Research Proves Radiant Barrier Market Is Growing

Persistence Market Research (PMR), a third-party research firm based in New York City, has shared its research on the radiant barrier market. PMR hosts a research model with collaboration of data analytics and market research methodology to help businesses achieve optimal performance.

In addition to a brief overview of how radiant barriers work, what materials are used and their various applications, the report also states, “The global radiant barrier market is anticipated to be driven by many factors, out of which the main factor being global warming. The product is finding acceptance as people use radiant barriers in their homes and buildings so that the heat is prevented from coming inside, making the place comparatively cooler. Radiant barriers are most effective in blocking summer radiant heat gain thus, saving air-cooling costs of the desired space. Also, use of radiant barrier has been helpful for the builders in getting accreditation for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), which is a mandatory norm for design of buildings – in both residential and commercial segments, thus resulting in increase of demand of the product.”

For more information on this report you can contact PMR directly at (800)961-0353. For more information on reflective insulation, radiant barriers and interior radiation control coatings (IRCCs), visit the RIMA International website or contact them directly at rima@rima.net.

NCFI Polyurethanes’ Spray Foam Products Use Honeywell’s Low Global-Warming Material

Honeywell has announced that NCFI Polyurethanes has transitioned to Honeywell’s low-global-warming material for roofing applications, with wall insulation systems to follow.

NCFI is offering closed-cell polyurethane spray foam formulated with Honeywell’s Solstice Liquid Blowing Agent (LBA) in roofing products. This offering marks another milestone as NCFI transitions its engineered building products line from hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents with high global-warming-potential (GWP) to low-GWP products. This includes converting much of its polyurethane product line to Solstice LBA encompassing integral skin and other applications in advance of environmental regulations calling for a phaseout of HFCs.

Solstice LBA, which is based on low GWP hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology, is an ingredient in closed-cell foam, allowing it to expand and enabling insulating performance. Solstice LBA has a low GWP of 1, which is 99.9 percent lower than HFCs and equal to carbon dioxide.

“A part of our low-GWP commitment is to introduce HFC-free spray foam products that meet our performance standards,” states Chip Holton, president, NCFI Polyurethanes. “Not only is our internal plan for conversions to a SmartSPF line ahead of the deadlines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we also believe these spray foam products give us a competitive advantage.”

The adoption of Solstice LBA is part of how NCFI is fulfilling its commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that was first publicized during a 20-company roundtable discussion held by President Obama at the White House last October. At that event, NCFI was honored for plans to transition from HFCs to low-GWP products. Honeywell was also recognized at the event during which it presented projections on the opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the adoption of the Solstice product suite. Worldwide adoption of Solstice products has resulted in the reduction of more than 31 million metric tons of greenhouse gases, equal to eliminating emissions from more than 6 million cars. 

“NCFI continues to make progress with the adoption of Solstice LBA,” says Laura Reinhard, global business manager for spray foam, Honeywell. “Not only is NCFI demonstrating environmental leadership by offering spray foam products with reduced climate impact, it is also seeing performance improvements.”

Compared to NCFI’s HFC-based insulation systems, the new systems featuring Solstice LBA deliver improvements in sprayability, consistency, and surface finish. The foam is strong and allows for walking on the roof to maintain equipment with less risk of damaging the foam.

Solstice LBA is nonflammable (ASTM E-681) and is not a volatile organic compound under applicable EPA air quality regulations. Solstice LBA is listed as an acceptable substitute for HFC blowing agents under the EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program. Similarly, in Europe, Solstice LBA is regarded as non-global-warming and is not considered an F-Gas under the F-Gas regulations. It is registered under the European Union’s REACH program. Honeywell’s Solstice LBA manufacturing plant in Louisiana started up in May 2014.

Lapolla Industries Inc. Supports Amendment to 1989 Montreal Protocol

Lapolla Industries Inc. has announced the company’s support of an amendment to the 1989 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. Joining forces with more than 500 national and international companies and organizations, as well as hundreds of sub-national governments, the company is calling for world leaders to pass the Montreal Protocol hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) phasedown amendment, which will be voted on in October during a meeting in Kigali, Rwanda, amongst signatories to the original Montreal Protocol.
 
“Getting this amendment passed lies in its ability to help deliver on the goals set forth by the December 2015 Paris Agreement,” said Doug Kramer, president and CEO of Lapolla Industries. “In essence, the amendment will allow us to further reduce the use of HFCs and, in doing so, avoid up to 0.5C of global climate warming by the end of the century. The importance of this to the health of the global environment, economy and our nation cannot be overstated.”
 
If world leaders adopt the amendment, it will enact a first reduction step in HFC use for Article 2 countries and a freeze date for Article 5 countries. The amendment represents global action toward reducing the use and emissions of global-warming potential HFCs as well as a transition over time to more sustainable alternatives that enhance energy efficiency.
 
Lapolla Industries is a Houston-based manufacturer and global supplier of building products including spray polyurethane foam for insulation and roofing applications, reflective roof coatings and equipment. In 2014, Lapolla Industries eliminated ozone depletion potential (ODP) and reduced global warming potential (GWP) in its product line. The company accomplished these initiatives through re-engineering of its product chemistry. 
 
Development of Lapolla’s product line innovation commenced approximately four years ago. CEO Doug Kramer was subsequently invited to participate in the President’s Climate Action Plan roundtable at the White House alongside the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and some of the nation’s recognized business leaders.
 
“Lapolla’s foremost commitment across all of its products is to maximize energy conservation in the building environment,” added Kramer. “We pushed to deliver a spray foam line that protected the ozone and the climate as well. This effort has fared well for both the environment and for our business.”
 
The innovation in Lapolla Industries’ fourth generation spray polyurethane foam product line produces additional product yield, resulting in lower installation cost and increased ROI and savings to the consumer. 
 
Lapolla’s fourth generation spray polyurethane foam products include: FOAM-LOKä 2000-4G Spray Foam Insulation, FOAM-LOKä, and FOAM-LOKä 2800-4G Spray Foam for Roofing and all other closed cell spray foam systems. While applications for each vary, all provide performance in energy efficiency by reducing the energy consumption of a home or commercial building up to 45 percent.
 
“Not only are we protecting the ozone and climate, but our next generation spray foam line also reduces fossil fuel use for heating and cooling,” said Kramer.
 

MBMA Releases EPDs for Primary Rigid Framing, Secondary Framing and Metal Cladding

In order to meet the increasing demand for unbiased data about the environmental impacts of commercial construction, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for three metal building product categories: primary rigid framing, secondary framing, and metal cladding for roofs and walls.

MBMA partnered with UL Environment (ULE) to develop and certify these EPDs, which summarize the cradle-to-gate environmental impacts of a metal building system. The cradle-to-gate method is used to describe the impact of producing products, from raw material extraction, through processing, fabrication and up to the finished product leaving the manufacturing facility.

EPDs provide specifiers, builders and other industry professionals with transparent third-party documentation of the environmental impacts of products, including global warming potential, ozone depletion, acidification and other factors. The LEED V4 green building rating system encourages the use of EPDs, which are important for earning credits in the program.

MBMA has been studying the sustainable attributes of metal buildings for several years, starting with the collection of the industry’s LCI data, and using it to perform whole-building LCA analysis to compare its products to other forms of construction. Through these studies, MBMA has shown that the structural efficiency of metal building systems is a key contributor to their sustainable performance when compared to conventional construction.

“There is a growing need to simplify and harmonize the decision-making processes for architects and specifiers that must choose building materials for construction,” says Dan Walker, associate general manager of MBMA. “MBMA members are dedicated to educating others about the sustainable performance of metal building systems, and these EPDs will effectively do that for the design community.”

Metal building systems are custom-engineered and fabricated in accordance with strict quality assurance standards, and with almost no scrap generated. Designers are beginning to realize that the structural efficiency of this approach brings tangible benefits, from a sustainability and cost-savings perspective. The completion of these EPDs gives designers the confidence that they are making a wise choice from financial and environmental aspects.

MBMA’s EPDs can now be found on the UL Environment website.