof,” Devine says. “The average person who looks at it doesn’t know it’s not a metal roof, but it’s all PVC. The way I designed it, there is not one piece of exposed metal that can rust anymore.”

With the PVC system, all the roofing materials could be brought up using the service elevators, eliminating the need for a crane. To top it off, it would be less expensive than a new metal roof.

“What got us the job was when I gave him my price for the Sarnafil and told him I wouldn’t have to have a 200-300 foot crane sitting in front of the Ritz Carlton for eight months,” notes Devine. “I took the entire roof off and put the whole new roof on using the service elevator.”

Challenging Installation

Coatings Application & Waterproofing (CAW) installed approximately 30,000 square feet of the PVC system. The steepness of the roof sections posed obvious challenges, and CAW developed special swing stages to remove the existing metal roofing and install the Decor system. “That’s 250 feet in the air with a 23/12 pitch,” notes Devine. “It’s almost a wall.”

Coatings Application & Waterproofing used special swing stages to remove the existing roof and install the PVC system.

A detailed safety plan was paramount. Crew members had to be tied off 100 percent of the time, and all tools were tethered. Anchor points were attached to the building’s heavy-duty steel framing at the top of the towers. “We drilled through that and put anchors through those big beams and ran our safety lines and swing stages through that,” says Devine.

The plan was to take everything up through the roof hatches, including the swing stages, which were engineered to fold up for transport. Debris was taken out the same way.

“We pulled all of the metal off a section at a time and dropped it down through the roof hatch,” explains Devine. “Each side had a roof hatch and we dropped it through there to the floor. We had guys inside who separated the trash from the metal and stacked it. We recycled all of the metal.”

Logistics at the jobsite were very tight. “The property doesn’t really have a parking lot area — it has a parking garage — so we had no place to put dumpsters. We just had a few spots down in the parking lot to stack insulation and rolls, and we took material up the freight elevator whenever we were ready for it.”

Recycled metal and debris were also taken out via the freight elevator. “We brought it down on a Friday, and we had a guy with a truck who would meet us at the loading dock. We’d load all of the trash in his truck and he’d take it to the dump,” Devine says. “There was nothing easy about it.”

Work on the project included installing new drains, tapered insulation and PVC membrane in the internal gutters.

As the metal roof was torn off in sections, roof areas were covered with 1.5-inch isocyanurate insulation with quarter-inch DensDeck bonded to it with adhesive. The pre-assembled 4-foot-by-4-foot boards caused some difficulties. “We had to make modifications to the swing stage so they could stack insulation on it,” notes Devine. “We dropped all of the trash down through the roof hatch, but when we went to pull our insulation up, it wouldn’t fit through the roof hatch. We cut a 5-foot-by-1-foot hole in the roof deck on each side of the building and had the guys hand the insulation up through the slot in the roof deck. They’d stack it on the stage, take it up and start installing it.”

The insulation panels were fastened to the 20-gauge steel decking with 3-inch #15 screws and insulation plates, and a Sarnafil vapor barrier membrane was installed. The slots cut in the deck were repaired using flat-stock steel.

The Patina Green PVC membrane was adhered using Sarnacol 2170 adhesive. Crews on the swing stages worked from top to bottom, adhering about 2 feet at a time. “When they got to the bottom, then they would go back up to the top with welders and weld the laps,” Devine explains.

Applying the Decor ribs with a hot-air welder was the last part of the process. The swing stages had to be modified for this step as well. “We had to be held off far enough that we could run our welder and still keep it in a straight line,” Devine recalls. “It was a fun one.”

Work on the project included the internal gutter systems and mechanical areas. “Each corner has an internal gutter that extends 15 feet down one side and 15 feet down the other. Those were completely shot,” says Devine. “The only thing that saved them was the concrete underneath. Everything above was shot. We had to put tapered insulation and the Sarnafil membrane in those and put new drains in.”

There was no exposed metal on the project, according to Devine. The hips and ridges were made from SarnaClad Patina Green metal, which is wrapped in PVC, and the metal framing was also wrapped with PVC membrane.

Award-Winning Work

Work on the project began in February 2019 and was completed in November 2019, ahead of schedule. The project received the Sarnafil Project of the Year award for 2019. “Winning that award is a pretty good feeling,” says Devine. “We went through a lot, and Sarnafil was there to help us out.”

Detailed planning was crucial to the project’s success. “I had the luxury of plenty of time to think about all of the different things we were going to have to do,” Devine notes. “We had to make some changes out in the field, like cutting a hole in the deck, but most of it went pretty smoothly.”

Devine credits CAW’s experienced team for the success of the project. “I had a good crew,” he says, “Our foreman, Bob Hinojosa, he’s been with me for 30 years, and he is just good.”

According to Devine, this project demonstrates CAW’s ability to execute difficult projects. “We find the best way to do it,” Devine says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Coatings Application & Waterproofing Co., Saint Louis, Missouri, www.cawco.com   

MATERIALS

PVC Roof System: Sarnafil Decor Roof System, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil/

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, https://buildgp.com

Premium Coverboard For FM Global’s Very Severe Hail Standard

Georgia-Pacific launches DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board, the first high-performance gypsum roof coverboard designed to help prepare commercial rooftops to hold tough under the dangers of impact and puncture caused by very severe hail conditions. The product, which is classified for use in approved assemblies meeting FM Global’s Very Severe Hail Standard set in 2019, is available nationwide. 

“DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board is the premium choice in our product portfolio and the latest advancement in roof assembly preservation from Georgia-Pacific,” said Mikael Kuronon, director of product management, roofs, at Georgia-Pacific Building Products. “If your building is in a very severe hail zone or is frequently confronted by the intense moisture of hurricanes, you need a roof board that stands up to attack. This new option is classified for use in approved assemblies meeting the FM Global Standard for withstanding very severe hail, making it a stronger, more durable, premium roof board. DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board is your roof risk mitigator.”

Over the past eight decades, multiple factors have combined to raise the risk of experiencing a severe storm. More people and property are in the path of severe weather than ever before, with an estimated 75 percent of American cities experiencing a hail storm annually. Since 1960, there has been a 400 percent increase in weather-related disaster losses. 

Through the benefits integration of DensDecK Prime with EONIC Technology and innovative product development, the use of DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board helps enable structures to meet the FM Global Very Severe Hail Standard while simultaneously enhancing assembly protection. (See release notes for additional information.) DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board is the market standard for ultimate hail defense, the preeminent choice against impact resistance and increased moisture resistance. 

“The unique combination of the GP legacy, plus the FM Global classification for Very Severe Hail, plus the extensive use applications combine to create a unique, premium, product choice,” continued Kuronon. 

DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board is the perfect solution for structures within the Very Severe Hail zone, located across Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska. New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. 

Proprietary engineering enables DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board to not only prepare a roof to adapt to severe weather events, but to recover from them.

A dedication to advancement by Georgia-Pacific continues to bring new innovations to a product line with a noble history. Since its invention in 1987, DensDeck® Roof Board has set new performance standards for roof assemblies. A dedication to advancement continues to bring new innovations to a product line with a noble history.

DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board builds on this legacy by innovating on impact resistance. DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board joins DensDeck Prime with EONIC Technology as the only gypsum roof board with manufacturing specifications that include five percent total water resistance by weight and one gram surface water absorption performance on both sides of the board. 

For complete information on DensDeck StormX Prime Roof Board, to include technical specifications, https://buildgp.com/densdeck/solutions/densdeck-stormx/

For more information about the company, visit www.buildgp.com

Massive High School Re-Roofing Addresses Urban Heat Island Concerns

Martin-Tomlinson Roofing Company recently re-roofed 195,000 square feet of the Marcus High School campus. Photos: Johns Manville

Marcus High School is one of more than 65 facilities that comprise the Lewisville Independent School District (LISD). Located north of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, the massive127-square-mile district serves more than 53,000 students. Over a decades-long partnership, Johns Manville and Martin-Tomlinson Roofing Company (M-T) have built a great track record with LISD and have completed dozens of roofing projects for the school district together.

On this project, the roof systems were replaced on several attached buildings with a roof area totaling approximately 195,000 square feet. This massive project covered only half of the Marcus High School campus, and there were very few places where M-T had flat surfaces to work on. With the client requiring minimal disruption to students, most of the work was completed over summer break. Then, exceptional care was taken once school was back in session to keep students and faculty apart and safe from the jobsite where M-T’s 10-man crew continued to progress.

The new roof also needed to be highly reflective and compliant with the International Energy Conservation Code, as required in the southern United States. The heat island effect is a concern under the relentless Texas sun.

The New Roof System

After evaluating the roof, Martin-Tomlinson and a third-party roofing consultant determined that some of the existing insulation could be left in place and that the tear off only had to go down to the cover board — not down to the roof deck, a few inches below. Salvaging existing insulation benefited the school financially, and it is better for the environment since fewer materials had to be discarded and replaced. Additionally, not removing those additional inches from the roof saved time, which lowered the installation cost for the school district. Before starting the tear off, specialized equipment was brought in to remove loose gravel to create a clean working surface. Then, the existing four-ply built-up roof was removed.

The two-ply SBS heat-welded modified bitumen roof system from JM features a highly reflective surfacing to help minimize the heat island effect. The new roof is Energy Star certified.

The updated roofing system is a two-ply JM SBS heat-welded modified bitumen roof system with highly reflective surfacing. JM ENRGY 3 polyiso roof insulation and DensDeck cover board were applied with JM RS Urethane Adhesive low-rise foam. The roof was covered with the SBS roofing system, which consisted of one-ply each of JM DynaWeld Base and DynaWeld Cap FR CR G. Heat island concerns are diminished with the cap sheet, and the roof is Energy Star certified.

M-T Vice President Jesse Byrd credits the technical knowledge of his JM sales rep and the outstanding service of his JM support person with the success of this job. “I never needed to call technical support with questions,” he says. “I went right to Joel Lewallen, the most knowledgeable roofing guy I know, and I know lots of them. We never had to stop work waiting on materials. JM technical representative Andy Austin was always available for support and he made sure we could keep working.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Martin-Tomlinson Roofing Company, Dallas, Texas, www.m-troofing.com

MATERIALS

Modified Bitumen Roof System: DynaWeld Base and DynaWeld Cap FR CR G, Johns Manville, www.JM.com

Insulation: ENRGY 3 Polyisocyanurate, Johns Manville,

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design Lives Up to its Name

The Kendeda Building is engineered to produce more energy than it consumes and capture rainwater for collection in an underground cistern for reuse. Photo: Jonathan Hillyer

When the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) decided to design its new building as a “Living Building,” the project team knew they had to be extremely thoughtful in their design choices and building materials selections. The Living Building Challenge is the world’s most ambitious green building program and requires that projects meet 20 rigorous performance requirements throughout the construction process and for a full year after completion. Made possible through a partnership with the Kendeda Fund, the new Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is the first academic and research building in the Southeast to attempt this certification and is designed to use one-third the energy of a comparable building.

With a combination of great insulation, energy-efficient systems, and a rooftop solar array, the 46,800-square-foot Kendeda Building is engineered to actually produce more energy than it consumes. The roof is also designed to capture rainwater for collection into a 50,000-gallon underground cistern where it is filtered for reuse throughout the building, including as drinking water. The building’s roof is also host to a 1,000-square-foot accessible roof deck and a 4,300-square-foot rooftop garden with a honeybee apiary, pollinator garden, and blueberry orchard.

The photovoltaic array is comprised of 913 solar modules covering approximately 15,860 square feet of area, with a total capacity of 330 kW. It forms a floating canopy above the building. The panels will tilt from the horizontal plane by 5 degrees to face south. This slight adjustment increases solar exposure and improves drainage.

Multi-Functional Roof

As you can imagine, a roof with so many functions demands the use of only the most exacting roofing products. The project team chose a 3-inch base layer of non-halogenated polyiso roof insulation to cover nearly the entire roof and approximately 13,000 square feet of thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane. GAF supplied the polyiso insulation and 60-mil EverGuard Extreme TPO roof system for the project, and it was installed by Roof Management Inc., headquartered in Norcross, Georgia.

The solar array forms a floating canopy above the building. The panels tilt to increase solar exposure and improve drainage. Photo: Vertical River

The design team also chose to direct rainwater into capture systems by the judicious use of tapered insulation over the flat material, which created the proper rooftop slope and drainage.

Even without this water catchment system, tapered insulation can be a very beneficial design feature for low-slope roofs. Ponding or standing water can add enormous stress to a building’s roof and lead to premature failure of roofing materials if water stands on the roof surface for more than 48 hours. If unaddressed, frequent ponding of water can lead to serious problems such as structural deflections of the roof deck, the growth of bacteria or unwanted vegetation on the roof, and can ultimately cause water intrusion into the building that can be costly to remediate. That the Kendeda Building roof can use this design to also collect water for reuse is an added bonus.

The Living Building Challenge specifies that materials in Living Buildings should avoid the use of certain chemicals. Polyiso insulation products manufactured with non-halogenated flame retardants satisfy this challenge while offering superior performance.

  • Polyiso insulation offers superior performance qualities, including:
  • High R-value per inch compared to other types of insulation of equivalent thicknesses.
  • High moisture resistance.
  • Improved fire resistance.
  • Lightweight boards for easy handling and installation.
  • Blowing agents with zero ozone depletion potential and negligible global warming potential.

Beneath its carefully designed roof, the building holds classrooms, laboratories, offices, an auditorium, and a student commons. But the educational mission of the building extends beyond these learning spaces. The entire project — from its low-waste construction to its low-consumption energy use — offers unique learning opportunities for designers, builders, and building operators, such as how a building’s design can conserve energy and water while mitigating a region’s humidity and potential droughts.

Salvaged Material

The Living Building Challenge is organized into seven performance areas — one of which addresses the materials used on a project. New building projects are required to include one salvaged material per 500 square meters of gross building area, which worked out to 10 salvaged materials for the Kendeda Building. These included the following:

The building’s roof features a 1,000-square-foot accessible roof deck and a 4,300-square-foot rooftop garden. Photo Credit: Justin Chan Photography

· Slate shingles: The project acquired a number of pallets of gray slate shingles when the aging roof of the Georgia Tech Alumni Association was renovated. These singles were used as tile on the walls and floors of showers and restrooms.

· Nail-laminated floor decks: 500 10-by-6-foot nail-laminated floor decks were created from two-by-fours salvaged from movie sets, including those form the show “24” and movie “Rampage,” with support from the Georgia Works training program.

· Heart pine joists: 140-year-old Tech Tower provided heart pine joists that serve as treads for the Kendeda Building’s monumental staircase.

· Lumber from felled trees: George Tech’s ground crew helped by collecting fallen trees across the campus, which were then turned into lumber used to make counters and benches.

· Granite curbs: Atlanta’s old State Archives Building provided granite that was used for curbs in the landscaping.

· Wood boards: A former church in Atlanta was the source of the wood that can be found on some of the decorative wall as well as the lobby’s ramp.

The Living Building was designed by a collaboration between Lord Aeck Sargent and the Miller Hull Partnership, constructed by Skanska, and funded through a $30 million grant from The Kendeda Fund, one of the leading philanthropic investors in civic and environmental programs in the Atlanta area with a commitment to ecological and social causes.

Certification by the Living Building Challenge 3.1 is anticipated in 2021, and the project is also pursuing the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED certification at the Platinum level.

About the author: Justin Koscher is the president of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), a trade association that serves as the voice of the rigid polyisocyanurate insulation industry and a proactive advocate for safe, cost-effective, sustainable and energy-efficient construction. For more information, visit www.polyiso.org.

TEAM

Architects: Lord Aeck Sargent, Atlanta, Georgia, www.lordaecksargent.com; and The Miller Hull Partnership, Seattle, Washington, www.millerhull.com

General Contractor: Skanska USA, Atlanta, Georgia, www.usa.skanska.com

Roofing Contractor: Roof Management Inc., Norcross, Georgia, www.roofmanagementinc.com

MATERIALS

TPO Membrane: EverGuard Extreme 60-mil TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com

Insulation: EnergyGuard Non-halogenated (NH) Polyiso Roof Insulation Board and EnergyGuard NH Tapered Polyiso Roof Insulation, GAF

Vapor Retarder: GAF SA Vapor Retarder, GAF

Insulation Adhesive: OlyBond500 Insulation Adhesive, OMG Roofing Products, www.OMGroofing.com

Cover Board: 1/2-inch DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Solar Panels: X-Series X22-360-COM, SunPower, https://us.sunpower.com

Outfitter’s New Roof Is Designed to Look Great, Withstand the Elements

When the owners of the Bass Pro location in Pearl, Mississippi, looked for a new roof, they initially considered the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, but the existing fascia boards inspired them to choose Colonial Red from Petersen’s palette of stock colors. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Bass Pro Shops brands itself as a supplier of performance products designed to endure the great outdoors, but at its Pearl, Mississippi, store, the roof was falling short of that standard. The roof’s mix of membrane and metal roof systems was damaged during a severe weather event, which prompted a re-roofing initiative.

“They had a hailstorm come through and they wanted to upgrade,” says Roman Malone, president of the installing firm, E. Cornell Malone Corp., based in nearby Jackson, Mississippi. In addition to installing a new membrane roof, the project including replacing the existing bare Galvalume steel panels with 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red. The panels form the highly visible sloped portions of the roof, along with a canopy overhang over the building’s storefront walkway and entrance.

After the metal roof system was installed, crews completed Firestone TPO roof on the low-slope section.

The 100,000-square-foot store was a founding anchor retailer in the 150-acre-plus Bloomfield Development. It shares the title with Trustmark Park, home of the Atlanta Braves’ minor-league baseball team, the Mississippi Braves. People visit the retailer for more than just shopping — the facility includes a large aquarium, shooting gallery and 3-D archery range along with a bar and restaurant. Since its 2005 opening, the surrounding development has grown to include The Outlets of Mississippi, the state’s largest outlet center, which welcomes almost 4.5 million visitors every year.

The metal portion of the re-roofing effort included removing the existing panels along with the ice and water shield below, while the existing plywood decking and insulation remained in good shape. For the roofing pros from E. Cornell Malone, the heavily trafficked surroundings proved a greater challenge than the roof itself. “We had to keep the front door open,” Malone recalls. “The flagpole and the tallest part of the standing seam roof are right over the main entrance. There was a period of time when we had to work there, and we had to use the exit door as an entrance and block off that area for safety reasons. We had to move as fast as we could to minimize the disruption. We also had to use cranes to get the material up to the roof and the demolished material off the roof.”

Eye-Catching Color

While the profile of the standing-seam roof remained similar to its original appearance, the Colonial Red finish certainly creates a major pop for the building. Malone says store managers initially were considering the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, when they happened upon Colonial Red in Petersen’s palette of stock colors. “The fascia boards just happened to be the same color as the roof — so, when they saw the Colonial Red, it was an obvious color choice for them,” Malone says. “We didn’t paint that fascia, and it just matched perfectly. I believe this is the first Bass Pro Shop in the country to use this color on their roof. It looks really good.”

E. Cornell Malone Corp. installed approximately 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels on the project.

Crews installed the metal roof system first, and then completed the installation of the single-ply roof on the low-slope section. “We had to use the flat roof as a work platform to reach the high part of the metal roof. We protected what was there, and then came back and put the TPO roof on. That way, we wouldn’t damage it during the installation of the metal roof.”

Crews mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil TPO system over 1/4-inch DensDeck cover board. “The TPO portion of the project was pretty straightforward,” Malone says. “The highlight of this project is really the metal roof. You can’t see the TPO roof from the ground, but it complemented everything else, brought everything under warranty and got them up to date.”

An interesting detail on the project involved the large flagpole on the metal roof over the entrance. The safety system incorporates shock absorbing anchors, S-5! clamps, and a 100 feet of stainless steel line with hands-fee Unigrab Travelers and dedicated lanyards. “We worked with a safety company, Rooftop Anchor, to engineer a safety system so people could manage the flag and be safe,” Malone says. “Before that, the owners used to hire us to come out and raise and lower their flag. Now that they have a safety system in place, they can manage the flag themselves.”

Feedback on the new roof has been very positive, notes Malone. “The customers are ecstatic about the roof. It has totally transformed the building — it’s definitely an upgrade.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: E. Cornell Malone Corp., Jackson, Mississippi, www.ecmalone.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Low-Slope Roof: 60-mil TPO, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Flagpole Safety System: Rooftop Anchor, Heber City, Utah, www.rooftopanchor.com

Standing Seam Clamps: S-5!, www.s-5.com

The Calcaire House Meets Strict Energy Codes — and Does it in Style

The residential compound is made up of five interconnected buildings and features both gabled standing seam metal roofs and low-slope TPO roofs. Photos: S-5!

The Calcaire House is a 15,000-square-foot modern Colorado single-family residential compound consisting of five interconnected buildings. Floor-to-ceiling glass connects the interior space to the exterior landscape, offering spectacular views of the Boulder Flatirons. A combination of exposed timber, stone and steel structural design elements, and exposed custom roof trusses complement the gabled standing seam metal roof.

Boulder Roofing Company and The Solar Revolution were charged with installing a metal roof and solar array with more than 60 kilowatts of solar dispersed over multiple rooftops. Boulder Roofing installed both standing seam metal and TPO roof systems on the project. Crews installed approximately 12,000 square feet of 14-inch, 24-gauge panels from Drexel Metals in traditional black over Titanium PSU30 high-temp peel and stick underlayment.

They also installed 3,000 square feet of 60-mil Versico TPO over low-slope areas. The TPO was adhered to quarter-inch DensDeck Prime over tapered EPS insulation. Boulder Roofing fabricated and installed custom flashings and coping, and also installed an S-5! snow-guard system incorporating the S-5! ColorGard bars, S-5-S Mini clamps, SnoClip IIs, and VersaClips.

The Energy Challenge

The city of Boulder has strict energy codes in place and requires all new construction to meet a certain level of efficiency. The requirements are based on the square footage of the home and are more stringent on larger homes — the larger the home, the more efficient it needs to be. The goal is to have a net-zero home, not taking energy from the grid, and the only way for a larger home to achieve this is with solar. A modest home or small addition might only require about 2 kilowatts. A large home might require 20-30 kilowatts.

The most optimal rooftops for solar were also the most visually prominent, and the homeowner was concerned about aesthetics. These concerns were alleviated after seeing a small-scale mock-up of the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution combined with an all-black solar module.

In addition, the area is considered a high-wind area and would require a study to account for windspeeds, as the solar installers could only rely on the roof itself and its attachment to the wood sheeting when attaching solar panels using S-5!’s zero-penetration system.

Another difficulty was finding a viable path to route the energy created by the solar panels back to the point of connection with the home’s distribution. The Solar Revolution worked with the builder and the architect, and analyzed photos and design plans to find ways to conceal the conduits. They ultimately found a viable path that was aesthetically pleasing, code compliant and cost-effective.

The Solution

The Solar Revolution installers utilized S-5!’s PVKIT 2.0 to build the solar array. The installation team started at ground level prepping S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs and EdgeGrabs. Another team member prepared the solar modules by installing the power optimizers and managing the various wires. By completing this work on the ground, the roof crew could focus on setting modules, and it minimized their time in harnesses on a steep metal roof. The solar installers prefer to install modules starting with the bottom row and working up. Extra care is taken when aligning the first row. This precision allows for subsequent rows to drop into place on the S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs.

The Solar Revolution installed a solar array that provides more than 60 kilowatts of power.

“The Solar Revolution has been utilizing the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution since it first hit the market,” says Doug Claxton, CEO of The Solar Revolution. “Hands down, it is the best solar mounting solution for metal roofing of any description. At first, we were a little worried about wire management and installing in landscape, but those worries were overcome with our first installation. It’s a piece of cake.”

Long-Term Outlook

With the S-5! PVKIT 2.0, the Calcaire House was able to meet the city code requirements for solar and establish itself as an energy-efficient, net-zero home. Because the PVKIT comes in black, it matched the roof nicely, pulling together all of the design elements in an aesthetically pleasing, cost-effective manner — saving the customer time and money on installation and materials.

TEAM

Architect: Surround Architecture, Boulder, Colorado, www.surroundarchitecture.com

General Contractor: Harrington Stanko Construction, Niwot, Colorado, www.harringtonstanko.com

Engineer: Anthem Structural Engineers, Boulder, Colorado, www.anthemstructural.com

Roofing Contractor: Boulder Roofing Company, Boulder, Colorado, www.boulderroof.com

Solar Installer: The Solar Revolution, Boulder, Colorado, www.thesolarrevolution.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 175SS 14-inch, 24 gauge panels, Drexel Metals, www.drexmet.com

Underlayment: Titanium PSU30, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

TPO Roof: 60-mil Grey TPO, Versico, www.versico.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Solar Attachment: S-5! PVKIT 2.0 in black with S-5-S Mini Clamps, www.S-5.com

Snow Guards: S-5! ColorGard, S-5-S Mini Clamps, SnowClipIIs and VersaClips

Roof System Protects Health Care Facility in Northern Saskatchewan

The roof system specified for the William Charles Health Centre was a two-ply modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by IKO. Photos: IKO

When the $11.5 million William Charles Health Centre was built north of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, durability and longevity were key considerations in the design and construction. The facility provides a variety of health care programs to meet the needs of the Montreal Lake Cree Nation.

The roof and walls were designed to last, even in tough weather conditions. The roof system specified was a two-ply modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by IKO. IKO’s Aquabarrier AVB was selected as an exterior peel-and-stick air and vapor barrier to support the facility’s exterior insulated wall system.

Oakwood Roofing& Sheet Metal Co., headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba, installed both the roof and wall systems. Founded in 1977, Oakwood Roofing is a full-service roofing and sheet metal contractor handling all types of commercial and residential projects including new construction, roof replacement, service and maintenance. The company also has a Building Division.

“We do all types of roofing and repairs,” notes Brett Laing, an estimator and project manager with Oakwood Roofing. “We do infrared scans, roof reports and assessments, budget pricing for new and re-roof projects, as well as metal cladding and composite panels. We also provide custom roof maintenance programs for companies, property owners and property managers.”

The company was invited to bid on the William Charles Health Centre installation by NDL, the construction manager on the project, and emerged as the low bidder. The roof on the new construction project was approximately 18,500 square feet. On either side of a slight peak, the metal deck slopes to the exterior, where gutters were installed for drainage. The slope on one side of the roof was 13.9 percent, and on the other it was 21.8 percent.

“The roofing wasn’t too difficult,” says Laing. “It’s a conventional two-ply mod bit system, but some of the components are not used that frequently. We use Z-girts to hold the insulation in place in high-wind applications.”

The first step was mechanically fastening 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime to the steel decking. Then a vapor barrier was torch-applied to the cover board. Two 4-inch layers of IKOTherm insulation were installed using Z-girts. Oakwood Roofing fabricated the Z-girts in the company’s sheet metal shop and installed them spaced 24 inches on center. The two layers of insulation and Z-girts were installed perpendicular to each other.

The insulation layers were topped with a layer of half-inch DensDeck Prime. “We used torch tape on all the laps, and ultimately torched the TP 180 FF base sheet from IKO over the top, and then torched the cap sheet to that.”

Oakwood Roofing also installed the wall systems. “We also installed the vapor barrier and longboard siding on this project,” says Laing. “It was a pretty good project for us.”

The remote location posed some difficulties, as crews stayed near the site. Weather is always a concern, and it can be even more problematic when crews are working remotely, but there were no delays on the project. The weather was mild and coordination of trades at the jobsite was excellent, according to Laing.

“NDL was the construction manager on the project, and they are very well organized with their scheduling,” he notes. “It was nice to work with such a professional team, and there were no issues. Everything went smoothly.”

The roof system was specified for its durability and ability to withstand severe weather conditions. “IKO put their name behind it and warranted the roofing system for 15 years,” Laing says. “They came out and made sure it was installed by us to their requirements. The project qualified for a no dollar limit warranty for 15 years, so that says it all right there about how durable the system is.”

Safety First

The fall protection plan incorporated warning lines at the perimeter and personal fall arrest equipment. “Everyone was tied off at all times on the roof,” Laing says.

For torch-down applications, the company’s policy it to institute a two-hour fire watch every time a torch is turned off. “We basically go around and test areas with a thermal gun,” Laing says. “Obviously, if temperatures are dropping, then we are headed in the right direction. We want to ensure that no hot spots are getting hotter, there is no fire risk, and that everyone is safe.”

Oakwood Roofing bears a Certificate of Recognition (COR), a nationally trademarked and endorsed program instituted by participating members of the Canadian Federation of Construction Safety Associations (CFCSA). “We are COR certified at Oakwood Roofing, so we hold our degree of standing to the highest for everyone involved — the workers, the owners of the building, the other trades,” Laing says. “Safety is at the very top of our list when we get into a project.”

For Oakwood Roofing’s experienced crews, this project was just another day at the office — even if the jobsite was 11 hours from home. “We’ve done a lot of work in the Prairie Provinces, in Ontario and into the Northwest Territories,” says Laing. “We are a special company. We wouldn’t have survived for 44 years if we weren’t. We’ve developed special skills and methods to overcome any obstacles that come our way, including extreme weather.”

TEAM

Architect: Patrick R. Stewart Architect, Chilliwack, British Columbia

General Contractor: NDL Construction Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba, www.ndlconstruction.com

Roofing Contractor: Oakwood Roofing& Sheet Metal Co., Winnipeg, Manitoba, www.oakwoodroofing.com

MATERIALS

Cap Sheet: Torchflex TP-250-CAP Heat Welded Cap Sheet, IKO, www.iko.com 

Base Sheet: Torchflex TP-180-FF-Base Heath Welded Base Sheet, IKO

Insulation: IKOTherm Commercial Roof Insulation, IKO

Wall Vapor Barrier: IKO AquaBarrier AVB Vapour Barrier, IKO

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab Features a Striking Standing Seam Metal Roof

The roof of Shirley Ryan AbilityLab incorporates striking V-shaped sections of standing seam metal panels and a tapered EPDM system. Photos: AJBROWNIMAGING.COM

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab provides rehabilitation services to help patients recovering from severe conditions including traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, strokes, and cancer. The organization’s new 25,000-square-foot outpatient facility in Burr Ridge, Illinois, features a unique, uplifting roof design incorporating angled, V-shaped sections of standing seam metal roofing.

The low points in the center of each section and other low-slope areas are covered with an EPDM roof system. At the building’s perimeter, the roof and walls frame clerestory windows that allow natural light to flood the interior.

It took a talented team of construction professionals to execute the design conceived by architects in HDR Inc.’s Chicago branch. Willie Hedrick, Division Manager of All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, notes that he and his team worked closely with the architect and the general contractor, Krusinski Construction of Oak Brook, Illinois, at each phase of the roof installation process.

“Initially the architect had specified a very nice but very expensive Terne-coated stainless steel panel,” notes Hedrick. “The project had budget issues, so we offered the Petersen prefinished steel panel as a value engineering option. The mechanically seamed Tite-Loc panel could handle the low-slope application and also came in a variety of colors. We also offered a 20-year watertight and finish warranty. For approval, we built a mockup for the architect and owner to review and also provided several references for completed projects around the Chicagoland area that they could visit to see finished examples of the proposed panel and color.”

Three different sections of the facility sport the Petersen’s V-shaped PAC-CLAD metal roof, with the wedges on each side sloping down to a valley in the center. Within the valley, the Carlisle SynTec EPDM roof system was installed over tapered insulation to ensure water would flow properly to the roof drains.

“The EPDM was an appropriate selection on the balance of the roof,” Hedrick says. “The workability of EPDM with tight, intricate details worked well throughout the project but especially within the gutter troughs between metal panel wedges.”

After the building’s metal deck was topped with half-inch DensDeck Prime and a self-adhered vapor barrier, crews from All American Exterior Solutions installed tapered polyisocyanurate insulation and 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime cover board. They then fully adhered 8,600 square feet of 60-mil EPDM.

All American then installed 21,500 square feet of 24-gauge steel PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc standing seam panels. The metal panels were installed over Carlisle WIP 300 HT underlayment, which topped 5/8-inch fire-rated plywood and 7 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation. Finishing touches included 3,800 square feet of Petersen .032 aluminum PAC 750 soffit panels and PAC 2000 prefinished Kynar column covers.

Installation Challenges

The weather was a concern, as the roof installation began in November and typical Midwest winter weather was looming. “The metal roof would be a time-consuming installation, so initially we focused on getting the building watertight for the GC by installing the EPDM roof and the metal roof underlayment, including insulation and plywood,” Hedrick explains. “The WIP 300HT allows for a 180-day exposure time to UV, so it gave us ample time to install the metal roof while ensuring watertightness in the space being finished below.”

Communication between all of the trades involved on the project helped ensure everything went smoothly. “There were trade coordination meetings with both the carpenter and the plumber,” Hedrick explains. “With the carpenter, we had to coordinate blocking heights to accommodate the tapered insulation. Also, due to the limited height to work within the gutter troughs and because the deck came down to a true V in the valley, we did an in-place mockup with the plumber to see how low the drain bowl could physically be set. Based on that elevation, we ordered custom EPS tapered edge panels to offset the V shape and provide a flat base to begin our tapered insulation system.”

Other details needed to be refined, including roof-to-wall transitions. “We worked with the GC and other trades to modify the detail for superior performance,” notes Hedrick.

Safety was always top of mind on the project. “Fall protection was the biggest safety concern,” Hedrick says. “We set up warning lines 6 feet from the edge creating a controlled access zone. Any work outside of the warning lines required workers to have 100 percent fall protection. All of the fascia and rake trim pieces were installed from an aerial lift.”

The installation was a complicated one, but All-American Exterior Solutions was up to the challenge. “We take pride in our ability to offer a range of products with a quality installation,” Hedrick says. “Our experience with multiple systems and manufacturers gives us the knowledge to be able to advise the design team on an appropriate product based on performance expectations balanced with budget.”

“Personally, I enjoyed the complexity and challenge that came with this project,” Hedrick concludes. “By no means is it a typical application; it required some critical and ‘outside the box’ thinking. I also enjoyed the collaborative nature a project like this requires. It was really a team approach between All American Exterior Solutions, the architects, the general contractor, and the other trades. The final product really shows that.”

TEAM

Architect: HDR Inc., Chicago, Illinois, www.hdrinc.com

General Contractor: Krusinski Construction Company, Oak Brook, Illinois, www.krusinski.com

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

EPDM Roof: 60-mil EPDM, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Underlayment: CCW WIP 300, Carlisle WIP Products, www.carlislewipproducts.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Planning Ahead Sets Up Warehouse Re-Roofing Project for Success

Citizens Service Center is the primary document storage facility for El Paso County, Colorado. When the roof had to be replaced, protecting the interior of the facility was critical. Photos: Exterior Solutions Group

The most crucial decisions on a project are often made before work even begins. According to Ken Flickinger Jr., president of Exterior Solutions Group, that was the case with the recent Citizens Service Center re-roofing project in Colorado Springs. Owned and managed by El Paso County, the building is the primary document storage facility for the county. The building’s historic documents — some dating back to the 1800s — were under threat of damage due to an active roof leak. The existing roof also had extensive hail damage, so the roof replacement project was put out for bid.

With offices in Colorado, Iowa and Oklahoma, Exterior Solutions Group does all types of roofing work, but its focus is primarily on commercial roofing, both re-roofing and new construction. Flickinger, who heads up the location in Parker, Colorado, was definitely intrigued by the project.

The scope of work involved removing old HVAC equipment on the roof, which would be done by a separate party in coordination with the roofing contractor. The HVAC equipment was obsolete; it had been replaced and relocated a few years earlier. “It was an interesting project because there was equipment everywhere on this roof,” he says. “It looked like an automotive manufacturing plant. For us, we like those types of projects. We like ones that are a bit out of the ordinary and require a little bit higher level of project management. So, that’s what drew us to bidding the job.”

Tim Hicks, the salesperson at Exterior Solutions who sold the job, explains that the original spec called for white EPDM, with TPO as an accepted alternate. “Oddly enough, they didn’t require you to do the base bid to bid the alternate,” he notes. “We chose to just bid the TPO. We ended up being the low bidder on that, and that’s how we got the project.”

After obsolete HVAC equipment was removed, crews from Exterior Solutions Group installed a TPO system from Johns Manville.

The logistics of the removal and roof replacement would be complicated, and it became obvious that access to the roof would also be an issue, as it was a high-security building. “This is a multi-story building, and the amount of security we would have to go through to enter the building and get up to the roof hatch would’ve created all kinds of problems,” Hicks explains. “So, we suggested putting a stair tower up and giving us complete access from the outside. We’d never have to enter the building. They had never even considered that option, but as we walked them through it and said, ‘This is how we’d like to set the job up,’ they replied, ‘We love it.’”

The next step involved coordinating equipment removal with the HVAC contractor. Again, a suggestion from Exterior Solutions helped increase efficiency and cut costs. The HVAC contractor’s original plan called for roofing crews to take out the roof system around the HVAC units, allowing HVAC crews to cut out sections of the steel decking below the equipment. The deck sections would have to be replaced before temporary roofs could be installed to keep the building watertight. The team at Exterior Solutions pointed out that there was no need to remove the decking. Instead, the equipment supports could be cut off as close to the deck as possible, and the ends of the supports could be buried in the insulation of the new roof system.

Equipment Removal

In the end, that’s the plan they executed. A fire watch was set up inside the building as equipment was removed. Crews from Exterior Solutions removed the existing roof to give the HVAC crews access. “We basically created a hole in the roof for them so they could see what they were doing,” Hicks explains. “We would slice the existing TPO back and take out the insulation. They would put down welding blankets in the area and then use cutting torches to cut the I-beam and L-beam steel supports off. Our roofers were on site to make sure supports were cut down to the proper length. As soon as the supports were cut off, we basically filled the hole.”

The deck was left intact, making it much faster and easier to patch the existing roof. It was critical to ensure the roof was weathertight every night to protect the documents inside the building. “We put the insulation back, we replaced the membrane, and we used an Eternabond product or welded a small cover strip around it, depending on the size of the hole,” notes Hicks.

The HVAC equipment was taken off the roof with a crane. Once the equipment was removed from one side of the roof, crews began installing the new system.

Roof Installation

With the equipment gone, the rest was clear sailing. “In all honesty, the roof was easy,” Flickinger says.

The existing roof system was torn off down to the deck and a TPO system from Johns Manville was installed. New polyiso insulation was topped with a fully tapered system to ensure proper drainage. After DensDeck cover board was installed, the 60-mil TPO membrane was adhered into place.

“We worked from one side to the other,” Hicks says. “The high point of the roof with the tapered system was in the center, and water is pushed to both sides where there are internal drains and overflow scuppers. We started at the low point and roofed up the hill to the center on one side, and then turned around and did the exact same thing on the other side.”

Details were minimal — just a few penetrations and a curb around the roof hatch. The edge metal installed was the Anchor-Tite system manufactured by Metal-Era. “We offered an upgrade on the metal edge,” notes Hicks. “Instead of a shop-fabricated metal edge, we recommended Anchor-Tite all the way around. After all, the area is subject to high winds. We felt that was a better way to go.”

The TPO system installed was ideal for the project, according to Flickinger. “I’ve been a thermoplastic guy my entire career,” he says. “I’m a big believer in heat-welded seams. We thought the heat-welded seams and adhered walls offered a better approach. We think it’s a very good-looking roof, and with the addition of a cover board — which the original roof didn’t have — it would definitely improve its hail performance.”

Hicks credits the manufacturer for assistance on the project. “Manville was very supportive,” he says. “They were local, and their technical support is excellent. We thought that for a project like this, to have a partner who was right there with you was important.”

The project was completed in less than a month, and Flickinger believes the key to executing the job efficiently was the decision to set up the stair tower. “That was the suggestion of our project manager,” says Flickinger. “Our company likes using stair towers, especially when we’re talking about long ladder runs. For us, it’s partly about safety for our own people, but because the building was secured, and as they talked to us about the steps we would have to take on a daily basis to just get access to the roof, we realized it was just going to kill us on production. We were going to waste so may man-hours on a weekly basis just getting to and from the roof. That was one of the driving factors that got the owner to agree to the stair tower, and we got a change order for it.”

The cost of the change order was minimal compared to the time and money it saved. “We have some really bright people,” says Flickinger. “They are all really good at looking at something and seeing if there is a better way. One of our strengths is we are really good at creative solutions, whether it’s something as simple as avoiding the grief of going through a secured building or taking a step back and asking, ‘Why cut holes in the deck? Why can’t we just cut these supports off above the deck because we are burying them in 6 inches of insulation anyway?’”

“The other piece for us is that we focus on the safety side of it, not only for our own people, but also the site safety and the safety of the people inside the building,” Flickinger continues. “We are very aware of that as we set our jobs up and decide where to set our materials and those types of things.”

The last component of a successful project is top-quality workmanship. “We focus on doing it right the first time,” Flickinger says. “Getting that customer satisfaction, not only at the end of the job with a great roof, but also during the project by trying to minimize the pain that an owner typically goes through in a roofing project, that’s one of our strengths that this project demonstrates.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Exterior Solutions Group, Parker, Colorado, www.exteriorsolutionsgroup.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: 60-mil TPO, Johns Manville, www.jm.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Edge Metal: Anchor-Tite, Metal-Era, www.metalera.com