MBMA Releases EPDs for Primary Rigid Framing, Secondary Framing and Metal Cladding

In order to meet the increasing demand for unbiased data about the environmental impacts of commercial construction, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for three metal building product categories: primary rigid framing, secondary framing, and metal cladding for roofs and walls.

MBMA partnered with UL Environment (ULE) to develop and certify these EPDs, which summarize the cradle-to-gate environmental impacts of a metal building system. The cradle-to-gate method is used to describe the impact of producing products, from raw material extraction, through processing, fabrication and up to the finished product leaving the manufacturing facility.

EPDs provide specifiers, builders and other industry professionals with transparent third-party documentation of the environmental impacts of products, including global warming potential, ozone depletion, acidification and other factors. The LEED V4 green building rating system encourages the use of EPDs, which are important for earning credits in the program.

MBMA has been studying the sustainable attributes of metal buildings for several years, starting with the collection of the industry’s LCI data, and using it to perform whole-building LCA analysis to compare its products to other forms of construction. Through these studies, MBMA has shown that the structural efficiency of metal building systems is a key contributor to their sustainable performance when compared to conventional construction.

“There is a growing need to simplify and harmonize the decision-making processes for architects and specifiers that must choose building materials for construction,” says Dan Walker, associate general manager of MBMA. “MBMA members are dedicated to educating others about the sustainable performance of metal building systems, and these EPDs will effectively do that for the design community.”

Metal building systems are custom-engineered and fabricated in accordance with strict quality assurance standards, and with almost no scrap generated. Designers are beginning to realize that the structural efficiency of this approach brings tangible benefits, from a sustainability and cost-savings perspective. The completion of these EPDs gives designers the confidence that they are making a wise choice from financial and environmental aspects.

MBMA’s EPDs can now be found on the UL Environment website.

MiaSolé Solar Modules Are IEC and UL Certified and Class A Fire Rated

MiaSolé's CIGS-based, thin-film FLEX-02 solar modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730, UL 1703 certified and UL 790 Class A fire rated.

MiaSolé’s CIGS-based, thin-film FLEX-02 solar modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730, UL 1703 certified and UL 790 Class A fire rated.

MiaSolé announces that its CIGS-based, thin-film FLEX-02 solar modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730, UL 1703 certified and UL 790 Class A fire rated. The MiaSolé FLEX module is a high-efficiency flexible, lightweight thin-film solar module, with production efficiencies of 16 percent. The FLEX module provides high power density for many types of applications—from roofing to reservoir and landfill covers, to auto, truck and other transportation applications through off-grid and consumer applications. The FLEX modules are produced in high volume at MiaSolé’s Heyuan, China, factory, which has passed UL, IEC and ISO9001 qualifications.

FLEX-02 modules provide customers significant benefits. The low weight of the module (less than 0.7 pound per square foot) allows installation on roofs and other structures that cannot support the weight of traditional glass solar panels. Because the FLEX-02 modules adhere directly to the surface of the structure or object, there are no penetrations or damage. The FLEX-02 is also aesthetically pleasing, blending into roofs, vehicles and other structures and preserving the original look without unsightly racking. The low-profile FLEX-02 module provides wind resistance and a seismic advantage over traditional rack-and-panel systems where their higher profile increases the likelihood of damage in a hurricane or earthquake.

Ygrene Energy Fund and Solar Roof Dynamics Offer Affordable Financing Options for Rooftop Solar

Ygrene Energy Fund Inc., a multi-state provider of residential and commercial PACE financing, announced a strategic partnership with Solar Roof Dynamics LLC, a premier distributor of best-in-class solar solutions for California’s roofing industry. Leveraging Ygrene’s unique PACE financing model, YgreneWorks, Solar Roof Dynamics can now offer consumers through its broad base of commercial and residential partners the ability to pay for their rooftop solar upgrades over time through property taxes.

Via Solar Roof Dynamics’ roster of expertly trained solar contractors, YgreneWorks is now making California’s cleanest, least expensive and most abundant renewable resource—solar—affordable for an even greater percentage of California’s businesses and homeowners, creating the potential for unprecedented growth. This is an exciting addition to Solar Roof Dynamics’ already innovative, value-added business model. Solar Roof Dynamics is transforming the solar industry by working directly through its network of authorized roofing contractors with extensive experience in installing roofing and solar systems. This network of contractors gives consumers the opportunity to install solar panels at the same time that they are replacing their existing roof.

“We have a long history of introducing quality solar products and services to local roofing contractors,” says Aaron Nitzkin, CEO of Solar Roof Dynamics. “With YgreneWorks, we can offer one of the best financing options for solar and roofing available on the market, reach more consumers, and most importantly, generate more clean, cost-effective solar energy to enhance California’s sustainable infrastructure.”

Available in more than 180 communities throughout California and Florida, YgreneWorks provides financing for energy efficiency, water conservation, renewable energy and climate retrofits for homes and businesses. PACE financing programs such as YgreneWorks are authorized by local governments in an effort to stimulate local economies, generate jobs, address climate change and provide constituents with access to low-cost, money-saving home improvement funds. Since its inception, YgreneWorks has approved more than $1 billion in funding nationally for upgrades to the built environment, producing more than $2.6 billion in economic stimulus, 15,500 new and sustained jobs and 65 megawatts of energy, as well as conserving 4.5 billion gallons of water and enough energy to power 1,026,635 homes for a full year and keep 1.2 million metric tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.

“California remains at the forefront of renewable energy innovation and the Solar Roof Dynamics partnership will ensure that PACE-financed solar power will be made available to as many homes and businesses as possible,” says Stacey Lawson, CEO of Ygrene. “We’re proud to support California’s accessible and cost-competitive solar installation platform.”

LG Electronics Selected as Official Solar Partner at Greenbuild

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), presenter of Greenbuild, the world’s premier sustainability and green building conference, selected LG Electronics USA as official solar partner for the 2015 trade show in Washington, D.C.

The centerpiece of the 2015 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo is the “Net Zero Zone,” where LG solar panels are powering exhibit booths as part of an on-site microgrid including alternate energy generation, storage and distribution. Thanks to solar panels from LG and others, the Net Zero Zone showcases the efficiency, reliability and resiliency of hybrid microgrids using EMerge Alliance direct current standards.

LG Solar’s flagship LG NeON 2 panels located outside the Washington Convention Center are designed to produce superior power performance and improved reliability. Due to LG’s “Cello” (which stands for Cell connection, Electrically, Low loss, Low stress and Optical absorption enhancement) technology, the LG NeON 2 was recognized this year for its “groundbreaking and technological innovation,” with the InterSolar Europe Award for Photovoltaics.

Ideally suited to power the Net Zero Zone, the LG NeON 2 can achieve higher power output with 60 cells than most 72-cell modules. The 320W NeON 2 boasts 6.4 kWp capacity with 20 modules (60 cells), higher than other 60-cell modules. Of special interest to architects and builders attending Greenbuild, the LG NeON 2 is ideal for those who want to maximize the energy production potential within a limited rooftop space.

In addition to LG’s role as Platinum Sponsor for Greenbuild 2015, LG is a technology provider for the “Growing Green Center” exhibit. Commissioned by USGBC and the Baltimore nonprofit Parks & People Foundation, in partnership with Building Design + Construction magazine, the exhibit is a sustainable modular training center featured at the two-day expo.

LG products designed with the environment in mind are integrated throughout the facility. Complementing the ENERGY STAR-certified appliances and electronics in the Growing Green Center, the exhibit highlights LG’s air conditioning systems and home comfort solutions that deliver powerful energy-efficient results for today’s savvy architects, engineers and consumers.

LG’s major presence at Greenbuild comes on the heels of the USGBC’s New Jersey Chapter honoring the company for “outstanding achievement and best practices in green building and sustainability.” As USGBC NJ’s top 2015 honoree, LG has been recognized for its corporate culture of environmental sustainability and for its $300-million LEED Platinum North American headquarters building project planned in Englewood Cliffs, N.J., that will the benefit of LG and the state of New Jersey, while protecting the iconic vistas and integrity of the national natural and historic landmark known as Palisades Park.

A Florida Home Educates Homeowners and Building Professionals and Green Building and Energy Efficiency

Many people visiting Shalimar, Fla., don’t want to miss one of the town’s attractions: a sprawling European-style waterfront estate on Lorraine Bayou. Featuring a 4,000-square-foot main house; 1,600-square-foot carriage house; and 1,200-square-foot guesthouse, the estate offers luxurious finishes and phenomenal views all the way to the Gulf of Mexico.

The EcoSmart Demonstration Home in Shalimar, Fla., is built for durability and energy independence. It features a Gerard Roofing stone-coated barrel-vault metal roofing system that slashes energy costs and adds visual appeal.

The EcoSmart Demonstration Home in Shalimar, Fla., is built for durability and energy independence. It features a Gerard Roofing stone-coated barrel-vault metal roofing system that slashes energy costs and adds visual appeal.


But these qualities only hint at its uniqueness. The structures are built to be highly secure against intrusion, resistant to storms sweeping off the Gulf and able to create their own electricity. All interior lighting, exterior lighting and dock lights are LED lighting fixtures using minimal electricity.

The crowning touch is a stone-coated, barrel-vault metal roofing system that not only resists 170-mph winds, but saves energy, as well. No wonder the electric bill for this three-structure estate is $47 and its gas bill is $14 per month.

Model Estate

This estate, the EcoSmart Demonstration Home, is about 50 miles east of Pensacola. This is the second eco-friendly showcase house I have built; the first eco-friendly showcase house was built in nearby Destin. The Shalimar home is open to visitors as a working educational model of an entirely green residence.

It’s a home but actually set up as a business. I can educate people about the top green products, teaching them about how they work and the benefits of saving energy and money. The demonstration home is designed to allow us to educate people first, and then talk about products.

The crowning touch is a stone-coated, barrel-vault metal roofing system that not only resists 170-mph winds, but saves energy, as well. No wonder the electric bill for this three-structure estate is $47 and its gas bill is $14 per month.

The crowning touch is a stone-coated, barrel-vault metal roofing system that not only resists 170-mph winds, but saves energy, as well. No wonder the electric bill for this three-structure estate is $47 and its gas bill is $14 per month.


Located at 781 Boulevard of the Champions, the EcoSmart Demonstration Home is set near the water on a “point lot” overlooking Lorraine Bayou with extraordinary waterway accessibility to Destin, Choctawhatchee Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. The home is perfect for the site because we have views of everything. On the point, there are barges and sailing clubs coming up. We’re looking behind the bayou to Destin, and behind that is the Gulf. We have great breezes off the Gulf and bayou. We get the trade winds up here; that’s the great thing about this part of Florida.

EcoSmart aims its sustainable products message not just at industry professionals but environmentally minded homebuyers, as well. We’re teaching industry professionals, like architects, probuilders, residential and commercial developers, and consumers interested in eco-friendly construction and sustainability. We also teach university and school groups. We have had officials and executives of Southern Company, which is called Gulf Power here, come by several times to advise us. They’re very excited because the home is green.

Visitors aren’t required to pay an admission fee, but there are requirements to touring the EcoSmart Demonstration Home. It’s open by appointment only to people who have a current project and aren’t just looking. We ask people to bring their builders and architects with them because if we’re educating all of them at once, we’re saving time. We’re getting them started and thinking along the same lines.

Building the Home

Before construction commenced on the EcoSmart Demonstration Home in2009, my team undertook a full year of site work. That endeavor included the installation of an 11-foot-high, 210-foot-long seawall and stepped-down concrete footers 2-feet wide and 2- to 4-feet deep for security purposes.

PHOTOS: Gerard Roofing

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ICC and ASHRAE Outline Roles for Development of International Green Construction Code

In a deal nearly two years in the making, the International Code Council (ICC) and ASHRAE have signed the final agreement that outlines each organization’s role in the development and maintenance of the new version of the International Green Construction Code (IgCC) sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), ASHRAE, ICC, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The code, scheduled to be released in 2018, will be powered by ANSI/ASHRAE/ICC/IES/USGBC Standard 189.1, Standard for the Design of High-Performance, Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings developed using the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved ASHRAE consensus process. The joint Standing Standards Project Committee 189.1 (SSPC) will serve as the consensus body that will work to ensure the standard is consistent and coordinated with the ICC Family of Codes.

The ICC will be responsible for Chapter 1, Scope and Administration. For the 2018 IgCC, ICC will coordinate the technical provisions developed by ASHRAE with the provisions in Chapter 1 of the 2015 IgCC. As a result, the 2016 Group B Cycle will not include Chapter 1 of the IgCC for code changes. With ASHRAE developing technical provisions, ICC’s 2017 Group C cycle to develop the 2018 IgCC has been cancelled. Part of the development process for the 2018 technical provisions will include the SSPC review of the 2015 IgCC and consideration of content for inclusion in 189.1-2017 along with changes generated by the committee and proposals submitted by stakeholders. Following the completion of the 2018 IgCC, Chapter 1 of the IgCC will be developed by ICC using its consensus code development process.

“Our goal in this partnership all along has been to share resources to increase use of the IgCC and make it simpler for code officials, designers and contractors to build environmentally efficient structures that will lessen energy and water consumption and reduce the carbon footprint,” said ICC Board President Guy Tomberlin, CBO. “We are now situated to do just that. We thank our partners, ICC Members and all who will contribute to the development of the IgCC powered by 189.1.”

The Executive Steering Committee for the effort to align 189.1, the IgCC and LEED consists of representatives of ICC, ASHRAE, USGBC, AIA and IES, and the SSPC Chair.

“The full integration of Standard 189.1 to serve as the technical content of the IgCC will leverage ASHRAE’s technical expertise and increase the standard’s influence on sustainable buildings,” notes ASHRAE President David Underwood. “We look forward to continuing to engage a broad spectrum of stakeholders in development of Standard 189.1 following the ANSI consensus standards development process. The result will be a comprehensive compliance tool that can be used by jurisdictions worldwide that are committed to a more sustainable built environment.”

The new publication also will align the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) rating system program to ensure a streamlined, effective set of regulatory and above-code options. The green building certification program recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification

“This joint initiative will forge the fundamental regulatory building blocks of green construction on which future green building leadership initiatives can grow,” says Brendan Owens, chief of engineering at USGBC. “It takes courage to think differently and to commit to a new model, and for that we thank the leadership of the partner organizations behind the IgCC powered by 189.1.”

“Our combined membership, consisting of practicing design professionals, code officials, and the building industry representatives, supports the development of codes and standards that protect the health, safety and welfare of the public at large,” says AIA CEO Robert Ivy, FAIA. “Through this significant agreement, both the AIA and the ICC agree to work more closely to achieve our common goals.”

In 2010, ASHRAE and ICC joined forces by making 189.1 an alternative compliance path for the IgCC. The new agreement between ASHRAE and ICC furthers the effort these organizations initiated in 2010 by providing the market with a single code that is coordinated with the International Family of Codes.

“IES looks forward to continuing to partner with ASHRAE in developing technical content for Standard 189.1,” according to Rita Harrold, IES representative. “And to participating with the other organizations in this unique collaborative opportunity to satisfy the goals for the new version of IgCC.”

The agreement creates a comprehensive framework for jurisdictions looking to implement and adopt green building regulations and codes. The unprecedented collaboration leverages the unique organizational expertise of the partners participating in this evolution of green building codes and brings AIA, ASHRAE, ICC, IES and USGBC into strategic and tactical alignment on the relationship between 189.1 and the IgCC. Other organizations that support this vision and would like to join the effort are invited to contact Dominic Sims or Jeff Littleton.

Dura Coat Products Completes Expansion of Manufacturing Facility

Dura Coat Products Inc. announced that the expansion of the Huntsville, Ala., manufacturing plant is now complete.

Dura Coat Products Inc. announced that the expansion of the Huntsville, Ala., manufacturing plant is now complete.

Mike Hong, president and CEO of Dura Coat Products Inc., announced that the expansion of the Huntsville, Ala., manufacturing plant is now complete. The factory has been undergoing construction recently to add 35,000 square feet of paint manufacturing capability.

The plant was originally built in 2002, designed from the ground up specifically for paint manufacturing. It was located to serve customers in the southeast and offer next day delivery within a 500-mile radius. Built next to the Wheeler Wild Life Refuge, a 35,000-acre preserve along the Tennessee River and habitat for wintering and migrating birds in the eastern U.S., Dura Coat adheres to stringent environmental restrictions and upholds some of the highest air quality, wastewater and hazardous waste management standards.

Because of increasing demands, the factory needed to expand and has now approximately doubled its manufacturing capacity.

GAF Offers Products That Meet Green Building Code and Title 24 Guidelines

In response to recent changes in local code and increased demands for asphalt shingles featuring higher reflectivity levels, GAF offers several products and colors that meet the new Los Angeles Green Building Code and California Title 24 guidelines.

The Los Angeles Green Building Code reflectivity requirement for a residential asphalt shingle is a minimum three-year aged solar reflectance of 0.20, a minimum thermal emittance of 0.75, OR a SRI (solar reflectance index) of 16.

In accordance with this new code, GAF has 11 products that have been tested and listed with the Cool Roof Rating Council for sale in the city of Los Angeles and all other areas covered by California Title 24:

    Timberline Cool Series

  • Antique Slate
  • Weathered Wood
  • Barkwood
    Timberline Ultra HD

  • Birchwood
    Timberline HD

  • Birchwood
  • Copper Canyon
  • Golden Amber
    Timberline American Harvest

  • Amber Wheat
    Timberline Natural Shadow

  • Arctic White
    Royal Sovereign

  • White
  • Desert Sand

“GAF remains dedicated to sustainability and will continue to invest in products and technologies focused on energy savings,” states Dan Witte, steep-slope product manager. “We fully support green building initiatives and are committed to manufacturing eco-friendly products.”

RCMA Accepts Abstracts for IRCC

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA), Washington, D.C., is now accepting abstracts for its third biennial International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC) program. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Oct. 1, 2015.

The 2016 IRCC will take place July 18-21 at the Sonesta Hotel Philadelphia. Offered in partnership with 11 industry organizations, the conference will feature networking opportunities, educational sessions, and other industry updates geared toward professionals involved in the roofing and building sciences industry.

RCMA’s 2016 conference partners include:

Roofing industry professionals, experts in building-envelope technologies and green-building fields, as well as researchers and those in the architectural community are welcome to submit their abstracts for consideration. Possible presentation topics include global market developments, sustainability and green-building practices, energy-cost-savings evaluations, roof-coatings formulation advancements, roof systems analysis and accelerated aging.

Those interested in presenting at the 2016 IRCC should visit RCMA’s website for more information and to download an abstract submission form.

Ecotech Institute Clean Jobs Index: 1.2 Million Green Energy Jobs Posted in First Quarter

Ecotech Institute’s Clean Jobs Index reported more than one million green energy job postings across the nation in the first quarter of 2015. The Clean Jobs Index classifies clean energy jobs based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics description, which says that clean jobs are jobs in businesses that produce goods or provide services that benefit the environment or conserve natural resources. The classification also includes jobs in which workers’ duties involve making their establishment’s production processes more environmentally friendly or use fewer natural resources.

Ecotech Institute, a school dedicated solely to renewable energy and sustainability, created the Clean Jobs Index to provide objective information about renewable energy jobs and to compare states’ use and development of clean and sustainable energy.

“As more businesses look for ways to conserve energy and renewables continue to gain traction, more jobs are becoming available,” says Chris Gorrie, Ecotech Institute’s president. “States have come to see clean energy sources as an important piece of infrastructure, opening the door to great opportunities in renewable energy.”

Highlights from the Clean Jobs Index Q1 2015

    Number of U.S. Clean Jobs Postings in Q1 2015:

  • 1.2 million
    Top three states with the most clean jobs openings:

  • California – 131,215 job openings
  • Texas – 90,281 job openings
  • New York – 71,748 job openings
    States with the highest rise in clean jobs openings, compared to Q1 2014:

  • Rhode Island
  • New York
  • Texas
  • North Carolina
  • Maryland
    States with most clean jobs per 100,000 people:

  • North Dakota
  • Iowa
  • Rhode Island
  • Colorado
  • Wyoming
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Ohio
  • Indiana
  • South Dakota

Ecotech Institute’s Clean Jobs Index is an aggregation of statistics by state. Although it may indicate a greater possibility for employment in the clean economy sector, the Clean Jobs Index in no way indicates the presence or the promise of any specific job opportunities. Data for the index is gathered regularly from independent research entities including: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Green Building Council.